Crown Pleas
36 Henry III - 38 Henry III (nos 6-49)

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London Record Society

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Martin Weinbaum (editor)

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1976

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3-15

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'Crown Pleas: 36 Henry III - 38 Henry III (nos 6-49)', The London eyre of 1276 (1976), pp. 3-15. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=35992 Date accessed: 22 November 2014.


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PLEAS OF THE CROWN 36 HENRY III [1251–2]

6. In the same year, Arnold de Geraudon and Thomas Esporon being chamberlains, Nicholas Bat and Laurence de Frowik being sheriffs, for whom no one answers; Maud wife of John de Taterig and Richard his brother appealed John le Gerdeler of London in the husting of the death of John de Tateregge. They do not come and do not prosecute their appeal, so let them be arrested and their pledges to prosecute are in mercy. They have not found pledges except by faith (nisi per fidem). John le Gerdlere now comes and proffers a charter (fn. 2) of King Henry pardoning him his suit for breach of the peace arising from this death on condition that he stands to right in the king's court if anyone wishes to implead him. Publicly and solemnly it is proclaimed. And there is no one. So he is granted firm peace. It is testified that John was arrested and detained at Newgate and afterwards was released by the king's writ to twelve men on pledge to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. The sheriffs do not answer for the pledges, so to judgment on the sheriffs. The sheriff of Essex is ordered to distrain John son and heir of Laurence de Frowyk then sheriff, on all his lands and from the profits and to have his body here on Monday in the third week of Lent [9 Mar. 1276].

Nota 1 . . . . manucaptus usque ad Her justiciariorum . . . hoc primo . . . 14th cent.: nota scribatur [cf. 524 no. 1].

7. John son of Aubery (Albredi) killed John del Perer. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels nor frankpledge but he was in the mainpast of John whom he killed, so nothing from the mainpast. All the neighbours have died. Adam son of Aubery [does not come] and is not suspected. He was attached by Adam de Witebi 'paternostrer' and Robert de Notingham (*misericordia).

8. Thomas de Michem fell from a ladder and was crushed by a beam . . . value of the beam 16d. for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours have died. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

9. [m. 1d] William son of Robert le Clerk of Tresk and Richard son of Geoffrey Boleng of the same took sanctuary in the church of St. Thomas on London Bridge, confessed that they were thieves and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. Richard's chattels are twenty-four sheep worth *24s. for which the sheriff of Yorkshire is to answer. He also had two bovates of land in the vill of Tresk in the same county. So the sheriff of Yorkshire is ordered to take the land into the king's hand and to enquire about the intervening period.

10. Hamo Suuthall servant of Nicholas Bat fell from a horse into the Thames and was drowned. Value of the horse 5s. (deodandum) for which Nicholas Bat then sheriff is to answer. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

11. Gocelin de Colon' took sanctuary in the church of St. Paul's London, confessed that he was a forger of money and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. No chattels.

12. Robert Russel, Geoffrey de Wyndesores and Walter de Oxford were in a boat loaded with wood (busca). The boat sank because of its weight and Robert with it. Geoffrey and Walter escaped, were attached and do not come. They were attached by Roger Inkel 'mariner', William Nichol 'mariner', Ralph de Holebod and William de Okele (fn. 3) who was from Berkshire. So they are all in mercy. Value of the boat and the wood 15s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. (Infortunium).

13. A woman named Cecily and her maid Juliana were fighting in a house, next to a leaden vessel full of hot water. During the fight both fell into the vessel and were scalded to death. Value of the vessel 4s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. William de Haverynge, attached for the death, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Richard de (fn. 4) Basing mercer and Roger de Derby 'taillur'. So they are all in * mercy. All the neighbours have died. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

PLEAS OF THE CROWN 37 HENRY III [1252–3]

14. In the same year, Arnold de Geraudon and Thomas Sporon being [chamberlains], for whom no one answers but Alice la Blund has their lands, William de Durham, who answers now, and Thomas de Wymbourn, for whom his son Michael answers, being sheriffs; Edith de Dumowe fell into a leaden vessel full of mash and was scalded to death. Value of the vessel *2s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours come except Alexander Aberdas and he is not suspected. Alexander was attached by Adam But of Melkstrete tailor and Gilbert de Hospitali tailor. So they are all in mercy. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

15. Four unknown malefactors encountered Richard son of the Parson on London Bridge. A quarrel arising among them, they killed Richard and at once fled. It is not known who they were. Richard Kyngesfeld and Ralph de Bradele were then in company with Richard and were attached. They do not come and are not suspected. Richard was attached by Ivor la Suche and William la Suzche and Ralph by Simon Godewe and William Megucer. So they are all in *mercy. Richard Wildelyfe, Robert Vivien and Adam de Grescherche were attached for the death because they were staying in the house in which Richard was found killed. They do not come and are not suspected. Richard was attached by Vincent Bonenfaunt and John Wilde, Robert by Walter Godinou and Simon Leuman, and Adam by Nicholas Anaine and Jordan le Frankeleyn. So they are all in *mercy. All the neighbours have died, so nothing from them. [cf. 530]

16. Alice wife of Ralph Mercer beat to death a boy named John in the ward of Michael Tovy. (fn. 5) She at once fled and is suspected, so let her be exacted and waived. No chattels. Her husband Ralph was attached for the death. He does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Ralph Sire, Richard de Rumford, Nicholas Pyning, Richer de Erebourwe, Nicholas Sely, Gilbert Golet, Richard le Wollemanger, Alfred le Surgien, Wakelin le Dubbur, Warin le Bocher, Lorekin Slipertop and Silvester Daniel. So they are in *mercy.

17. Charter of the earl of Gloucester of acquittance from common summons.

'Henry by the grace of God; we have granted on behalf of ourselves and our heirs to Gilbert de Clare that for his lifetime he shall have this liberty, namely, that he shall not be molested by reason of a general summons before any of our justices and shall not at any time be amerced for this reason; at Westminster, 17 September 47 Henry III [1263].'

PLEAS OF THE CROWN 37 HENRY III [1252–3]

18. Arnold de Gerowedon and Thomas Sporon being chamberlains, for whom no one answers, Thomas de Wymborn and William de Durham, who answers now, being sheriffs; on Monday before the feast of SS. Simon and Jude [21 Oct. 1252] Richard Norman was found drowned in a pit in the garden of his father William Norman in Aldresgate street in the aldermanry of John le Minur. (fn. 9) Because it is not known and cannot be ascertained by any inquest held by the chamberlain and sheriffs whether he died by misadventure or felony, the justices wish to examine twelve men from the aldermanry where the incident occurred concerning the death. The mayor and barons say that it is not for the justices to hold an examination concerning a man's death. Because it is found in the rolls (fn. 10) of William de York that the mayor and barons in eyre have granted that the justices should hold enquiry at will, notwithstanding any inquest held by the chamberlain and sheriffs, the mayor and commonalty are in *mercy. Because no one answers for Arnold and Thomas, the sheriff of Essex is ordered to distrain Arnold's heirs and have their bodies here in fifteen days from the Purification [16 Feb.]. And likewise the bishops of Lincoln, Salisbury and Chichester are ordered to cause Thomas to come at the said term, as he is a clerk.

Nota 2. De maiore et communitate amerciatis quia in isto itinere dedixerunt id quod prius in alio itinere concesserunt. 14th cent.: Nota scribatur [cf. 524 no. 2].

19. In the same year John de Gisors being chamberlain and the same being sheriffs; Alice de Enefeud was found drowned on Sunday after the feast of St. Matthew [28 Sep. 1253]. The neighbours have died. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Because the chamberlain makes no mention in his roll of the attachment of neighbours, whereas he should always enrol attachments of this kind on his roll and answer for them before the justices, to judgment on John son and heir of John de Gisors because he answers for his father, [cf. 628]

20. On Wednesday before the feast of St. Gregory [5 Mar. 1253] Thomas son of William the Smith of Faversham took sanctuary in the church of St. Lawrence Jewry, confessed that he had cut purses and stolen a surcoat of russet at (? Barnet) and abjured the realm. No chattels. He was not harboured in the City, but was there because he was a vagabond. In addition the mayor and barons were asked how watch and ward should be kept over such thieves who took sanctuary in a church and who should answer for any escape. They say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that there should be no watch and ward over such men and that no one should be amerced for their escape except only if any of them should escape from prison and then the sheriffs will answer for the escape. So let there be a discussion.

Nota 3. Quod nullus latro qui fugit ad ecclesiam debet per cives vigilari nec custodiri. 14th cent.: Nota scribatur [cf. 524 no. 3].

21. On Thursday before the Annunciation [20 Mar. 1253] Agnes de Barkyng, wishing to draw hot water from a leaden vessel in the house of John Makerel, fell into the vessel by accident. She was scalded and died forthwith. Value of the vessel *40d. (deodandum). William Wade (fn. 13) and Thomas le Laster, neighbours, do not come. William was attached by Henry de Canterbury and Geoffrey Gypes, Thomas le Laster by Walter de Oxford tailor and Adam le Fuster. So they are in mercy. Be it known that the mayor and barons say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they are not bound to present the finder; and this is found in the rolls of the last eyre. (fn. 14) John Makerel and his wife Felice, in whose house the incident occurred, were attached for the death elsewhere . . . Judgment: misadventure.

Nota 4. Quod nullus presentabitur inventor in Civitate pro morte hominis. 14th cent.: Nota scribatur [cf. 524 no. 4].

22. [m. 2] On Thursday after the Annunciation [27 Mar. 1253] in his own house in the ward of William son of Richard [Tower ward], Nicholas de Hallyngber', wanting to make a hole in a plank (plana) with a knife, accidentally wounded himself in the thigh and cut his veins so that he bled to death. Arnold de Geredon and Thomas Sporon chamberlains and William de Durham and Thomas de Wymbourn sheriffs did not value the plank and knife when they held the inquest on the death, so to judgment on them. Alexander le Bowyer and Hervey de Martilane, neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by Thomas de la Sale, Nicholas de Len, William le Minur and Walter le Pestour. So they are all in *mercy. The mayor and barons are asked whether all persons of twelve years old and over should attend inquests before the chamberlain and sheriffs and say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that when such an event occurs in the City they themselves hold the inquest with the more discreet neighbours and it is not customary in the City for all those of twelve and over to attend. So let there be a discussion.

Nota 5. Quod non est necesse ut omnes de etate xii annorum veniant ad inquisiciones de morte hominis coram coronatore et vicecomitibus. 14th cent.: Scribatur nota [With a pointing hand. Cf. 524 no. 5].

23. John son of Geoffrey Bosse of Warwickshire fled to the church of St. Bartholomew the Less in London, confessed that he had stolen 20s. from a servant near Coventre and committed many other thefts and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. No chattels because he was a vagabond and stranger.

24. On Friday before the feast of St. Dunstan [16 May 1253] in the aldermanry of William Viel [Bread Street ward] in Westchepe a stranger out riding tried to take from Henry de Westhamme a staff which he held in his hand and threw him down onto the pavement. He fell on his head as though half dead and died forthwith. The stranger at once fled. It is not known who he was and no one pursued him or raised the hue and cry. Geoffrey de Hallyngber' and Richard le Tayllur, neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by William Viel, William Page, Richard Damyas and Martin de Waldene (obierunt). So they are in *mercy. Because this happened by day and the stranger was not arrested nor pursued, to judgment on the aldermanry. The mayor and aldermen are asked how pursuit should be made through the neighbourhood when a man is killed and whether the men of the neighbourhood should raise the hue and cry in such an event. They say that the neighbourhood need not raise the hue and cry unless they wish but in order to preserve the king's peace the men of the neighbourhood pursue the malefactors to arrest them if they can; though even if they do not pursue them they will not suffer any penalty on that account. So let there be a discussion. Because John le [sic] Gisors chamberlain made no mention in his rolls of the pledges of the neighbours, to judgment on his son John who answers for him. [cf. 628]

Nota 6. Si secta debeat fieri post latrones out hutesium levari. 14th cent.: Scribatur [With a pointing hand. Cf. 524 no. 6].

25. On the feast of St. Urban [25 May 1253] an unknown beggar was found dead, apparently from hunger, in the ward of John de Blakethorn [Aldersgate ward] outside Aldresgate. Nicholas de Herlauwe and Roger de Celario, neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Nicholas was attached by Philip de Wynton' and Alan de Pelham, Roger by Nicholas le Lorimer and John de Gatesdene. So they are in *mercy. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Because John de Gisors chamberlain does not answer for the attachments of the neighbours and makes no mention of them in his roll, to judgment on him. Because the mayor and aldermen testify that the beggar was living among them in the ward, and the men of the ward made no mention of his name at the inquest held before the chamberlain and they do not even yet know what he is called, *to judgment on the ward. [cf. 628]

Nota 7. Quod oportet nominare interfectum. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 7].

26. Ranulf de Brinkele came out of his house at night to light a candle in Wollelane (fn. 21) in the ward of Ralph Sparling [Billingsgate ward] and an unknown malefactor waylaid him and struck him with a knife so that he died forthwith in his own house. The malefactor at once fled and it is not known who he was. Henry le Keu, Richard Boles, Walter Jur', and William de Faversham, the four neighbours who were attached, do not come and are not suspected. Henry was attached by Austin de Wrotham and Alfred Oysel, Richard by Ralph le Portur and Reginald Wytside, Walter by Christian the Clerk and Henry le Reus, William by Simon le Reus and Walter Skete. So they are in mercy. Be it known that four neighbours should always be attached when anyone is killed feloniously. Because the chamberlain makes no mention of the neighbours in his roll, to judgment on him. [cf. 628]

Nota 8. De quatuor vicinis semper attachiandis. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 8].

27. Robert Bord, a beggar suffering from the falling sickness, suddenly fell down dead in the ward of John Horn [Bridge ward]. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Adam Capes and Austin Ballard, neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Adam was attached by John Godhale and John le Cuneyse, Austin by Henry Beaupyne and Ralph Smalehunte. So they are in *mercy.

28. Morkin de Enefeud of Middlesex took sanctuary in the church of St. Katherine outside London, (fn. 22) confessed that he had harboured a thief, Reginald de Beverley, with his stolen goods, and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. Nothing is known of frankpledge or chattels because he is from Middlesex. Therefore the sheriff of Middlesex is ordered to inquire about chattels and frankpledge and to answer for the amercements. Later the sheriff testifies that he had no chattels and was not in frankpledge because he was a vagabond.

29. On Friday after the feast of SS. Peter and Paul [4 July 1253] Guyot servant of Master Matthew Boby encountered Arnato de Garsie, a Roman, and, a quarrel arising between them, Arnato hit Guyot on the arm and wounded him in other parts of the body so that he died on the third day after in the house of Master Sylvester de Anania in the ward of Nicholas de Wynton' [Langbourn ward]. Arnato at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the law and custom of the City. Chattels *3s. for which William de Durham sheriff is to answer. Because the mayor and aldermen testify that Arnato was harboured in the ward for a long time outside frankpledge, to judgment on the ward. Master Sylvester and his servant Bernard de Chaors were attached for the death because Guyot died in Sylvester's house and they do not come. Master Sylvester was attached by Andrew le Fraunceys and William Prest, Bernard by John Theoland and Richard Faukes. So they are in *mercy. The sheriffs are ordered to arrest Sylvester and Bernard if they can be found. Because William de Durham and Thomas de Wymbourn then sheriffs attached Sylvester and Bernard each by only two pledges whereas anyone suspected of a man's death should be attached by twelve, to judgment on the sheriffs. Afterwards the sheriff (fn. 26) testifies that they have not been found. The mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not suspect them and that they did not abscond because of the death. Therefore nothing from them. [cf. 531]

Nota 9. Ad iudicium quia quidam receptatus fuit extra francum plegium.

Nota 10. De vicecomitibus amerciatis quia dimiserunt quemdam attachiatum pro morte hominis per duos plegios ubi deberet [sic] invenisse xii plegios. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 nos. 9–10].

30. On the feast of St. Margaret the Virgin [20 July 1253] Lettice la Waleys, who suffered from the falling sickness, accidentally fell dead at the gate of a canon of St. Paul's London. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. William Synod and Robert de Bray, (fn. 27) neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. William was attached by Ellis de Gynges and Simon le Frank, Robert by Nicholas Synot and Master William le Carpenter. So they are in *mercy. The men of the ward of Simon de Hadstok [Queenhithe ward] where the incident occurred are asked how it happened and say they know nothing. So to judgment on the whole ward.

31. Henry Vennair died suddenly of the falling sickness in the ward of Anketin de Auvergne [Farringdon ward]. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Gilbert de Cambridge, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. A second neighbour has died, so nothing from him. Gilbert was attached by Robert le Marchaunt and Ralph de Wyteby. So they are in *mercy. Because the men of the ward do not know who the neighbours are and cannot name them, to judgment on the ward.

Nota 11. Oportet nominare vicinos. 14th cent.: Scribatur nota [cf. 524 no. 11].

32. [m. 2d] Nicholas de Berkyng while gathering pears in the garden of the prior of St. Bartholomew fell from a tree and died. Value of the tree and the pears *18d. (deodandum). No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. The men of the ward of John de Blakethorn [Aldersgate ward] are asked who was with him when he fell and say they do not know, so *to judgment on the whole ward. Afterwards it was found in the rolls of the chamberlains and sheriffs that Henry de Wimbeldon, William de Leuesham, Gilbert de Wimbeldon and Thomas Randal were with him and were attached, but they do not come and are not suspected. Henry was attached by William Albyn and Peter Dunkan, William by Roger le Wolf 'pessoner' and Ranulf Canon, Gilbert by William de Berkyng and William Dibel, Thomas by Ralph Canon 'puleter' and John Randolf. So they are in *mercy. Two neighbours have died, so nothing from them. Because the chamberlain and sheriffs falsely valued the deodand, *to judgment on them. [cf. 532]

Nota 12. De warda amerciata quia nesciverunt qui fuerunt cum quodam qui oppressus fuit per quemdam [sic] arborem per infortunium.14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 12].

33. Alice de Lichefeld, who was suffering from some infirmity, accidentally fell dead in the ward of Simon de Hadstok [Queenhithe ward]. The men of the ward are asked how this incident occurred and say they know nothing, so *to judgment on the whole ward. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Thomas Everard and Jordan de St. Pauls, neighbours, do not come. Thomas was attached by Adam the Sealmaker (Factorem sigillorum) and Gilbert le Cordwainer, Jordan by Ralph Paternoster and Simon le Cuverur. So they are in *mercy.

34. Theobald de Melton was found drowned in the ward of Walmar de Essex [Billingsgate ward]. As the justices cannot discover by inquest how he was drowned, the men of the ward are asked how it happened and say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they know nothing, so *to judgment on the whole ward. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Robert Dagun and William Egrith, neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Robert was attached by William Fros and Robert le Sachier, William by Michael the Clerk and John Sperlyng. So they are in *mercy.

35. A woman called Agnes was crushed by a beam in the house of Ralph Bullok in the ward of Henry le Waleys [Cordwainer ward]. Value of the beam *12d. (deodandum). No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Two neighbours have died, so nothing from them. Ralph was attached for the death but has died. William de Neuport and Isabel de Haverhull who were in the house were attached, but do not come and are not suspected. William was attached by John le Bas and Peter le Botoner, Isabel by Geoffrey le Botoner and Thomas de Norhamton tailor. So they are in mercy.

PLEAS OF THE CROWN 38 HENRY III [1253–4]

36. In the same year the same being chamberlain, Richard Pikard and John de Norhamton being sheriffs; Robert de Haselyngfeud, walking on the bank of the Thames, fell in and was drowned. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Robert le Cornmonger and Roger Edrith, neighbours, do not come. Robert was attached by Henry le Engleys and John Ters, Roger by William Edrith and Richard de Billing. So they are in *mercy.

37. On the morrow of St. Andrew the Apostle [1 Dec. 1253] in the ward of Simon de Hadstok [Queenhithe ward], Ralph the Parmenter and William Gille quarrelled in the house of Walter de Exeport and later went out of the house and during the dispute Ralph hit William on the head with a wooden staff, so that he quickly died. Ralph was arrested by Walter de Exeport and handed over to Richard Picard and John de Norhamton then sheriffs, who imprisoned him in Newgate. Because it is testified that Ralph is still alive and living in the City and no one knows how he was delivered from prison, to judgment on the sheriffs for the *escape. The sheriffs are ordered to arrest Ralph and have his body in court on the following day (?hic cras). Walter de Exeport, John Milneward, Adam Scot and Ralph le Joynur, four neighbours, do not come. Walter was attached by Laurence le Brocher and William Dibel, John by Nicholas Hunde and William Hog, Adam by William Baterell and William Forain, Ralph by Laurence le Brocher and Baldwin le Tymbermonger. So they are in *mercy. The mayor and aldermen, asked if they suspect the neighbours, say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not. Ralph comes on the following day and says when asked how he was delivered from prison, that it was by royal writ in the shrievalty of John de Norhamton. Asked where the writ of mainprise is, he says that it was taken from him in time of war, but that he was handed over to Paulin de Thorp skinner and William de Evesham who are present and acknowledge the fact; likewise to Richard de Batewell, William de Batewell, Simon de Norhamton, Geoffrey Poteys, John de Garst, Thomas Prest 'peleter', Henry de Cestfeud, Thomas de Barton, Siward de Hertford and Thomas de Cambridge who were to have him here on the first day and did not have him. So they are in *mercy. *To judgment on John de Norhamton because he did not answer earlier for the mainprise, but nothing because the mainprise is not found in the coroner's roll. Asked how he wishes to clear himself, Ralph denies the death and everything and offers the king *20s. for enquiry to be made by the mayor and aldermen; by licence of the justices this is permitted. The mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is not guilty. So he is quit. But they say that Richard Fukelape of Northamptonshire killed William, so *let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Chattels *2s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. [cf. 533]

Nota 13. Quod ambo vicecomites responderunt de evasione licet aliquis evadat ab uno eorum.

Nota 14. Quod oportet quod manucapcio irrotuletur in rotulo camerarii. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 nos. 13–14].

38. Agnes Daythef took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary le Bow London, confessed that she had stolen a surcoat and committed many other thefts and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. Nothing is known of chattels because she was a vagabond from Oxfordshire. Afterwards it is testified that a woman of this name is living in the City, so let her be arrested. Later a woman called Agnes comes, and asked by the justices what her name is and how long she has lived in the City, says she is called Agnes de Leic' and does not know by what surname others call her. Because the justices agree that at the time that the event occurred she was not yet born (non fuit in residencia nativa), she is quit.

39. On Friday after the feast of St. Scholastica the Virgin [13 Feb. 1254] in the ward of Laurence de Frowick [Farringdon ward], Lambert de Cologne and Walter esquire of Master Philip de Cancellis clerk were taking Philip's sister Alice home and when they came to the churchyard of St. Dunstan in the West (iuxta Novum Templum) they met Henry de Merston, a clerk of the chancery, and his servant Robert [de Kyngeston]. A quarrel ensued among them about the woman and Robert de Kyngeston, by Henry's order, stabbed Lambert with a knife below the right shoulder, so that he died on the third day after in the house of Master Henry the Versifier (Versificatoris). Robert at once fled and is suspected; because he was not of the City but of the county of Stafford, the sheriff of Stafford is ordered to have him exacted and outlawed in his own county. Henry is a clerk and lives in Bedfordshire in the diocese of Lincoln. Therefore the bishop of Lincoln is ordered to cause him to appear in three weeks from the Purification [23 Feb. 1276]; and the sheriff of Bedford is to arrest him if he can be found. Walter and Alice and the others who were present when the incident occurred do not come and were not attached, so *to judgment on the chamberlain and sheriffs for not attaching them. The mayor and aldermen are asked if they suspect Walter and Alice of the death and say that they do not, but that they were present. So they are in *mercy. Afterwards Henry conies, and asked how he wishes to clear himself of incitement, says that he is a clerk and is not bound to answer here. Thereupon Richard de Berues minor canon of St. Paul's London comes and claims him as a clerk by virtue of letters of the bishop of London in which the bishop entrusted to him his authority for claiming clergy. Because it is provided by the king's council that no one is bound to answer a charge of incitement (fn. 38) before the committer of the deed (factor) has been convicted, let Henry be handed over to the bishop to have him before the king or his justices on summons on penalty of £100.

Nota 15. De coronatore et vicecomitibus amerciatis quia non attachiaverunt illos qui presentes fuerunt in lite ubi quidam interfectus fuit percussus.

Nota 16. De clericis liberandis ordinariis per justiciaries sub pena centam librarum ab episcopo loci levandarum. 14th cent.: Scribatur nota [cf. 524 nos. 15–16].

40. [m. 3] James le Chaucer fell from a step in the house of William de Norfolk in the ward of William son of Richard [Tower ward], so that he died. Value of the step *7d. (deodandum). William de Norfolk was attached for the death, but has died and is not suspected. The neighbours have died, so nothing from them. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. The men of the ward falsely valued the step, so *to judgment on them.

41. Ralph de Worstede and Peter de Richemund were standing together by the church of St. Michael by Westchepe in the ward of Laurence de Frowyk [Farringdon ward] and, a quarrel arising between them, Ralph wounded Peter in several places with a sword, so that he died soon afterwards. Ralph was at once arrested while fleeing by near neighbours and taken to Newgate where before Peter the Constable (fn. 42) and Roger de Boyland justices of gaol delivery he was convicted and hanged. Chattels *4s. Because the justices cannot find out about the chattels from any inquest held by the chamberlain and sheriffs, * to judgment on them. All the neighbours have died. Because it is testified that Ralph was harboured in the ward outside frankpledge before he committed the crime the whole ward is in *mercy. Alecot de Wyteby, attached for the death because he was present when it occurred, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Thomas le Paternoster and Stephen le Chapeleyn. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 534]

Nota 17. De warda amerciata pro quodam commorante in eadem extra francum plegium.

Nota 18. Et de camerario et vicecomitibus amerciatis quia camerarius et vicecomites non inquisiverunt de catallis felonum. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 nos. 17–18].

42. Thomas de Sanzdamage of Yorkshire took sanctuary in the church of St. Botolph without Aldresgate, confessed that he had plundered certain men in Essex and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. Nothing is known of chattels nor of frankpledge because he was a stranger.

43. A woman called Alditha, wanting to draw hot water from a leaden vessel in the house of Roger Crepyn outside Alegate in the ward of Porsokene, fell into the vessel and was at once scalded to death. Value of the vessel *3s. 4d. (deodandum). Roger was attached for the death but has died, so nothing from him. All the neighbours have died, except John de Stebenhuthe who does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Thomas Pynnot and Roger Haring. So they are in *mercy. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Because the men of the ward falsely valued the deodand before the justices, to judgment on them. [cf. 535]

Nota 19. De warda amerciata quia male appreciaverunt deodandum. 14th cent.: Scribatur nota [cf. 524 no. 19].

44. A sow bit a one-year old child called Amice in the ward of Laurence de Frowyk [Farringdon ward] so that she died. Value of the sow *20d. (deodandum). The neighbours have died. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Walter le Soper, the child's father, and his wife Alditha were attached for the death but have died, so nothing from them. Because the chamberlain and sheriffs make no mention in their roll of their attachment, * to judgment on them.

45. On the feast of St. Dunstan [19 May 1254] Nicholas the Carter (Carettarius) of Shordich was driving a cart and horse beyond London Bridge and when he came to a ditch outside Bisshopesgate the cart overturned on him and crushed him to death. Value of the horse and cart 7s. (deodandum) for which Richard Pycard is to answer. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Thomas Mutton and Henry le Tuler, neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Thomas was attached by Richard le Tuler and Walter Frebodi, Henry by John of Waldegrave and Richard Frere of the same. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 536]

46. Jaket servant of John de Gysors, Fulk [?servant] of John Amerb', Reginald de Wautham and William Picard were together in a boat on the Thames when the boat overturned. Jaket was drowned, but the others escaped. All the neighbours have died. Fulk and the others who were with him in the boat were attached for the death, but do not come and are not suspected. Fulk was attached by Bartholomew le Ferur and Geoffrey de Waldegrave, Reginald by John Burel and Richard Heryng. So they are in *mercy. William Picard has died, so nothing from him or his pledges (omnes obierunt). No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Asked what became of the boat, they say that it was never found, so nothing from the deodand.

47. William de Suffolk was suddenly found dead in bed in the ward of Henry le Galeys [Cordwainer ward]. The mayor and aldermen, asked if they suspect anyone of the death, say they do not. The aldermanry falsely presented the neighbours, so *to judgment on them. The first neighbour has died, but Ralph Adrian the second neighbour comes and is not suspected. So he is quit. Judgment: misadventure.

48. On the morrow of the Assumption [16 Aug. 1254] William de Wendene of Essex was playing chess (ad scaccarium) with Robert son of Bernard, a knight of Essex, in Robert's house in the ward of Ralph Sperling [Billingsgate ward] when a quarrel arose between them. Robert the knight's squire intervened with the intention of striking William because he was arguing with his master and William, perceiving this, struck Robert in the stomach with a knife so that he died. William at once fled and took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary atte Hulle where he remained for three days and then escaped. The mayor and aldermen are asked who should answer for the escape and say that an answer has been given elsewhere. (fn. 47) Therefore let there be a discussion. Because William was not of the City but of the county of Essex the sheriff of Essex is ordered to have him exacted and outlawed in his own county, and to inquire about chattels and frankpledge. Thomas de Hales, Henry the Cook, William Baudri and Simon Crul, four neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Thomas was attached by John Sperlyng and Roger Heryng, Henry by John Frere and William Pikeman, William by Reginald Fresheryng and William le Fhismongere [sic], Simon by Richard le Rus and Thomas de Oystergate. So they are in *mercy. Robert son of Bernard was attached for the death but does not come. The mayor and aldermen, asked if they suspect him, say they do not. He was attached by Walter de Coumbes and Henry de Waleton baker. So they are in *mercy.

Nota 20. Quod nemo tenetur respondere de evasione in Civitate. 14th cent.: Scribatur nota [cf. 524 no. 20].

49. John le Tawyer killed Henry de Plumstede in the ward of Simon de Hadstok [Queenhithe ward] and was at once arrested and hanged for the death at Newgate. No chattels. Simon le Candeler, Stephen the Capper (Capellarius) and William Russell, three neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. The fourth neighbour has died. Simon was attached by John the Cook and Ralph Pertrix, Stephen by Henry de Gotham and Eustace le Fruter, Eustace (fn. 48) by Lovekin le Chapeler and Godman the Cook. So they are in *mercy.

Footnotes

2 C.R. 1251–3, 55, 22 Feb. 1252 (cancelled).
3 Willelmum de Okele deleted; obiit interlined.
4 Ricardus de deleted; obiit interlined.
5 In 1246 purprestures were found in the ward of Michael Tovy versus Turrim; Tower ward was tentatively suggested in London Eyre, 1244, no. 466. However, as William fitz Richard was alderman of Tower ward in 1253 (22), Aldgate ward seems to be a more plausible identification.
6 C.P.R. 1258–66, 278, 18 Sep. 1263.
9 Presumably Aldersgate ward.
10 London Eyre, 1244, nos. 39–40.
13 obiit interlined.
14 Cf. London Eyre, 1244, no. 37 for a similar claim.
21 Unidentified.
22 Presumably the hospital of St. Katherine by the Tower, still regarded as part of Portsoken ward in the 13th century.
26 Viz. William de Durham, surviving.
27 Robertus de Bray underlined; obiit interlined.
38 Cf. 70, 219; Statute of Westminster I, c. 14.
42 i.e. constable of the Tower.
47 See 20.
48 Recte William.