Folios 301-313
Nov 1457-

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

Reginald R. Sharpe (editor)

Year published

1911

Pages

392-403

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'Folios 301-313: Nov 1457- ', Calendar of letter-books of the city of London: K: Henry VI (1911), pp. 392-403. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=33736 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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Folio 301.

Judicium combustionis diversor' "verthkyns."

Wednesday, 24 Nov., 36 Henry VI. [A.D. 1457], came the Masters or Wardens, and many other good men of the Mistery of Coupers, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Geoffrey Boleyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and complained that Stephen Wolf and John Bromer, fishmongers, had made certain vessels (comprising "ferthkyns") of wood that was not pure nor entire, but sawn into pieces (in medio serrat') and full of "sappe," contrary to the ordinance made in the Mayoralty of Drew Barantyne. (fn. 1) The vessels were thereupon ordered to be burnt. (fn. 2)

Proclamacio pro vasis videl't barell' et aliis h'mo'i non fact' de ligno puro et integro etc.

Proclamation made by order of the Mayor and Aldermen of an ordinance to the above effect and for the burning of all such vessels as had been found to be "made of uncleen and sappy tymbre & lakking of their just mesure" contrary to the ordinance.

Exon'acio Joh' Randolf ab assisis etc.

28 June, 36 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458], John Randolf, mercer, discharged by Geoffrey Boleyn, Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to his infirmities.

Folio 301.

The commencement of a deed by John Tamworth, clerk, touching tenements in Coubriggestrete and Hosyerlane, near Smithfield ....

[Fos. 302-304 b blank.-N.B. There is no folio numbered 303.]

Folio 305.

Thursday, 8 June, 36 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458], petition made by William Rotheley, goldsmith, to the Mayor and Aldermen, showing that whereas he and John Johnson, "bocher," had agreed to submit their differences touching the title to certain lands and tenements in the parish of Wolwich to the judgment of Thomas Tyrell, Knt., and the said Thomas Tyrell had adjudged that the said John Johnson should pay damages to the said William Rotheley to the amount of £20, and that the said William should enjoy peaceable possession of the said lands and tenements, the said John Johnson had refused to pay the money, and was thereupon sued by the said petitioner on his bond. Judgment was allowed to go by default, and a counter action was commenced by John Johnson. A jury empanelled to try the case, but the parties agreed to abide by the judgment of six of the jury, viz., Walter Langriche, draper, John Stone, Richard Snowdon, skinners, John Dey, "cotiller," Simon Briggeman, fuller, and John Wilkes, draper, both parties binding themselves in the sum of £300. Within a few days, declares the petitioner, the said John Stone sent John Lounde to say that they knew that he had received scanty justice at the hands of Sir Thomas Tyrell, and that he might look for a better award, but as to payment for the labour of the arbitrators, he was given to understand by John Lounde that John Stone "wold have no shales but he wold have the kernels." On this understanding the petitioner delivered to John Lounde a piece of silver covered and gilt as security for payment of £5 to John Stone for his reward, but when the said John Stone saw that the piece was worth more than £5, he desired to retain it as his reward, and, furthermore, desired the petitioner to give Richard Snowdon a piece of silver of the value of 40s. for his reward, for, said John Stone, he was "sure of þe said Richard Snowdon to doo and sey as he wold have hym," and that as a result of such rewards the said John Johnson "shuld pay þerfore right largely by þeir awarde & jugement." Thereupon came the above John Wilkes and claimed his reward in hand, and would not be satisfied with less than 40s., as security for which the petitioner delivered to him a piece of silver worth 40s., and to Richard Snowdon a piece worth 60s. Finally, the said John Wilkes, John Stone, and Richard Snowdon gave judgment in writing under their seals that the said "John Johnson shuld have the land þt was in variance betwene theym." (fn. 3)

[Folios. 305 b blank.]

Folio 306.

24 Oct., 37 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458], Robert Botiller, goldsmith, discharged by Geoffrey Boleyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Proclamacio ne quis emat' seu vendat aliquas mercandisas ponderand' quousq' ponderentur ad co'em balanc'.

Proclamation forbidding merchant strangers to buy or sell "any maner avoir de pois that oweth to be poised" or weighed except it be weighed by the King's Common Beam pursuant to the franchises and liberties of the City.

Folio 306 b.

Letters patent discharging Richard Burton of the Isle of "Gersey" from serving various offices. Witness the King at Westminster, 2 July, 36 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458].

Eleccio vic'.

The Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 37 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458], in the presence of Geoffrey Boleyn, the Mayor, Thomas Ursewyk, the Recorder, Stephen Broun, John Athirle, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Norman, William Hulyn, John Walden, Thomas Scot, William Marwe, William Gregory, Richard Alley, John Middelton, Ralph Verney, William Taillour, and Ralph Josselyn, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs for the year ensuing, Ralph Josselyn was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and Richard Nedeham the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day Thomas Thorndon, draper, was elected Chamberlain; Thomas Davy and Peter Alfold were elected Wardens of London Bridge; John Walden, John Middelton, Aldermen, and William Porter, John Bernewell, John Wallshawe, and John Harowe, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts in arrear of the Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, and accepted before the Barons of the Exchequer.

The Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 37 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458], in the presence of Geoffrey Boleyn, the Mayor, Thomas Ursewyk, the Recorder, the Prior of Christchurch, Stephen Broun, John Hathirle, William Gregory, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Norman, William Marwe, Thomas Canyng', Thomas Scot, William Cantelowe, William Hulyn, Matthew Philip, Richard Alley, Richard Lee, John Walden, John Feld, John Middelton, Thomas Cook, William Taillour, Thomas Oulegreve, Ralph Josselyn, and Hugh Wyche, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, Thomas Scot was elected [ends abruptly].

Folio 307.

Ex' Joh' Newerk iremonger.

22 Nov., 37 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458], John Newerk, "iremonger," discharged by Thomas Scot, the Mayor, and the Aldermen from serving on juries, &c., owing to increasing old age.

Ex' Ric'i Carnerley Groc'.

16 Jan., 37 Henry VI. [A.D. 1458-9], Richard Carnerley, grocer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Ex' Thome Elys pannar'.

17 Jan., the same year, Thomas Elys, "draper," similarly discharged owing to his being afflicted with stone, &c.

Ex' Joh' Hobert sellar'.

3 March, the same year, John Hobert, "sadiller," similarly discharged owing to increasing old age.

Ex' Ric'i Philip groceri.

12 June, 37 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459], Richard Philip, grocer, similarly discharged for like cause.

Presentacio ad ij am cantar' iij cantar' in eccl'ia Sc'i Pauli pro ai'a Joh' Pulteney per viam Resignaco'is.

Letter from Thomas Scot, the Mayor, under the Mayoralty seal, to the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, presenting Thomas Bolton, chaplain, for admission to the second of the three chantries founded in the said church by Sir John Pulteney, Knt., for the good of his own soul and the souls of Sirs William Milleford and John Plesseys, late Archdeacons of Colchester, vacant by the resignation of Robert Hubert. [No date.]

Folio 307 b.

Letters patent appointing Peter Ardern, Knt., Chief Baron of the Exchequer, Thomas Thorp, Brian Rouclyff, John Holme, and John Durham, Barons of the same Exchequer, to receive and swear into office William Hulyn, lately elected Mayor of the City, in the place where the Court of Exchequer would have been sitting had it not been adjourned beyond the morrow of SS. Simon and Jude [28 Oct.], and further to receive the account of Thomas Scot, Mayor and Escheator, for his year of office as Escheator, the King himself being unable to be present either at Westminster or at the Tower. (fn. 4) Witness the King at Warrewik, 20 Oct., 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459].

Folio 308.

4 Feb., 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459-60], came William Broun, William Prynce, Thomas Snersland, and Robert Hardyng, goldsmiths, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Hulyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorndone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £10.

The above bond to be void on payment of a similar sum into Court by the said William Broun, or by some one on his behalf, to the use of Robert, son of Henry Boode, late goldsmith, as soon as he shall come of age.

The money was paid on the 3rd Sept., 7 Edward IV. [A.D. 1467].

Folio 308 b.

Judicium pillorie Ric'i Claidissh scryven' et al' pro falsis l'ris testimonial'.

9 April, 37 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459], Richard Claydissh, writer of court-hand, Nicholas Walsshe, John Englisshe, John Gawran, and William Stountone, "fruterers," and John Hoke, grocer, attached to answer the lord the King, the Commonalty, as well as William Chattok and William Braybroke, fishmongers, on a charge of fraudulently fabricating letters bearing witness to an alleged sale of certain figs to them by the said William Braybroke; whereas the said William Braybroke had as a fact sold the same figs, which had been imported from Normandy, to Richard Rawlyns and John Kipping, grocers, and Simon Smyth, "iremonger," and thus the said Chattok and Braybroke ran the risk of losing £200. After due investigation by the Mayor and Aldermen it was adjudged that Richard Claydissh and Nicholas Walsshe, as the principal offenders, should stand on the pillory on Cornhull for an hour, and the lesser offenders half an hour, and afterwards should remain in prison until further orders, public proclamation being made of their offence.

Folio 309.

De apprest' facto per m'cat' Hanze Aliman' ad relevium Warde de Dowgate.

11 Feb., 39 Henry VI. [A.D. 1460-1], an acknowledgment by John "Walssha," Alderman of the Ward of Dowgate, Robert Gayton, grocer, Thomas Danyell, dyer, Thomas Boyles, tailor, William Gardener, fishmonger, William Wikwan, dyer, and John Trewynard, sherman, inhabitants of the Ward, William Cawche, Robert Brigger, Thomas Baxster, and John Broke, collectors of the money to be furnished by the said Ward to the King, of the receipt of a sum of £20 paid by the merchants of the Teutonic Hanse in the Ward towards the sum to be paid by the Ward to the King's use, as a freewill offering on the part of the said merchants, and not otherwise.

Folio 309 b.

A recital of the proceedings touching the forging of certain letters by Richard Claidisshe and others already recorded supra, folios. 308 b. Dated under the Mayoralty seal, 9 April, A.D. 1459. (fn. 5)

Folio 310.

Custod' pueror' Joh'is Roo m'ceri orphan' civit'.

12 March, 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459-60], came Margaret Roo, widow, Simon Dawdely, John Baker, and Henry Bumstede, mercers, and Richard Mortymer, grocer, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Hulyn, Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorndone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of £433 6s. 8d.

The above bond to be void if the said Margaret or some one on her behalf pay into Court the sum of 400 marks to be equally divided among John, Thomas, Richard, and Robert, sons of John Roo, late mercer, when they shall have come of age; and also the sum of £100 for Katherine, daughter of the said John Roo, as soon as she comes of age or marries. Mention made of Anne, another daughter of the said John Roo, already deceased.

Folio 310 b.

And forasmuch as the said Simon Dawdely died, his place was taken by Richard Kempe, mercer, on the 20th August, 1 Edward IV. [A.D. 1461].

And forasmuch as John, son of the said John Roo, died of full age, having made a will, as was plainly shown to Ralph Josselyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, on the 21st March, 4 Edward IV. [A.D. 1463-4], the above Margaret and her sureties were declared quit in respect of the said son's portion.

9 Feb., 7 Edward IV. [A.D. 1467-8], came John Baker and Henry Bumstede, mercers, who married Alice and Margaret, daughters of the above John Roo, late mercer, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Thomas Oulegreve, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for money accruing to their respective wives by the death of Katherine, daughter of the said John Roo.

18 April, 9 Edward IV. [A.D. 1469], came Thomas, son of the above John Roo, being of full age, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Taillour, Mayor, and the Aldermen, and acknowledged satisfaction for his patrimony.

Eleccio Vic'.

The Feast of St. Matthew [21 Sept.], 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459], in the presence of Thomas Scot, the Mayor, Thomas Ursewik, the Recorder, Stephen Broun, John Hathirle, William Gregory, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Norman, William Marwe, William Cantelowe, William Hulyn, Matthew Philip, Richard Lee, John Walden, John Middelton, Thomas Oulegreve, Ralph Josselyn, Hugh Wiche, Aldermen, and very many Commoners summoned to the Guildhall for the election of Sheriffs for the year ensuing, John Plomer was elected one of the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex by the Mayor, and John Stokker was elected the other Sheriff by the Commonalty.

The same day Thomas Thorndone, draper, was elected Chamberlain; Peter Alfold and Peter Calcot were elected Wardens of London Bridge; John Middelton, Hugh Wiche, Aldermen, John Walshawe, John Harowe, John Lambart, and Henry Waver, Commoners, were elected Auditors of the accounts in arrear of the Chamberlain and Wardens.

Afterwards, viz., on the eve of St. Michael [29 Sept.], the said Sheriffs were sworn at the Guildhall, and on the morrow of the said Feast were presented, admitted, and accepted before the Barons of the Exchequer.

The Feast of the Translation of St. Edward [13 Oct.], 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459], in the presence of Thomas Scot, the Mayor, Thomas Ursewik, the Recorder, the Prior of Christchurch, Stephen Broun, William Gregory, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Norman, William Marwe, Thomas Canyng', William Cantelowe, William Hulyn, Matthew Philip, Richard Lee, John Middelton, John Walden, Thomas Cook, Ralph Verney, John Feld, Ralph Josselyn, Thomas Oulegreve, Hugh Wiche, and John Stokker, Aldermen, and an immense Commonalty summoned to the Guildhall for the election of a Mayor for the year ensuing, William Hulyn was elected. (fn. 6)

Folio 311-12.

Recital of the terms of the will of Thomas Dukmantone, late mercer, whereby he bequeathed the sum of 500 marks to John his son, the same to remain in the hands of Henry and John his brothers successively, in trust for his said son until he come of age, with remainder to pious uses. Whereupon the said Henry Dukmanton, together with John Broddesworth, John Lambard, and Thomas Niche, mercers, and John Billesdon, draper, entered into the customary bond before John Chichele, then Chamberlain, on Monday, 12 Nov., 25 Henry VI. [A.D. 1446]. Afterwards, viz., on Friday, the 23rd November, 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459], the said orphan having died under age, and the testator's brothers, Henry and John, being also dead, came the executors of the said testator and also the aforesaid John Lambard and Thomas Niche before William Hulyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and produced the testator's will dated 10 Feb., A.D. 1445[-6], duly proved, and prayed to be discharged of their bond as none of the money had come into their hands. On the same day came Robert Dukmanton, executor of Henry Dukmanton, and produced the latter's will, dated 22 July, A.D. 1454, and proved on the 12th Nov., A.D. 1459. The will having been read in Court, the said Robert also prayed the Mayor and Aldermen for the discharge of the said John Lambard and Thomas Niche on the same grounds as already stated, and judgment was given to that effect on the 12th December, 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459].

Folio 312.

Friday, 30 May, 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1460], came Richard Riche, Richard Nedeham, John Reynkyn, John Marchall, mercers, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Hulyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorndone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 500 marks.

The above bond to be void provided that the above Richard Riche, or some one on his behalf, pay into the Chamber the sum of 250 marks to the use of Richard, son of John Riche, late mercer, and a like sum to the use of Katherine, daughter of the same, when they come of age.

Folio 312 b.

Custod' orphanor' Joh' Riche mercer'.

The same day came John Albourgh, John Lok, John Reynkyn, John Tate, and Robert Strayngham, mercers, before the same, and entered into bond in the sum of 500 marks.

The above bond to be void on payment into the Chamber by the said John Alburgh, or some one on his behalf, of the sum of 250 marks to the use of Thomas and John, sons of the above John Riche, respectively when they come of age.

Eleccio Joh'is Aisshein co'em servient' ad arma civitat'.

28 Feb., 38 Henry VI. [A D. 1459-60], John Aisshe admitted into the office of Common Serjeant-at-arms by William Hulyn, the Mayor, Geoffrey Feldyng, John Norman, Geoffrey Boleyn, William Cantelowe, Matthew Philip, Richard Lee, William Gregory, John Waldene, John Feld, John Middeltone, Ralph Josselyn, William Taillour, Thomas Cook, Ralph Verney, John Stokker, and Hugh Wyche, Aldermen, with the assent of an immense Commonalty in Common Council assembled.

30 May, 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1460], came John Alburgh, John Lok, John Reynkyn, John Tate, and John Worsop, draper, into the Court of the lord the King in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before William Hulyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and entered into bond with Thomas Thorndone, the Chamberlain, in the sum of 1,000 marks. [No condition recorded.]

25 April, 4 Edward IV. [A.D. 1464], William Bedknap (?) entered into bond before Matthew Philippe, the Mayor, for the payment of the sum of 1,000 marks to Robert Colwich, the Chamberlain, in the place of the above John Lok, deceased.

The above bond to be void if the said John Alburgh, or some one on his behalf, shall pay into Court the sum of 500 marks to the use of John and Anne respectively, children of John Malvern, late haberdasher, when they shall have come of age.

Folio 313.

Letters patent appointing William Marowe, Alderman, to be a Justice to determine all pleas for debt among the merchants of Almaine according to the law merchant, in which pleas the Mayor and Sheriffs may be unable to do speedy justice, pursuant to charters granted to the said merchants. (fn. 7) Witness the King at Westminster, 30 March, 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1460].

Folio 313 b.

Letter from the King to the Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs, and Commonalty of the City (fn. 8) :-

"Trusty and Welbeloved We grete you wele And where as we nowe late directed unto you oure l'res...willyng and chargyng you by þe same to aggree and condescende unto a restfull ende & goode conclusion in suche matires as of long tyme have d...in trave(?) & variaunce betwix the Curates of oure Citee of London... We have understande by the declarac'on of your Recordour honorably purposed unto us on yor behalfe (?) the good will and full entente that ye have tobeye oure good plaisirs and lawefull comaundements as wele in the saide matere as in all oþere in as humble wise as any oure soubgettes livyng (?) by the which your honourable demeanyng according to youre duete We verraily perceive the naturell love true obeissaunce and feithfull ligeance that ye owe and bere unto us and can you þerfore right singler thank and so according to yor desertes we accepte and repaie (?) you as our feithfull and true subgettes and over this whereas we also nowe late directed unto you oure l'res of commission (fn. 9) for to have yor aid (?) and assistence at this tyme to the suppressing of our Rebelles and traitours of this oure Royalme We have understand by the said declarac'on the goode disposic'on and towardnesse that ye have tobeye and accomplissh oure intent [and plai]sir in that partie so þat it shuld not be or redounde to þe derogac'on or breche of yor franchises privileges and libertees in any wise We woll ye wite þat it is nat our entent or wille ne at any tyme hath be to doo any thing that myght be or sowne to the breche deminuc'on or rupture of yor said franchises privileges or libertees or any of theym but rather to se them to be observed contynued and supported in as ample and honourable wise in oure daye....as....they have be of tyme passed in the dayes of oure noble progenitours and therunto we shall yeve unto you oure personal aide and assistence if the cas shal require And as for the certificat of our said Commission we shal have deliberate co'icac'on therin with þe lordes of oure Counsell for suche a direcc'on to be taken theryn as shall be for þe conservac'on of yor said franchises and for yor true acquitall and feithfull demenyng at this tyme We shall shew unto you suche favor and tendernesse of oure goode grace as ye and alle oþere shall have couraige to be of semblable disposic'on and towardnesse in tyme to come Yoeven under oure signet at oure Towne of Northamptone the second day of Feverie" [A.D. 1459-60]. (fn. 10)

8 Jan., 39 Henry VI. [A.D. 1460-1], divers merchants of Almaine being summoned into the Court of the lord the King, in the Chamber of the Guildhall, before Richard Lee, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, and being informed that the inhabitants of the Ward of Dowgate were unable through poverty to raise the sum of 2,000 marks due from them for the defence of the City, they consented to advance £20 for that purpose of their own free will and not by way of forming a precedent.

10 March, 38 Henry VI. [A.D. 1459-60], Thomas Dounham elected by William Hulyn, the Mayor, and the Aldermen, to the office of Serjeant of the Mayor formerly exercised by John "Aisshe."

Footnotes

1 See 'Cal. Letter-Book I,' p. 75.
2 Set out, together with the proclamation which follows, in Firth's 'Coopers' Company,' pp. 14-16.
3 What the Mayor and Aldermen did in the matter is not recorded, although the petition is introduced with an unctuous allusion to the duties of municipal authorities in protecting good men against evildoers.
4 A civil war had now fairly commenced; the battle of Bloreheath had been fought (23 Sept.) and decided in the King's favour, and the Yorkist lords had sought safety in flight.
5 These proceedings are subscribed with the name "Tonge," Roger Tonge alias Spicer being the Town Clerk of the day. In signing himself thus he was following a mode initiated by John Carpenter, a former Town Clerk. See 'Cal. LetterBook I,' p. 197. The custom became general, and is continued at the present day.
6 For his being sworn into office, vide supra, 396.
7 Cf. 'Liber Albus,' i. 295-6.
8 Parts of the letter are illegible.
9 On the 14th January, 1460. a Royal Commission had been read in the Common Council directing the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs to put in array a force to oppose the late Duke of York and the late Earls of Warwick, Salisbury, and Rutland, these nobles having been deprived of their respective titles and estates. Journal 6, fo. 224 b; 'Rot. Parl.,' v. 349.
10 On the 5th February it is recorded that Geoffrey Boleyn and Richard Verney, Aldermen, Thomas Ursewyk, the Recorder, and Thomas Burgoyne, one of the Under-Sheriffs, who had been dispatched to Northampton to interview the King and his Council on the King's letter touching the City curates and the Commission of array, reported to the Common Council the result of their journey, and brought with them a gracious letter from the King addressed to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Sheriffs, which was then read; the "gracious letter" there mentioned being no doubt this letter of the 2nd Feb. Journal 6, fo. 196 b.