Roll A 3
1338-41

Sponsor

Centre for Metropolitan History

Publication

Author

A.H. Thomas (editor)

Year published

1926

Pages

100-142

Citation Show another format:

'Roll A 3: 1338-41', Calendar of the plea and memoranda rolls of the city of London: volume 1: 1323-1364 (1926), pp. 100-142. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=36656 Date accessed: 15 September 2014.


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ROLL A3

Cedula

13 Nov. 1338

A list of men in each Ward appointed and sworn at a Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Friday after the Feast of St Martin [11 Nov.] Ao 12 Edw. III [1338], to collect money from various Religious Houses and others holding property in the City, but not bearing lot or paying scot, for the purpose of putting the City into a posture of defence pursuant to the King's command (fn. 1) . One third of the rents had been stopped in the hands of the tenants for future collection.

Tower: Simon Turgys, Edmund de Samford.

Billingsgate: Richard de Lamhuth, John Joye.

Bridge: John Lambyn, Arnald le Chaundeler, John Cotekyn, James atte Pirye.

Alegate: Maurice Turgys, Walter Costantyn.

Portsokne: John de Stowe, Peter de Weston.

Lymstrete: William de Algate, William de Sabricheworth.

Bisshopsgate: James Sherman, Ralph Herion.

Cornhull: Ralph de Cantebrugge, John Levelif, Gilbert de Brauncestre, Richard de Farnebergh.

Bradstrete: William Brunne, Richard de Staundone.

Candelwykstrete: John atte Diche, William atte Nok.

Langebourne: Alexander de Watford, John de Bromholm.

Walbrok: John le Neve, Thomas de Farnham, Thomas de Canterbury.

Douegate: Richard Andreu, William de Stanford.

Aldresgate: Thomas de Cantebrugge, John Chaumpeyn, Thomas de Lincoln, John Spray, junior.

Farndone Within: Ralph de Blithe, Richard de Arderne, William de Ippegrave, William de Lindeseye.

Farndone Without: Walter le Marescall, Robert Pekfythel.

Queenhithe: Richard le Rous, Thomas Corteys, William Michel.

Castle-Bainard: Simon de Tornham, John Tornegold.

Crepelgate Within: Thomas de Worsted, John de Keselingbery, Adam Walpol.

Crepelgate Without: Robert de Finchingfeld, Simon Seman.

Colman Strete: Philip Gentyl, Henry de Ware.

Cheap: Adam de St Albans, John de Enefeld, Thomas de Waldene.

Bredstrete: John de Denham, John de Kingestone, John de Toppesfeld, Hamo le Barber.

Vintry: Simon Hauteyn, John Fynch.

Bassieshaghe: John de Dalling, Nicholas de Bedingtone, Thomas West.

Cordewanerstrete: John atte Gate, William de Chelrych.

Cedula dors.

Moneys received: The Prior of the Church of Holy Trinity, 10 marks; the Prioress of Kelbourne, 10s; the Master of St Thomas of Acon, 40s; the Dean and Chapter of St Martin's, 40s; William de Fynchyngfeld, 20s, part payment of 40s; Adam Basset, 1 mark; the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's, 10 marks; the Prioress of Clerkenwell, 60s; John, Rector of St Peter's, Cornhull, 1 mark; the Abbess of Berkyng...; the Abbess of St Clare without Algate, 100s; the Prioress of Haliwell, 80s, part payment of 100s; William de Horwod, 20s; Joan, widow of John de Bokelond, knight, 20s; the Abbot of Lesnes, 20s; the Prior of the Hospital of St John of Jerusalem, 5 marks by pledge of John de Dyngele; the Prior of the New Hospital without Bishopsgate, 20 marks; the Master of the Hospital of St Bartholomew, Smithfield, 5 marks; William Fitz Martin, 2 marks; the Abbot of Westminster, £4; the Prior of Bermundeseye, 5 marks; Sir Robert de Hagham, 40s; Sir William de Everdone, excused by the Mayor and Roger de Depham; the Master of the Hospital of St Giles, 50s; Stephen de Canterbury, 20s; the Abbot of Redyng, 40s, by pledge of Adam de Gillyngham; the Abbot of Waltham, 40s, by pledge of Thomas de Maryns; Nicholas Larmurer, 10s; the Prior of Tortyngton, 1 mark; Thomas Passelewe, 20s; Thomas de Lambourne, 5s, by John de Shirbourne.

Membr. 1

28 March 1339

At a Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Easter Sunday afternoon [28 March] Ao 13 Edw. III [1339], arrangements were made to keep guard over the Thames by night (fn. 2) for fear of foreign invasion. Four Aldermen were assigned to watch each night with the good men of their Wards. (L)

31 March 1339

Precept sent to the Aldermen on Wednesday in Easter week, charging each to make a return of the number of men-at-arms, arbalesters, archers and men capable of bearing arms or finding substitutes in his Ward. The men-at-arms are to be enrolled in the constabulary and the others organised in vintaines and centaines (fn. 3) . (F)

Richard de la Pole, Alderman of Bishopsgate, John de Caustone, Alderman of Lime Street, and Richard de Berkyng, Alderman of Aldgate, with the men of their Wards, were assigned on the same day to guard Aldgate and Bishopsgate. (L)

Names of the carpenters sworn to guard the engines of war stored in the new house near Petywales (fn. 4) for the defence of the City. (L)

5 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Monday after the Feast of S t Ambrose [4 April] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

A Genoese, named John de Plesancia of Lumbardy, was charged with buying arms at the Conduit and exporting them for the use of the King's enemies, on the information of John de Horwod. He was found not guilty by a jury. (L)

Membr. 1b

A similar list of men appointed to collect money to that set out on the above cedula. (L)

Membr. 2

5 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Monday week after Easter Sunday [28 March] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

Henry de Ware, ironmonger, was attached to answer for an assault on John de Mockyng, Alderman, near the Conduit. A jury was summoned. On Friday the Alderman withdrew the charge and the defendant put himself in mercy. (L)

On the same day, John de Gildeford, servant of John de Gloucester, Thomas, servant of John de Triple, and Robert, servant of Adam Brabazon, who had been arrested the previous day for joining in an affray in Cheap, were liberated on bail. (L)

The same afternoon Henry de Ware, ironmonger, met the Mayor, Henry Darcy, in the street near the Conduit and accused him of having shown partiality in the recent trial. Thereupon he was committed to the custody of Hugh le Marberer, Sheriff. Being brought before the Mayor on Thursday he admitted his fault, and was pardoned next day, on finding security for his good behaviour. (L)

3 April 1339

8 April 1339

Membr. 2b

12 April 1339

On Saturday in Easter week the Mayor learnt that a great crowd of fishmongers and goldsmiths were gathered together in Cheap, in consequence of a dispute which had arisen between them in East Cheap the preceding day. Taking with him the Sheriffs and several Aldermen, the Mayor went thither and called upon the more responsible people to compose their differences before Monday. Thereupon John de Mockyng and other fishmongers, and Robert de Shordych and other goldsmiths undertook to do so. Nevertheless next day at the corner of Friday Street and Cheap there was a terrible affray, in which several men were wounded. On the arrival of the Mayor, the rioters fled. The Mayor then ordered the Sheriffs to arrest and bring before him at the Guildhall all who were guilty, and to summon those fish mongers and goldsmiths who had undertaken to keep the peace, as well as a jury of twenty-four men from Cheap and Friday Street, to come before him on Monday. None of the offenders could be discovered by Monday, but next day the leading fishmongers and goldsmiths presented Robert de Fourneux and John Froyssh, called "de Wetheresfelde," fishmongers, for assaulting Peter de Mildenhale and John de Shordyche; and Thomas de Shordyche, Thomas de Cauntebrigge, John de Shordyche and John de Taunton, goldsmiths, for assaulting John de Norwich. As none of these persons could be found by Thursday, and it was impossible to assemble the masters, apprentices, and servants of the two misteries, for the purpose of making peace, except on a Sunday, the matter was postponed till Monday. On that day, the leaders of the two misteries announced that both parties had agreed to keep the peace for the future. A proclamation was made in the presence of the Aldermen and many commoners, calling upon the offenders, who were still in hiding, to surrender before Friday, otherwise proceedings would be taken against them as rebels. (L)

16 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Friday 16 April A o 13 Edw. III [1339] at which a great Commonalty was present

Proclamation having been again made that the above persons must surrender before 1 May, otherwise they would be taken alive or dead, Thomas de Shordyche, Thomas de Cantebruge and John de Shordyche surrendered and were committed to Newgate, bail not being allowed. (L)

In the same congregation John de Guldesburgh, servant of John de Gloucester, and Thomas, servant of John de Triple, surrendered to their bail and were committed to prison. (L)

20 April 1339

On Tuesday after the Feast of St Alphege [19 April] Robert de Evesham, servant of Adam Brabason, having surrendered to prison, was next day bound over to keep the peace. (L)

In the same congregation Richard Lacer, William de Brikelesworth and Ralph de Upton, Aldermen, John de Somersham, William Haunsard, John de Gloucester, fishmonger, Thomas de Waledene, Thomas de Canterbury, Thomas de Farnham, Robert de Shordych, William de Thorneye, John de Aylesham, Henry Wymond, John de Dallyng and Henry de Prestone, Commoners, were elected auditors of the accounts of Alan Gille and John Lovekyn, Wardens of London Bridge. The same were appointed auditors of the accounts of Thomas de Marynz, Chamberlain, to be presented on Friday next. (L)

Simon Fraunceys, John Hamond, Richard Lacer and Hugh le Marberer were appointed to buy livery-cloth (fn. 5) for the Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs against the Feast of Pentecost [16 May]. (L)

17 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Saturday before the Feast of S t Alphege [19 April] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

John de Guldesburgh, servant of John de Gloucestre, and Thomas de Kynebelle, servant of John de Triple, were released on bail. (L)

Robert Halpany, fishmonger, was bound over to keep the peace. (L)

19 April 1339

On Monday the Feast of St Alphege [19 April] Andrew de Portinaire brought a bill of complaint (F) to the effect that he had equipped and paid wages to a man-at-arms, Robyn de Toulouse, to serve overseas, and that the said Robyn had sold some of his equipment, which consisted of a pair of plate-gauntlets, a shirt of good Lumbardy, a pour-point (fn. 6) , a dagger and a shield. The above Robert (sic) admitted the offence and was committed to prison.

Membr. 3

20 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs on Tuesday after the above Feast

Thomas de Shordyche, Thomas de Cantebrugge, and John de Shordyche, goldsmiths, were bound over to keep the peace. (L)

John Fynch acknowledged a debt of £15 16s 8d due to William Beauflour. (L)

Thomas de Rokeby, called "le Clerk," of co. Warwick, and Margaret la Brewster were arrested at the suit of John de Maudeleyne, servant of John de Hyntone, charged with the mainour (fn. 7) of a silver cup value 5s, which he alleged they had stolen from him at the corner of Bread Street. A jury found a verdict of not guilty. They were acquitted, and order was given to arrest the appellor. (L)

21 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday after the above Feast

Robert de Fourneux, fishmonger, and John de Taunton, goldsmith, who had been proclaimed at the Stone Cross in Cheap for the late affray, surrendered to the peace and were committed to prison. On Friday John de Taunton was bound over with eighteen mainpernors to keep the peace. (L)

An assessment was made on the Wards in various proportions to raise the sum of 1000 marks by way of composition for the wool tax (fn. 8) . (L)

Precept to the Alderman of each Ward to assemble the men of his Ward for the purpose of assessing the inhabitants, in order that the Ward quota might be paid into the Guildhall on Friday. (F)

Membr. 3b

23 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Friday after the above Feast

The Sheriffs were ordered to distrain the inhabitants of Aldersgate for neglecting to pay the Ward quota. (L)

24 April 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Saturday after the Feast of S t George [23 April] the aforesaid year [1339]

Robert Fourneux was bound over, with twenty mainpernors, to keep the peace. (L)

16 April 1339

Note that at a Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on 16 April, a proclamation was made at the Stone Cross in Cheap calling upon Robert de Fourneus, John Frossh called "de Wetheresfeld," fishmongers, and Thomas de Shordyche, Thomas de Cantebrugg, John de Shordyche and John de Taunton, goldsmiths, who had been engaged in an armed affray in Cheap on Sunday the Feast of St Ambrose [4 April], to surrender themselves before the first day of May. This proclamation was made in accordance with the promise of the authorities (fn. 9) to hold the City for the King during his absence abroad, and because riots in London, which was the mirror and exemplar (fn. 10) of the whole realm, tended to encourage the King's enemies (F). Appended is a note to the effect that all the above persons had surrendered by the day named except John Frossh. (L)

1 May 1339

At a Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and Commonalty on 1 May, John Frossh was proclaimed at the Stone Cross as a rebel and banished from the City, for failure to obey the proclamations made at the New Cross in Cheap. (F)

Membr. 4

1 May 1339

On the same day certain aldermen and commoners were elected to assist the collectors in getting in 800 marks arrears of the tax of a fifteenth (fn. 11) . (L)

11 May 1339

Pleas held before the Mayor, one of the Sheriffs, and the Aldermen on Tuesday after the Feast of S t John ante Portam Latinam [6 May]

Reginald de Cornwall, Richard Bene, Henry le Yonge, Roger de Arderne, and John de Essex, carpenters, were charged with making a confederacy among men of their trade to prevent foreign carpenters coming to the City from accepting less than 6d a day, and with having beaten and maimed John de Chalfhonte, who had taken service with Richard Denys for less than that wage (fn. 12) . A jury found that they had not beaten the said John Chalfhonte, but that they had intimidated men from taking work for less than 6d a day and an after-dinner drink. The defendants were bound over to come up for judgment. (L)

9 June 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday before the Feast of S t Barnabas [11 June] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

Richard Paterlyng, William Gandre, John de Thremynhale, Thomas Houkyngg, William de Bury and Thomas de Ishmongerelane, sworn overseers of the trade of Pouchmakers (fn. 13) , produced a number of confiscated pouches which they declared to be falsely made and of divers skins contrary to rule. The pouches, having been inspected, were ordered to be burnt publicly in Cheap opposite Soper's Lane. (L)

At the same congregation John de Borham and Roger le Callere were bound over for using threats to the above overseers for having seized their pouches. (L)

Membr. 4b

10 July 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs on Saturday after the Feast of the Translation of S t Thomas the Martyr [7 July] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

A jury of twenty-five persons belonging to Farringdon Within, who had presented a number of disorderly persons and nightwalkers before Richard Lacer, the Alderman of the Ward, in his Wardmote held on Friday [2 July] before the said Feast, prayed that the above evildoers might be apprehended and committed to prison. Note that the majority of those named were taken and sent to Newgate, some being subsequently released on bail. (L)

At the same congregation Richard Lacer brought the presentment of the twelve jurors of Farringdon Without, made at a Wardmote held in the Church of St Sepulchre on Friday [2 July] after the Feast of St Peter and St Paul [29 June]. They indicted Thomas, son of Simon Nichol, for beating his father, and for being leader of a gang of disorderly persons who terrorized the neighbourhood of Smithfield; Thomas de Hundesmor, dwelling in the Rents of St John of Clerkenwell within the Bar of the New Temple, for being an armed bully and a harbourer of women of ill fame; and several other persons, male and female, for keeping disorderly houses, receiving armed nightwalkers and committing assaults, in consequence of which the neighbours did not dare to come out of doors at night. (F)

Membr. 5

The names of those who mainprised the bad characters of the Ward of Farringdon Within on various dates before 14 Aug. the same year. The offenders were liberated from Newgate, under security of twelve mainpernors each, to come up for judgment quo & quando. (L)

Membr. 5b

20 Aug. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs on Saturday after the Feast of the Assumption B.M. [15 Aug.] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

Infangthef. Walter, son of John Barry, taken with the mainour of a supertunic of "appelblome" and a tunic of blanket of the value of one mark, which he had stolen from the house of Roger de Barkworth, tailor, on the preceding Thursday evening, was found guilty by a jury. He was hanged. No chattels. (L)

23 Aug. 1339

On Monday the eve of St Bartholomew the Apostle [24 Aug.] Salomon Patryk was carried before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen, having been put in the Tun (fn. 14) overnight by the beadle of Cripplegate Ward Within, for wounding Ralph de Fyfhide in the back with a knife. As the wounded man himself appeared and refused to prosecute, the prisoner was released, on mainprise of three for his good behaviour. (L)

31 Aug. 1339

Pleas before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen on Tuesday after the above Feast

John Janyn was charged with an affray in Cheap. He was acquitted by a jury. (L)

John de Aysshbourne, John de Lincoln, bowyer, Robert Doke, James le Botailler, Richard le Cobelere, and John atte Watre, senior, "cotiller," were charged with an affray in St Paul's Churchyard opposite the Bishop's close. They were acquitted by a jury. (L)

John de Berkyng, "latoner (fn. 15) ," was charged with an affray in Ladelane. A jury found him not guilty of an affray, but said that he had struck a certain Henry de Asshindon, tiler, under the jaw because the latter used abusive words to him, and that no hue and cry was raised. A day was given to the defendant to hear judgment. (L)

12 July 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Monday after the Feast of the Translation of S t Thomas the Martyr [7 July] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

Membr. 6

Names of those sworn to keep the King's peace in the Wards of Langbourne and Cordwainer Street.

7 Aug. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Saturday before the Feast of S t Laurence [10 Aug.]

Demise by the Commonalty of the City of London to Philip de Dene, Master of the House of the Order of St Mary of Bedleem without Bishopsgate (fn. 16) , of certain tenements appurtenant to the House at an annual rent of 40s. (L)

[Schedule of contents of the Roll in a later hand.]

Membr. 7

31 Aug. 1339

Pleas held before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen on Tuesday after the Feast of S t Bartholomew [24 Aug.] continued

Inquest on the affray in St Paul's Churchyard. The jury find Stephen de Irland, servant of James le Botailler, and Thomas Dooke, servant of John de Lincoln, bowyer, guilty of having wounded William de Lelleworth, vicar of St Paul's, on the night of Sunday after the above Feast, so that his life was despaired of. Precept to the Sheriff to arrest the said Stephen and Thomas. (L)

14 Sept. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross [14 Sept.]

An inquest was held as to what boatmen were ferrying disturbers of the peace across the Thames at night. The jury found Thomas de Perndon and Richard Boge guilty of so doing, well knowing that their passengers were men of evil character. They were committed to prison, being liberated a week later on mainprise of Hugh FitzRoger and Simon Snellyng, Clerk of the Chamber. (L)

An inquest was held the same day as to nightwalkers and others causing disturbances at night. The jury found that John Hamond, cornmeter, Walter de Yerdele, "werkman," John le Cornmongere, "werkeman," Robert de Portesmouthe, junior, saltmeter, John le Keu, oysterseller, Richard le Keu his brother, Simon Melleward, meter, and John Paywell, "dyeghere," dwelling with John de Gedeleston at Billingsgate, were common evildoers and disturbers of the King's peace, and that the aforesaid John, Walter and John had threatened to kill John le Coroner of Vintry Ward and other good men, if they attempted to indict them. Precept was issued to the Sheriffs to arrest the men and bring them up on the following Wednesday. The Sheriffs made return that Robert de Portesmouth, Richard, brother of John le Keu, and John Paywell could not be found. The others pleaded not guilty and put themselves on the country. Subsequently all the indicted persons put themselves on the mercy of the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen, and were bound over for their good behaviour. (L)

Membr. 7b

15 Sept. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen on Wednesday after the above Feast

On a bill of complaint (F) from John Padegris and Robert his brother, William Whitcrok was charged with having rescued William Sawyer, who had been arrested for assaulting the above Robert and breaking his left shoulder-bone. The defendant's master, Richard Frere, was charged with abetting. The jury found the latter not guilty. William Whitcrok was committed to prison, and a week later was bound over, with eight mainpernors, for his good behaviour. (L)

18 Sept. 1339

Note that on Saturday after the above Feast, Richard Broun, carter, was brought up by John le Keu, beadle of Portsoken, for having wounded William de Bathe and created a disturbance on the preceding Thursday night, for which he had been put in the Tun. He was bound over for his good behaviour with two mainpernors. (L)

1 Oct. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Friday after the Feast of S t Michael [29 Sept.]

A letter was read from the Mayor and good men of the town of Leicester to the effect that they had witnessed a deed of release made by Margaret, widow of John Wrenche, to Nicholas Pyk, vintner, of her late husband's lands and tenements in Friday Street in the parish of St Matthew. Dated on Friday after the Feast of the Exaltation of the Holy Cross [14 Sept.]. (F)

William de Estwyke, Thomas de Burgate, Thomas de Burneham, Roger de Stonham, and William de Ascote were mainprised not to inflict any injury upon John Ballard. (L)

Membr. 8

5 Oct. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and a great Commonalty on Tuesday after the Feast of S t Michael [29 Sept.]

Henry Pykard, Walter Waldeshef and Roger Fynch were charged with being addicted to playing knuckle-bones (ad talos) at night, leading apprentices into gambling habits, and using threats against citizens and strangers. Order was given for their arrest. They were subsequently mainprised for their good behaviour. (L)

12 Oct. 1339

On Tuesday before the Feast of St Edward King [13 Oct.] John Scot, cobbler, of St Edmunds was mainprised for his good behaviour. (L)

21 Oct. 1339

Pleas held before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen, on Thursday after the Feast of S t Luke [18 Oct.] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

Nicholas le Heymongere, living at Paul's Wharf, was attached to answer a charge of having bought a quantity of hay from John le Keu, servant of Sir William de Everdone, and failing to pay for it. He admitted the debt, and was ordered to prison until he should pay. Thereupon the said John and Nicholas came to terms. (L)

John de Chippenham, executor of Simon de Pecham, was summoned to answer a charge of withholding from Matilda, widow of the said Simon, the sum of 100s bequeathed by him to his unborn child. The defendant pleaded that the widow was in possession of the goods of the deceased so bequeathed, and demanded a jury. While the jury was being summoned, the sum of 100s attached on the above John was handed over to the Chamberlain for safe-keeping. The matter was eventually decided on Friday after the Feast of St Martin [11 Nov. (fn. 17) ] when the jury found a verdict for the widow. Judgment was given that the 100s be delivered to the widow under security according to the custom of the City. (L)

25 Nov. 1339

Note that on Thursday the Feast of St Katherine [25 Nov.] Ao 13 Edw. III [1339], William de Donstaple, tailor, was arrested by the neighbours, on the hue and cry being raised, for having assaulted Peter le Foundour near "La Ledynhalle," and was committed to Newgate. Next day he confessed his fault before the Mayor, and was released on mainprise for his good behaviour. (L)

4 Dec. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Saturday after the Feast of S t Andrew the Apostle [30 Nov.]

John Levelyf was attached for having said in Guildhall Yard that the collectors of Cornhill Ward had assessed him unfairly and maliciously at 10s for his share of the £9 6s due from the Ward. The defendant admitted the words and put himself on the mercy of the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty. He was ordered to pay his assessment and a fine of 10s, and to be bound over. (L)

Membr. 8b

4 Dec. 1339

Nicholas de Tame and John de Bristoll, junior, were attached to answer a charge of having torn a deed whereby Alice, the widow and executrix of Henry de Seccheford, conveyed to Margaret Rous a certain quitrent of a shop in the parish of St Nicholas Shambles, and of having snatched from Alice and her co-executor, John de Tiddeswelle, the pledges which they had taken in the shop. John de Bristoll admitted having taken the pledges in the presence of the beadle and other good men of the Ward. Nicholas de Tame denied the offences, but was afterwards found guilty by a jury. Both were committed to prison. (L)

7 Dec. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday the morrow of S t Nicholas [6 Dec.]

Inquiry was made by a jury of the venue outside Newgate as to whether or not Simon atte Gate charged the assessors for the Ward of Farringdon Without with dishonesty. He was found not guilty. The assessors were amerced for a false declaration. (L)

Membr. 9

28 Oct. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and Commonalty on Thursday the Feast of SS. Simon and, Jude [28 Oct.] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

Immediately after Andrew Aubrey had been elected Mayor (fn. 18) loco Henry Darcy, who had been Mayor the two previous years, a certain Gerard Corp ascended the Compter, where the clerks of the City sit, and used opprobrious words to Henry Darcy, saying that the latter had called him an evildoer and a riffler, and that these words would cost Henry Darcy dearer than any words which had been spoken in the City for twenty years; and he went on to say that he could produce twenty witnesses to prove that he never had been a riffler. On hearing these threats, the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty committed Gerard Corp to Newgate. On the Wednesday following he appeared before the Mayor etc. and apologized to the above Henry. He was bound over in forty casks of wine for his good behaviour towards him and the other officers of the City, and was mainprised by twelve persons to keep the peace. (L)

12 Nov. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and Commonalty on Friday after the Feast of S t Martin [11 Nov.] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

Ordinances (fn. 19) regulating the sale of wheat to prevent enhancing of prices. (L)

Alexander, the Bailiff of Billingsgate, and John Russel, the farmer of the Market, to whom belongs the oversight of all corn sold on the pavement at Newgate and Gracechurch, were sworn to see that the above ordinances were observed, with the assistance of Roger atte Belhous, John Borre, Richard atte Hill, William de Lyndeseye and Richard atte Gate. Thomas Curteys, John de Dytton, John le Coroner, Hugh FitzRoger, Thomas de Leddrede and Geoffrey le Chaundeler were associated with Gilbert atte Halle, the farmer of Queen Hithe, for the same purpose. (L)

Membr. 9b

The Serjeants (named) of the Wards were sworn to keep the King's peace and not to allow any evildoers or persons of ill-fame to remain in their Wards. They were ordered to clean the streets and lanes of the City and to remove all dung and rubbish before Monday week. (L)

17 Nov. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday after the above Feast

Robert de Hakeneye, Alexander le Gauger and Adam Canoun were sworn to assist the Bailiff of Billingsgate in carrying out the ordinances relating to the sale of wheat. (L)

It was agreed that the Sheriffs should summon from each Ward one good man to consult with the Mayor and Aldermen with regard to levying from the more wealthy people a sum of money as a present to the King, Queen and other magnates on their return from abroad. On the Tuesday following the Ward representatives attended and by common consent the Ward quotas were assessed as follows. (L)

£ s
Walebrok: 18 18
Farndon Within: 22 16
Farndon Without: 16 4
Langebourne: 12 12
Algate: 4 10
Tower: 25 16
Billingsgate: 21
Lymstrete: 20
Bredstrete: 18 6
Crepulgate Within: 20 14
Crepulgate Without: 6 18
Portsokne: 4 10
Aldresgate: 5
Bradestrete: 17 8
Colmanstrete: 6 12
Bassieshawe: 4 10
Cornhull: 9 6
Queen Hithe 12
Candlewyk: 9 12
Bridge: 24
Cheap: 36 12
Vinetrie: 23 14
Castle Baynard: 7
Cordewanerstrete: 36 12
Douegate: 21 6
Bishopsgate: 11 8

Membr. 10

26 Nov. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, and one representative from each Ward on Friday after the Feast of & Katherine [25 Nov.] A o13 Edw. III [1339]

Names of men chosen in each Ward to assess the men of their Wards, and to levy the money, with special consideration for the poor.

Farndon Without: William de Waltham, Robert Pekfythele, Robert de Aysshe.

Farndon Within: William de Blythe, William de Ippegrave, Robert de Wyke, John de Crykkele.

Colmanstrete: Henry de Ware, John Bussh.

Cordewanerstrete: Simon Rote, John de Kelyngworth, Roger le Carpenter, Maurice le Ropere.

Bassieshawe: John de Wrytele, Thomas West.

Aldresgate: John Burdeyn, John de Thame.

Queen Hithe: Hugh FitzRoger, Walter de Reynham.

Crepulgate Within: John de Totenham, " chaundeler," Robert de Pertenhale, John de Colewelle.

Bredstrete: John Sprot, William le Botiller, John de Risle, Nicholas Madefray.

Vinetrie: Henry Mongol, John Fynche, John Hardel.

Castle Baynard: Thomas le Koo, Thomas de Cornewaylle.

Cheap: Nicholas de Reygate, John de Carlel.

Crepulgate Without: Hugh atte Cok, Simon Seman.

Bishopsgate: Henry de Northampton, Walter Brett, Ralph Heryoun.

Portesokene: Peter de Westone, Thomas de Caxton, John atte Crouchehous.

Lymstrete: William de Sabrichesworthe, Ralph de Mixsebury.

Walbroke: William de Lycheberghewe, William de Shrovesbury, Robert de Hatfeld, Thomas de Sewell.

Bradestrete: John de Herewardstok, John de Kent, Thomas Lyouns, Richard de Staundon.

Langebourne: Robert de Holewelle, John de Bristoll, barber, John de Sothereye, tapicer, Adam de Bandone.

Candelwykstrate: William atte Stoke, Adam de Canefeld, Henry atte Lanende.

Billingsgate: John de Wrotham, Nicholas Deubeneye, John de Greylond.

Cornhull: Robert de Manhale, Adam Aspal, Robert de Banstede.

Douegate: William de Stanford, Thomas de Spayne, Richard de Enefeld.

Bridge: John Lambyn, William de Mordone, Richard Paterlyng, John Horn, Fleming.

Algate: John de Neubury, Thomas Savage, Walter le Keu.

Tower: Adam Hurel, Edmund de Saunford, Geoffrey de Wynterton.

Precept from the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty to the assessors, ordering them to bring the money on Friday after the Feast of St Andrew [30 Nov.], with an indenture containing names and amounts. No one is to be assessed having less than 40s in goods and chattels. (F)

The following chandlers were sworn to oversee their trade and to prevent bad liquor being put into mustard, sauces and saxifrage (fn. 20) : for the West, John le Chaundeler of St Lawrence Lane, John de Totenham, John de Saunford, Hugh le Chandeler of Eldefisshstret loco John de Saunford, deceased, Walter Cady, William de Douuegate; for the East, Roger de Clovyll, Henry de Stystede, Robert le Chaundeler of Candelwykstrete, John le Chaundeler of Grasscherche. (L)

Note that the same persons were sworn before John Hamond, Mayor, on Monday before the Feast of St Katherine [25 Nov.] Ao 17 Edw. III [1343].

Membr. 10b

7 Dec. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday the morrow of S t Nicholas [6 Dec.]

A jury of the venue of Coleman Street was summoned to say whether Alan de Causton had charged the assessors of the Ward with unfairness. Before the verdict was given, the said Alan confessed his guilt and was committed to Newgate. Subsequently he was mainprised to pay a fine and released.(L)

10 Dec. 1339

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Friday after the above Feast

Thomas le Brewere of Tower Street was attached to answer a charge, brought by Nicholas Clompe, of having purchased a quantity of malt and of failing to pay for it at once. The defendant declared that a day was given for payment and that the transaction was not to be in accordance with the Statute of Smithfield (fn. 21) . Both parties demanded a jury, but eventually came to terms. (L)

The same day John Peverel, goldsmith, was mainprised for his good behaviour by Thomas de Hanneye, Richard de Hanneye, William de Stretham, William de Castre, William de Leylond, goldsmiths, and Egrettus de Bursels, "lorymer." (L)

11 Dec. 1339

Note that on Saturday after the Feast of St Nicholas [6 Dec.] the same year, precepts were issued to the Aldermen of the Wards to hold their Wardmotes between then and the Feast of St Thomas next ensuing. If any were indicted before them for causes on which they might be arraigned, or for felony or trespass, their names were to be certified under the seal of the indicters at the Guildhall on the morrow of the above Feast. (F)

Membr. 11

7 Dec. 1339

Pleas held before the Mayor and Aldermen on Tuesday the morrow of S t Nicholas [6 Dec.]

John le Fevre was attached to answer a charge, brought by Nicholas Clompe, that he bought a quantity of malt in accordance with the Statute of Smithfield and failed to pay for it. The defendant pleaded that he had already paid for it in Friday Street. Both parties claimed a jury. Eventually the plaintiff allowed the defendant to clear himself by his own oath (fn. 22) , which the latter did. The defendant was acquitted and the plaintiff was amerced. (L)

17 Dec. 1339

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Friday after the Feast of S t Lucia [13 Dec.] A o 13 Edw. III [1339]

An ordinance was made to the effect that no one should sell "Renys Wyn" at more than 8d a gallon. (L)

12 Jan. 1340

On Wednesday after the Feast of the Epiphany [6 Jan.], Joan de Romeseye, "hucstere," was bound over for her good behaviour. (L)

10 Jan. 1340

On Monday after the above Feast, Alice, widow of Henry de Denecoumbe, brought a petition complaining of having been forcibly carried off by robbers, together with 100s and a gold bracelet and other goods, in December last, and praying that the matter may be investigated. (F)

Membr. 12, 12b

1 March 1340

Memorandum of proceedings relative to a loan of £5000 (fn. 23) to the King with a schedule of subscribers, according to assessment. [Set out in abstract in Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. 45-9, end of para, 1.]

18 March 1340

On Saturday after the Feast of St Gregory [12 March] Ao 14 Edw. III [1340-1], the Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty appeared before the King and his Council at the House of the Carmelite Friars in the suburbs, when it was agreed that certain citizens should pay the sums at which they were assessed direct to Jacob de Artfeld (fn. 24) at Bruges, to the amount of £1500 out of the above sum of £5000.

£
Andrew Aubrey, Mayor 100
John de Oxford 300
Simon Franceys 300
John Hamond 120
John de Grantham 60
William de Brykelesworth 60
Simon de Brunnesford 40
Richard de Hakeneye 50
Henry de Combemartyn 30
Richard de Rothyng 200
John Anketel 20
John Lovekyn 30
Bartholomew Denmars 60
Walter de Mordone 80
William Box 40
(whereof due from William Brangweyn) 10

Membr. 13

15 March 1340

On Wednesday after the Feast of St Gregory [12 March] Ao 14 Edw. III [1340-1], the Dean and Chapter of St Paul's brought a bill of complaint before the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen praying that John de Neuport might be attached to answer them for resisting a distraint. They declared that their Renter, John de Colcestre, with the assistance of John de Ry, one of the City Serjeants, had taken a distress from John de Neuport's house for arrears of a rent-charge due to the Dean and Chapter; and the above John de Neuport had brought a writ of trespass against the Renter and Thomas de Snodelond, chaplain, whereby they were arrested on a Capias, whereas he ought to have made a plaint of Vee de Naams (fn. 25) in the Guildhall. On a second occasion the said John de Neuport had refused entry to two of the City Serjeants, John de Ry and Nicholas de Abyndon, when they wished to take another distress. (F)

11 July 1340

On Tuesday after the Feast of the Translation of St Thomas the Martyr [7 July] Ao 14 Edw. III [1340], precept was given to Peter de Hungry, Serjeant of the Chamber, to summon John de Colecestre, mercer, before the Mayor and Chamberlain to show cause why a debt of 40s due to John de Eynesham, skinner, on a recognizance, should not be levied from his goods and chattels. The said John de Colecestre resisted execution on the ground that John de Eynesham had granted him a general acquittance, which he produced. John de Eynesham denied that the document was his deed and demanded a jury. (L)

William Pycot, Simon de Shordyche, Simon Haunsard, Nicholas le Leche, and John Yrysshe were mainprised for their good behaviour. (L)

Membr. 13b

3 Aug. 1340

Inquest before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Thursday after the Feast of St Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] Ao 14 Edw. III [1340] as to the cause of the affray (fn. 26) which took place in Walbrook Ward on the preceding day. The jury said that on Wednesday afternoon an affray began between Nicholas le Leche, fishmonger, and John de Oxford, servant of Robert de Eynesham, skinner, in front of the latter's shop, owing to an old quarrel; that certain fishmongers named Ralph Turk (fn. 27) , Robert Halpeny and Simon Haunsard, who had been accompanying the above Nicholas from the shop of Robert de Shordiche in Cheap towards Bridge Street, turned back to help him, when they were set upon by certain skinners of Walbrook, whose names the jury did not know; Hugh Trappe, skinner, who attempted to stop the fight, was wounded in the head with a knife by Robert Halpeny, and Geoffrey de Hibernia, skinner, was wounded by another fishmonger. (L)

Inquest before the Mayor and Sheriffs in the presence of John de Shirbourne, Coroner, as to the conduct of certain fishmongers. The jury returned the names of William atte Felde, John, son of Henry Frossh, Geoffrey his brother, Peter de Fulham, Ralph Thomelyn, John Cros, formerly apprentice of Hugh de Mockyng, Robert Halpeny, Thomas Litle, Edmund, son of Thomas de Ware, John, formerly apprentice of Andrew Cros, Richard, son of John Haunsard, Robert, formerly apprentice of William Swote, and William de Clopham as evildoers and disturbers of the peace, who were rebellious to the wardens of their mistery. They say further that William Turk, fishmonger, abetted them, and that John Sterre, son of Henry Sterre, called "Monqoi," and others assaulted Hugh de Hampton at Eldeneslane, so that his life was despaired of, and that William atte Felde and others had shown violence to the Mayor, Sheriffs and their officials in Bridge Street, and had rescued Robert Halpeny out of the hands of the Sheriff. (L)

2 Aug. 1340

Pleas held before the Mayor and Chamberlain (fn. 28) on Wednesday the morrow of S t Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340]

Matilda, widow of Thomas de Gloucestre, William de Harewell and John de Litlington, executors of the said Thomas, claimed the sum of 53s 4d from John Priour as due to the estate of the deceased. The defendant denied the liability, and when he came prepared to make his law, the executors failed to appear. Judgment for the defendant. (L)

Membr. 14

1 July 1340

Inquests as to evildoers and disturbers of the King's peace taken before the Mayor and Sheriffs in the presence of John de Shirbourne, Coroner

1. Saturday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June] (fn. 29) . A jury of twenty persons from the Wards of Coleman Street, Bassishaw and Cripplegate Within and Without say on oath that as to the Wards first named they have no knowledge, but as regards Cripplegate Without, they say that John Mazerer, Walter Kyng, Thomas "consanguineus Litelwatte," Thomas Fitz Simon, Nicholas de Westsmethfelde, Walter le Tyrteyner and John Wantynge are evildoers, nightwalkers and disturbers of the peace, that John de Catton keeps a common bawdy-house, and that John le Clerk is a receiver of bawds. (L)

2. The same day. A jury drawn from the Wards of Bread Street, Cordwainer Street and Vintry make no presentment. (L)

3. The same day. A jury from the Wards of Castle Baynard, Queen Hithe, Aldersgate, and Farndon Within and Without say that Henry de Pountoys and Nicholas de Kent, brewer, are receivers of men of ill-fame in Aldersgate Ward; that Andrew Wrenne and Beatrice his wife are common evildoers and disturbers of the peace in Castle Baynard Ward, and that on Saturday after the Feast of St Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] they assaulted the constable, Richard de Pynnore, Jurdan his serjeant and the latter's boy; that on Saturday before the Feast of St Augustine [5 May] John Assheby, skinner, wounded William de Shepey in Fleet Street, and at another time wounded Agnes la Shepstere in the same place; that Robert son of Clarice la Converse, tailor, wounded Philip de Cornewaille in the same street and is a common evildoer; that William le Chapman is a receiver of malefactors and disorderly women; that Hugh de Staunton is a common evildoer and frequents the house of Alice de Stanewell; that William le Taillour of Shoe Lane assaulted Matilda la Bakere on Sunday before the Feast of St Laurence [10 Aug.] and lies hid at night in Shoe Lane, springing out on honest men passing by. The jurors of the Ward of Farringdon Within make no presentment. (L)

5 July 1340

4. Wednesday after the Feast of SS. Peter and Paul [29 June] Ao 14 Edw. III [1340]. The jury, drawn from the Wards of Bridge, Billingsgate and Tower, present Andrew le Brewere of the parish of St Andrew Huberd as a man who sleeps by day and wanders about at night, and Richard le Wayte of Essex as a nightwalker with sword and buckler, and an associate of bad characters; they further present that Alice la Jueler of the same parish keeps a disorderly house; that Henry, late keeper of the wharf of Henry Combemartyn, robbed William de Stanes, potter, of twenty-two brass pieces value 40s; that a surgeon, name unknown, is a receiver of bad characters; that Agnes de Chedyngfeld and Clarice la Claterballok do the same and are women of ill-fame; and that a certain Sayer de Valoyns, who dwells with the latter, prefers bad company to good. The jurors of Bridge Ward make no presentment. (L)

5 July 1340

5. The same day. The jury drawn from the Wards of Broad Street, Walbrook, Dowgate and Candlewick Street present Thomas Whitheved, Joan la Tapstere and William atte Ponde as persons of ill-fame, and say that a house in Apcherche Lane—"atte Pye on the hope"—and a brewhouse near the Church of St Mary Wolnoth are the resort of bad characters; they further say that John le Parker is a receiver of evildoers and women of ill-fame, that John Albon and Master John le Leche are thieves, that Thomas le Keu, "herberger," dwelling in the Rents of the Abbot of St Albans, is a receiver of evildoers and women of ill-fame; that Sarra le Mareschal, dwelling in the Rents of the Archdeacon of Colchester, keeps a disorderly house; that Henry le Taillour receives bad characters; that Walter Walteshelf, Gracian le Palmer and John Walssh are nightwalkers, well dressed and lavish of their money, though no one knows how they get their living, and that these people, if they had their opportunity, would sooner consort with bad characters and disturbers of the peace than with men of good report. The jurors of the Wards of Walbrook and Candlewick Street make no presentment. (L)

Membr. 14b

5 July 1340

6. The same day. The jury, drawn from the Wards of Portsoken, Lime Street, Bishopsgate and Cornhill, present Master Gerard le Armourer, John de Lincoln, "furbour (fn. 30) ," and John le Keu, "fevere (fn. 31) ," and his servants, as armed nightwalkers, who had threatened the beadle of Algate Ward because he refused to open the gate for them at midnight. They further present Roger Torold, taverner, and John de Wrytele for harbouring evildoers, and say that women of ill-fame continually resort to James le Sherman's Rent, called "le Breggehous," and the houses of Hugh le Peleter and John le Hosteler. (L)

23 Aug. 1340

On Wednesday the eve of St Bartholomew [24 Aug.] Peter de Fulham, who had been committed to Newgate, on an indictment of the men of the mistery of Fishmongers that he was a common evildoer and disobedient to the mistery, was liberated on mainprise. (L)

Membr. 15, 15b

Inquests taken before the Sheriffs and Coroner (fn. 32) with regard to the affrays in Walbrook and Bridge Street on Wednesday, 2 Aug. 1340

3 Aug. 1340

1. Thursday after the Feast of St Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] Ao 14 Edw. III [1340]. The jurors, after describing the affray in Walbrook, say that the Mayor, with his servants and the Sheriffs and their servants, went thither to stop the affray, and commanded the men of the mistery of Skinners to apprehend the offenders and deliver them to the Sheriffs; that the Mayor etc. immediately went on to Bridge Street to give a like command to the Fishmongers, when Robert Halpeny came up, carrying arms against the King's peace and the proclamation of the City, and was arrested by the Mayor and delivered to Roger de Forsham, Sheriff, but broke his arrest and fled; and that thereupon Thomas, son of John Haunsard, laid violent hands on the Mayor, and that John le Brewere wounded the Mayor's Serjeant, Simon de Berkyng, on the head with a stick, felling him to the pavement, so that his life is now despaired of. (L)

3 Aug. 1340

2. The same day. A different jury made a like presentment, adding that in the affray at Walbrook, William de Croydone, chaplain, helped the fishmongers, who were armed with knives called "bydaus" and "panades," and that Robert Furneux and Simon Haunsard took part in the resistance to the Mayor and Sheriffs in Bridge Street. (L)

3 Aug. 1340

3-5. The same day. Three further juries made like presentments in the same matter. (L)

9 Sept. 1340

Saturday after the Feast of the Nativity B.M. [8 Sept.], Thomas Marvel, "keu (fn. 33) ," servant of Walter de Schardebourgh, cook, was mainprised for his good behaviour. (L)

Membr. 16

3 Aug. 1340

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and an immense Commonalty on Thursday after the Feast of S t Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340]

The names of seventy-three of the many Commoners who were present.

The mode of safeguarding the City (fn. 34) —as undertaken by the civic authorities on the occasion of the King's going abroad in the 12th year of his reign—having been read, the Mayor and Sheriffs reported the affray between the Fishmongers and Skinners in Walbrook on the preceding day, the arrest of Robert Halpeny in Bridge Street and his rescue by Robert Furneux, Simon Haunsard, Thomas, son of John Haunsard, John le Brewere, porter, William atte Felde, William de Clopham, Ralph Thomelyn, fishmongers, and Robert Wygeyn, mariner; and the assault on the Mayor by Thomas, son of John Haunsard, who took the Mayor by the throat, and the wounding of Simon de Berkyng by John le Brewere. The said Thomas and John were brought in, and acknowledged their guilt. Judgment was deferred until Thursday after the Feast of the Decollation of St John the Baptist [29 Aug.], when the Commonalty were asked what penalty should be inflicted on the guilty men. After deliberation the Commonalty, by the mouth of William de Iford their Common Serjeant, declared that they ought to be beheaded immediately by the Stone Cross in Cheap. Thereupon judgment was given by the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen, with the assent of the whole Commonalty, that this sentence be carried out (fn. 35) , which was done the same day by the Sheriffs. (L)

31 Aug. 1340

In the same Congregation on Thursday after the Feast of the Decollation of St John the Baptist [29 Aug.], John de Oxford, skinner, servant of Robert de Aynesham, who had been the chief cause of the affray between the Fishmongers and the Skinners mentioned above, was committed to prison for a year and a day by the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen, with the assent of the whole Commonalty, at the expiration of which term he was to find security for his good behaviour. (L)

Membr. 16b

31 Aug. 1341

At a Congregation of the Mayor and Aldermen on Friday after the above Feast a year later [1341], the above John de Oxford was mainprised for his good behaviour by the following twelve skinners: John de Bedeford, Robert de Eynesham, Thomas de Farnham, Laurence Sely, Walter Page, Simon de Pulham, Robert de Lyncoln, Simon Rote, Robert de Cnapwelle, John Trappe, John de Bury, and Adam de Bury. (L)

Membr. 17, 17b

30 Aug. 1340

Names of the Commoners present at the Congregation held on Thursday after the Feast of the Decollation [29 Aug.] Ao 14 Edw. III, when Thomas Haunsard and John le Brewere were condemned to death.

The East of Walbrook: Tower [24], Bradestrete [24], Bishopsgate [22], Cornhill [24], Algate [12], Portsokene [12], Lymstrete [6], Douuegate [24], Bridge [22], Billingsgate [23], Candelwykstrete [21], Walebrok [20], Langebourne [21].

The West of Walbrook: Farndon Within [24], Aldresgate [24], Crepelgate [27], Chepe [24], Colmanstrete [22], Bassieshawe [14], Queenhithe [22], Castle Baynard [25], Vintry [21], Bredstrete [23], Cordwainer Street [28], Farndon Without [19], [Total: 528].

Membr. 18

21 Sept. 1340

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and an immense Commonalty on Thursday the Feast of S t Matthew [21 Sept.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340]

Adam Lucas was elected (fn. 36) Sheriff by the Mayor; and Bartholomew Denmars, as his colleague, by the Commonalty. (L)

Ralph de Upton and William de Brykelesworth, Aldermen, and Henry de Preston and Reginald de Thorp, were elected auditors of the Chamberlain's accounts. (L)

25 Sept. 1340

On Monday after the above Feast, Ralph Thomelyn, fishmonger, was mainprised by ten for his good behaviour. (L)

Thomas, apprentice of John Litle, was mainprised by his master, and Edmund, son of Thomas de Ware, by his father etc. (L)

Two aldermen and four commoners were elected to collect money from the "religious" and other foreigners having rents and tenements in the City. (L)

12 Oct. 1340

Pleas held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Tuesday before the Feast of S t Edward King [13 Oct.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340]

Richard le Keu, "webbe (fn. 37) ," was attached to answer Richard de Horwode, bailiff of the Weavers, for preventing him from executing a judgment of the Court of the Weavers, and for assaulting him with a drawn sword. He was found guilty by a jury of this offence and of general insubordination towards the authorities of the City and the trade of Weavers. He was committed to prison until he paid two marks damages to the plaintiff and a fine of two shillings to the Sheriffs. (L)

Membr. 18b

13 Oct. 1340

On Friday the Feast of the Translation of St Edward King, the above Richard was mainprised for his good behaviour. (L)

Note of a meeting of the Mayor, Aldermen and auditors of the Chamberlain's accounts on Monday after the above Feast. (L)

9 Nov. 1340

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commoners on Thursday before the Feast of S t Martin [11 Nov.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340]

It was agreed that six tuns of wine should be sent to Sir William de Montacute, Earl of Salisbury, at the expense of the Commonalty (fn. 38) . (L)

20 Dec. 1340

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday the eve of S t Thomas the Apostle [21 Dec.]

It was agreed to send the following present to the King's sons living in the Tower, viz. 4 carcases of beef, 8 pigs, 12 swans, 6 calves, 2 dozen rabbits, 4 dozen capons and 2 tuns of wine. (L)

Membr. 19

11 Oct. 1340

Pleas held before the Mayor and Sheriffs continued

On Wednesday before the Feast of the Translation of St Edward King [13 Oct.], William Dynion, a merchant of Sluys, brought a letter from the Echevins, Captains and Councillors of Ghent directed to the Echevins, Jurats and Councillors of London, praying them to assist the above William to recover from William le Brasseur of London a debt of £8 "de gros." (fn. 39) William le Brewer (sic) was summoned to attend next day, when the plaintiff alleged that he delivered to him 40 barrels of woad-ash, by the hands of John de Grave, to sell at £12, and that William le Brewer, having sold the woad, detained the money. The defendant said that he received the woad from John de Grave to sell at £7 17s, without any mention being made of William Dynion, and that he sold it and paid over the money, for which he held John de Grave's acquittance. A jury gave a verdict in his favour. (F and L)

Membr. 19b

7 Dec. 1340

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and Commoners on the morrow of S t Nicholas Bishop [6 Dec.]

One auditor from each ward was appointed to hear the account of Reginald de Conduit for the time when he was receiver of the toll of 1d the lb, imposed on foreign merchants bringing avoirdupois (averia ponderis) and other merchandise to the City. (L)

Cedula

Particulars of the crews of ships furnished by the City.

The "Seyntemariecog" of "Grenewych," 120 tuns burden; Master: Stephen Sarloc.

Bregge Ward, 18 men; Billinggesgate, 18 men; Candelwykstrete, 7 men; Cornhill, 4 men; Bradestrete, 8 men; Bysshopisgate, 8 men; Walbrok, 20 men.

Total of men-at-arms, 83; mariners, 24; and 6 boys (garzouns).

The "Michiel" of "Dertemowthe," 80 tuns burden; Master: William Weryn.

Vinetrie, 21 men; Queenhithe, 13 men; Chostel Baynard, 3 men; Aldresgate, 4 men; Langebourne, 15 men.

Total of men-at-arms, 56; mariners, 20; and 6 boys.

The "Cok Johan" of "Fowy," chosen by the City for the fleet, left without leave, and in her place was sent the "Godzer" of "Tynemowth," 95 tuns burden; Master: William Pondere.

Farndon Without and Within, 19 men; Crepelgate Without and Within, 17 men; Cordewanerestrete, 24 men; Colmanstrete, 5 men.

Total of men-at-arms, 87 (fn. 40) ; mariners, 25; and 10 boys.

The "Cok James" of "Dertemowth," 60 tuns burden; Master: John Bourne.

Chepewarde, 26 men; Bredstrete, 14 men; Bassyngeshawe, 2 men; Algate, 2 men; Portesokene, 2 men; Lymstrate, 2 men.

Total of men-at-arms, 48; mariners, 25; and 3 boys.

The "Naudeu" of London; Master: Henry Prest.

Douuegate, 19 men.

Total of men-at-arms, 19. (L)

Membr. 20, 21.

The names of men-at-arms sent to the King at Orewell by the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty of London 18 June 1340 to assist in the war against Philip of Valois.

[The duty of providing men appears to have been charged on the wealthier inhabitants of the Wards. The Aldermen and certain others each provided two men. John Hamond of Walbrook found four. In many cases two or three citizens shared the expense of finding one man-at-arms. In other cases a person named, cum sociis suis, provided one or more. In Bassishaw Ward, John de Dallynge was charged with one man-at-arms, and the rest of the Ward with another. Thomas Gysors of Vintry and others served in their own persons, and many others were evidently represented by kinsmen.]

Membr. 21 b

Total of men from the East (of Walbrook): 140; from the West: 143.

Total from both parts of the City: 283.

Thus there was a deficit of seventeen men from the 300 required. Of these seventeen, six went in the Company of Henry Darcy, leaving a final deficit of eleven men, for whom fifteen citizens (named) ought to have been responsible. (L)

29 June 1340

At a Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Thursday after the Feast of the Nativity of St John the Baptist [24 June] Ao 14 Edw. III [1340] it was resolved that the above fifteen citizens, who had failed to provide men, should each pay 50s to the Commonalty. (L)

Membr. 21,

Cedula 1 8 Jan. 1341

At a Court of Andrew Aubrey, Mayor, held on Monday after the Epiphany [6 Jan.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340-1] for presentments of defaults in the various Wards at Christmas last

Twenty-eight persons (named) of the Wards of Cordwainer, Bishopsgate and Broad Street were amerced for refusing to serve on the Watch, when summoned by the beadles of their wards. (L)

Membr. 21,

Cedula 2

Names of sureties for Margaret, wife of John Haunsard, and Helewysia de Mycham.

Membr. 22

22 Dec. 1340

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen, one of the Sheriffs and numerous Commoners, on Friday the morrow of S t Thomas the Apostle [21 Dec.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340]

Ralph de Upton, John Hamond, William de Pomfreyt and John de Refham, Aldermen, and William Box, John de Rokele, Thomas de Waldene and Reginald de Thorpe, Commoners, were elected to consider how money could be raised to prevent Robert de Burghcher, Chancellor, William de Kyldesby, Robert Parnyng, Treasurer, Robert de Sadyngton and William Scot, the King's commissioners, from sitting at the Guildhall to hold an inquiry contrary to the liberties of the City (fn. 41) .

A note to the effect that nothing was done, inasmuch as the Justices in Eyre were summoned to sit at the Tower, and this fact was proclaimed throughout the City and suburbs on 21 Jan. Ao 14 Edw. III [1340-1]. (L)

1 Feb. 1341

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and numerous Commoners on Thursday the eve of the Purification B.M. [2 Feb.] A o15 Edw. III [1340-1]

A Ward Committee was appointed to consider how best to raise ways and means for defending the City's franchises before the Justices Itinerant at the Tower (fn. 42) on 5 March next. (L)

16 Feb. 1341

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Friday after the Feast of S t Valentine [14 Feb.] A o 15 Edw. III [1340-1]

[The names of 33 Commoners are given, but no business is recorded.]

Membr. 22b

17 Feb. 1341

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Saturday after the Feast of S t Valentine [14 Feb.]

A bill of complaint, addressed to the Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs, was brought by the commune of the mistery of Mercers, to the effect that its franchises were prejudiced by certain foreigners of Norfolk, viz. Simon de Stanhowe and his partners, William Sprot, Robert Sprot, John de Nareford and others, who were selling cut materials (vendantz et trenchantz) to foreigners and citizens, viz. silk coverchiefs, thread, "aylesames," and linen stuff, and all other goods belonging to mercery. It was ordered that any mercer finding a foreigner cutting up such material (cindendo per particulas) and "exposing it for sale might, in the absence of a Serjeant, seize the goods and carry them to the Sheriff. (F and L)

2 April 1341

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and an immense Commonalty at Guildhall on Monday the morrow of Palm Sunday [1 April] A o 15 Edw. III [1341]

John de Tyffeld brought a bill of complaint addressed to the Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and Commonalty, against Martin de Aumbresbury, goldsmith, alleging that the latter at a meeting in Guildhall the same day had called him false, disloyal and a conspirator, a maintainer of false plaints in the City and a person who practised champerty (fn. 43) . The above Martin declared that all he had said against the plaintiff was true. Both parties demanded an inquiry at the hands of the Mayor and Aldermen. A jury was summoned, which gave a verdict for the plaintiff. Precept was issued to attach the defendant, who was absent, for his appearance at the next Husting to hear judgment. (F and L)

Membr. 23

20 March 1341

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen, Sheriffs and an immense Commonalty on Tuesday the Feast of S t Cuthbert [20 March]

Hugh de Croydon, keeper of the Gaol of Newgate, was removed from his office for divers oppressions and extortions practised on the prisoners in his charge, and the Sheriffs were ordered to appoint a fit person in his stead. (L)

It was ordered that the Aldermen in their several wards should raise a moiety of the present voted, but not yet sent, to the King, and apply the money to the costs and expenses of the session of the Itinerant Justices at the Tower. (L)

2 April 1341

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Monday the morrow of Palm Sunday [1 April]

Simon Fraunceys and William de Brykelesworth were elected to attend the Parliament to be held at Westminster in the quinzaine of Easter, to do and consent to what shall there be ordained by the King and his Council. (L)

Ralph de Upton and Richard de Berkyng, Aldermen, and Henry Wymond and John de Bredstrete, Commoners, were elected to sue out writs (fn. 44) ordering the allowance of the City's liberties by the Justices Itinerant at the Tower. (L)

16 April 1341

A Congregation of the Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Monday the morrow of the Close of Easter [15 April]

Henry Darcy, Richard Lacer, Ralph de Upton, Simon Fraunceys, John de Mockyng and William de Brykelesworth, Aldermen, and William Haunsard, Henry Wymond, John Lovekyn, William de Rothyng, John de la Rokele, Richard de Keslyngbury, John de Bredstrete, John de Enefeld, William de Elsyng, William de Iford, Robert de Shordyche and John Tornegold, Commoners, were elected to treat with the King's Council in matters concerning the City (fn. 45) . (L)

Martin de Aumesbury was mainprised for his good behaviour towards John de Tyffeld. (L)

Membr. 23b

Names of the jurors from each Ward attending the Iter at the Tower, A.D. 1341.

[Aldgate and Lime Street were represented by one jury, as were also Bassishaw and Coleman Street.]

Membr. 24

9 May 1341

On Wednesday after the Feast of St John ante Portam Latinam [6 May], at the hour of parish Mass, a certain Thomas Beneyt came to the house of Andrew Aubrey, Mayor, representing that he belonged to the household of William de Montacute, Earl of Salisbury, and produced a letter (F), purporting to be written by the Earl, in which the Mayor was requested to lend the Earl £40 and to entrust the money to the bearer. The Mayor, noticing that the seal was clumsily placed on the letter, and never having seen the said Thomas before, suspected that he was an impostor. Accordingly he ordered his factor, Thomas Aubrey, to bring the money, but privately told him to be dilatory in counting it out, and to keep the man waiting, until he could make inquiries. However, the latter suspected, from the slowness of the payment, that doubts were entertained against him, and crept away secretly, while the Mayor was at Mass. Orders were given to the Mayor's doorkeeper to bring him back, and after some time the wanted man was found near St Paul's Church, in a different suit of clothes, and taken back to the Mayor's house, where he was detained till Saturday by request of the Earl of Salisbury. On that day he came before the Mayor and Aldermen at the Guildhall and admitted that the letter was forged, and that he had taken an impression of the Earl's seal from another letter, and fixed it on the forgery. He was handed over to the Earl. A week later the forger executed a quitclaim to the Mayor of all actions, plaints or demands arising by reason of his imprisonment. (L)

11 July 1341

Pleas held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Wednesday after the Feast of the Translation of S t Thomas the Martyr [7 July]

Thomas Lauda of Wales, tailor, and Richard de Kent, cobbler, were attached to answer a charge of having assaulted and thrown stones at Peter, the beadle of Bassishaw, when the latter was in charge of the watch. An associate, William de Stotford, afterwards came into court to answer the same charge. The defendants were found guilty by a jury, and adjudged to pay the plaintiff 20s damages. Subsequently they were released from prison on mainprise, on the prosecutor's withdrawing the claim for damages against them. (L)

Membr. 24b

18 Jan. 1341

At a Court of the Mayor, Aldermen and Chamberlain (fn. 46) on Thursday before the Feast of the Conversion of S t Paul [25 Jan.] A o 14 Edw. III [1340-1]

Order was given to summon Alice, widow of John Ballard, skinner, and William de Pountfreyt and Walter de Oxford, skinner, her mainpernors, to show cause why £30 left by the above John to his children, Richard, John and Cecilia— which money was entrusted to Alice under the said mainprise in the Chamber—should not be paid out to the surviving children, who were now of age, to wit, John and Cecilia, the latter of whom had married Robert de Hamme. It was reported in court that Alice and her mainpernor Walter were dead, and had no lands, tenements, heirs or executors. The remaining mainpernor, William, called to witness the Book of Memoranda of the Chamber to prove that in anno 17 Edw. II [1323-4] he was discharged from his mainprise, on the appointment of Adam de Bokeland, skinner, and Roger atte Sole. The matter was remitted to the Husting, where it was reported that Adam de Bokeland was dead and had no lands, tenements etc., and that Roger atte Sole, though surviving, had no goods and chattels, lands or tenements in the City. Thereupon a jury was summoned to inquire what goods and chattels, lands and tenements he had on the day he undertook the mainprise. They found that he had at that time and still had two shops in the parish of All Hallows Gracechurch of an annual value of 5 marks, less 13s 4d quitrent to the Nuns of Haliwelle and 6s 8d annual repairs, which shops had come to him by his marriage with Christina, daughter of Richard de Hirston, cordwainer, and were now in the tenure of Master Henry de Grenehurst. The latter was summoned to show cause why a moiety of the two shops should not be delivered to the children until the £30 due could be levied from them. As he had nothing to say in opposition, the southern moiety was delivered to the claimants to hold until the legacy was discharged from the rents, and 17s rent already due was stopped in the hands of the tenants for payment to the same claimants. (L)

Membr. 25

20 July 1341

Inquest held before the Mayor and Sheriffs on Friday the Feast of St Margaret [20 July] Ao 15 Edw. III [1341] as to a disturbance which took place the preceding evening in the parish of St Mary Aldermanbury opposite the hostel (hospicium) of Sir Robert Parnyng (fn. 47) , the King's Treasurer. The jury said that certain men, to whom the King owed money for wages, went to the Treasurer with letters under the Privy Seal instructing him to pay the sums due, and that the Treasurer put them off with smooth and false words, after which members of his household assaulted the men with drawn swords and wounded them, without any reasonable cause. (L)

23 July 1341

On Monday the morrow of St Mary Magdalene [22 July] Ao 15 Edw. III [1341] John Oubrey, mason, was brought into full Husting by John Wolfel, beadle of the Ward of Farndon Without, and other reputable men of the same Ward, on a charge of being a common forestaller of pavingstones. Evidence was given to the effect that a certain merchant stranger named John Joye had that day offered for sale at Flete Bridge a boat-load of stone for 7s to Thomas de Banham, and that John Oubrey had immediately offered him 8s 3d to the common prejudice of the City. A jury from the neighbourhood of Flete Bridge, of which the above Thomas de Banham was a member, found him guilty of forestalling. He was committed to prison, but was released on payment of a fine of 20s to the Sheriff. (L)

A copy of the bill sent to the assessors and collectors of the several Wards, ordering them to levy their quota of the 2000 marks due to the King, which he had assigned to divers creditors, in part payment of £5000 lent to the King in the 14th year of his reign. (F)

[The bill, directed to the collectors of Langebourne Ward, orders them to levy £86 17s 10d, and to repay 5s for each £ lent by the good men of the Ward towards the £5000 abovementioned. The surplus is to be brought to Guildhall.]

Membr. 25 b

6 Aug. 1341

A Congregation of the Mayor, Aldermen and an immense Commonalty on Monday after the Feast of S t Peter ad Vincula [1 Aug.] A o 15 Edw. III [1341]

Six aldermen, of whom two were chosen from the East and four from the West (of Walbrook), and two reputable commoners from each Ward were elected to see to the raising of £2000, viz. 2000 marks for payment to various citizens in part payment of £5000 (fn. 48) lent to the King, and 1000 marks for City purposes. (L)

Names of the aldermen and commoners.

Seven aldermen, one of the Sheriffs, and nineteen commoners were also elected to treat with the King's Council touching the provision of ships with men-at-arms and victuals for the war in foreign parts. (L)

26 Aug. 1341

A Congregation of Mayor, Aldermen and two Commoners from each Ward on Sunday after the Feast of S t Bartholomew [24 Aug.]

Mention was made of a very grievous burden imposed on the City, viz. the provision of twenty-six ships. After discussion, the Ward representatives pledged their Wards to pay the necessary sums, and co-opted the assessors of the fifteenth, lately granted to the King in the presence of Lord de Wake, Sir William Scot and Sir William de Langeford. (L)

Membr. 26

The names of the Ward representatives, and of the assessors above-mentioned, and the sums charged on each Ward for providing the ships. (Total: £1587 8s 7d.)

27 Aug. 1341

On Monday after the above Feast a bill was sent under the Mayor's Seal to the collectors and assessors of the Wards, ordering them to raise 2000 marks for payment to those who had contributed to the £5000 loan to the King and for City purposes; the money to be brought to the Guildhall on Wednesday. (F)

Precept was issued to the Sheriffs to assist the collectors and assessors in raising the above sum. (L)

20 Sept. 1341

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on the eve of S t Matthew the Apostle [21 Sept.]

Nicholas Crane of London brings a plaint of Intrusion (fn. 49) against John, son of John Spray, touching his free tenement in the parish of St Nicholas Shambles. He appoints Cristian de Bury his attorney. (L)

Membr. 26b

25 Sept. 1341

On Tuesday after the above Feast another bill was sent to the collectors and assessors of the tax of 2000 marks, with regard to which nothing had as yet been done. The money is to be at Guildhall by Wednesday after Michaelmas. (F)

26 Sept. 1341

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday after the above Feast

Richard Teste and Margery his wife demand an Assize of Nuisance (fn. 50) against Henry de Lyndeseye, clerk, touching their free tenement in the parish of St Swithin. (L)

22 June 1341

Friday before the Feast of the Nativity of S t John the Baptist [24 June] A o 15 Edw. III [1341]

Proceedings by Matilda, widow of Thomas, son of Henry de Gloucestre, and John de Litlyngton, chandler, and William de Harewelle, her co-executors, for the recovery of £22 due on a bond from John de Bedeford, skinner, John de Northburgh, draper, William Baynard, cordwainer, and William Passefeld, spurrier. The above William and William paid their debts out of court. Execution was granted against John de Bedeford for 17s 9d in arrears, and six white budge furs (fn. 51) (furure de bugeto albo) belonging to him were valued at 20s. The executors accepted the furs and returned the balance of 2s 3d to him. In the case of John de Northburgh, a moiety of three shops belonging to him in the parish of All Hallows, Berkyngcherche, of an annual value of 14s, was handed over to the executors as a free tenement until they had levied from the rents thereof the arrears of 3 marks due to them. (L)

3 Oct. 1341

A Congregation of Mayor and Aldermen on Wednesday after the Feast of S t Michael [29 Sept.]

Isabel, widow of Walter de Rokesle, demands an Assize of Nuisance against William Martyn touching her free tenement in the parish of St Michael Cornhill, and appoints John de Manewedene her attorney. (L)

Footnotes

1 The Mayor and Aldermen were summoned before the King and his Council on 20 April 1338, when they promised to safeguard the City during his absence abroad. They were ordered to produce a scheme in writing on the following Friday. Cal, of Letter Book F, pp. 20-3; and below, p. 128. By a writ of 23 Oct. the Duke of Cornwall, acting as Guardian of the kingdom, permitted them to call on all those holding rents, as well religious as others, to make contributions. Ibid. p. 28.
2 Philip of France had gathered a fleet for the purpose of making a descent on the English coast during the King's absence, and throughout the autumn and winter of 1338 there was considerable apprehension in the City.
3 Companies of 100 and sections of 20.
4 This "new house" appears to have been known as "La Bretaske," and to have been used for storing springalds, quarrels, and other war material. Letter Book F, fly-leaf; Riley's Memorials, p. 204.
5 ad emendum pannos pro liberacione....
6 A quilted doublet or jacket. As an article of military equipment it was usually made of leather stuffed, with or without sleeves.
7 A case of Infangenthef. See p. 48, n. 1.
8 In Feb. 1338 Parliament granted the King half the wool of the kingdom, 20,000 sacks, which were to be delivered at Antwerp 7 Aug. 1338. Rymer's Foedera, vol. ii, pt. ii, p. 1022. The citizens of London, having no wool, were allowed to pay a composition of 1000 marks. Cal. of Letter Book E, p. 56.
9 See below, pp. 128, 189.
10 qest merour & en sanple de tute la terre.
11 This refers to the composition of 1000 marks mentioned above.
12 Cf. Cal. of Early Mayor's Court Rolls, p. 251, where a mason was charged with threatening to beat the King's masons and carpenters, if they took less wages in the City than the City masons.
13 See above, p. 40 and n. 1.
14 Built as a prison for nightwalkers by Henry le Waleys, Mayor, about 1283. It was so called because it resembled a tun standing on the one end. Lib. Cust. i, p. 213; Kingsford's Stow, i, pp. 106, 188.
15 A worker in "latten" or brass-alloy.
16 Old Bethlehem Hospital, on the east side of Bishopsgate Street, founded by Simon FitzMary, Sheriff in 1247, as a Priory of Canons, with brethren and sisters of the Order of St Mary of Bethlehem. Kingsford's Stow, i, pp. 164-5.
17 Next day the Mayor and Aldermen entrusted the guardianship of the child to the mother under surety of Richard de Kyselyngbury, "chaucer," and Thomas his brother. Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 39.
18 Set out in Riley's Memorials, pp. 207-8, from Letter Book F, fo. 27 b.
19 These ordinances were repeated in 1344, see Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 101, paras. 1-6.
20 non ponant falsum Licorem in senapio nec in aliis sausibus sive saxifragiis. The root of the white meadow-saxifrage was used in the Middle Ages as a condiment, and was supposed to possess medicinal properties.
21 See p. 95, n. 1.
22 The oath with the single hand, known as the decisory or peremptory oath, was generally sworn by the plaintiff, on the demand of the defendant, but occasionally by the defendant, with permission of the plaintiff, in actions for debt where there was no tally or a lack of evidence, or where a verbal condition in the sale was alleged. See Lib. Alb. i, p. 521; Cal. of Eatly Mayor's Court Rolls, pp. xxxv, 13-14, 66-7, 122-3.
23 The King asked for £20,000, the City offered 5000 marks, and the King finally accepted £5000 as a loan.
24 The famous Flemish nobleman who organized the resistance of the wool-weaving towns of Flanders against their feudal lord, the Count of Flanders. He had recently brought about a treaty between England and the Flemings, based on their mutual interests as producers and consumers of wool.
25 A man on whose goods a distress had been taken might have recovery of the distress by a process known as a replegiare. After having the distress valued, the aggrieved person made a plaint to the Sheriff de namiis injuste captisconcerning pledges unjustly taken—and put in two sureties to answer for the debt claimed against him, after which the distress was returned to him. The Sheriff then drew up a bill containing the substance of the plaint, which was filed in the Husting of Common Pleas, where the action was heard and judgment given. Lib. Alb. i, pp. 188-9; Jacob's Law Dictionary, "Replevin."
26 See also pp. 126-8. This affray is said to have originated in a struggle for precedence between the two companies. Herbert, Livery Companies, II, p. 306. Even after the drastic punishment of the offenders, disturbances continued until on 27 Nov. 1343 the better men of both misteries were summoned before the Mayor, Aldermen and Sheriffs, and two days later came to an agreement to deal with evildoers among their members. Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. 95-7.
27 It appears from a series of inquests held on Ralph Turk towards the end of Aug. (Cal. of Coroners' Rolls, pp. 266-9) that he died of a blow from a "polax" or "sparth" inflicted either by John de Cornubia, otherwise "Lyttle Jakke," or by Geoffrey Horn, skinner, or by the latter's master, Robert de Stodham, skinner.
28 This was probably a Court of Aldermen, at which the Chamberlain was present as the custodian of the property of orphans. Jurisdiction in orphanage belonged to that Court, being afterwards delegated to a Court of Orphans under the Common Serjeant. The Chamberlain's own court, of which some proceedings of A.D. 1299 are bound up with the Mayor's Court Rolls, was exclusively concerned with matters relating to apprenticeship. See Cal. of Early Mayor's Court Rolls, pp. 46-8; Laws and Customs of London, A.D. 1765, pp. 192-3. See below, p. 138, for a similar plea of orphanage before the Mayor, Aldermen and Chamberlain, and Cal. of Letter Book G, p. 55.
29 These juries of grouped wards were a development of the ordinary inquest juries of the wardmotes, which were already at this time an ancient institution. They corresponded in the City to the leet juries of the hundreds and large private sokes, which presented offenders before the Sheriffs in their Tourns. Their presentments in the Iter of 1276 are preserved in the Hundred Rolls (Rec. Comm.). An ancient set of articles for the Wardmote Inquest is given in the City's Liber Home, fo. 232. Though a Wardmote Inquest might be summoned at any time by precept of the Mayor, their meetings became an annual event, taking place on St Thomas's Day, and the presentments were made to the Grand Court of Wardmote at Guildhall on Plow Monday. The inquests ceased to be summoned in 1856, when those portions of the Wardmote Precepts relating to the summoning and impanelling of the juries were omitted. Court of Ald. Minutes, 29 Nov. 1856.
30 Sc. furbisher. It appears from the ordinances of the Furbishers in 1350 (Riley's Memorials, p. 259) that among other articles they made pommels and hilts of swords and leather scabbards.
31 Sc. smith.
32 It appears from the records of the Session of the Itinerant Justices at the Tower in 1244 that the King's Chamberlain together with the Sheriffs (City's Iter Roll AA; Lib. Alb. i, pp. 77-109) were regarded as keeping the Pleas of the Crown. The King's Chamberlain was also King's Butler and ex officio Coroner. Lib. Cust. i, p. 296. They were considered to be the proper officers to hold inquests as to deaths and accidents (Lib. Alb. p. 83), though the Sheriffs had been in the custom of making attachments and holding inquests without the King's Chamberlain. Ibid. p. 100. The duties of the Coroner were defined in the Statute of 1275-6 (Statutes of the Realm (Rec. Comm.), i, pp. 40-1), when they were empowered to hold inquests as to homicides, fatal accidents, rapes, wounding and maiming, treasure-trove, etc. In ordinary circumstances, persons indicted as the result of such inquests would be dealt with either by the Justices of Gaol Delivery at Newgate or before the Itinerant Justices. In the present case the City authorities took action on the ground that they had promised to hold the City for the King and to maintain his peace, in accordance with a scheme laid before the Council on 20 April 1338 (see below, p. 189), in which disturbers of the peace were threatened with judgment of life and limb.
33 Cook.
34 Cf. Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. 20-3, and below, p. 189.
35 Though the City authorities had Infangenthef, i.e. the right of hanging thieves with the mainour of stolen goods found on them, as conferred by the first charter of Edw. III, they had no other power of life and death, except as commissioners for Gaol Delivery at Newgate. On 6 Dec. 1340 the King sent a letter under the Privy Seal commending their action, and ratifying it, "so far as in us lies." Riley's Memorials, pp. 210-11. On 18 March 1346 the King sent a further writ mentioning that he had already indemnified them for their action and ordering them to put down any disturbance which might arise in the City by reason of it. Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 138. The many occasions on which Edw. III and his predecessors had charged the City authorities with the duty of maintaining the peace formed precedents for the establishment of Justices of the Peace for the country at large. Cf. i Edw. III (1327), stat. ii, § 16 (Statutes of the Realm, i, p. 257); 18 Edw. III (1344), st. ii, § 2 (ibid. p. 301); 34 Edw. III (1361), c. i (ibid. pp. 364-5).
36 See p. 69, n. 1.
37 Weaver.
38 In the Chamberlain's accounts above mentioned, one item concerns robes sent to the Earl of Salisbury. He was Marshal of England at the time, and the presentation was in accordance with City custom. Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 55.
39 In Flemish groats or grosses.
40 The contingent from Tower Ward is omitted from this list; possibly it consisted of 22 men—the number needed to complete the total of 87.
41 After making an unsatisfactory truce with Philip of France, Edw. III returned home on 30 Nov. 1340 with the intention of punishing those who had been remiss in collecting and sending out supplies. On 10 Dec. a writ was sent to the Sheriffs announcing the appointment of a commission of Justices to inquire into the misdoings of the King's ministers. The commission ordered juries to meet them at the Guildhall on 20 Dec. On that day the Mayor, Aldermen and Commonalty, by the mouth of the Recorder, challenged the session on the ground that it was contrary to the franchise of the City, which allowed no Justices to sit within the liberty of the City, except at the Tower when an Iter was being held, at Newgate for Gaol Delivery, and at St Martin le Grand for the correction of errors and taking inquisitions. Thereupon the Justices postponed their session till 16 Jan. 1341, when the King annulled their commission and ordered an Iter at the Tower. Cal. of Letter Book F, pp. xiii, 59-60.
42 The Iter continued from 5 March to 18 May 1541. For proceedings see P.R.O. Assize Rolls 549-52.
43 Jacob's Law Dict. "A bargain with the plaintiff or defendant in a suit to have part of the land, debt or other thing sued for, if the party that undertakes it prevails therein." It was repeatedly forbidden by statute. 3 Edw. I, c. 25; 13 Edw. I, c. 49; 20 Edw. I, de Conspiratoribus; 28 Edw. I, c. ii, etc.
44 Murimuth says that these writs were refused by Chancery, whereupon a number of unknown persons caused a riot at the Tower. Chron. A. Murimuth (Rolls Series), p. 119.
45 The Itinerant Justices at the Tower, after adjourning on 17 March, met again on 16 April. The above-mentioned committee was probably concerned with the payment of 500 marks, whereby the City secured the termination of the Iter. Col. of Letter Book F, pp. 61, 92.
46 See above, p. 123, n. 1.
47 Robert Parnyng, or Parvyng, was Chief Justice of the King's Bench from 24 July 1340 (Cal. Close Rolls, 1339-41, p. 497), Treasurer the same year (Cal. of Letter Book F, p. 59), and Chancellor in Oct. 1341 (Cal. Close Rolls, 1341-3, p. 301).
48 See p. 120, n. 2.
49 A person disseised of his freehold in the City might have redress by bringing a plaint of Intrusion either to any Husting held in the Guildhall or to a Congregation of the Mayor and Aldermen in the Chamber of the Guildhall. An Assize of Freshforce or Novel Disseisin was then summoned before the Sheriffs and Coroner on any Saturday in the Guildhall, to decide whether the plaintiff had been disseised unjustly and without judgment, and reseisin might be granted. Freshforce was already in existence before 1166, when Henry II established the Assize of Novel Disseisin by the Assize of Clarendon, and we are told that the King approved of the City custom. English Historical Review, xvii, p. 708; Add. MS. 14, 252, fos. 113a-116b; Lib. Alb. i, pp. 114, 195-8.
50 An Assize of Nuisance was the remedy for disputes between neighbours concerning party-walls, rain-gutters, ancient lights, etc. It was established towards the close of the 12th century by Fitz-Eylwin's Assize of Building, the text of which is given in Lib. Alb. pp. 319-32. It could be demanded either in the Husting or in the Mayor's Court. The Court consisted of the Mayor, Sheriffs and Aldermen, and the Assize or jury of 12 men gave their verdict after view taken on the premises in dispute. Rolls of this Assize for the period 1300-1428 are preserved in the Guildhall Records Office. By the 17th century the Assize had become an ordinary action in the Husting of Common Pleas begun by a writ de quod permittat.
51 N.E.D. A kind of fur consisting of lambskin with the wool dressed outwards.


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