Crown Pleas
45 Henry III - 47 Henry III (nos 108-147)

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London Record Society

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Martin Weinbaum (editor)

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1976

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31-41

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'Crown Pleas: 45 Henry III - 47 Henry III (nos 108-147)', The London eyre of 1276 (1976), pp. 31-41. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=35995 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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45 Henry III – 47 Henry III (nos 108–147)

Pleas of the crown 45 Henry III [1260–1] Seyton

108. [m. 6] In the same year, Peter de Gisors being chamberlain, John de Norhampton, who answers now, and Richard Picard, for whom Hubert Pycard answers, being sheriffs; Gailard, servant of Gailard de Solio, John the Cook, (fn. 2) and John, Gailard's cook, were fighting together in the ward of Henry de Coventre [Vintry ward] in the house of Stephen Bukerel, who has died. Peter Arnald came up to settle the quarrel between them and Gailard, wanting to strike John with a knife, struck Peter instead, so that he died. He at once fled and took sanctuary in the church of St. Martin in the Vintry, where he remained for eight days and then escaped, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom [of the City]. No chattels. Gailard de Solio, Bertram de la De and John the Cook were arrested for the death and delivered at Newgate before Richard de Coleworth and William Aguilon, justices [of gaol delivery], by royal writ, so nothing from them. The said [sic] Peter le Rus baker, Ralph le Large, John ad Crucem and Henry le Cordewaner, four neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Peter was attached by Hugh le Rous and Ralph le Large, Ralph by Peter le Rus and Hugh le Rus, John by Ralph le Large and Richard le Coupere, Henry by Nicholas Hardel and Reginald de Suffolk. So they are in *mercy. Because the sheriffs attached the neighbours one by the other, to judgment on them. [cf. 610]

Nota 44. Quod nullus vicinus debet attachiari per alium et hoc patet hic [cf. 524 no. 44].

109. Robert le Girdeler, Albin de Gosewell, Hugh le Caretter, Thomas le Brid, Robert le Brid, Robert de Gosewell and Walter [sic] killed Bartholomew de Bungey one evening in the house of Alexander le Orbatour in the ward of John de Blakethorn [Aldersgate ward]. They at once fled and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. No chattels. Stephen son of Nicholas, Richard de Berkhamstede, Peter le Vineter, three neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Stephen was attached by Richard de Cesterhunte goldsmith and Thomas de Edelmeton, Richard by Absolon de Haketon and Robert le Girdeler, Peter by Gervase (Servagium) de Notyngham and Walter le Quilter. So they are in *mercy. The fourth neighbour has died. Afterwards it is testified that Robert le Girdeler was harboured in the City until he died, so to judgment, [cf. 611]

Nota 45. Quod nullus debet receptari in Civitate postquam feloniam fecerit sub pena etc. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 45].

110. Philip de Sar' took sanctuary in the church of St. Michael Paternosterstrete, confessed that he was a thief and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. No chattels.

111. Reginald Caperoun killed Nicholas le Baud in the house of Richard le Rus, clerk, in the ward of Porsokene. He at once fled, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. No chattels, but he was harboured in the ward in the house of Reginald le Clerk, who now has no land in the City, but holds an ecclesiastical benefice in the diocese of Exeter. So he is in *mercy for the mainpast. The men of the ward falsely presented the neighbours, so they are in *mercy. The neighbours have died, so nothing from them.

112. John son of Richard de Baldersham took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary Wolmarchirche in the ward of Walter le Poter [Cornhill ward], confessed that he had committed many thefts and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. Chattels 4s. for which Richard de Culesworth of Essex then constable of the Tower is to answer. He was harboured in the ward outside frankpledge, so the whole ward is in mercy.

Nota 46. Tota warda in misericordia quia receptaverunt quendam in warda qui non fuit in franco plegio. 14th cent.: Scribatur [With a pointing hand. Cf. 524 no. 46].

113. Christine wife of William de Swath' bit Luke le Girdeler on the finger so that his whole hand and body swelled up and he died soon afterwards. Christine was arrested and imprisoned in Newgate, where she died, so nothing from her. Gilbert le Teynturer, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by William le Bokeler and William le Correour. So they are in *mercy. All the other neighbours have died, except Thomas de Norwich who comes and is not suspected, so he is quit.

114. Christine daughter of Simon de Beverley was found drowned in the Thames. No one is suspected. John le Carpenter and John Smyth, neighbours, do not come. John [le Carpenter] was attached by Robert Bret and Baldwin de Gaunt, John Smyth by Robert de St. Edmunds 'cordewaner' and William Proudman. So they are in *mercy. Later John le Smyth comes and is not suspected, so nothing from him or his pledges, [cf. 612]

115. Robert son of Nicholas de Alsithere of Cheshire and Geoffrey son of Roger de Erwell of Suffolk took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary Conehop, confessed that they had burgled a house at Camerwell and carried off all the goods found there, and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. No chattels. Because it is found in the rolls of the chamberlains and sheriffs that they assigned to Geoffrey the port of Portesmuth and to Robert the port of Dover, it is adjudged that the chamberlain and sheriffs are in mercy. (fn. 9)

Nota 47. Quod carnerarius et vicecomitibus fuerunt amerciati eo quod dederunt duobus abiurantibus regnum simul et semel diversos port us transeundi. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 47].

116. On Sunday before the Nativity of Mary [4 Sep. 1261], Richard de Borham with many other people from London went to a wrestling match (luctus) at Bermundseye outside the City and there wrestled with the men of the prior of Bermundeseye; a quarrel arose among them and Richard and his companions chased the prior's men into the priory; then came a monk called Arnulf and other monks from the priory who entered a solar above the gate and threw stones at Richard and his companions; Arnulf the monk threw a stone upon Richard and crushed him so that he quickly died. It is testified that Arnulf is still alive and living in the priory, so let him be arrested. Likewise the prior of Bermundeseye is to be distrained by all his lands. The mayor and aldermen are told to enquire about the names of those who were present at the fight and death. Afterwards Arnulf comes and, asked how he wishes to clear himself of the death, says that he is a clerk and is not bound to answer here. Thereupon Richard de Harwes, minor canon of St. Paul's London, comes and claims him as a clerk by virtue of letters of the bishop of London which he proffers testifying that the bishop entrusted to him his authority for claiming clergy; so that it may be known for what he is to be handed over, let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and aldermen; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is guilty of the death, so as such let him be handed over to the bishop. Thereupon it is testified that he had previously been arrested for the death and released on bail to William de Kent mercer, William de Laufar 'espicer', Matthew de Pontefract, Walter Tovy, Robert de Monte Pessulano, James le Peverer, Robert de St. Helens, Adam de Walsyngham, Bartholomew le Espicer, John Derkyn, Peter de Frowyk and Thomas de Wymbourn, to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. (Philippus le Tailur tunc vicecomes recepit manucapcionem.) So they are all in mercy. Because Arnulf was harboured in the priory from the time when he killed Richard until the present and the prior and convent knew it well, to judgment on the prior for the harbouring, [cf. 613, 615]

Nota 48. Quod manucaptus pro felonia sit coram justiciariis primo die. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 48].

117. [m. 6d] Emma wife of Henry le Chaloner beat and maltreated Alice wife of Richard Attelithe and struck her (dedit ei orbos ictus) (fn. 14) so that she died on the fourth day after. Emma fled to the church of Fanchirche and escaped from there, so let her be exacted and outlawed [sic] according to the custom [of the City]. Chattels *12d. for which the sheriffs are to answer. Because Emma was harboured after the deed in the ward of Nicholas de Wynton' [Langbourn ward] and the sheriffs did not attach her, to judgment on the sheriffs and the whole ward. The neighbours have died. [cf. 614]

Nota 49. De vicecomitibus et tota warda amerciata quia non attachiaverunt felonissam.14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 49].

118. Ellis the Clerk of Amias, Alexander de Kenesherte and Gilbert de Framelyngham assaulted and wounded John de Berners so that he died later the same day in the City. Ellis and the others fled and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed. No chattels. Isabel Bukerel in whose house John died was attached, but does not come and is not suspected. She was attached by William le Corner and William de Waltham. So they are in mercy, [cf. 616]

Pleas of the crown 46 Henry III [1261–2]

119. In the same year, Peter de Gysorz being chamberlain, Richard de Walebrok, for whom Thomas Bokez (fn. 17) answers, and Philip le Tayllur, who answers now, being sheriffs; Henry Peticors and Roger le Stedeman went to a house in the parish of All Hallows Colemanescherche, where lived Margery de Pyriton, Agnes de Blida, Dulcia Trye, Maud de Norfolk, Notekina Hoggenhore and Isabel la Rus, prostitutes; when they entered the house they found some foreign merchants there and, a quarrel arising between them, the merchants killed Henry and Roger and at once fled; it is not known who they were. It is found in the rolls of the chamberlain and sheriffs that the prostitutes were not attached when the inquest was held by the chamberlain and sheriffs, so *to judgment on the sheriffs. Now the prostitutes have absconded for the death and are suspected, so let them be exacted and waived according to the custom of the City. No chattels. The mayor and aldermen testify that they rented the house from Alice la Blunde, who lives in the City, so let her be arrested. All the neighbours come except Nicholas de Worcester and he is not suspected. Nicholas was attached by Godfrey de Bramleye and William Gardiner. So they are in *mercy. Afterwards Alice comes and for good or ill puts herself upon the verdict of the mayor and aldermen; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that she is not suspected, so she is quit. [cf. 617–18]

Nota 50. De vicecomitibus amerciatis quia non attachiaverunt meretrices que fuerunt presentes quando quedam felonia fuit facta. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 50].

120. Idonea sister of Richard de la Batail appealed in the husting Christopher de Milkstrete tawyer (allutarium) and his brother Clement of the death of her brother Richard. Idonea comes, but Christopher and Clement do not and are suspected of the death. Therefore Idonea is told to prosecute them in the husting until they are outlawed according to the custom of the City etc. No chattels, but they were harboured in the ward of Henry de Frowyk [Cripplegate ward] outside frankpledge, so the whole ward is in *mercy.

Nota 51. Tota warda in misericordia pro franco plegio. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 51].

121. Bartholomew Chapman was crushed by a party-wall (parete) in his own house in the parish of St. Benet. Value of the party-wall 12d. for which the sheriffs are to answer. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Henry Sutor, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Master Robert the Mason and Thomas May. So they are in *mercy.

122. John servant of Roger de Essewelle, Roger de Essewelle, Henry de Cane, Hugh and Adam, yeomen of the king's chapel, and a stranger were together in a boat on the Thames; John and the stranger, who were sitting in the stern of the boat and were drunk, fell into the water and drowned. Roger and the others at once fled. The mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not suspect them of the death, so *let them return if they wish. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Two neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit. Asked what became of the boat, they say that it was never found, so nothing for the deodand.

Nota 52. Quod attachiati eo quodpresentes [fuerunt] ubi felonia vel infortunium accident, se debent acquietare per veredictum maioris et aldermannorum.14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 52].

123. Roger de Gayste took sanctuary in the church of St. Mary Wolmarechirche, confessed that he had stolen sheep and committed other thefts and abjured the realm. No chattels nor frankpledge because he was .from Hertfordshire.

124. A woman called Edith, wanting to wash her hands in the Thames, accidentally fell into the water and was drowned. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. The neighbours have died, so nothing from them. Because the mayor and aldermen testify that Edith was drowned in the ward of Douegate, and the sheriffs and chamberlain held no inquest in the ward for the death, to judgment on them.

125. In the same year, John de Swyneford being chamberlain, for whom no one answers, and the same being sheriffs; Robert Poyntel (fn. 22) killed Ralph de Taxstede in Bradstrete. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels nor frankpledge, but he was harboured in the ward of William de Bukerel [Broad Street ward] outside frankpledge. So [the ward] is in mercy. All the neighbours have died.

126. Unknown malefactors struck and wounded William de Berkyngg in Westchep; the neighbours came out because of the noise, rescued William and took him to the house of William le Quilter where he died soon afterwards. The malefactors at once fled and it is not known who they were. James le Barber, the third neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by John de Creye and Thomas Malemeyns. So they are in *mercy. Because the sheriffs and chamberlain made no enquiry about the men who took him to William's house and did not attach William himself, to judgment on them.

127. [m. 7] Haukin le Munur, Haukin le Ganter of Lilleston, Bette Letherharde of Totenhalestrete and Henry le Forester of Lilleston encountered William de Creton at Hendon in Middlesex and there assaulted and wounded him so that he died on the third day after in the house of Agaline the Brewster in the City. They at once fled and are suspected. Because they are from Middlesex, let them be exacted and outlawed there. The sheriffs are ordered to enquire (inquiratur in comitatu Midd') (fn. 23) about their chattels and frankpledge and to answer for their amercements. All the neighbours and Agaline have died, so nothing from them.

128. Simon le Suur and Richard le Decore killed Laurence de Jakeford in the market of Westchepe. Simon was at once arrested and hanged at Newgate before Laurence de Brok; Richard has now absconded and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels but he was harboured in the ward [? of Cheap] outside frankpledge. So [the ward] is in *mercy. The four neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit.

Pleas of the crown 47 Henry III [1262–3]

129. In the same year, the same being chamberlain and Osbert de Suffolk and Robert de Monte Pesulano being sheriffs, who answer now; Alexander de Leuesham fell from a ladder in the house of Alexander le Cuver in the ward of Thomas de Pevelesdon (fn. 24) and died. Value of the ladder 4d., which are given for God. Because the men of the ward valued the deodand at three halfpennies before the chamberlain, *to judgment on the whole ward. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. All the neighbours have died.

130. A ship laden with mill-stones belonging to John Gisorz berthed at his quay; Simon Stanhard and others wanted to unload the mill-stones and they had pulled one up to the upper part of the ship when the rope by which they were pulling it broke and it fell back into the ship, crushing Simon to death forthwith. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. All the neighbours have died. Walter Coleman, who was in the ship, was attached, but does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Walter de Haliwell and John Gaugi. So they are in *mercy. Value of the mill-stone *20s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Because the men of the ward of Henry de Coventre [Vintry ward] falsely valued the deodand before the chamberlain, to judgment on them. Because they valued only the mill-stone, let there be a discussion.

131. Adam le Peuerer killed Ralph Sinod in the ward of Henry le Waleys [Cordwainer ward]. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels. He was in the mainpast of Hugh Gratefige. So he is in *mercy. All the neighbours have died. Afterwards it is testified that Maud, Ralph's widow, appealed Adam in the county (in comitatu) of the death, but she does not come now or prosecute her appeal, so let her be arrested and her pledges to prosecute are in mercy. Because the sheriffs and chamberlain do not answer for her pledges, to judgment on them.

132. In the same year, William de Purstok being chamberlain, for whom Ellis de Herteford answers, and the same being sheriffs; on Wednesday before the feast of the Nativity of St. John the Baptist [20 June 1263] Simon Godgrom went to bathe in the Thames and was accidentally drowned. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Adam Picard, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Thomas le Blater and Ralph Hayron. So they are in *mercy. Because the accident happened in the ward of Castle Baynard and the sheriffs and chamberlain held their inquest with the men of the ward of Richard de Ewelle [Farringdon ward], to judgment on them. Afterwards Adam Pycard comes and is not suspected, so nothing from him or his pledges.

133. William Greygrom and Adam de Benleyhe were quarrelling in the ward (custodia) of Walter Hervi [Cheap ward]. Robert Etc well came up to separate them and William drew his knife to strike Adam, but struck himself in the thigh, so that he bled to death. Adam comes now and the mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is not guilty of the death, so he is quit; but because he was present he is in *mercy. Because it is found in the rolls of the chamberlain and sheriffs that he was not attached when the inquest was held into the death, to judgment on the chamberlain and sheriffs. Robert Etewelle was attached for the death, but does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Henry de Sandwich and Nicholas Braunte. So they are in *mercy. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. All the neighbours have died, except Adam Mollyngg, and he is not suspected, [cf. 619]

134. Richard Valet came up to the door of a house in the ward of Philip le Tayllur [Bishopsgate ward] where lived Beatrice de Wynton', Isabel de Staunford and Margery de Karl', prostitutes; they immediately came out of the house, dragged Richard inside and took from him a buckle (firmachulum) worth 6d., whereupon Richard drew his knife and, intending to strike Beatrice with the handle, instead struck her beneath the breast with the blade, so that she died. It is found in the rolls of the chamberlain that Richard, Isabel and Margery were arrested and handed over to the sheriffs, who do not answer for them now or know what has become of them; nor do they show the chirograph by which they were handed over to the succeeding sheriffs, as is the rule (moris) according to the custom of the City. The mayor and aldermen say that the custom of the City is such that when a sheriff relinquishes his bailiwick, he has to draw up a chirograph between himself and the succeeding sheriff listing those who are imprisoned. So to judgment on the sheriffs for the *escapes. Richard, Isabel and Margery do not come and are suspected, so let Richard be exacted and outlawed, and Isabel and Margery exacted and waived. No chattels nor frankpledge. William son of Adam, John le Ber, John Skot and Roger le Tyeler, four neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. William was attached by John le Bere and Roger le Tyeler, John by William son of Adam and Richard le Cordwaner, John by Peter le Bray and Peter le Gorger, Roger by Peter le Gorger and Peter le Bray. So they are in *mercy. Because the sheriffs attached the neighbours one by the other, to judgment on them. [cf. 620]

Nota 54. De cyrographo faciendo inter vicecomites deprisonibus tempore recessus eorum de balliva sua [cf. 524 no. 54].

135. John de Grenewyz killed Simon le Poter in the house of William la Persone. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels. The mayor and aldermen say that William was an accomplice in the death, but he has now died, so nothing from him. All the neighbours have died except John le Caretter. He was attached by William de Ely and Ingebert le Avener. So they are in mercy.

136. Alexander Caby was found dead, apparently from hunger in the ward (custodia) of William de Durham [Bread Street ward]. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Geoffrey le Santur (fn. 26) and Thomas le Barber, two neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by John le Stilter and Thomas le Barbur. So they are in *mercy. Because the chamberlain does not have the names of the pledges on his roll, to judgment on him. [cf. 621]

137. Ralph de Westminster capper was killed in the ward of Anketin de Auvergne near Ludgate [Farringdon ward] by two unknown servants who came out of the house of some prostitutes. They at once fled and it is not known who they were. All the neighbours have died. Because the prostitutes had a fixed abode where they had lived for a long time and the sheriffs and chamberlain had made no enquiry into their names, they are in *mercy. Afterwards the mayor and aldermen testify that Cecily, Ralph's sister, appealed Robert the Goldsmith outside Ludgate of the death and the chamberlain does not put the fact on record. Therefore let there be a discussion.

138. [m. 7d] Geoffrey de Hattefel and several others were keeping watch in the City by night according to custom (fn. 29) when about midnight they encountered Thomas de Exeport escorting a woman; a dispute arising between them, Thomas and Geoffrey went away together quarrelling to the church of Wolmarchirche, whence came six unknown men who assaulted and wounded Geoffrey so that he died on the third day after. Thomas fled with the other malefactors, and it is not known who they were. Thomas has absconded and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels, but he had a house, year and waste worth 3 marks and a rent of assize of 4 marks; for the intervening period the house and rents amount to *91 marks for which the sheriffs are to answer. The mayor and aldermen testify that immediately after the felony had been committed Peter de Chauvent took possession of the house and rent and afterwards for the four subsequent years he sold the rent to Robert de Monte Pessulano without warrant. So the sheriff is ordered to take the said messuages and rents into the king's hand and to cause Peter to appear. Afterwards Peter comes and says that he holds the messuages and rents by the gift of King Henry and he proffers a royal charter (fn. 30) in these words (carta Petri de Chauvent): 'Henry by the grace of God; we have granted to Peter de Chauvent for his faithful service those houses with appurtenances in the parish of Holy Trinity le Petit in the City of London which belonged to our enemy Thomas de Exeport, formerly citizen of London, to have and hold in perpetuity, performing the due and accustomed service; letters patent at Westminster, 16 October 49 Henry III'. Because the charter does not mention the felony, the house with the rents is to remain in the king's hand. (Judicium).

Nota 55. De carta regis non faciente mencionem de felonia, per quod tenementum per eamdem cartam datum remansit in martus [sic] regis. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 55].

139. John Poytevin and Robert de St. Edmunds boatmen took two unknown squires aboard their ship (in navi) at Westminster and John accidentally fell into the water and was drowned. Robert absconded and is not suspected, so *let him return if he wishes, but his chattels are to be confiscated for his flight. No chattels. It is not known who the squires were. Value of the ship *3s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours have died. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

140. William Egrith appealed in the husting Robert servant of Ralph Pikeman of wounds and battery against the peace. William and Robert come and William appeals Robert that on Tuesday before Whitsun 46 Henry III [23 May 1262] Robert gave to William le Kyvere, who is now dead, a staff with which to beat and wound him and the same William broke three of his ribs and wounded him elsewhere in the body; and that he did this wickedly and feloniously. Robert comes and denies the felony and everything; he says that when William Egrith appealed Robert and William in the husting he said that Robert gave the staff to William on Monday before the Ascension 47 Henry III [7 May 1263] and now he says it was on Tuesday before Whitsun 46 Henry III [23 May 1262]; so Robert seeks judgment concerning the discrepancy and whether he is bound to answer before William is convicted of the deed. This being allowed, it is adjudged that the appeal be null and that William Egrith be committed to gaol for a false appeal. To preserve the king's peace let the truth be ascertained by jury (per patriam). Thereupon the mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that since it was adjudged that William's suit be null, no suit belongs to the king concerning the battery and trespass, unless it be in a matter touching life and limb. So Robert is quit.

Nota 56. De appello transgressionis quassato pro variacione dierum in narracione facta primo die in hustengo et postea coram justiciariis. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 nos. 56–7].

Nota 57. Et quod ad regem non pertinet aliqua secta in huiusmodi casu post appettum quassatum, nisi esset de re tangente vitam et membrum.

141. Andrew de Aldewich appealed in the husting Richard Page of the kitchen of the prior of St. Bartholomew and William le Palfrayour and Alan le Palfrayour, the prior's men, of wounding and mayhem. Andrew does not come or prosecute his appeal, so let him be arrested and his pledges to prosecute are in mercy, viz. William de Derby and Maurice de Waltham, cobblers. Richard, William and Alan do not come and were not attached. Thereupon the mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that when Andrew first appeared in the husting and appealed them, the sheriffs were ordered to attach them and they went to the priory to do this, but the prior and his men did not allow them to enter the priory to attach Richard and the others. Therefore the sheriffs are ordered to cause the prior to appear on the morrow. To preserve the king's peace let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and aldermen; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they are guilty of wounding but not of mayhem, so they are in *mercy.

Nota 58. Quod justiciarii inquisiverunt de facto licet pars appellans non fuisset prosecutus appellum suum de plagis et mahemio [cf. 524 no. 58].

142. In the same year, (fn. 35) the same being chamberlain and Gregory de Roqesle and Thomas de Lafford, who has now died, being sheriffs; Simon servant of Adam de Leden fell into a vessel (patella) full of hot water in Adam's house and was scalded to death. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Value of the vessel *14d. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Thomas le Cordewaner, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Robert Poygnant and William le Waleys. So they are in *mercy.

143. Osbert the Clerk was found dead without a wound in the ward of William Bukerel [Broad Street ward]. Michael le Oynter was attached for the death and comes. The mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not suspect him of the death because Osbert died of a fever, so he is quit. The neighbours have died, so nothing from them. (Infortunium.)

144. Richard de Stebenhuth, wanting to water a horse in the Thames, fell from the horse into the water and was drowned. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Value of the horse 10s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. The neighbours have died.

145. Maud widow of Hemming de Cestreis appealed in the husting Henry de Lewes, Henry de Mapelderfeld, Stephen de Pencestr', William de Mapelderfeld, Stacey servant of William de Say, Richard Caperoun, Gilbert de Estbus, John de Wytham and Ralph le Tayllur of the death of her husband and of robbery. She comes and withdraws from her appeal, so let her be committed to *gaol and her pledges to prosecute are in *mercy, viz. Robert Otes and Hubert de Wynton'.

146. On Friday the feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June 1263] John de Brittany, crossing the City by night, came upon the mayor and other good men of the City who were patrolling the streets to see that a good watch was being kept, and for a long time he walked along with them. At length he left them and when he reached the churchyard of St. Paul's London he encountered some unknown men who at once attacked him; Arnold the Cook came up to help him and the malefactors killed both John and Arnold and at once fled. It is not known who they were. All the neighbours have died. Because it cannot be ascertained by any inquest held by the chamberlain and sheriffs who the men were, the justices want to examine the men of the ward of Thomas de Wymborn, (fn. 38) where the incident occurred, concerning the names of those who were present at the death. Afterwards Michael Tovy (Michael Tovi) was arrested for the death and for the theft of horses belonging to the king and to John de Gray and for thefts committed in Jewry and from William le Latimer and for other thefts and trespasses committed in time of peace; Michael comes and for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of the mayor and citizens; they say on the oath they made to the king and in the faith in which they are bound that he is guilty of all the robberies and the death, except the robbery in Jewry, so [let him be hanged]. (Suspensus.) No chattels in the City but he has chattels and tenements in Kent. Therefore the sheriff of Kent is ordered to cause twelve [men] of the neighbourhood where Michael's lands, tenements and chattels were to appear before Roger de Seyton or John de Cobham when they visit these parts, to certify them of his lands, tenements and chattels and their value; in the meantime they are to be taken into the king's hand. Afterwards John de Cobbeham holds the enquiry and it is found that Michael had chattels worth £27 10s. 9d., for which the sheriff of Kent is to answer, [cf. 278, 287–8]

Nota 59. De quodam magno interpositore Civitatis suspenso [cf. 524 no. 59].At foot of membrane: Placita corone anno Edwardi primi.

147. [m. 8] Thomas Viel (fn. 41) appeals Robert de Esture that when he was in the (? ward) (via) of Westchepe in Soperlane on the feast of SS. Simon and Jude 47 Henry III [28 Oct. 1263] Robert came up about the hour of curfew and wounded him in the left hand with a sword of Coloyne, so that he was maimed; that Robert did this wickedly and feloniously and with premeditation he offers to prove against him. Robert comes and denies the felony and mayhem and everything; he says he is not bound to answer to the appeal because it makes no mention of raising the hue and cry or of the hour of day, but of the hour of curfew, which is an hour of night; so he seeks judgment concerning the appeal and the matters above being allowed, for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of the mayor and aldermen; it is adjudged that Thomas be committed to *gaol for a false appeal. The mayor and aldermen put on record that Robert can not put himself upon their verdict for mayhem because he is not of the liberty of the City, but should put himself upon the verdict of twelve men of the ward where the incident occurred. The twelve [men] of the ward say on their oath that Robert did wound and maim Thomas, but that he did it in self-defence, because he could not otherwise escape. Therefore it is adjudged that he be committed to *gaol and make satisfaction for the injury. It is testified that Robert was arrested previously (fn. 42) in the time of Osbert de Suffolk and Robert de Monte Pessulano sheriffs and they released him publicly to have here on the first day and did not do so. Because the same sheriffs do not answer for him now, to judgment on them. [cf. 622]

Nota 60. De appello quassato per varias proposiciones contra appellum de mahemio et de veritate inquisita per xii homines de warda et non per maiorem et aldermannos quia appellatus fuit extraneus. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 no. 60].

Footnotes

2 Recte Bertram de la De.
9 Despite Nota 47, the reason for this amercement is unclear. The assignment of different ports to felons who abjured from one church on the same day appears to have been usual (Cal. Coroners' Rolls, ed. R. R. Sharpe (1913), 124, 131; R. F. Hunnisett, Medieval Coroner (Cambridge, 1961), 47).
14 With blows which caused neither swelling nor bleeding.
17 Not mentioned in 4.
22 Cf. 290.
23 Possibly intended as Nota 53 (cf. 524 no. 53).
24 Unidentified, cf. 293. Not in Beaven.
26 le Saltere in 621.
29 See Lib. Ant. Leg., 55. Again referred to in 159 and presupposed in 146.
30 Cf. C.P.R. 1258–66, 624, 6 Aug. 1265.
35 Viz. 48 Henry III (cf. 148).
38 Thomas de Wymborn was associated with Portsoken (Beaven, i, 365n) but presumably the ward of Castle Baynard or Farringdon was here in question.
41 For Thomas Viel's pledge see 622.
42 Cf. ?487.