Crown Pleas
54 Henry III - 57 Henry III (nos 207-237)

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London Record Society

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Martin Weinbaum (editor)

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1976

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55-66

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'Crown Pleas: 54 Henry III - 57 Henry III (nos 207-237)', The London eyre of 1276 (1976), pp. 55-66. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=35998 Date accessed: 22 November 2014.


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54 Henry III - 57 Henry III (nos 207–237)

Pleas of the crown 54 Henry III [1269–70]

207. In the same year, Hugh son of Otto being chamberlain and the same being sheriffs; Laurence son of Humphrey Duket killed Master William le Fremund in the ward of John Adrian [? Walbrook ward]. (fn. 2) He comes and proffers a charter of King Henry in these words: 'Henry by the grace of God; at the instance of John de Valence, our grandson, we have pardoned Laurence Duket of London his suit for breach of the peace arising from the death of Master William le Fremund, of which he is accused, and we grant him firm peace on condition that he stand to right in our court if anyone wishes to implead him; letters patent at Westminster, 4 June 56 Henry III [1272]'. And there is no one who wishes to prosecute him, so he is granted firm peace. All the neighbours have died.

Nota 71. Pax per cartam regis [cf. 524 no. 71].

208. Alan le Somoter, John and Robert, men of Giles de Arraz, with others of his household came out of Giles' house and waylaid William de Edelmeton in the parish of [St.] Mildred assaulting and wounding him so that he died forthwith. (fn. 3) Alan and the others at once returned to Giles' house and stayed there until they and about seven other members of the household were [arrested] for the death and taken to Newgate. It is not known how they escaped from prison, so to judgment on [the sheriffs] for the escape. Alan, John and Robert do not come and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. No chattels nor frankpledge, but they were in the mainpast of Giles. So he is in *mercy. The mayor and aldermen are told to enquire the names of the others who were arrested. All the neighbours come and are not suspected. Afterwards the king notified the justices by writ that King Henry at the instance of his son Edmund pardoned Alan, John and Robert their suit for breach of the peace arising from this death; he understands by inspection of the rolls of chancery that Alan, John and Robert were delivered from Neugate prison where they were detained on account of this death; consequently the sheriffs are not to be prosecuted for the delivery. Therefore nothing for the escape of Alan, John and Robert. Afterwards on Monday on the quindene of Trinity [8 June 1276] the king ordered the justices by writ, as appears among the 'brevia de precepto' of this eyre, to hold an enquiry by good and lawful men of the City by whom the truth may better be known and who are in no way suspected by the sheriffs and aldermen of the City; according to their findings they are to proceed further in this matter as by law and by the custom of the City they see should be done. The mayor and aldermen and the good men of the City say [blank]. (fn. 4)

209. Bartholomew de Durham, nephew of Jollan de Durham, appealed Cecily, widow of Jollan, that in 48 Henry III [1263–4] she gave a poisoned drink to her husband so that he died. Because he does not come or prosecute his appeal let him be arrested and his pledges to prosecute are in mercy, viz. John Duraunt; the other pledge has died. Cecily comes and, asked how she wishes to clear herself of the death, freely says that she denies the death and everything and puts herself upon the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood that she is not guilty thereof. The mayor and citizens are asked whether the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood is sufficient for her release or condemnation and say it is not because she is of the liberty of the City and that she must purge herself by the great law according to the custom of the City. Therefore it is adjudged that she should wage law in the hand of the justices and purge herself thirty-six-handed, with eighteen men from one side of the Walebrok and eighteen from the other; they are to be chosen before the mayor and aldermen, the chamberlain and sheriffs being absent, in the folkmoot in the churchyard of St. Paul's London with the parties present; the election is to be on the first Sunday in Lent [22 Feb. 1276] and she is to come with her law on the following Wednesday. Because she did not find pledges of law she is to be committed to the sheriffs. Afterwards on the appointed day the thirty-six men were elected at the folkmoot in the prescribed form; on the east of the Walebrok, viz. Peter de Micheam, William de Keleweden, Henry de. . ., Maurice de Waltham, John le Fethermonger, Hugh le Wolf, Peter le Hoder, Henry le Buriler, John Wy . . ., Osbert le Puleter, Roger le Braeler, John le Batour, John Skip, Ralph le Cotiler, Henry de Faversham, Thomas de Capeneshors, Thomas de Suffolk 'peleter'; (fn. 7) on the west, viz. Godfrey le Coffrer, Henry le Coffrer, Roger de Euere, Richard le Poter, Roger le Lorimer, Geoffrey Monquey, John Wake, Robert Ha . . ., Ellis of Honilane, Thomas Heyron, Roger de Cleve, Robert Curteys, Roger Fucedame, Nicholas [? Le . . . ], Faukes le Taverner, Hugh de Wyndesoures, Alan le Huyrer, Thomas de Hereford. Afterwards on the appointed day Cecily comes with her law and wages it before the justices swearing in these words: viz. that she never gave any poisonous drink to her husband Alan (fn. 8) or did anything by which he was nearer to death and further from life, so help her God and these holy things (hec sauncta); afterwards six men swore that according to their conscience her oath was a true one; after the six had sworn, Cecily repeated her former oath and after her another six swore and thus Cecily swore six times and waged her law. Therefore it is adjudged that Cecily be quit of the death in perpetuity. The mayor and aldermen testify that Cecily was previously arrested at the suit of Bartholomew and that because she was of the liberty of the City she was handed over to twelve pledges according to the custom of the City, viz. Roger Norman 'orlatour', (fn. 9) Geoffrey de Rothyng, Henry le Burger, William Wynterington tailor, Peter de Micheham 'peterer', Robert de Essex 'borleor', Adam de Eye dyer, Mahekin de Folesham 'pessoner', Auncelin le Tronur, Robert de Lynton, Philip Frowyk, Fulk de St. Edmunds 'burler', who mainperned to have her here on the first day [and did not] have her. So they are all in *mercy. [cf. 657]

Nota 72. Quod manucapti pro morte hominis usque ad iter justiciariorum non possunt se acquietare per veredictum maioris et aldermannorum et visneti, sed per magnam legem. Et quia non invenit plegios, ideo amerciatur vicecomes. Qualiter magna lex debet fieri. Quod omnes manucapti usque ad iter justiciariorum veniant primo die. [cf. 524 no. 72]. 14th cent, at foot of membrane: Die Jovis apud Turrim.

210. [m. 11] Michael son of Warin was scalded to death in a brass pot in the house of William le Chaloner. Value of the pot 20d. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours have died. William le Chaloner was attached for the death, but does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Ranulf le Chaloner and Gilbert le Chaloner. So they are in mercy. Because it is testified that there were others in the house when the accident happened and the sheriffs did not attach them, to judgment on them. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 658]

211. An unknown man was found drowned in the ward of Henry de Frowyk [Cripplegate ward]. Thereupon the mayor and aldermen testify that he lay for about five weeks before he was seen by the chamberlain and sheriffs, so to judgment on the alderman and his ward. All the neighbours have died. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

212. Isabel daughter of Richard la [sic] Paternostrer was scalded to death in a leaden vessel full of hot water in her father's house. Value of the vessel 2s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Edmund the Goldsmith and John le Heyward, neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Edmund was attached by Richard Pecche and Hugh le Plumer, John by Richard le Paternostrer and Robert Stroby. So they are in *mercy. Emma de Len was attached for the death because she was in the house, but she does not come. She was attached by Alan Godard and Hugh de Rokyngham. So they are in *mercy. Because the wards of Anketin le Mercer, William de Durham and Bartholomew de Castello [Farringdon, Bread Street and ? Cripplegate wards] falsely valued the deodand before the chamberlain and sheriffs, *to judgment on them. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 656, 660]

213. Alexander Esprigonel hanged himself in the house of Katherine de Westminster. Chattels *17s. 4d. for which the sheriffs are to answer. Katherine was attached for the death, comes and is not suspected, so she is quit. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, except Gilbert de Northbrok. He was attached by Richard de Northbrok and Laurence le Mercer. So they are in *mercy. No one else is suspected. Judgment: suicide. [cf. 661]

214. Thomas servant of Master Geoffrey, cook of sir Robert Walrant, with others from Robert's household went to Queenhithe (Ripam Regine) and there encountered Robert son of Hamo de Pystewell; urged on by Henry le Petit and his wife Margery they at once attacked and wounded Robert and Thomas struck him to the heart with a sword so that he died forthwith. Thomas immediately fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Nothing is known of chattels or frankpledge because he was not of the household of Robert Walrant, who has died. Henry fled at the time and has now returned to the City and been arrested and imprisoned at Neugate. Because Margery is still living in the City, the sheriffs are ordered to arrest her. Richard le Armurer and Peter le Furbur, two neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Richard was attached by John May and Solomon le Cotiler, Peter by Thomas Payn cobbler and John de Borham 'correur'. So they are all in *mercy. Afterwards Henry and Margery come and deny the death and everything and put themselves upon the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood that they are not guilty thereof. The mayor and citizens are asked whether the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood is sufficient, and they say it is not, but as they are strangers the verdict of forty-two men from the three aldermanries nearest to the place where the incident occurred will suffice; so that from each ward fourteen men are to be chosen on whose oath the truth is to be ascertained; and upon their verdict they freely put themselves for good or ill. They are to be elected immediately and swear before the justices to tell the truth; they say on their oath that they are not guilty of the death, so they are quit. Because it is testified that Henry previously absconded for the death, his chattels are to be confiscated for the flight. Chattels *4s. for which the sheriffs are to answer, [cf. 541, 655, 662]

Nota 73. Quod non oportet quod extraneus sit in franco plegio. Nichil de catallis pro fuga.

Nota 74. Qualiter extraneus se debet purgare per sacramentum xlii hominum de tribus wardis. 14th cent.: Scribatur [cf. 524 nos. 73–4].

215. Guillot le Paternoster and his wife Lucy quarrelled with Robert le Heaumer in the house of Simon le Heaumer and Guillot struck Robert with a staff so that he died on the third day after. Guillot and Lucy at once fled and are suspected, so let Guillot be exacted and outlawed and Lucy be exacted and waived according to the custom of the City. Chattels *2s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. Because the sheriffs and chamberlain held no enquiry concerning chattels, *to judgment on them. Guillot and Lucy were harboured in the ward of Anketin le Mercer [Farringdon ward] outside frankpledge, so the ward is in mercy (pro franco plegio). It is testified in the rolls of the chamberlain and sheriffs that Thomas de Caxton was present at the fight, but he does not come and is not suspected; the sheriffs did not attach him, so to judgment on them. All the neighbours come and are not suspected. Afterwards the sheriffs testify that Thomas le Peleter was attached for the death and he comes and is not suspected, so he is quit [cf. 542]

216. Robert le Waleys, who had the falling sickness, fell upon a chair and died. Value of the chair 3d. which are given for God. Stephen le Salter and Geoffrey le Salter, two neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Stephen was attached by Walter de Gloucestre tawyer and Lovekin the Cook, Geoffrey by Reginald de Fridaistrete and John de Boketon. So they are in mercy. William le Waleys, in whose house the accident occurred, was attached for the death; he comes and is not suspected, so he is quit. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Afterwards Stephen le Salter comes, so nothing from him or his pledges.

217. Isabel daughter of William Scrul, wanting to draw water from the Thames, fell into the water and was drowned. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Roger de Chesewyke and Adam le Botare, two neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Roger was attached by William le Plastrer and Simon le Plastrer, Adam by William de Wautham and John le Deveneys, so they are in mercy. [cf. 543]

218. John Russel killed Lucy widow of Adam the Woodmonger (de Wysdarii) in Estchepe. John comes and proffers a royal charter (fn. 13) testifying that King Henry pardoned him his suit for breach of the peace arising from this death of which he is accused and also outlawry, if it should have been promulgated against him for this death, and granted him firm peace; on condition that he stand to right in the king's court if anyone wishes to implead him. Publicly and solemnly it is proclaimed. And there is no one, so he is granted firm peace, but because he previously absconded for the death for about a year, his chattels are to be confiscated. Chattels *20s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours come [except] Robert de Lavenham and he is not suspected. He was attached by Matthew le Chaundeler and John le Barbour. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 544]

219. [m. 11d] Symonet Spinelli, Agnes his mistress (amica ipsius) and Geoffrey Bereman were together in Geoffrey's house when a quarrel broke out among them; Symonet left the house and returned later the same day with Richard Russel his servant to the house of Godfrey le Gorger, where he found Geoffrey; a quarrel arose and Richard and Symonet killed Geoffrey. They immediately went to the house near Grescherche where they lived with Hugh Mace and Reyner Durant and then Richard at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels, but he was harboured in the ward of John de Norhampton [Aldgate ward] outside frankpledge, so the ward is in *mercy. Symonet, Hugh Mace and Reyner Durant were arrested and taken to Newgate, where they were imprisoned. Afterwards Hugh and Reyner on the order of the king were released publicly to Reyner Albertis merchant of Florence and James Anguillaunt of Pistoia, who do not answer for them now. So they are in *mercy. Symonet was delivered to Hugh son of Otto then constable of the Tower of London by royal writ addressed to the keeper of Neugate gaol; Hugh does not answer for him now, so to judgment on him (evasio). Symonet does not come and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according, to the custom of the City. After outlawry has been promulgated against Richard, let proceedings be taken for the outlawry of Simon [sic], because it is testified that he is not guilty except of incitement and the king has lately ordained that no one accused of incitement (fn. 15) should answer or incur any penalty before the principal has been convicted. (*Inquiratur.) Afterwards the king reported by writ that his father had pardoned Hugh Mace. (fn. 16) [cf. 545]

Nota 75. Quod utlagaria primo promulgetur super indictatum de facto et postea super ipsum qui indictatur de auxilio. Et quod rettatus deprecepto non portabit penam antequam principalis actor sit convictus [cf. 524 no. 75].

220. In the same year, Walter Hervy being chamberlain and Philip le Tayllur and Walter le Poter being sheriffs; Walter son of Gerard le Estrays, William le Batiler of Grenewiz, Maud le Estreys, Herman le Estrays and Alice de Grenewich were on the Thames in a boat overloaded with faggots. The boat sank because of the excessive weight of the faggots and Walter, Maud and William were drowned, but the others escaped alive. Value of the boat and faggots *6s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. The two neighbours have died. The chamberlain and sheriffs did nothing concerning Herman and Alice at the inquest, so *to judgment on them. The wards of Arnald Tedmar and William de Hadstok [Billingsgate and Tower wards] falsely valued the deodand before the chamberlain, so they are in *mercy. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. [cf. 546]

Pleas of the crown 55 Henry III [1270–1]

221. In the same year, Walter Hervy being chamberlain and Gregory de Roquesle and Henry le Galeys being sheriffs; on Wednesday before the feast of the Purification [28 Jan. 1271] John de Gynges, Alexander de Asshewell and Maud de Haliwell, Maud their niece, Margery de Haverhulle, Philip Tilly, William de Harwes, Clemence widow of Robert de Penkerk, Agnes de Huntyngfeud, John le Poleter, Alice de Bynere, Andrew de Suthwerk, Andrea widow of John de Alorinton were crushed by the belltower of the church of St. Mary le Bow (de Arcubus), London, (fn. 18) which fell upon them. Value of the bell-tower 20 marks for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours come except Stephen de Cornhill. He was attached by Anketin de Bentull and Robert de Camaile. So they are in mercy, and he is not suspected. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure. Thereupon the sheriffs come and proffer a royal writ (fn. 19) in these words: 'Henry [III] to the sheriffs of London; because of the unfortunate accident in which men and women were crushed to death in Westchepe by the ruin of the bell-tower of the church of St. Mary le Bow and of a house belonging to the prior and convent of Christchurch Canterbury, the stone, timber, lead and everything else pertaining to the house were taken into our hand as deodand; wishing to give thanks to the prior and convent, we have granted them the stone, timber, lead etc. taken into our hand on that occasion; we order you to restore to the prior and convent, as our gift, the stone, timber and lead etc.; at Westminster, 12 March 55 Henry III [1271]'. [cf. 547]

Nota 76. De oppressione virorum et mulierum per casum campanarii ecclesie de Arcubus. [With a sketch of the bell-tower. Cf. 524 no. 76].

222. William Sorel appealed in the husting Robert de Hakeney that he beat his wife Alice so that she gave birth to a still-born boy. He does not come or prosecute his appeal, so let him be arrested and his pledges to prosecute are in *mercy, viz. John Hog and Thomas the Carpenter. Thereupon it is found in the rolls of the coroner that William did proceed against him and he was attached by Ralph le Paumer, Solomon le Cotiler, John de Mimmis, John le Marbrer, Nicholas May 'coreyer', Adam le Chaundeler, Stephen le Ferun, Guillot le Rous 'cordewaner', William Bonefaunt 'seler', John May 'poter', Gladwin le Forbour and Edward the Mercer (Mercenarium) to have him here on the first day of the eyre and they did not have him. So they are in *mercy. Robert comes and, asked how he wishes to clear himself of the death, says that for good or ill he puts himself upon the verdict of the mayor and citizens. Because the suspicion is slight, although he is of the liberty of the City, it is allowed by grace of the justices. The jury say on their oath that he is not guilty of the death and the parties have not agreed, so he is quit. [cf. 548]

[Nota unnumbered. 14th cent.]. Appellatur in hustengo.

223. Peter de la Mote and Dunnyng Petrus were fighting together in the ward of William de Durham [Bread Street ward] and Peter killed Dunnyng and at once fled and took sanctuary in the church of St. Paul's London; afterwards he escaped from the church and has now absconded and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according, to the custom of the City. Chattels 2s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. The wards of William de Durham, Henry le Waleys and Simon de Hadstok [Bread Street, Cordwainer and Queenhithe wards] falsely valued the chattels before the chamberlain and sheriffs, so they are in *mercy, Hugh de Fridaystrete and Henry de Suffolk, two neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Hugh was attached by John le Paumer and Richard le Chaundeler, Henry by Gregory le Pruter and Robert de Prato. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 549]

224. Richard de Taddesworthe and Beatrice maid-servant of Roger de Merton were carrying between them a tub full of water when the tub fell upon Richard and killed him. Value of the tub *6d. (deodondum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours have died, and so has Beatrice, so nothing from them. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

225. Walter le Ferur, a man of the Earl Warenne with twelve other men from the earl's household went to the house of the abbot of Walden to claim hospitality (ad capiendum hospicium); there he found Henry de Rothyng within the gate of the house and he would not allow Walter to enter, so Walter and the others assaulted Henry and Walter killed him with a sword. Walter at once returned to the earl's house. He has now absconded and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Nothing is known of chattels because the chamberlain and sheriffs held no enquiry concerning them or who the men were who went with Walter or what has become of them, so *to judgment on the chamberlain and sheriffs. Walter was in the mainpast of the earl. So he is in mercy.

226. [m. 12] William, servant of Master Bonett, (fn. 21) king's clerk, killed John de Nastok in the ward of John Horn [Bridge ward]. He at once fled to Bonett's house in the City who on the following day sent him overseas. He does not come and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. No chattels, but he was in the mainpast of Bonett. So he is in *mercy. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, [cf. 550]

227. John de Wastmel of Lambourn was riding an unbroken (indomitum) horse to water when he met Robert son of Peter de Stebenhuthe driving a horse and cart. John's horse jumped upon the cart and crushed him to death. Value of the horses and cart *14s. 8d. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Robert comes and is [not] suspected, so he is quit; he was released publicly by William Godewyn carter to his brother William Speleman, John Spendellum, (fn. 22) Reginald Edwyne, Ralph Swetyng, John Strip, John Wytstone, William Bagel, Hugh le Poel and John de Hede, Walter de Clive, Hugh de Cruce and Henry de Fige to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. So they are all in *mercy. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 552]

Pleas of the crown 56 Henry III [1271–2]

228. In the same year, the same being chamberlain and John de Buddle and Richard de Paris, who answers now for himself and John, being sheriffs; Adam de Ware killed Reginald Tropinel tailor. He was at once arrested and taken to Neugate and afterwards by the liberty of the City he was released on bail (traditus fuit in ballium) to Gilbert Cusyn 'taverner', Thomas le Mareschal 'taveraer', William de Mannahole, Robert le Escot 'taveraer', Roger le Rous 'braeler', John le Lung 'pessoner', Richard de Ware 'macegref', John de Salle 'mercer', Robert de Hakeneye 'cuteler', Roger de Stoppes, Roger le Mareschal 'vineter' of the Conduit (fn. 24) to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. So they are all in *mercy. Afterwards because it is testified that Adam has died, nothing for the mainprise or outlawry; but because he absconded and is suspected, let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Chattels ½ mark for which the sheriffs are to answer. The chamberlain and sheriffs made no enquiry concerning the chattels, so they are in mercy. Richard Pel, Philip de Grascherche, John Hatche and Adam de Gandos were attached for the death because they were present and come; the mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they are not guilty of the death, so they are quit. Richard de Walden, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Richard le Cuper and Geoffrey le Furbur. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 553]

Nota 77. De quodam tradito in ballium per libertatem Civitatis [cf. 524 no. 77].

229. Hervey de Scardesborgh fell from a boat at Byllinggate into the Thames and was drowned. Value of the boat *6s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours come except William le Wyte and he is not suspected. He was attached by John the Clerk and Roger le Marischall. So they are in *mercy. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

230. Hugh cook of sir Thomas de Clare, John de Montfort and Richard Brid went to the house of a certain Richolda in Bredstrete, where they found a number of women with whom they amused themselves. Philip le Orbatour, Robert de Hadstok clerk, John Porteioye and Osbert de Kent arrived and, a quarrel arising among them, they left the house arguing. Philip seized a knife from Richard Brid and struck Hugh the Cook in the stomach so that he died. Philip at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. No chattels nor frankpledge, but he was harboured in the ward of William de Durham [Bread Street ward] outside frankpledge, so the ward is in *mercy (pro franco plegio). Robert and John Porteioye, Osbert, Richolda and also Maud la Wyte, Juliana de Wynton' and Alice Blereheye, who were with Richolda in the house, were arrested for the death and taken to Neugate. It is not known how they were delivered from prison, so let there be a discussion. John de Montefort and Richard Brid were not found at the time. It is testified that they afterwards returned to the City with Thomas de Clare and the sheriffs did not attach them, so to judgment on the sheriffs. The mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not suspect John and Richard of the death, so nothing from them. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit. Afterwards Osbert de Kent, Richolda and Alice Blereheye, who were arrested for the death, come and, asked how they wish to clear themselves, say that they were previously delivered as quit thereof before Laurence de Brok, justice of gaol delivery at Neugate; this is confirmed by the neighbourhood, so they are quit. Nothing for their escape, [cf. 555]

231. Geoffrey le Mareschal and his servant Bernard Angolam, Giles Chasteloyne clerk of Lorianico, William le Messager, Gilbert de Hokyng, Philip de Hokyng, Theobald and Nicholas, Giles' packmen (sometarii), were lodging in the house of Christine widow of Robert the Cook of Flete. One night Geoffrey le Mareschall and Giles went to the stable in the courtyard, where Geoffrey's servant Bernard Angulame was, and, during a quarrel, Geoffrey strangled Bernard in Giles' presence. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. Chattels 20s. (deodandum [sic]) for which the sheriffs are to answer. He was not in frankpledge because he was a stranger. All the others, together with Christine's servant Robert and her maid-servant Estrilda, were arrested and imprisoned at Newgate. Afterwards Giles was delivered with his chattels on the king's command by a royal writ of pardon which the sheriffs now proffer testifying to this. It is not known how the others were delivered, so to judgment on the sheriffs. Christine who was attached for the death, comes and is not suspected, so she is quit. [cf. 554]

Nota [unnumbered]. Perdonacio secte regis.

232. In the same year, the same being chamberlain and John Horn and Walter le Poter being sheriffs; Eustace de Laufare fell from a pear tree in the garden of Jollan de Durham and died. Value of the pear tree *18d. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Lambert le Flemyng, Good Neighbour Romayn, two neighbours, come and are not suspected. Lambert was attached by William de Enefeld and Thomas son of Jordan, Good Neighbour by Richard le Carpentare and Austin de Graschirch. So they are all in mercy. James Bonacurs and Rembertinus [son] of James were attached for the death, but do not come and are not suspected. James was attached by Thomas le Pourte and Nicholas le Taverner, Rembertus [sic] by Adam de Giseburn and Richard le Paumer 'le fevere'. So they are in * mercy. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 556]

Nota 78. Defugientibus attachiandis cum proximo venerint ad Civitatem [cf. 524 no. 78],

233. Margery la Huppehaldestere was found killed outside Alegate and Nicholas son of Ralph Attediche was accused of the death and comes now. He denies the death and everything, and for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of forty-two men from the three aldermanries nearest to the place where the incident occurred. Because he is not of the liberty of the City, this is granted to him. Afterwards the forty-two men, sworn before the justices to tell the truth, say on their oath that he is not guilty of the death, so he is quit. It is testified that Walter le Brewer absconded for the death and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels nor frankpledge because he was a stranger.

Nota 79. Acquietacio per xlii homines [cf. 524 no. 79].

234. 1 Edward I [1272–3]. (fn. 28) Hugh Caldelwell took sanctuary in the church of St. Giles without Crepelgate in the ward of Henry de Frowyk [Cripplegate ward] and afterwards escaped from the church. Chattels *28s. (deodandum [sic]) for which John Horn and Walter le Poter sheriffs are to answer. Hugh has now been arrested and is in prison at Newgate. Afterwards it is testified that Hugh was previously sought in the City in the shrievalty of Nicholas de Wynton' and escaped. Goods to the value of 76s. were found in the house of Denise de Lovecotes and were handed over to the king's exchequer in full by John de Cobham justice of Neugate who is present and testifies to this. Therefore nothing from the chattels. Afterwards it is testified that he had other goods or armour to the value of ½ mark for which John Horn is to answer, [cf. 557.]

Pleas of the crown 57 Henry III [1272]

235. [m. 12d] Roger servant of Ranulf de Waltham killed Reginald de Waltham in the house of William le Tuk. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels and he was not in frankpledge because he belonged to the household of Alan la Zuche, who has died. William Tuk was arrested for the death and delivered before Laurence de Brok at Neugate. Constance, William's wife, was attached for the death, but does not come and is not suspected. She was attached by William Foucher and Maurice de Sandwys. So they are all in *mercy. All the neighbours come except John Bolace and he is not suspected. He was attached by Roger de Keylaston and John Snod. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 558]

236. William le Wyte, John servant of John de Depe, and Ralph le Taverner were drinking together with others in a tavern when a quarrel arose among them and William and John killed Ralph. John at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. No chattels nor frankpledge because he was a stranger. William was immediately arrested and taken to Newgate, but afterwards he was delivered to Walter de Merton chancellor with orders to produce him at the king's command. William still remains with Walter, so the sheriffis ordered to arrest him. Robert Torp, Thomas de Combe, John de Depe and Henry Spirhard were attached for the death because they were present in the tavern and they come now. The mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not suspect them, so they are quit. Geoffrey Dyting was attached for the death, but does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Roger Shaylard, Walter Shank, John Lock, Ralph de Berkhamstede, John de Malmesbur', Simon de Donyngham, Geoffrey de Retherhete, John le Paumer, Henry le Fevere, Simon le Clerk, William de Canwode, Richard Daniel, Geoffrey de St. Salvator, William Wasem, Adam Spedel and Roger de Bedford. So they are all in mercy. Afterwards it is testified that all the pledges have died, so nothing from them.

237. William le Meystre killed John de Cranlegh in the ward of Henry de Coventre [Vintry ward]. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. No chattels, but he was harboured in the ward outside frankpledge, so the alderman and the whole ward are in mercy. All the neighbours come except William le Tele and he is not suspected. He was attached by Robert de Mallyng 'barber' and Thomas le Barber in Vintry. So they are in *mercy. Gilbert de Dynton, Andrew de Pauely, Alan de Dunton and Edmund le Taverner were attached for the death because they were present when the incident occurred and they are not suspected, so they are quit. Likewise Ellis de Rotheley and Thomas Baron, in whose house John was found dead, were attached, but they do not come and are not suspected. Ellis was attached by Robert le Escot and Matthew le Karon, Thomas by Richard le Skinnere and Adam de Basyng. So they are all in *mercy. [cf. 559]

Footnotes

2 Cf. 92n.
3 Cf. Rotuli Hundredorum, i, 407.
4 Cf. C.F.R 1272–1307, 139, 2 Dec. 1280 Giles de Argenteyn. Not in the estreat.
7 i.e. only 17 names.
8 Recte Jollan.
9 Recte orbatour.
13 C.P.R. 1266–72, 454,15 Aug. 1270, Lucy la Queyfer.
15 Cf. 39,70.
16 Cf. C.P.R. 1266–72, 401, 6 Jan. 1270, pardon of Symonet at the instance of Hugh Mace.
18 Noted in Lib. Ant. Leg., 130.
19 C.P.R. 1266–72, 523, 16 Mar. 1271.
21 Alias Bonacius Lombardus (Tout, Chapters, i, 273–4).
22 ?Recte Spendelove (cf. 552).
24 Only 11 sureties named.
28 See below, 238.