Folios 231-241
Aug 1446 -

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Centre for Metropolitan History

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Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

314-325

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'Folios 231-241: Aug 1446 - ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 314-325. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33729 Date accessed: 21 November 2014.


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Folio 231.

Monday, 26 Aug., 24 Henry VI. [A. D. 1446], grant by Simon Eyre, the Mayor, and the Aldermen to Richard Power, Esquire and Swordbearer of the Mayor, of a reward of 40s. for his services in connexion with the Queen's Coronation. (fn. 1) It was further granted that he should have a yearly allowance of 20s. towards the rent of a house until a suitable house be provided for him. The grant was not to be treated as a precedent.

Folio 231 b.

17 June, 24 Henry VI. [A. D. 1446], petition to the Common Council by John Croxtone, a mason, as follows:-

"Besechetch full mekely youre continuell servaunt John Croxtone, masone, that where he hath done hys true diligence and laboure in attendaunce upone alle the werkes of thys Cytee and specially upone the werkes of the Guyldhalle by xxx yere and more and there in spended hys yonge age in wych service there is yet due to him by yow of wages paide oute of hys purce to divers werkmen in the tyme that Brykles and Blysworth weren Clerkes of the same werkes viijli. ijs. and sythen that tyme in attendaunce daily upone your werkes by vj yere and more aboute the foundementez & reisyng of yor chapell at Guyldhalle and purveying for the ordenaunce and Counseille of the mooldes þ'e of and upone youre werkes at Padyngtone, Tybourne, Trippeswelle, (fn. 2) Charyngcrosse, Crosse in Chepe, and other places and had never ony wages fee or reward of yow for alle hys longe service savyng onely a litell hous and xxs. by yere and hys clothyng yerely That it please unto youre good graces in considerac'on of the long service of youre seid besecher so done And by the grace of god yf it like yow for the terme of hys lyf shall doo, to graunte unto him youre paiment of the seid viijli. ijs. and also for the terme of hys lyf xls. more yerely of Fee to the seid xxs. to be takene yerely by the hands of youre Chamb'leyn for the tyme beyng at the festes of Nativite of Seint John Baptist Mighelmasse Cristmasse and Esterne be even porc'ons & he shall pray to god for yow."

His prayer granted.

[Folios. 232 blank.]

Folio 232 b.

Wednesday, 21 Sept., 25 Henry VI. [A. D. 1446], in the presence of Simon Eyre, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, Robert Danvers the Recorder, Henry Frowik, John Gedney, Stephen Broun, William Coumbes, William Gregory, John Olney, Nicholas Wifold, John Derby, Robert Horne, Thomas Canynges, Geoffrey Feldyng, and Thomas Scot, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs for the year ensuing, Robert Horne, Alderman, was elected one of the Sheriffs by the Mayor, and Geoffrey Boleyn was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day John Chichele, grocer, was elected Chamberlain for the year ensuing; Thomas Cook, senior, draper, and John Herst, skinner, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; and Stephen Forster and Thomas Canynges, Aldermen, and Thomas Cook, junior, Thomas Haukyns, Alan Johnson, and Richard Lee, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the Chamber and the said Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented and admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Thursday the Feast of Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], the same year, in the presence of Simon Eyre, the Mayor, Robert Danvers the Recorder, the Prior of Christchurch, Henry Frowik, John Gedney, Stephen Broune, Robert Cloptone, John Pattesle, John Hatherle, Thomas Chaltone, John Olney, William Wetenhale, John Suttone, William Coumbes, John Norman, Nicholas Wifold, and Robert Horne, Aldermen, Geoffrey Boleyn, one of the Sheriffs, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, John Olney, by aid of the Holy Spirit, was elected. Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 233.

12 Dec., 25 Henry VI. [A.D. 1446], came good men of the Mistery of Hostelers into the Chamber of the Guildhall, before John Olney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and presented a petition as follows:-

"To the honourable lord' wyse & worchipfull sires the Maire and Aldermen of the Cyte London

"Please it un to youre Wyse discrecions in considerac'on of the grete mischief & hurt whych that oft tyme fallene & happene þorugh riotours haserdours & other worse mysgoverned people whyche that bene luskyng a boute in thys Cyte and dayly repayryng ther to that arne harboured wyth diverse folk men & wemen not enfraunchised nor otherwise charged with contribucions of thys Cyte & not havyng opene signes & some in vicious howses called Stewes and some harboured wyth alienes and straungers beyng such people so harboured not knawyng whens they come not havyng eny goodes to lyve by and bene gret Wastoures and Spenders to grete disceit & hurt of owre soveraygne lord & of alle the commen people of thys Realme and in especialle of thys Cite To graunt there fore as for the remedie there of to the people enfraunchised in the craft (fn. 3) of Hostillers of thys Cyte of Londone the pointes after folwyng that is to sey

"First that the Wardeyns of the same Craft have liberte & poware to serche alle maner persones holdyng co'e hostrie havyng wyth hem eny maner gestes or straungiers comyng to the Cite & suche gestes or people as they fynd wyth hem not of good rule or good name or fame to enforme the Maier of thys Cyte or Chamb'leyn for the tyme being for to do correcc'on aswell upon the harberers of hem as upon them that bene suche gestes evell named

"Also that no persone of the said Cite take upone him to hold eny comune hostry or to be a comune herberour of eny people repayryng to thys Cyte but that he have a comon' & an opene sygne wtoute & at his place & that he be knowen of good name and good fame by the Wardeynes & other persones of the same craft to occupie the said occupac'on and they truly to present and truly to do ther in wtout eny favour or malice

"Also that no persone dwellyng in the Cite holdyng comune hostry & opene signe not herborwe nor resceyve eny mane aliene or straunger borne out of thys realme comyng to thys Cite in no wyse o lesse than the same persone present & bring a fore the Maire for the tyme beyng every suche aliene or straunger comyng un to thys Cite wtinne a day & a night after that he be come to the entente that the Maire may have knowleche of the cause of his comyng & of his abydyng upon a competent peyne ther upon to be ordeyned & sett & duly to be arreised of what persone that breketh the saied ordinaunce or do the contrarie therof for the grete availe honeste & profite of thys Cite & alle the realme upon peyne for to lese vjs. viijd. atte first tyme, xiijs. iiijd. atte secund tyme and xxs. at the iij tyme half to the Chaumbre of the Guyldhall & half to the said craft of hostillers and so forth doweblyng the somme as oft tyme as they schall be found doyng the contrarie

"Also that no maner man holdyng comone hostrie wtin the said Cite resceive nor take eny servaunt hostiler which that hath bene dwellyng afore tyme wt eny persone occupying the said craft in cas the said servaunt hostiller have bene detecte or found vicious or untrewe to his maister a fore tyme occupying the said craft or to eny of his gestis

"Also that alle maner persones enfraunchised in the said Craft be ruled & governed after the good ordinaunces & rules in the same Craft by youre graunt & assent ordeyned & devised for the comone wele of the kynges liege people & availle of the said craft & that every man enfrauncheised of the same craft be obedient to the Wardeyns of the same craft for the tyme being & come at their sommons at alle tymes at place & tyme limited under peyne to paie to the use of the said craft at every tyme that they lakke or be absent the value of j pound wax half to the Chaumbre of the Guyldhalle & half to the Fraternite of Seint Julian saving the Frauncheise of the Cite."

Their petition granted.

Folio 233 b.

Precept for levying in each Ward a fourth part of a fifteenth granted in a Common Council held on the 20th August, anno 23 Henry VI. [A.D. 1445], for the use of the common aqueduct. [No date.]

Precept for holding an armed watch in the several Wards at Christmas to continue until further orders. [No date.] (fn. 4)

18 Nov., 25 Henry VI. [A.D. 1446], petition by John West, "plummer," to the Common Council, that an indenture may be made confirming to him a former grant to the effect that he should "entend to the werkes of the newe condites and of the chambre of thys Citee and do his trewe labour and diligence ther inne and to leve ther fore all other occupac'ons" at a wage prescribed; and further, that he should have two gowns of the Mayor's livery for the time being, and that he should not be put on inquests, &c.

His petition granted.

Wednesday, 1 March, 25 Henry VI. [A.D. 1446-7], William Andrewe, one of the Mayor's Serjeants-at-mace, admitted one of the Mayor's Serjeants of the Chamber, loco William Stork, deceased.

Folio 234.

Monday, 12 Nov., 25 Henry VI. [A.D. 1446], came Henry Dukmantone, John Broddesworth, John Lambard, and Thomas Niche, mercers, and John Billesdone, draper, into the Court of the lord the King, before John Olney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with John Chichele, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 500 marks for the payment of the said sum by the said Henry Dukmantone to John, son of Thomas Dukmantone, when he comes of age.

Proclamation.

Folio 234 b.

"Be it proclamed on oure soveraygn lord the Kynges behalve in eschwyng of the Importable hurtes & gret parell of Fyre that dayly is lykly to growe wyth in thys Cyte whych god defend by the makyng repairyng & susteynyng of treene (fn. 5) chymneys wyth in thys said Cite which be not sufficiant nor able to eschwe the gret peryll of Fyre that what maner of persone wyth in thys Cite enfrauncheised as masoun, carpenter, or other of what condic'on that he be, after the fest of Seint Mighell tharchaungell next for to come be found or seene to make repaire or susteygn eny such treene chymney wyth in thys Cyte or the Frauncheise of the same that he forfaite & pay unto the use of the cominalte of the same for a fyne xxs. wyth out redempcion as oft tymes as he therof shall lawfully be convict.

"And also that no maner persone wyth in thys Cite nor the Frauncheise of the same dwellyng Fremane or foreyn after the said fest of Seint Mighell do make nor susteyn eny maner fyre in eny maner suche treene chymney upon peyne to pay un to the use of the same cominalte vjs. viijd. wyth out redempc'on as oft tymes as he shall ther of be convict.

"Be it purveyed alway that Goldsmythes, Copersmythes, lorimers, bladsmithes, blaksmythes & Ferrours of thys Cite may laufully have & occupie such treene chymneys well and sufficiantly repaired to theire craftes nedfulle & belongyng and them to make or do make & repaire when necessite shalle require it wyth out eny interrupc'on enpechement or fyne ther for to be made in eny wyse this present ordinaunce not withstondyng."

12 Jan., 25 Henry VI. [A.D. 1446-7], grant by John Olney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, that Richard Power, esquire and sword-bearer to the Mayor, may have a suitable servant to wait upon the Mayor, for the time being, and himself, like other Serjeants-at-mace. The grant not to become a precedent.

Folio 235.

Monday, 3 April,. 25 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], Thomas Smyth, "irmonger," discharged by John Olney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Monday, 19 June, the same year, John Valentyne, "hurer," similarly discharged for like cause.

Folio 235 b.

Letter from Charles [VII.], King of France, to his very dear and great friends [the Mayor, &c., of London], notifying the dispatch of ambassadors to his nephew, the King of England, for the purpose of effecting a perfect union between England and France, and asking them to use their influence to that end. Dated at Mehun sur "Eure," 2 May [A.D. 1447 ?]. (fn. 6)

18 Dec., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], came Thomas Shirwinde, Thomas Onhand, Augustine Strattone, and Walter Durward, mercers, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before John Gedney, the Mayor, (fn. 7) and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with John Chichele, the Chamberlain, for the payment of a sum of £47 10s. to Johanna, daughter of Robert Hulle, late grocer, by the said Thomas Shirwinde, who had been appointed her guardian.

Folio 236.

22 Aug., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1448], came Thomas Bele, tailor, John Pye, "stacioner," John Grove, "scrivener," Richard Tolle and William Rogers, tailors, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before John Gedney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with John Chichele, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £6 13s. 4d.

The same day the guardianship of John, son of John Mundeford, late tailor, together with his patrimony of £6 13s. 4d., was committed by the Mayor, Aldermen, and Chamberlain to the above Thomas Bele on his finding the above security.

5 April, 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1448], in the presence of John Gedney, the Mayor, Robert Danvers the Recorder, Simon Eyre, John Olney, Thomas Chaltone, William Gregory, John Suttone, William Wetenhale, John Norman, Robert Horne, John Derby, Geoffrey Feldyng, Thomas Scott, William Abraham, and Philip "Malepas," Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty, John Tyler, "gentilman," was elected Common Hunt of the City, vice John Russell, he receiving yearly the sum of £10 and his clothing.

Folio 236 b.

25 Oct., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], John Colion, "girdeler," discharged by John Olney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries owing to increasing old age.

The same day Richard Coyfote, "peintour," similarly discharged for like cause.

24 Oct., the same year, Richard Lumley, "peautrer," similarly discharged for like cause.

25 Oct., the same year, John Glyse, "hatter," similarly discharged for like cause.

[The upper part of this folio has been cut off. Delpit (op. cit., p. 264) suggests that the reply of the City to the letter from Charles of France (supra, fo. 235 b) may have been entered on the folio and removed par un motif quelconque, mais À une époque déjÀ ancienne. That the French antiquary was wrong in his surmise is shown by the next entry.]

Folio 237.

Whereas a certain ordinance made by John Olney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen on the petition of the Master and Wardens of the Mistery of Drapers touching the scrutiny of linen cloths and yards called "metierdes" or "metyerdes" had been recorded on fo. ccxxxvii of this Letter-Book K, but had been surreptitiously cut and taken away; the Master and Wardens of the said Mistery on the 15th Oct., anno 2 Henry VIII. [A.D. 1510], came before William Capell, Knt. and Mayor, John Tate, Knt., Thomas Kneseworth, Richard Haddone, Knt., Laurence Aylmer, Knt., Stephen Jenyns, Knt., William Copynger, John Warner, William Butler, Thomas Exmewe, Thomas Mirfyne, James Yarford, John Bruges, John Rest, and John Mylbourne, Aldermen, and brought a certain black book belonging to the said Mistery in which the said ordinance was entered, and they prayed that the said ordinance might be again inscribed in Letter-Book K.

Their prayer granted, and the said ordinance made on Friday, 6 Oct., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], in the presence of John Olney, the Mayor, Robert Danvers the Recorder, Simon Eyre, William Coumbes, John Norman, John Suttone, William Gregory, Nicholas Wyfolde, Stephen Forster, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Derby, William Cantlowe, Thomas Scott, and William Abraham, Aldermen, was again inscribed. (fn. 8)

Folio 237 b.

5 Oct., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], grant by the Mayor and Aldermen to William Coumbes, Alderman, of lands and tenements formerly belonging to John Reynwelle, late Alderman, in the town of Calais, in recognition of his services in the execution of the will of the said John Reynwelle, who devised property in the City of London and the said town of Calais to the use of the Commonalty of the said City; to hold the same for a term of thirty years at an annual rent of 6 marks.

[Folios. 238 blank.]

Folio 238 b.

12 Jan., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447-8], Richard Ponten', citizen and "septer," (fn. 9) discharged by John Gedney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries owing to increasing old age.

24 Feb., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447-8], John Levgor, tailor, similarly discharged for like cause.

Eleccio Vicecomit'.

21 Sept., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], in the presence of John Olney, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, Robert Danvers the Recorder, Henry Frowik, Stephen Broune, William Coumbes, John Gedney, Simon Eyre, Thomas Chaltone, William Gregory, John Sutton, John Norman, Nicholas Wifold, Robert Horne, Stephen Forster, John Derby, Geoffrey Feldyng, Thomas Scot, and William Abraham, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs for the year ensuing, William Abraham, Alderman, was elected one of the Sheriffs of the City by the Mayor, and Thomas Scot, Alderman, was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day John Chichele, grocer, was elected Chamberlain; Thomas Cook, senior, draper, and John Herst, skinner, were elected Wardens of London Bridge; and John Norman, Thomas Canynges, Aldermen, Alan Johnson, Richard Lee, John Stokker, and John Harowe, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts of the said Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

Folio 239-41.

Monday, 18 Sept., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], John Olney, Mayor, Robert Danvers the Recorder, Stephen Broun, John Hatherle, Simon Eyre, William Gregory, Thomas Chaltone, John Sutton, John Norman, Nicholas Wyfold, John Derby, Robert Horne, Stephen Forster, Geoffrey Feldyng, Thomas Scot, and William Abraham, Aldermen:-

On the above day, and in the presence of the above Mayor, two bonds were entered into, each in the sum of £200, one by John Balle and John Lambe, Wardens of the Mistery of Brouderers, and the other by John Sewale, sometime Warden of the said Mistery, binding themselves to abide by the award to be given by Nicholas Wifold and John Derby, Aldermen, who had been accepted as arbitrators in all matters of dispute existing between the said John Balle and John Lambe, John Mounsell, John Cursone, Walter Whitebrede, William Whitebrede, Elys London, William Kyrkeby, John Vyaunt, Henry Wyche, Thomas Halle, John Bourgh, William Skynner, Thomas Howell, William Acton, Robert Page, John Colence, Thomas Newe, William Outkampe, and all others of the same craft of Brouderers on the one part, and the said John Sewale on the other part. (fn. 10)

Folio 241.

Friday, 13 Oct., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], in the presence of John Olney, the Mayor, the Prior of Christchurch, Robert Danvers the Recorder, Henry Frowik, John Gedney, Stephen Broun, John Hatherle, Simon Eyre, Thomas Chaltone, William Gregory, William Coumbes, John Suttone, John Norman, William Wetenhale, Nicholas Wifold, Stephen Forster, Robert Horne, John Derby, Geoffrey Feldyng, Thomas Canynges, William Cantlowe, Thomas Scot, and William Abraham, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, John Gedney was elected.

Afterwards, viz., on the Feast of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], he was sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow was presented, admitted, and accepted, &c., before the Barons of the Exchequer.

3 Nov., 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1447], came John Waryn, goldsmith, and Nicholas Preest, grocer, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before John Olney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with John Chichele, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £17, for the due payment of such sum to William Dyst, son of Gyse van Dyst, late goldsmith, on his coming of age.

Folio 241 b.

5 April, 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1448], Richard Aleyn, cook, discharged by John Gedney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

27 July, the same year, Thomas Redyng, "powchemaker," similarly discharged for like cause.

7 Aug., the same year, came Thomas Grenehille, "pasteler," executor of John Fysshe, late "pasteler," John Stockwell and Richard Tykerych, "pastelers," Roger Estone and Walter Taillour, "cowpers," into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before John Gedney, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged themselves bound to John Chichele, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 20 marks.

The same day the guardianship of Alice and Elizabeth, daughters of the above John Fysshe, together with their patrimony of 20 marks, was committed by the said Mayor, Aldermen, and Chamberlain to the above Thomas Grenehille, on his finding the above security.

Officium co'is venat'.

Friday, 5 April, 26 Henry VI. [A.D. 1448], John Tyler appointed by John Gedney, the Mayor, the Aldermen, and Common Council to the office of Common Hunt of the City, receiving a yearly fee of £10 and the clothing or livery of the City in the same manner as Serjeants of the Chamber receive it.

Footnotes

1 The coronation of Margaret of Anjou took place on Sunday, 30 May, 1445.
2 Every effort has been made to localize this well, but without success.
3 This appears to be the first occasion on which the English word "craft" is applied in the LetterBooks to a mistery or occupation such as that of Hostelers. Mr. George Unwin, however, in his recent work on 'The Gilds and Companies of London.' (p. 62), states that there was practically no distinction between a craft, art, or mistery; that a craft "signified a trade or calling generally, and the typical member of a craft was a well-to-do shopkeeper, a tradesman"; and again, that "the full master of a craft was from the first always a trader."
4 The watch was probably the one kept at Christmas, 1446, of which Gregory writes ('Chron.,' pp. 187-8): "that same yere there was grete wache at Syn Donstonys in the Este, by the sofferens of oure sufferayne lorde the Kyng, in every warde of London alle the xvj dayes in Crystysmasse by the commaundement of the Kynge."
5 Made of wood.
6 This is the date assigned (with some hesitation) by Jules Delpit, who sets out the letter in full (op. cit., p. 263). On the 1st April, 1447, the truce between England and France had expired. Ramsay, 'Lancaster and York,' ii. 70. Monstrelet (Engl. transl.), ii. 144.
7 His election not recorded in the Letter-Book.
8 The Drapers had occasion in 1441 to complain to the Mayor and Aldermen that the Tailors interfered with them in the execution of their right of search; the dispute ended then in a compromise. Vide supra, pp. 259-60.
9 Possibly=a gaoler, or officer, who put irons (cippi) on prisoners.
10 The "Warde" (award) of the Arbitrators, dealing mainly with accounts between the parties, is set out at considerable length. It is followed by "The Recorde of Fulfilling and performing of the Warde aforesaid by John Sewale, Brouderer of London."