Crown Pleas
1 Edward I - 4 Edward I (nos 238-294)

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London Record Society

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Author

Martin Weinbaum (editor)

Year published

1976

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Pages

66-83

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'Crown Pleas: 1 Edward I - 4 Edward I (nos 238-294)', The London eyre of 1276 (1976), pp. 66-83. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=35999 Date accessed: 25 July 2014.


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1 Edward I - 4 edward I (nos 238–294)

Please of the crown 1 edward I [1272–3] (fn. 1)

238. Adam de Durham encountered Richard de Castle Baynard and Richard de Pek of Norfolk, servants of Robert de Teyford, in the ward of Henry le Waleys [Cordwainer ward]. A quarrel broke out among them and Richard and Richard killed Adam. They at once fled and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 2) No chattels, but they were harboured in the ward outside frankpledge, so the alderman and the whole ward are in mercy. Robert de Teyford who was attached for the death, comes and is not suspected, so he is quit. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit.

239. John de Shordiche killed Peter son of John de Stonhall in the ward of Anketin de Auverne [Farringdon ward]. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 3) No chattels nor frankpledge because he was a stranger. John, Peter's brother, was attached for the death because he was present, but he does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Joce the king's purveyor (emptorem) (fn. 4) and William de Enefeld. So they are all in *mercy. Hugh le Chapeyler, Peter de Durham and William the Cook, three neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Hugh was attached by Alexander Russel and Stephen Brian, Peter by Richard le Couriur and Nicholas the Cook, William by William de Ware cobbler (sutorem) and Nicholas de Wenham. So they are all in *mercy. Afterwards Peter de Durham comes and is not suspected, so he is quit; nothing from him or his pledges, [cf. 560]

240. [m. 13] Roger de Chevendre of Sheperton was sailing in a ship which belonged to Robert Burnell when he fell from the ship and was drowned. Value of the ship *2 marks (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Hubert the Tailor, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Stephen de Suffolk baker and Richard le Fevere. So they are in mercy. Afterwards the mayor and aldermen testify that Master Geoffrey de Shankerton clerk of Robert de Burnell took the ship for the use of his master, so *to judgment on him. Because the chamberlain made no enquiry concerning the ship, to judgment on him. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 562]

241. Adam son of Robert Monsorel killed Richard de Wycombe in a seld in the parish of St. Mary le Bow. He at once fled to the church, confessed the deed and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. No chattels, but he was harboured in the ward of Cheap outside frankpledge, so the alderman and the whole ward are in * mercy (pro franco plegio). All the neighbours come except Richard de St. Botolph and he is not suspected. He was attached by Henry le Wympler and Robert Grapefig. So they are in *mercy. Because the chamberlain made no enquiry concerning those who were present in the seld and did not order them to be attached, to judgment on him. [cf. 561, 721]

242. John de Tuffel took sanctuary in the church of St. Peter Wodestrete, confessed that he had committed several thefts and abjured the realm. No chattels nor frankpledge because he was a stranger.

243. In the same year, the same being chamberlain and Peter Cusin and Robert de Meldeburne, who answer now, being sheriffs; on Thursday before the feast of St. Edmund the king [17 Nov. 1272] William Blauet encountered Robert son of Oskin and Walter de Wodeham in the ward of Peter de Aunger [Broad Street ward], and they immediately attacked and killed him. They at once fled and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 5) No chattels, but they were harboured in the ward outside frankpledge, so the alderman and the whole ward are in *mercy. Thereupon it is testified that John de Wodeforde, Adam de Wynton', Richard de Wautham, Robert de Tame, Robert de Beri, William de Tykenham, Richard de Rothing, Thomas Frere and William Cok' were arrested on suspicion of the death, but delivered by jury before John de Cobeham justice [of gaol delivery] at Neuwegate. John is present and proffers his rolls which testify to this. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit.

244. Simon le Waleys servant of Master Reymund de Nogeriis (fn. 6) killed Laurence le Barbur near the New Temple. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed (fn. 7) No chattels nor frankpledge, but he was in the mainpast of Reymund. So he is in *mercy. All the neighbours come except Hubert the Tailor, Ellis Picard and John le Vinere and they are not suspected. Hubert was attached by Hugh le Broier and John le Taillur, John by Richard Sotewy and Nicholas de Oxford, Ellis by William le Brewere and William de Suffolk. So they are all in *mercy. [cf. 563]

245. Alice widow of Michael le Mareschal appealed in the husting William le Noreis, Robert Randolf, Ralph the Priest (Sacerdotem) of Hakeneye, William son of Ralph le Lung clerk, William Turgis, Richard de Hoke, Robert de Hull, Robert Swain, William Tuler and Robert Prituse of the death of her husband Michael. She does not come and it is testified that she has died, so nothing from her or her pledges. Robert Randolf, William Turgis, Richard de Hoke, Robert de Hull, Robert Swain, William le Tuler and Robert Prituse come, but the others do not. So let the truth -be ascertained by jury. Robert Randolf and the others who come, asked how they wish to clear themselves, say that they freely put themselves upon the verdict of forty-two men from the three aldermanries nearest to the place where the incident occurred. Because they are strangers this is granted to them. The forty-two men, sworn before the justices to tell the truth, say on their oath that none of them is guilty of the death except Ralph the Chaplain (Capellanum) of Hakeneye, William son of Ralph le Lung clerk and William le Noreys, so the others are quit. Ralph, William and William are to be exacted and outlawed and because they are of Middlesex, let them be exacted and outlawed there. There is to be an enquiry concerning chattels and frankpledge in the hundred of Osolvestane, and the sheriff is ordered to produce on the morrow twelve men from the hundred. Robert Randolf, William Turgis, Richard atte Hoke, Robert de Hull, Robert Swain, William le Tuler and Robert Prituse were previously arrested and released publicly on the king's command; Robert being released to William de Harenges, Robert le Marchaunt, John Goldeston, Robert de Shakewell, all of Hakeney, Henry Attelane of Shoredych, Richard the Clerk, John Aston, John Pode, Richard Alward, Richard le Veer, Robert le Rus, all of Hakeneye, and John de Store of Stebenheth; William Turgis to William le Veer, William Charle, Henry le Scoueler, John le Veer, Thomas le Freman, all of Hakeney, Richard le Wodere of Stebenheth, Richard Chapman of Hakeneye, William Bisshop of Hakeneye, Laurence Mauntel of Haliwell, John atte Hoke, William le Fevere, Warin Grosile, all of Hakeneye; Richard Attehoke to William atte Mersce, John atte Hegge, both of Hakeneye, Edmund Kyse of Stebenhethe, William atte Grove, Robert Roger, Warin Silketop, Richard Leuis, Adinette Merke, Richard le Canon, Richard Pige, Richard Gilbert and William Warin, all of Hakeney; Robert del Hull to William Bruning, Richard son of Robert of Hakeney, Alan son of Philip of the same, William Attebrok, Roger Bruning, Robert Attewell, Robert atte Merk, Richard Attehull, Richard son of Peter, Warm Attestile, and William Goding, all of Stebenhethe; Robert Swain to Adam de Caldelonde of Stebenhethe, Richard Attepyre of Iseldone, William Pig, Robert Coleman, Osbert Attewell, Richard Osbern, John Atteasse, Richard Patrick, John Silketop and Walter le Wodeward, all of Hakeney; William le Tuler to Brouning Mauntel, Richard Mauntel, John le Pil, William Wranghora, Richard atte Well, Reginald Alvene, Robert Nicol, Godfrey le Tuler, Paulinus Heron, Daniel le Tuler, all of Shordiche, Herion of Hoxton, Adam Herion of the same; Robert Prituse to Robert Atteponde of Hakeney, Henry le Nas of Stebenheth, Richard le Vair, Reginald le Neuman, Alan Dusse, William Brid, all of Hakeney, Solomon Atteclive of Stebenhethe, Richard Artur of Hakeneye, John Coding of Stebenhuthe, Hugh Coding of the same, John son of Robert of Edelmeton and John le Sondere of Stebenheth; they (fn. 9) were to have them here on the first day and did not have them. So they are in *mercy. Afterwards twelve men from the hundred come and say on their oath that Ralph, William and William had no chattels and were not in frankpledge because they were vagabonds, [cf. 564]

Nota 80. Appellum in hustengo. Acquietanciaper xlii homines. Quod forinceci exigantur in comitatibus de quibus sunt [cf. 524 no. 80].

Pleas of the crown 2 edward I [1273–4]

246. In the same year, Gregory de Roqesley being chamberlain and Henry de Coventre and Nicholas de Wynton' being sheriffs; John Coubely and Richard Wert were with others on a ship at the wharf of Laurence Hardel, (fn. 10) loading it with wine, when a quarrel broke out among them; Stephen le Esert came up to strike John and John seeing this fell out of the ship into the water in avoiding the blow and was drowned. Stephen was afterwards arrested and delivered by jury before John de Cobham at Neugate, so nothing from him. Laurence de Amewell was attached because he was on the ship at the time, but he does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Richard de Ware and Henry de Ware. So they are all in mercy. Because the sheriffs did not attach William Skinnere of Ware and the others who were on the ship and because the chamberlain made no mention of their names in his roll, to judgment on the chamberlain and sheriffs. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit. Afterwards the mayor and aldermen testify that Richard Werry [sic] was arrested and detained in prison at Neugate and afterwards released publicly by royal writ to Simon le Clerk 'bereman', [Edmund] (fn. †) de Suffolk vintner, Walter de [Gloucestre], (fn. †) Walter le Pender, Robert de Rotherhethe, Henry le Wowere 'bereman', Roger le [Seler], (fn. †) Geoffrey le Weringe, Robert de Ware, Solomon le Juvin, Adam Spendelove 'bereman' and William [Barber servant] (fn. †) of John Adrian to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. So they are in mercy. Richard comes and is not suspected, so he is quit. [cf. 565]

247. [m. 13d] Christine de London while drawing water from the bottom of a vat (in fundendo aquam in quadam cuva) fell into the vat and died soon afterwards. Value of the vat 2s. (deodanduni) for which the sheriffs are to answer. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit. No one else is suspected. (fn. 11) Judgment: misadventure.

248. Robert son of Roger fell from a ship into the Thames and was drowned. Value of the ship *20s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

249. Miles le Coureur killed Henry de Kent in the ward of Henry de Coventre [Vintry ward]. He was at once arrested for the death and taken to Neugate, where before John de Cobham he was released to Nicholas le Coureur, Thomas de Norwich, William Knith, John de Cruce Roes, Geoffrey le Botoner, Henry le Crepiner, John de Grey, John Goldrik, John Lucas, Richard le Bukeler, Abraham le Traiere and Gilbert le Coureur to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. So they are all in mercy. Miles comes and, asked how he wishes to clear himself, for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of forty-two men from the three aldermanries nearest to the place where the incident occurred; sworn before the justices to tell the truth, they say on their oath that he is not guilty of the death and was not present when Henry was killed, so he is quit. (Acquietacio per xlii.) Asked who did kill Henry, they say it was John de la Marche, so let him be exacted and outlawed. (fn. 14) No chattels. Asked also at whose instigation Miles was arrested and charged with the death, they say that it was at the instigation of Roger le Petite, servant of Henry de Coventre, who accused him out of hatred, so let him be arrested. (Capiatur de abetto.) John de Cobham put on record that the pledges undertook to produce Miles at the king's will. Miles comes now to stand to right, so it is adjudged that his pledges are quit of amercement, [cf. 566]

Nota 81. Deplegiis amerciatis quia non habuerunt primo die itineris [cf. 524 no. 81].

250. John le Gaunter and his wife Agnes beat Isabel widow of Geoffrey le Sachier in the ward of Walter le Poter [Cornhill ward]. Isabel escaped from them, but afterwards at nightfall John went to her house and killed her with a knife. He at once returned home, took all his goods and fled with his wife Agnes. He is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed. (fn. 15) No chattels, but he was harboured in the ward outside frankpledge, so the alderman and the whole ward are in *mercy (pro franco plegio). The mayor and aldermen, asked whether Agnes was an accomplice in the death, say that she was, so let her be exacted and waived. (fn. 15) All the neighbours come except Robert de Kydemenstre and he is not suspected. He was attached by William le Engleis and Walter de Welles. So they are all in *mercy. Afterwards it is testified that John was in the frankpledge of Humphrey le Tailur and John Cristemes. So they are in *mercy, and nothing from the ward. [cf. 567]

251. A boy called Bartholomew fell from a boat into the Thames and was drowned. Value of the boat 2s. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

252. William de Boys killed William le Clerk in Bradestrate. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 16) No chattels, but he was harboured in the ward of Anketin de Auverne [Farringdon ward], so the alderman and the whole ward are in *mercy. Nicholas de Goreham 'fruter' and John le Cordwaner, two neighbours, do not come and are not suspected. Nicholas was attached by Andrew le Barbur and Michael le Tailur, John by James the Cook and Richard le Barbur. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 568]

253. Peter de Perone, a lunatic (lunaticus), fell out of a window in a house in the ward of Douegate and died. Sauncelina, who was in the house at the time, was attached, but does not come and is not suspected. She was attached by Walter de la Forde and Adam de Walsingham. So they are in *mercy. All the neighbours come except William de Mare 'gaunter' and he is not suspected. He was attached by Ellis Shadde and Robert de Horsham 'boghyer'. So they are in *mercy. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 569]

Pleas of the crown 3 edward I [1274–5]

254. In the same year, the same being chamberlain and Luke de Batencurt, for whom no one answers, and Henry de Frouwyk, who answers now, being sheriffs; Henry de Suffolk fell from a step in the house of Luke de Batencurt and died. Value of the step ½ mark (deodandum) for which Henry de Frouwyk is to answer. Guillot le Moler, who was in the house at the time, was attached, but does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Hubert de Arraz and Ralph de Rumford. So they are in *mercy. All the neighbours come and are not suspected. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 570]

255. Adam de Ramesey, Roger Aledrawere, Motekin de Sussex and William le Careter, servants of Adam de Brok, canon of St. Paul's London, killed his cook Simon in Adam's house within the churchyard of St. Paul's. They at once fled and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 17) No chattels, and they were not in frankpledge because they were living within the precincts (sanctuarium) of the church. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit.

256. Richard de Lamenesse bailiff with his servant Richard, William le Bret, Geoffrey le Taverner, John de Horsepol, Walter le Taverner, John le Taverner and William Shepesheved went to the house of Emma Louel in the ward of Nicholas de Winton' [Langbourn ward], to arrest some thieves who were being harboured there, as they thought. They entered the house and found no one there except Emma and her maid-servants, but John de Horsepol and William le Bret went out of the house and in the courtyard they found Richard de Veer, chaplain, hiding in a gutter (stillicidio); they at once assaulted and wounded him, so that he died in the third week after. So the sheriff is ordered to arrest them. Afterwards Richard de Laymenes, his servant Richard, William le Bret, John de Horsepol and William Shepesheved were arrested and they come now. Asked how they wish to clear themselves, John de Horsepol says that he was previously arrested for the death and delivered by men from the three wards (wardis) nearest to the place where the incident occurred before John de Cobham at Neugate. John de Cobham is present and puts this on record from his rolls, so let him be quit. Richard and the others, except William le Bret, deny the charge and for good or ill put themselves upon the verdict of forty-two men from the three aldermanries nearest to the place; sworn before the justices, they say on their oath that they are not guilty of the death, so they are quit. William le Bret says that he is a clerk and is not bound to answer here. Thereupon Richard de Berwes, proctor of the bishop of London, comes and claims him as a clerk; but that it may be known [for what he is to be handed over], let the truth be ascertained by the forty-two men; they say he is not guilty of the death, so he is quit. Asked who killed Richard, they say it was Geoffrey le Taverner, who has now absconded and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 19) No chattels.

Nota 82. De quodam ballivo Civitatis et aliis acquietatis per xlii homines trium wardarum [cf. 524 no. 82].

257. Andrew le Sarazin, who was suffering from a fever, consulted Master John de Hexham and Master Semann his brother, doctors (medics), that they might cure him; John sent Master William de Crek to give him pills (pilas) and Andrew at once ordered his valet Richard de Langeley to look after them. Later Andrew and Richard his valet ate such a quantity of the pills that they died soon after. Master William de Crek comes and the mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they do not suspect him of the death, so he is quit. Masters John and Semann were arrested and imprisoned at Neugate; John is now dead, but Semann is living in the City and it is not known how he was delivered from prison, so to judgment on the sheriffs for the escape. The sheriff is ordered to arrest him. Simon Malon [sic], Bartholomew de Raban, Otto de Gask, Henry Fos . . ., Geoffrey servant of Simon Malur [sic], Geoffrey servant of Otto, John the Cook and Nicholas Page were attached because they were present in the house when Andrew and Richard died, but they do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by Thomas le Taillur, John de Shordiche, William de Enefeud, Ralph de Araz, Ranulph de Hexham, David le Escot and John le Taillur. So they are all in *mercy. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit. Afterwards Semann comes and for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of the mayor and citizens. Because the suspicion is slight, this is granted to him by licence of the justices. The mayor and aldermen say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is not guilty of the death, so he is quit. Asked in whose custody he was when he was previously arrested for the death, Semann says that Luke de Batencurt sheriff arrested and imprisoned him, then took ½ mark from him and allowed him to go. The mayor and aldermen testify to this, so to judgment on Luke. Henry de Frowyk is quit of the escape, [cf. 571]

258. Geoffrey Whiting and his wife Alice came out of a tavern together and, a quarrel arising between them, Geoffrey suffocated Alice. He at once fled and is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 20) Chattels 3s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. In addition he had 100s. which Ponce de Mora owed to him. So John Horn and Ralph le Blunt sheriffs are ordered to raise that sum from Ponce's lands and chattels and to answer for it to the king. He was harboured in the ward of Henry de Coventre [Vintry ward] outside frankpledge, so the alderman and the whole ward are in *mercy. Isabel la Frauncis, who was attached for the death, comes and is not suspected, so she is quit. All the neighbours come except Peter le Cotiler and he is not suspected. He was attached by John de Castello and Leo the Clerk. So they are in mercy. Afterwards [m. 14] the mayor and aldermen testify that Geoffrey was in the frankpledge of Walter de Abeton and Robert le Messager, so the frankpledges are in mercy and the ward is quit of amercement for the harbouring, [cf. 267, 572]

259. William Sipring was trying to drag a ship into the Thames when the rope by which he was dragging it broke and he fell into the water and was drowned. Value of the ship *6s. 3d. (deodandum) for which the sheriffs are to answer. Robert le Taillur, a neighbour, does not come. He was attached by Austin le Taillur and Michael the Tailor. So they are all in *mercy. No one else is suspected. Judgment: misadventure, [cf. 574]

260. Peter de Burdeus servant of Reymund de Burdeus, killed John de Gaunt 'eskirmesur' with a knife in the house of Robert le Mareschall. He at once fled to the church of St. Paul's London, but later escaped from the church and has now absconded; he is suspected, so let him be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 21) No chattels, but he was in the mainpast of Reymund. So he is in *mercy. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit. Robert le Mareschall, Hugh le Orfevere, Gilbert Trille, Richard Bonaventure, John Viel, Richard his brother, and Ralph de Balesham were attached because they were present, come and are not suspected, so they are quit. Ismania wife of Robert le Mareschall and Master Thomas le Surigien were also present at the time, but do not come and are not suspected. They were attached by Henry de Roff, Thomas Fyntard, Adam le Barbur, James the Cook, Michael le Taillur and Nicholas de Gatham. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 573]

261. Robert le Gras and his wife Isabel, and John de Benteley and his wife Isabel appealed Richard Taillehaste that on Saturday before Christmas 2 Edward I [23 Dec. 1273] he went to Robert and Isabel's house in Wodestrate, broke down the door and entered; he beat and ill-treated the two Isabels whom he found inside so that as a result of the beating they both afterwards gave birth to still-born boys, and stole a silver brooch worth ½ mark from Isabel wife of John; that he did this wickedly and feloniously they offer [to prove]. Richard comes and denies the death, robbery and everything. He says that previously when they were at the busting the appellors made no mention of the robbery and did not appeal him in the proper form, but only made a simple plaint; so he seeks judgment whether he is bound to answer their appeal. This having been allowed, it is adjudged that the appeal be null. Robert and all the others are to be committed to gaol for a false appeal. To preserve the king's peace let the truth be ascertained by jury. Richard, asked how he wishes to clear himself, says that he is a clerk. Thereupon Richard de Berwes, minor canon of St. Paul's London, and by letters of the bishop of London etc. comes and claims him as a clerk; but that it may be known for what he is to be handed over, let the truth be ascertained by the neighbourhood. Forty-two men from the three nearest aldermanries, sworn before the justices, say on their oath that he is not guilty of death, robbery or any other crime, so he is quit.

Nota 83. De appello in hustengo facto et posted quassato coram justiciariis. Clericus ad sectam regis acquietatus per xlii [cf. 524 no. 83].

262. Alexander de Bestenore of Buckinghamshire took sanctuary in the church of St. Botolph without Aldresgate, William de Fremingham in the church of St. Giles without Cripelgate and Margaret de Wengham in the church of St. Michael Bassieshawe. They confessed that they had burgled houses, stolen horses and committed other thefts and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. Alexander's chattels *1 mark for which the sheriffs are to answer. The others had no chattels and were not in frankpledge because they were strangers, [cf. 574]

263. Richard Scot of Northumberland, John Ismongere of Fremingham and Richard le Clerk of Winchester broke out of Neugate prison where they were imprisoned for theft and fled to the church of the Friars Minor London. They confessed that they had broken out of prison and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs, so to judgment on the sheriffs for the escape. No chattels because they were strangers, [cf. 575]

264. John le Jovene 'weder' was found killed in his house in the parish of St. Mary Abechirche. Robert de Paris tailor, William de Derbi and Alan de Hakeny were accused of the death and arrested. They come and deny the death and everything and put themselves upon the verdict of forty-two men from the three aldermanries nearest to the place where the death occurred, because they are strangers and not of the liberty of the City. These men, sworn before the justices to tell the truth, say on their oath that none of them is guilty of the death, so they are quit. The mayor and aldermen are asked who killed John and say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that Robert de Bannebury, Walter Cadaz, Roger de Asseborne and Geoffrey clerk of the church of St. James Graschirche (fn. 24) encountered John in the ward of Thomas de Basingge [Candlewick ward] and beat and wounded him so that he died. Robert, Walter and Roger at once fled and are suspected, so let them be exacted and outlawed according to the custom of the City. (fn. 25) Walter Cadaz' chattels *16d. for which the sheriffs are to answer. The others had no chattels. Geoffrey the Clerk took sanctuary in the church, but comes now in the king's peace to stand to right before the justices. Asked how he wishes to clear himself of the death he says that he is a clerk and is not bound to answer here. Thereupon Richard de Herwes minor canon of London comes and claims him as a clerk by letters of the bishop of London testifying that the bishop entrusted him his authority to claim clergy. But that it may be known for what he is to be handed over, let the truth be ascertained by the forty-two men; the jury say on their oath that he is guilty, so as such let him be handed over to the bishop. No chattels. Hugh de Gloucester, Godfrey le Barber, Robert atte Wodecote and Robert le Weder were present when the incident occurred, but are not suspected, so they are quit. All the neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are all quit. Afterwards Robert de Bannebyr', who was arrested for the death, comes and denies the death and everything and puts himself for good or ill on the verdict of forty-two men from the three aldermanries nearest to the place where the incident occurred, because he is a stranger and not of the liberty of the City; these men, sworn before the justices to tell the truth, say on their oath that he is not guilty of the death nor of any crime, so he is quit. Nothing from his outlawry, [cf. 576]

Nota 84. De extraneis acquietatis per xlii. Quod maior et aldermanni dicent quis occidit mortuum. De clerico convicto per xlii et liberate episcopo. De extraneo acquietato per xlii [cf. 524 no. 84].

265. Abraham le Treyer and his wife Brunamia complain that on Monday before the feast of the Nativity of Mary 3 Edward I [2 Sep. 1275] Maud de Stanes went to their house in the parish of St. Michael Bassinggeshawe and against the peace etc. beat, wounded and ill-treated Brunamia, so that she was maimed; whence they say that they have suffered damage and loss to the value etc. and they produce witnesses. Maud comes and denies the force and injury. She strongly denies that she ever beat or maimed Brunamia as she is accused and puts herself upon the verdict of the aldermen who in the faith in which they are bound to the king testify to this. So it is adjudged that Maud is quit and Abraham and Brunamia be committed to gaol; but they are pardoned at the instance of John de Cobeham.

Nota 85. Querela de transgressione [cf. 524 no. 85].

266. Walter son of Adam le Huyrer appealed in the husting Martin Horn of wounds and battery. He does not come or prosecute his appeal, so let him be arrested and his pledges to prosecute are in *mercy, viz. Robert le Cordwaner and Robert brother of Walter. Martin comes now. So let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and aldermen; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king [blank]. He was previously arrested and released to John of St. Albans, Philip the Tawyer, Adam de Ismongerelane, Robert the Cook, Alan le Barbur and Robert le Burser to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 576]

267. John de Calabre 'bereman' appealed in the busting Geoffrey Whyting of wounds and battery. He does not come, so let him be arrested and his pledges to prosecute are in mercy, viz. Richard Rose and Alexander Codeford. Geoffrey does not come. He was attached by Peter Guillame, Martin le Criur, Walter Saule and Richard Pighe. So they are all in *mercy. To preserve the king's peace let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and citizens; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king [blank], [cf. 258, 577]

268. Alice daughter of Ralph of New Place (de Novo Loco) appealed in the husting Maud de Kent of wounds and battery. She does not come, so let her be arrested and her pledges to prosecute are in mercy, viz. Walter Winter and Alan le Mazon. Maud does not come and was not attached, so to judgment on the sheriffs.

269. Adam le Burser was killed in the parish of St. Botolph without Aldresgate. William de Beverle was arrested for the death and comes now. Thereupon John de Cobeham, justice, puts on record that William was previously convicted by jury before him at Neugate of killing Adam in selfdefence because he could not otherwise avoid his own death, for which he was committed to prison until he should obtain the king's grace. So let him be kept in custody until the king shall make known his will. The four neighbours come and are not suspected, so they are quit.

Nota 86. De quodam deliberate coram justiciariis itinerantibus per recordum justiciarii de Neugate [cf. 524 no. 86].

Pleas of the crown 4 edward I [1275–6] (fn. 28)

270. In the same year, Gregory de Roqeley being chamberlain and John Horn and Ralph le Blunt being sheriffs; Robert Scot 'bereman' was crushed to death while carrying a load of lead. Value of the lead 2s. for which the sheriffs are to answer. No one is suspected. Judgment: misadventure.

271. [m. 14d] Isabel widow of John Picot appealed in the husting (fn. 30) John de Arundel of the death of her husband John. She comes and prosecutes her appeal, but John does not come. So Isabel is told to go to the husting and prosecute him there until he be outlawed according to the law and custom of the City. Thereupon it is testified that Henry le Taverner and Robert Hodin were at the time crossing the road where the incident occurred and the mayor and aldermen in no way suspect them, so nothing from them. John de Oxford, a neighbour, does not come and is not suspected. He was attached by Richard de Export and John Wyther. So they are in *mercy. [cf. 578]

Nota 87. Appellum in hustengo. Et quia appellatus non venit coram justiciariis, ideo appellans redeat ad hustengum quosque etc. [cf. 524 no. 87].

272. Wyot the Clerk appealed in the husting Richard de Blida 'seler' of wounds and battery. He does not come, so let him be arrested and his pledges to prosecute are in mercy, viz. Walter Wysman and John Heron 'mercer'. Richard comes now. So let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and citizens; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is not guilty of the wounds and beating and the parties are not agreed. So he is quit. He was previously arrested and released to William de Blida goldsmith, John de Paris 'seler', Ralph de Balesham 'seler', Robert de la More 'lorimer', Richard le Paumer, 'seler', Robert Pecche 'seler', Robert de Assendone 'seler', Richard de Strata 'seler', Richard Joce 'seler', Robert le Chaumberlein, John de Westle and Richard de Balesham to have him here on the first day and they did not have him. So they are all in *mercy. [cf. 579]

Nota 88. Appellum in hustengo . . . [see 273 n].

273. John le Plomer appealed in the busting Master Robert le Fizicion le Petit and his son Robert of wounds and battery. He does not come, so let him be arrested and his pledges to prosecute are in *mercy, viz. John Attestrande and Henry Aspele. Robert and Robert do not come. They were attached by Hugh de Byflete tawyer, John de Reyley tawyer, Geoffrey Frosch 'pessoner', Richard de Bristoll, John de Derbi tawyer, Robert de Totenham, Robert Passelewe, Gilbert le Tor, Gilbert de Pelham, Peter de Terringg and Roger de Oxford tawyer. So they are all in mercy. Let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and citizens; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that the parties are agreed, [cf. 580]

Nota [88] Appellum in hustengo de plagis et verberatura [cf. 524 no. 88].

274. Maud la Russe appealed in the husting Alice de Kent of wounds and battery. She does not come, so let her be arrested and her pledges to prosecute are in mercy. She has not found pledges except by faith. Alice does not come. She was attached by John le Barbur by Neugate, Richard the Cook of Fridaystrete, Gerard Beynin, William de Wycombe, Matthew de Lincoln and Richard de Herwes (liberatur episcopd). (fn. 33) So they are all in *mercy. Let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and citizens; they say [blank], [cf. 581]

275. William de Dunhache is accused of the death of Alexander le King killed at Retherhethe; Maurice Gorel and his wife Maud of the theft of eggs, hens and capons; Adam de Say of stealing corn and other thefts; William Crete of the theft of seven sheep; John son of Robert of the Bridge of stealing a sheep and other thefts and Agnes daughter of Thomas Attehill of burning the house of William Hithe. They come and deny the death, theft, burning and everything and for good or ill put themselves upon the verdict of twelve men from the neighbourhood of Retherhethe and Enefeud where the thefts took place and this is granted to them because they are strangers. The jury say on their oath that they are not guilty of any crime, so they are quit.

Nota 89. Forinceci acquietati per forcincecos [cf. 524 no. 89].

276. Alexander Fraunkelein is accused of the theft of a cow which belonged to Robert Cristemeson of Northale and a horse belonging to Thomas Hanche; Alexander de Langeley of the theft of two bushels of wheat; Robert le Suur of Suthwerk and Agnes Atteknol of the death of Henry le Baud; and Adam Scot of the theft of a horse. They come and deny the theft, death and everything and for good or ill put themselves upon the neighbouring wards and the neighbourhood who say that none of them except Alexander le Fraunkelein is guilty of any crime, so [let] Alexander [be hanged] (suspensus) and all the others are quit. Chattels *½ mark for which the sheriffs are to answer, [cf. 582]

277. Stephen de Burton and William de Norfolk, approvers, come and withdraw from their appeal and confess that they are thieves. So [let them be hanged] (suspensi). No chattels.

278. Philip le Taillur accused of robbery of and receiving of horses belonging to John de Grey and William le Latimer, comes and denies that he was involved in the robbery, but freely admits that he had one of the horses in his keeping for the use of John and that he afterwards returned it to John and gave him satisfaction for it, as appears from a letter written in John's name which Philip produces and which fully testifies to this. He puts himself upon the verdict of the mayor and aldermen that he was not involved in the robbery and never committed or caused to be committed any trespass, damage, trouble, loss or grievance against John or William or any of their household. The mayor and aldermen say on the oath which they made to the king and in the faith in which they are bound to him that Philip is in no way guilty and that the horse did not come into his hands of his own volition, so he is quit. [cf. 146, 287–8]

Nota 90. Acquietatus per maiorem et aldermannos [cf. 524 no. 90].

279. The jurors of the hundred of Edelmeton presented before the itinerant justices in Middlesex in 2 Edward I [1273–4] that Adam servant of Henry de Eure and Geoffrey servant of Stephen de Ponte killed Geoffrey Swomld in the vill of Enefeud in the time of King Henry when they were both living in the City with their masters Henry and Stephen; the sheriff of London was therefore ordered to arrest both masters and servants. So Henry and Stephen were arrested for the harbouring of Adam and Geoffrey and appeared before the justices in Middlesex. Thereupon the mayor and citizens of London came and said that they were of the liberty of the City and were not bound to answer there outside it and they claimed them for their liberty. So they were allowed by the justices to find pledges until the coming of the justices here. Henry and Stephen come, but because the incident occurred in the time of King Henry and the justices do not wish to proceed in this case without consulting the present king, it is adjudged that they should find pledges to stand to right at the king's will. They found pledges, viz. Edmund Horn, Nicholas Horn, John Lorenz, Henry Bole, Henry de Greneford, Thomas the Goldsmith of the Bridge, Walter le Blund, Robert de Garscherch, Robert le Burser, Gilbert de Colecestre 'taverner', Stephen Pikeman and John Jovene, but because Stephen did not appear on the first day the pledges who mainperned him before the itinerant justices in Middlesex are in *mercy, viz. William de Storteford 'gaunter', Edmund Horn 'feroun', Roger de Ponte 'feroun', William Amis 'pessoner', Aylwin de Ponte 'feroun', William de Essex 'cornur', John de Depe, Bartholomew de Capella 'gaunter', John Hurel 'feroun', Miles de Oysterhull, Daniel de Ponte 'gaunter' and Herman le Estreis. [cf. 583]

Nota 91. De civibus dismissis per manucapcionem, qui attachiatifuerunl coram justiciariis itinerantibus in comitatu Midd' pro morte hominis [cf. 524 no. 91].

280. Richard Attehale and his brother Walter were accused of burning down the house of John de Bow of Totenhale. Thereupon they were arrested during the last eyre of Middlesex and the mayor and citizens of London appeared before the itinerant justices and said that Richard and Walter were of the liberty of the City of London and were not bound to answer on any account outside the liberty. So they were released by the justices to the mayor and citizens to have them here. Richard and Walter do not come and the mayor and citizens, asked what became of them, say they were handed over to Walter de Saumford then sheriff of Middlesex, (fn. 38) who does not answer for them now, so to judgment on Walter [de Saumford] for the escapes. Richard and Walter [his brother] have now absconded, [cf. 588]

Nota 92. De civibus London' liberatis maiori et civibus per plegios (? licet) factum esset forincecum [cf. 524 no. 92].

281. Osbert le Furbur accused of the death of his wife Beatrice comes and denies the death and everything and for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of the mayor and aldermen. Because he is a stranger and not of the liberty of the City this is granted to him. They say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is not guilty, so he is quit.

282. James de Stoke clerk, accused of breaking open a box in the church of St. Paul's London, comes and denies the theft and everything. He says he is a clerk and is not bound to answer here. Thereupon Richard de Herewes comes and claims him as a clerk by letters of the bishop of London testifying that the bishop entrusted to him his authority to claim clergy. So he is handed over to him, but so that it may be known for what he is to be handed over, let the truth be ascertained by the mayor and aldermen; they say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is not guilty, so he is quit and as such let him be handed over to the bishop.

Nota 92 [sic; no text; cf. 524 no. 92].

283. In the year 4 Edward I [1275–6], Gregory de Rokesle being chamberlain and John Horn and Ralph le Blunt sheriffs; Roger de Farenbergh took sanctuary in the church of St. Thomas on London Bridge, confessed that he was a thief and abjured the realm before the chamberlain and sheriffs. No chattels.

284. Adam Scot is accused of the theft of a horse; Thomas son of William Mus of Norhamton and Isabel de Norhamton of the theft of a silver goblet (cipho); Henry Fraunkelein of harbouring thieves; Thomas [Shap] (fn. †) of the theft of a silver goblet; Edith de Brichull of clipping coins; Henry de Lynnhull (fn. 41) of Staffordshire was arrested with three surcoats of burel (burello) stolen from a (? suit); Thomas de (? Gandone) is accused of the death of Ralph Testard; John Bonvalet of many thefts; and Denise Lovecote of harbouring Hugh de Caldewell approver. (fn. 42) They come and deny the theft, death, harbouring and everything and for good or ill put themselves upon the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood; who say on the oath they made to the king and in the faith in which they are bound to him that none of them is guilty of any crime except Henry de Lynnhill and John Bonvalet. So let Henry and John be [hanged] and the others are quit. Henry's chattels 5s. and John no chattels. Afterwards the mayor and aldermen testify that Denise Lovecote was previously arrested and released to Edmund [Pecok], (fn. †) Walter [le Poleter], (fn. †) William Slich, William de Hertford goldsmith, William de Wautham 'corder', Geoffrey le Feverer, [John] (fn. †) Tanur, Nicholas le Chandeler, Walter Chubbe, Gamelin Canon and John le Seriaunt (fn. 43) to have her here on the first day and they did not have her. So they are in mercy, [cf. 584–5]

285. [m. 15] Richard le Vineter of la Bernette, accused of cutting off the hand of Walter le Hewe near la Bernette in Middlesex so that he died, comes and denies the death and everything and for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of twelve jurors from the neighbourhood of la Bernette where the incident occurred. They say on their oath that he is not guilty, so he is quit.

286. Holdin le Taillur was accused of harbouring thieves, so the bailiffs of the City went to arrest him. He at once fled and absconded and has now returned and been arrested. He comes and denies the harbouring and everything and for good or ill puts himself upon the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood who say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that he is not guilty; so he is quit, but he previously fled, so his chattels are to be confiscated for the flight. Chattels *20s. for which Luke de Batencurt and Henry de Frouwyk are to answer, [cf. 586]

287. Ives le Longe 'draper', William le Flaoner, Robert le Stor, Adam de Ismongerelane, Richard de Assewy 'brokur', Nicholas de Brente and John de Coventre are accused of robbery of horses belonging to John de Grey and to the king at Cornhulle and robbery committed in Jewry in 47 Henry III [1262–3]. They come and deny the robbery and everything and for good or ill put themselves upon the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood, who say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they are not guilty of any crime except in time of war (nisi tempore guerre). So they are quit as regards life and limb, but are to be committed to *gaol. Afterwards William le Flaoner came and makes fine of *40s, on the pledges of Robert de Norwich and Thomas le Flaoner. (fn. 45) [cf. 587,146, 278, 288]

Nota 94 [also apposed to 286 and 288–9 but without text]. De quibusdam rettatis de felonia et acquietatis. Acquietati per veredictum aldermannorum et visneti. (fn. 1)

288. Philip le Bret, Richard le Vilein, William de Blye, Stephen de Goteley, Roger le Avener, John le Staumpeur, Richard Dragon, Osbert le Poleter, Henry le Rous, Roger le Chaundeler, Michael le Oynter, Reginald Pointel, John de Elilaund, Martin le Bokeler, Ranulf Lure, Robert de Waldegrave, William de Manhale, Thomas de Estchep, William Egrith and Nicholas le Convers are accused of robbery of horses belonging to John de Grey and to the king at Cornhull and of robbery committed in Jewry in 47 Henry III [1262–3] and other robberies in time of peace; they come and deny the robbery and everything and for good or ill put themselves upon the verdict of the aldermen and neighbourhood, who say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that they are not guilty of any crime, so they are quit.

289. It is established by the verdict of the mayor and aldermen upon which Henry de Coventre put himself that at the time when he was sheriff he arrested Nicholas de Staunford, who was accused of the theft of money and goods from Ralph le Butiller clerk and Richard de Staunford, and afterwards committed him to William le Bowyer and Guillot servant of Richard de Lamenes, who allowed him to go free. To judgment on Henry, William and Guillot for the escape. Henry, asked if he harboured William and Guillot after the event and if any goods seized with Nicholas remained in his keeping, says no, and puts himself upon the verdict of the mayor and aldermen who say in the faith in which they are bound to the king that Nicholas had no chattels in his house, nor did any remain with him, but in truth they say that Henry harboured Guillot in his house for some time after the event, so to judgment for the harbouring, [cf. 589]

290. Of Stephen de Edeworthe concerning the chattels of Robert Pointell 40s. (Bedford), [cf. 125, 590]

291. Charter of Guy de Brusseles to Philip le Taillur.

'I Guy de Brusseles son and heir of Walter de Brusseles formerly citizen of London have given to Philip le Taillur citizen of the same all the lands and tenements with appurtenances which fell to me by inheritance on the death of my father Walter in the parish of St. Nicholas Shambles London in St. Nicholas and Pentecostelanes, together with 50s. annual quit rent in the same parish, namely 40s. from the tenement held by John King and 10s. from the tenement held by Denis de Benchesham, viz. whatever he holds or ought to hold in the parish, in lands, buildings of wood and stone, rents, etc., except the tenement held by Walter Carbonel in Pentecostelane, for the annual rent of a clove payable at Easter and the service due to the chief lords of the fee. I Guy and my heirs and assigns warrant the same in perpetuity to Philip his heirs and successors against all men and women, Christians and Jews; for which gift, grant, warranty, quittance and in confirmation of the charter Philip has given me £100 as gersum. Witnesses: Gregory de Roqele, mayor of London.' He granted further that the alderman of the place might take the aforesaid tenements into the king's hand.

292. The following have sold wines contrary to the assize: Walter de England, Henry de Coventre, Ellis de Conducto [sic], Gilbert de Duntone, John de Staunford, Ralph de Suffolk, Henry de St. Osyth, Alan de Suffolk, John Hardel, Richard de St. Botolph, Robert the Scot, Richard de Kyngestone, John de Cestrehunte, Osbert de Suffolk, John le Taillur, Peter de Gysors, Thomas de Coumbe, Simon de Farnham, Bruin de Gysorc, Reginald de Suffolk, Emma la Barbere, Christine Renerii, John Stacy, Eustace le Taverner, Nicholas de Westone, Rustikel Thedald, Joce the king's purveyor (emptor regis), William Warage, John son of Saer, William de la Cornere, William de Portesmuth, William Hewe, James the Taverner, John Fuatard taverner, Reginald le Chaundeler, Adam Neverathom, Robert de Reding, Henry de Hereford, Roger de Coventre, John de Depe, William de Beille, Thomas de Conductu the elder, John Wade, Richard Deusour, Richard de la Bernette, Richard Bole, John de Northwode, John Doget, Hubelin de Arraz, Robert le Treyer, John Hache, Adam de Blakeny, Thomas de Carron, Wolmar de Essex, William Doget, Richard Cortois, Simon de Seint Liz, Thomas le Barber, Robert de Fridaiestrate, Richard de Neuwerk, Andrew le Bell, Ellen de Flete, Agnes de Wylehale, Thomas de Conductu the younger, Fulk the Taverner, James de Treys, Reginald de Lauvare, Arnold de Depe, Adam le Feroun, Eleanor de Conductu, Richard de Bedeford, Robert Russel, Roger Piggesflesh, Roger le Estmor, John Skyp, Robert de Suffolk, John de Wodeham, Roger de Garschirche, Bartholomew de Capella 'gaunter', Beatrice de Hakeford, Richard servant of Avice Hardel, Philip le Traour, John de Brilond, Deudatus Gwillam, Donelin Junte, William Russell and Robert de Dorset. So they are all in *mercy. [cf. 527, 529]

293. Charter of Master Thomas of Pyvelesdon. (fn. 48)

'Edward by the grace of God; at the instance of R[obert Kilwardby] archbishop of Canterbury we have pardoned Master Thomas de Pywelesdon all displeasure and rancour conceived against him by reason of trespasses allegedly committed by him against our father King Henry and us and others of our faithful subjects during the recent disturbances; and we have admitted him to our grace and peace; he is not to be impleaded, molested in any way or injured on account of any such trespasses on condition that henceforth he conduct himself well and faithfully towards us and our heirs; at Westminster, 10 May 4 Edward II [1276].' (fn. 49) So he is granted firm peace.

[Nota] 95. [No entry, cf. 524 no. 95].

294. The following have sold cloth contrary to the assize: John Adrian the elder, John Adrian the younger, John Neuman, William de Northawe, Anketin de Brettevill, Roger de Derbi, Reginald de Frouwyk, Robert Camayle, Stephen de Cornhull, Robert de Linton, William Bukerell, Reginald Canon, Walter Everard, John de Wylehale, Richard his brother, John Cole, Peter de Edelmeton, Richard Eswy, William de Hadestok, William of Winton', Geoffrey de Geddingges, Roger Beynin, William de Geddingges, John de Waltham, Thomas son of Thomas the younger, John Racolf, Thomas Bath, Robert de Arraz, John Heron 'peuerer', William de Beck, William de Betoyne, Rusticall Thedal, Deodatus Willame, Richard de Ewell, Robert Curteys, Ingram de Betoyne, William Heron, William le Hurer, Roger Piggesfles, William de Boys, Richard de Abindon, Boydin de Gaunt, Copin Trossin, John de Armenters, Thomas Beuvin, Thomas de Reynham, John de Brylord, John de Nichole, Adam de Blakeney, Robert de Acre of London, Richard de Arraz of Lincoln, Thomas de Melkestrete, William de Staunford the younger, Geoffrey le Taillur by St. Martin le Grand, Hugh le Taillur of Lincolnshire, Robert de Kydermenstre, William de Wouburne, William de Lewes, William le Tundur, Belin Pe de Argent, Nicholas Cauntyng, Walter Pe Dargent, Walter his son, Walter de Gowys, Hugh Loger, Peter de Cambray, Philip de Benekuk, John his brother, Jakes de la Barbere, Gerard de Heyrin, Nicholas de Wyrenale, Gerard le Carpenter, Cristelot Bel, Ingram Falconel, William Tuddehors, Bernard Pilate, Baude de Sovenaunt, John Bonebroke, [Rykewin] (fn. †) de Douwai, Gerard de Staleward, Thomas his brother, John de Plankes, Wiz de Plankes, Gerard de Flos, Jake de Landa, Amaury de Castello, Bernard de Lyons, [Jomes] (fn. †) Purteus, Gerard Bonfrani, Nicholas de Scaylon, Nicholas de Loberg, Terry Baudan, John le Clerk of Sevenhaunt, Baude de Midi, Nicholas [Curte, Gerardinus de la Vile], (fn. †) Ingram Alein, Walter Musard, Lambert de la Potente, Alexander his son, Jakes [de Fresang, William de St. Amand], (fn. †) Waubert de Pikete, Gamelin le Vilein, Thomas Pikete, Giles de Araz, [John de Furfeles, Sewel] (fn. †) Pammoyle, Giles son of Baldwin son of Gerard, Godfrey son of Odeken, Gilbert . . ., [John le Parchemener, Godfrey le Parchenerius]. (fn. †) [cf. 663–4]

Footnotes

1 Above this heading in a different hand: De tempore regis Edwardi filii regis Henrici. See also 234.
2 They were put in exigent for the first time on 20 July 1276 and twice thereafter in the busting of pleas of land (Husting Pleas of Land Roll 4, mm. 1d., 2d., 3d.) but the procedure was the subject of enquiry by the justices in 1321 (Eyre of London, 1321, i, 31–7; Lib. Cust., i, 333–8).
3 See 238 n. 2.
4 Alias Joce le Akatur (Tout, Chapters, ii, 7 n. 2).
5 See 238 n. 2.
6 Papal chaplain and nuncio (W. E. Lunt, Financial Relations of the Papacy with England to 1327 (Cambridge, Mass., 1939), 618).
7 See 238 n. 2.
9 Several of the above lists of mainpernors are incomplete.
10 Words supplied from 565; plea roll much faded.
11 ? In Vintry ward (cf. E. Ekwall, Street-names of the City of London (1954), 138–9 under Hardeleslane).
12 Idea inde quieti. Nullus alius inde malecreditur. interlined.
14 See 238 n. 2.
15 & 2. See 238 n. 2.
16 See 238 n. 2.
17 See 238 n. 2.
19 See 238 n. 2.
20 See 238 n. 2.
21 See 238 n. 2.
24 ? St. James Garlickhithe.
25 See 238 n. 2.
28 For the coroner's roll covering the later part of 4 Edward I (from March), see C. Letter-Book B, 256–64.
30 Husting Common Pleas Roll 4, m. 1d., Nov. 1275.
33 Apposed to 273 but perhaps belonging here (cf. 264).
38 So designated in 588. Cf. 522 and C.C.R. 1272–9, 423.
40 Names supplied from 584; membrane much faded.
41 Huvill in 585.
42 Cf. 234.
43 An additional name in 584.
45 Cf. the list of those proscribed in 1269 (Lib. Ant. Leg., 120–1).
46 This sentence is written in large letters between 286 and 287. A line in the margin erroneously implies that it relates to 285–90 inclusive.
48 Among those proscribed in 1269 (Lib. Ant. Leg. 120–1).
49 C.P.R. 1272–81, 140. For an earlier pardon see 476.
50 Names supplied from 469, 663–4; plea roll faded.