February 1689

Commons Journal

Lords Journal

Roger Whitley's Diary

History and Proceedings

Grey's Debates

CSPD James II

CSPD William and Mary

CSP, Colonial

Treasury Books

Treasury Papers

King James' Parliament
The succession of William and Mary - begins 13/2/1689

Sponsor

History of Parliament Trust

Publication

Year published

1742

Pages

255-277

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'King James' Parliament: The succession of William and Mary - begins 13/2/1689', The History and Proceedings of the House of Commons : volume 2: 1680-1695 (1742), pp. 255-277. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=37644 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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Upon the 13th of February the Prince and Princess of Orange, being placed on two large Seats under a Canopy of State in the Banquetting-House, both Houses of the Convention waited upon their Highnesses in a full Body, and caus'd the Clerk of the Crown to read with a loud Voice the following Declaration of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons-assembled at Westminster; the most memorable and significant that had been known for several Ages.

The two Houses Declaration of Rights.

'Whereas the late King James the Second, by the Assistance of divers evil Counsellors, Judges and Ministers employed by him, did endeavour to subvert and extirpate the Protestant Religion, and the Laws and Liberties of this Kingdom; by assuming and exercising a Power of dispensing with, and suspending of Laws, without Consent of Parliament: By committing and prosecuting divers worthy Prelates, for humbly petitioning to be excus'd from concurring to the said assumed Power: By issuing and causing to be executed, a Commission under the Great Seal, for erecting a Court called, The Court of Commissioners for Ecclesiastical Causes: By levying Money for and to the Use of the Crown, by pretence of Prerogative, for other time, and in other manner, than the same was granted by Parliament: By raising and keeping a Standing-Army within this Kingdom in time of Peace, without Consent of Parliament; and quartering Soldiers contrary to Law: By causing divers good Subjects, being Protestants, to be disarm'd, at the same time when Papists were both arm'd and employed contrary to Law: By violating the Freedom of Election of Members to serve in Parliament: By Prosecutions in the Court of King's-Bench for Matters and Causes cognizable only in Parliament; and by divers other arbitrary and illegal Courses. And whereas of late Years, partial, corrupt, and unqualified Persons, have been return'd and serv'd on Juries in Trials, and particularly divers Jurors in Trials for High-Treason, which were not Freeholders; and excessive Bail hath been required of Persons committed in criminal Cases, to elude the Benefit of the Laws made for the Liberty of the Subjects; and excessive Fines have been imposed; and illegal and cruel Punishments inflicted; and several Grants and Promises made of Fines and Forfeitures, before any Conviction or Judgment against the Persons upon whom the same were to be levied: All which are utterly and directly contrary to the known Laws and Statutes, and Freedom of this Realm.

'And whereas the said late King James the Second, having abdicated the Government, and the Throne being thereby vacant, his Highness the Prince of Orange (whom it hath pleased Almighty God to make the glorious Instrument of delivering this Kingdom from Popery and Arbitrary Power) did (by the Advice of the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and divers principal Persons of the Commons) cause Letters to be written to the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, being Protestants, and other Letters to the several Counties, Cities, Universities, Boroughs, and Cinque-Ports, for the chusing of such Persons to represent them, as were of right to be sent to Parliament, to meet and sit at Westminster, upon the 22d Day of January in this Year 1688, in order to such an Establishment, as that their Religion, Laws and Liberties, might not again be in danger of being subverted: Upon which Letters, Elections having been accordingly made; and thereupon the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, pursuant to their several Letters and Elections, being now assembled in a full and free Representative of this Nation, taking into their most serious Consideration the best means for attaining the Ends aforesaid, do in the first place (as their Ancestors in like case have usually done) for vindicating and asserting their ancient Rights and Liberties; declare,

1. 'That the pretended Power of suspending Laws, or Execution of Laws, by regal Authority, without Consent of Parliament, is illegal. 2. That the pretended Power of dispensing with Laws, or the Execution of Laws, by regal Authority, as it hath been assum'd and exercis'd of late, is illegal. 3. That the Commission for erecting the late Court of Commissioners for Ecclesiastical Causes, and all other Commissions and Courts of the like Nature, are illegal and pernicious. 4. That Levying of Money for or to the Use of the Crown, by Pretence of Prerogative, without Grant of Parliament, for longer Time, or in any other Manner than the same is or shall be granted, is illegal. 5. That it is the Right of the Subjects to petition the King, and all Commitments and Prosecutions for such Petioning, are illegal. 6. That the Raising or Keeping a Standing-Army within the Kingdom in time of Peace, unless it be with Consent of Parliament, is against Law. 7. That the Subjects, which are Protestants, may have Arms for their Defence suitable to their Condition, and as allow'd by Law. 8. That Elections of Members of Parliament ought to be Free. 9. That the Freedom of Speech, and Debates or Proceedings in Parliament, ought not to be impeach'd or question'd in any Court or Place out of Parliament. 10. That Excessive Bail ought not to be requir'd, nor Excessive Fines impos'd, nor cruel and unusual Punishments inflicted. 11. That Jurors ought to be duly Empannell'd and Return'd, and Jurors which pass upon Men in Trials of High-Treason ought to be Free-Holders. 12. That all Grants and Promises of Fines and Forfeitures of particular Persons, before Conviction, are illegal and void. 13. And that for Redress of all Grievances, and for the Amending, Strengthening and Preserving of the Laws, Parliaments ought to be held frequently.

'And they do Claim, Demand and Insist upon all and singular the Premisses, as their undoubted Rights and Liberties; and no Declarations, Judgments, Doings or Proceedings, to the Prejudice of the People in any of the said Premisses, ought in any wise to be drawn hereafter into Consequence or Example. To which Demand of their Rights they are particularly encourag'd by the Declaration of his Highnoss the Prince of Orange, as being the only Means for obtaining a full Redress and Remedy therein.

By which the Prince and Princess are made King and Queen.

'Having therefore an entire Confidence, that his said Highness the Prince of Orange will perfect the Deliverance so far advanc'd by him, and will still preserve them from the Violation of their Rights, which they have here asserted, and from all other Attempts upon their Religion, Rights and Liberties; the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, assembled at Westminster, do Resolve, That William and Mary, Prince and Princess of Orange, be, and be declared King and Queen of England, France and Ireland, and the Dominions thereunto belonging, to hold the Crown and Royal Dignity of the said Kingdoms and Dominions, to them the said Prince and Princess during their Lives, and the Life of the Survivor of them; and that the sole and full Exercise of the Regal Power be only in, and executed by the said Prince of Orange, in the Names of the said Prince and Princess during their joint Lives; and after their Decease the said Crown and Royal Dignity of the said Kingdoms and Dominions to be to the Heirs of the Body of the said Princess; and for Default of such Issue, to the Princess Anne of Denmark, and the Heirs of her Body; and for Default of such Issue, to the Heirs of the Body of the said Prince of Orange.'

The Oaths.

'And the said Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, do pray the said Prince and Princess of Orange, to accept the same accordingly: And that the Oaths hereafter mentioned be taken by all Persons of whom the Oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy might be required by Law, instead of them; and that the said Oaths of Allegiance and Supremacy be abrogated: I A. B. do sincerely promise and swear, That I will be faithful, and bear true Allegiance to their Majesties, King William and Queen Mary. So help me God. I A B. do swear, That I do from my Heart abhor, detest and abjure, as impious and heretical, this damnable Doctrine and Position, That Princes excommunicated or depriv'd by the Pope, or any Authority of the See of Rome, may be depos'd or murder'd by their Subjects, or any other whatsoever. And I do declare, That no Foreign Prince, Person, Prelate, State or Potentate, hath or ought to have, any Jurisdiction, Power, Superiority, Pre-eminence, or Authority Ecclesiastical or Spiritual, within this Realm. So help me God.'

The Prince's Answer to it.

After the public Reading of this Declaration, the Marquiss of Hallifax, Speaker of the House of Lords, made a solemn Tender of the Crown to their Highnesses, in the Name of both Houses, the Representative of the Nation; whereupon the Prince of Orange return'd the following Answer: 'My Lords and Gentlemen, This is certainly the greatest Proof of the Trust you have in Us, that can be given, which is the Thing which makes Us value it the more; and We thankfully accept what you have offer'd. And as I had no other Intention in coming hither, than to preserve your Religion, Laws and Liberties; so you may be sure, that I shall endeavour to support them, and shall be willing to concur in any thing that shall be for the Good of the Kingdom, and to do all that is in my power to advance the Welfare and Glory of the Nation.'

William and Mary, proclaimed King and Queen.

The Occasion being so remarkable and extraordinary, it will be necessary to insert the Proclamation itself, which runs thus: 'Whereas it hath pleased Almighty God in his great Mercy to this Kingdom, to vouchsafe us a miraculous Deliverance from Popery and Arbitrary Power; and that our Preservation is due, next under God, to the Resolution and Conduct of his Highness the Prince of Orange, whom God hath chosen to be the glorious Instrument of such an inestimable Happiness to us and our Posterity: And being highly sensible, and fully persuaded of the great and eminent Virtue of her Highness the Princess of Orange, whose, Zeal for the Protestant Religion will, no doubt, bring a Blessing along with her upon this Nation: And whereas the Lords and Commons now assembled at Westminster, have made a Declaration, and presented the same to the said Prince and Princess of Orange, and therein desired them to accept the Crown, who have accepted the same accordingly: We therefore the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, together with the Lord-Mayor and Citizens of London, and others of the Commons of this Realm, do with full. Consent Publish and Proclaim, according to the said Declaration, WILLIAM and MARY, Prince and Princess of Orange, to be King and Queen of England, France and Ireland, with all the Dominions and Territories thereunto belonging; Who are accordingly so to be Own'd, Deem'd and Taken, by all the People of the aforesaid Realms and Dominions, who are from henceforth bound to acknowledge and pay unto them all Faith and true Allegiance; beseeching God, by whom Kings reign, to bless King WILLIAM and Queen MARY, with long and happy Years to reign over us.

The Declaration of the Estates of Scotland, concerning the Misgovernment of King James the seventh, and filling up the Throne with King William and Queen Mary.

'THat King James the seventh had acted irregularly,

'1. By his erecting public Schools and Societies of the Jesuits; and not only allowing Mass to be publicly said, but also inverting Protestant Chapels and Churches to public Mass Houses, contrary to the express Laws against saying and hearing of Mass.

'2 By allowing Popish Books to be printed and dispersed, by a Gift to a Popish Printer, designing him Printer to his Majesty's Houshold, College and Chapel, contrary to the Laws.

'3. By taking the Children of Protestant Noblemen and Gentlemen, sending them abroad to be bred Papists, making great Funds and Donations to Popish Schools and Colleges abroad, bestowing Pensions on Priests, and perverting Protestants from their Religion, by Offers of Places, Preferments, and Pensions.

'4. By disarming Protestants, while at the same time he employed Papists in the Places of the greatest Trust, Civil and Military, such as Chancellor, Secretaries, Privy-Counsellors, and Lords of Session; thrusting out Protestants to make room for Papists, and intrusting the Forts and Magazines of the Kingdom in their Hands.

'5. By imposing Oaths contrary to law.

'6. By giving Gifts and Grants for exacting of Money without Consent of Parliament, or Convention of Estates.

'7. By Levying and keeping on foot a Standing-Army in Time of Peace, without Consent of Parliament; which Army did exact Locality, free and day Quarters.

8. 'By employing the Officers of the Army, as Judges through the Kingdom, and imposing them where there were held Offices and jurisdictions, by whom many of the Lieges were put to death summarily, without legal Trial, Jury or Record.

'9. By imposing exorbitant Fines, to the Value of the Parties Estates, exacting extravagant Bail, and disposing Fines and Forfeitures before any Process or Conviction.

'10. By imprisoning Persons without expressing the Reason, and delaying to put them to Trial.

'11. By causing pursue and forfault several Persons upon Stretches of old and obsolete Laws, upon frivolous and weak Pretences, upon lame and defective Probations: as particularly the late Earl of Argyle, to the Scandal and Reproach of the Justice of the Nation.

'12. By subverting the Right of the Royal Boroughs, the third Estate of Parliament, imposing upon them not only Magistrates, but also the whole Town-Council and Clerks, contrary to the Liberties and Express Charters, without the Pretence either of Sentence, or Consent: So that the Commissioners to Parliament, being chosen by the Magistrates and Councils, the King might in effect as well nominate that entire Estate of Parliament; many of the said Magistrates put in by him were avowed Papists, and the Boroughs were forced to pay Money for the Letters, imposing these illegal Magistrates and Council upon them.

'13. By sending Letters to the chief Courts of Justice, not only ordering the Judges to stop and desist sine die, to determine Causes, but also ordering and commanding them how to proceed in Cases depending before them, contrary to the express Laws: And by changing the nature of the Judges Gifts, ad vitam ant culpam, and giving them Commissions ad bene placitum, to dispose them to compliance by arbitrary Courses, turning them out of their Offices when they did not comply.

'14. By granting personal Protections for civil Debts, contrary to Law.

'All which are utterly and directly contrary to the known Laws, Freedoms, and Statutes of the Realm.

'Therefore the Estates of the Kingdom of Scotland find, and declare, that King James the Seventh, being a profest Papist, did assume the regal Power, and acted as a King, without ever taking the Oath required by Law; and has, by Advice of evil and wicked Counsellors, invaded the fundamental Constitution of the Kingdom, and altered it from a legal, limited Monarchy, to an arbitrary and despotic Power; and hath exercised the same to the subversion of the Protestant Religion, and the Violation of the Laws and Liberties of the Kingdom: Inverting all the Ends of Government, whereby he hath forfeited the Right to the Crown, and the Throne is become vacant.

'And whereas his Royal Highness William, then Prince of Orange, now King of England, whom it hath pleased the Almighty God to make the glorious Instrument of delivering these Kingdoms from Popery and arbitrary Power, did, by Advice of several Lords and Gentlemen of this Nation, at London, for the Time, call the Estates of this Kingdom, to meet the 14th of March last, in order to such an Establishment, as that their Religion, Laws, and Liberties, might not be again in danger of being subverted: And the said Estates being now assembled, in a full and free Representative of this Nation, taking into their most serious Consideration the best Means of attaining the Ends aforesaid, do in the first place (as their Ancestors in the like Cases have usually done, for the vindicating and asserting their ancient Rights and Liberties) declare,

'That by the Law of this Kingdom, no Papist can be King or Queen of this Realm, nor bear any Office whatsoever therein; nor can any Protestant Successor exercise the regal Power, until he or she swear the Coronation Oath.

'That all Proclamations asserting an absolute Power, to cass, annul, and disable Laws; the erecting Schools and Colleges for Jesuits; the inverting Protestant Chapels and Churches to public Mass-houses, and the allowing Mass to be said, are contrary to Law.

'That the allowing Popish Books to be printed and dispersed, is contrary to Law.

'That taking the Children of Noblemen, Gentlemen, and others, sending and keeping them abroad to be bred Papists: The making Funds and Donations to Popish Schools and Colleges; bestowing Pensions on Priests, and the perverting Protestants from their Religion, by Offers of Places, Preferments, and Pensions, are contrary to Law.

'That the disarming Protestants, and employing Papists in the Places of greatest Trust, both Civil and Military; the thrusting out Protestants, to make room for Papists, and entrusting Papists with the Forts and Magazines of the Kingdom, are contrary to Law.

'That the imposing Oaths without Authority of Patliament, is contrary to Law.

'That the giving Gifts or Grants for raising of Money without the Consent of Parliament, or Convention of Estates, is contrary to Law.

'That the employing Officers of the Army, as Judges through the Kingdom, or imposing them where there were several Offices and Jurisdictions, and the putting the Lieges to death summarily, and without legal Trial, Jury, or Record, are contrary to Law.

'That the imposing extraordinary Fines, the exacting of exorbitant Bail, and the disposing of Fines and Fore-faultures before Sentence, are contrary to Law.

'That the imprisoning Persons without expressing the Reason thereof, and delaying to put them to Trial, are contrary to Law.

'That the causing pursue and fore-fault persons upon stretches of old and obsolete Laws, upon frivolous and weak Pretences, upon lame and defective Probation, as particularly the late Earl of Argyle, are contrary to Law.

'That the nominating and imposing Magistrates, Councils and Clerks, upon Burghs, contrary to the Liberties and express Charters, is contrary to Law.

'That the sending Letters to the Courts of Justice, ordaining the Judges to stop or desist from determining Causes, or ordaining them how to proceed in Causes depending before them; and the changing the nature of the Judges Gifts, ad vitam aut culpam, unto Commissioners, durante bene placito, are contrary to Law.

'That the granting personal Protections for civil Debts, is contrary to Law.

'That the forcing the Lieges to depone against themselves in capital Crimes, however the Punishment be restricted, is contrary to Law.

'That the using Torture without Evidence, or in ordinary Crimes, is contrary to Law.

'That the sending of an Army in a hostile manner upon any part of the Kingdom, in a peaceable Time, and exacting of Locality, and any manner of free Quarter, is contrary to Law.

'That the charging the Lieges with Law-boroughs at the King's Instance, and the imposing of Bands without the Authority of Parliament, and the suspending the Advocates from their Employments for not compearing when such Bands were offered, are contrary to Law.

'That the putting of Garrisons on private Men's Houses in a time of Peace, without the Consent of the Authority of Parliament, is contrary to Law.

'That the Opinion of the Lords of Session in the two Causes following, were contrary to Law; viz.

'1. That the concerting the Demand of a Supply for a for faulted Person, although not given, is Treason.

'2. That Persons refusing to discover what are their private Thoughts and Judgments in relation to Points of Treason, or other Men's Actions, are guilty of Treason.

'That the fining Husbands for their Wives withdrawing from the Church, was contrary to Law.

'That Prelacy, and Superiority of any Office in the Church above Presbyters, is and hath been a great and unsupportable Grievance and Trouble to this Nation, and contrary to the Inclinations of the Generality of the People ever since the Reformation (they having reformed from Popery by Presbyters) and therefore ought to be abolished.

'That it is the Right and Privilege of the Subjects to protest for Remand of Law to the King and Parliament, against Sentences pronounced by the Lords of Session, providing the same do not stop Execution of the said Sentences.

'That it is the Right of the Subjects to petition the King, and that all Imprisonments and Prosecutions for such Petitions are contrary to Law.

'That for Redress of all Grievances, and for amending, strengthning, and preserving of the Laws, Parliaments ought to be frequently called and allowed to sit, and the Freedom of Speech and Debate secured to the Members.

'And they do claim, and demand, and insist upon all and sundry the Premisses, as their undoubted Rights and Liberties, and that no Declarations, Doings, or Proceedings, to the prejudice of the People in any of the said Premisses, ought in any ways to be drawn hereafter in Consequence and Example; but that all Forfeitures, Fines, Loss of Offices, Imprisonments, Banishments, Pursuits, Persecutions, and rigorous Executions be considered, and the Parties seized be redressed.

'To which Demand of their Rights, and Redressing of their Grievances, they are particularly encouraged by His Majesty the King of England his Declaration for the Kingdom of Scotland, of the day of October last, as being the only Means for obtaining a full Redress and Remead therein.

'Having therefore an entire Confidence, that his said Majesty the King of England, will perfect the Deliverance so far advanced by him, and will still preserve them from the Violation of the Rights which they have here asserted, and from all other Attempts upon their Religion, Laws, and Liberties:

'The said Estates of the Kingdom of Scotland do resolve, That William and Mary, King and Queen of England, France, and Ireland, be, and be declared King and Queen of Scotland; to hold the Crown and Royal Dignity of the said Kingdom of Scotland, to them the said King and Queen during their Lives, and the longest Liver of them: And that the sole and full Exercise of the Royal Power, be only in, and exercised by him the said King, in the Names of the said King and Queen, during their joint Lives: And after their Deceases, the said Crown and Royal Dignity of the said Kingdom, to be to the Heirs of the Body of the said Queen. Which failing, to Princess Anne of Denmark, and the Heirs of her Body: Which also failing, to the Heirs of the Body of the said William, King of England.

'And they do pray the said King and Queen of England, to accept the same accordingly.

'And that the Oath hereafter mentioned be taken by all Protestants of whom the Oath of Allegiance, and any other Oaths and Declarations might be required by Law, instead thereof: And that the said Oath of Allegiance, and other Oaths and Declarations may be abrogated.

I A. B. de sincerely promise and swear, That I will be faithful, and bear true Allegiance to their Majesties King William and Queen Mary.

So help me GOD.

A Proclamation declaring William and Mary King and Queen of England, to be King and Queen of Scotland.

Edinburgh, April 12. 1689.

'WHEREAS the Estates of this Kingdom of Scotland, by their Act of the Date of these Presents, have resolved that William and Mary, King and Queen of England, France, and Ireland, be, and be declared, King and Queen of Scotland, to hold the Crown and Royal Dignity of the said Kingdom of Scotland, to them the said King and Queen, during their Lives, and the longest Liver of them: And that the sole and full Exercise of the regal Power, be only in, and exercised by the said King in the Names of the said King and Queen, during their joint Lives. As also the Estates having resolved and enacted an Instrument of Government, or Claim of Right, to be presented with the Offer of the Crown, to the said King and Queen, they do statute and ordain, That William and Mary King and Queen of England, France, and Ireland, be accordingly forthwith proclaimed King and Queen of Scotland, at the Market-Cross of Edinburgh, by the Lion King at Arms, or his Deputies, his Brethren Heralds, Macers, and Pursevants, and at the head Burghs of all the Shires, Stewarties, Bailliaries, and Regalities within the Kingdom, by Messengers at Arms. Extracted forth of the Meeting of the Estates, by me,

James Dalrymple, Clerk.

God Save King WILLIAM and Queen MARY.

The Manner of the King and Queen taking the Scotish Coronation Oath.

May 11, 1689.

THIS Day being appointed for the public Reception of the Commissioners, viz. The Earl of Argyle, Sir James Montgomery of Skelmerly, and Sir John Dalrymple of Stair younger, who were sent by the Meeting of the Estates of Scotland, with an Offer of the Crown of that Kingdom to their Majesties, they accordingly, at three of the Clock, met at the Council-Chamber, and from thence were conducted by Sir Charles Cotterel, Master of the Ceremonies, attended by most of the Nobility and Gentry of that Kingdom, who reside in and about this Place, to the Banqueting-House; where the King and Queen came attended by many Persons of Quality, the Sword being carried before them by the Lord Cardrosse, (and their Majesties being placed on the Throne under a rich Canopy) they first presented a Letter from the Estates to His Majesty; then the Instrument of Government; Thirdly, a Paper containing the Grievances, which they desired might be redressed; and lastly, an Address to His Majesty for turning the Meeting of the said Estates into a Parliament: All which being signified by his Grace the Duke of Hamilton, as President of the Meeting, and read to their Majesties, the King returned to the Commissioners the following Answer.

'WHEN I engaged in this Undertaking, I had particular Regard and Consideration for Scotland, and therefore I did emit a Declaration in relation to that as well as to this Kingdom, which I intend to make good and effectual to them: I take it very kindly that Scotland hath expressed so much Confidence in, and Affection to me: They shall find me willing to assist them in every thing that concerns the Weal and Interest of that Kingdom, by making what Laws shall be necessary for the security of their Religion, Property, and Liberty, and to ease them of what may be justly grievous to them.'

After, which the Coronation-Oath was tendered to their Majesties, which the Earl of Argyle spoke Word by Word directly, and the King and Queen repeated it after him, holding their right Hands up after the manner of taking Oaths in Scotland.

The Meeting of the Estates in Scotland did authorize their Commissioners to represent to His Majesty, that that Clause in the Oath, in relation to the rooting out of Heretics, did not import the destroying of Heretics; and that by the Law of Scotland, no Man was to be prosecuted for his private Opinion; and even obstinate and convicted Heretics were only to be denounced Rebels or out-lawed, whereby their moveable Estates are confiscated. His Majesty, at the repeating that Clause in the Oath, 'did declare, that he did not mean by these words, that he was under any Obligation to become a Persecutor.' To which the Commissioners made answer, 'That neither the Meaning of the Oath, nor the Law of Scotland did import it.' Then the King replied, 'That he took the Oath in that sense, and called for Witnesses, the Commissioners, and others present.' And then both their Majesties signed the said Coronation-Oath.

After which the Commissioners, and several of the Scotish Nobility, kissed their Majesties Hands.

The Coronation-Oath of England.

The Arch-Bishop or Bishop shall say,

'Will you solemnly promise and swear to govern the People of this Kingdom of England, and the Dominions thereto belonging according to the Statutes in Parliament agreed on, and the Laws and Customs of the same?'

The King and Queen shall say.

'I solemnly promise so to do.'

Arch-Bishop or Bishop.

'Will you, to your Powet, cause Law and Justice in Mercy to be executed in all your Judgments?'

King and Queen.

'I will.'

Arch-Bishop or Bishop.

'Will you, to the utmost of your Power, maintain the Laws of God, the true Profession of the Gospel, and the Protestant reformed Religion, established by Law? And will you preserve, unto the Bishops and Clergy of this Realm, and to the Churches committed to their Charge, all such Rights and Privileges as by Law do or shall appertain unto them, or any of them?'

King and Queen.

'All this I promise to do.'

(After this, the King and Queen laying His and Her Hand upon the Holy Gospels, shall say)

King and Queen.

'The things which I have here before promised, I will perform and keep.'

So help me GOD.

(Then the King and Queen shall kiss the Book.)

The Coronation-Oath of Scotland

'WE William and Mary, King and Queen of Scotland, faithfully promise and swear, by this our solemn Oath, in presence of the Eternal God, that during the whole Course of our Life we will serve the same Eternal God, to the uttermost of our Power, according as he has required in his most Holy Word, revealed and contained in the New and Old Testament; and according to the same Word shall maintain the true Religion of Christ Jesus, the preaching of his Holy Word, and the due and right Ministration of the Sacraments, now received and preached within the Realm of Scotland; and shall abolish and gainstand all false Religion contrary to the same, and shall rule the People committed to our Charge, according to the Will and Command of God, revealed in his aforesaid Word, and according to the laudable Laws and Constitutions received in this Realm, no ways repuguant to the said Word of the Eternal God; and shall procure, to the utmost of our power, to the Kirk of God, and whole Christian People, true and perfect Peace in all time coming. That we shall preserve and keep inviolated the Rights and Rents, with all just Privileges of the Crown of Scotland, neither, shall we transfer nor alienate the same; that we shall forbid and repress in all Estates and Degrees, Reif, Oppression and all kind of Wrong. And we shall command and procure, that Justice and Equity in all Judgments be kept to all Persons without exception, us the Lord and Father of all Mercies shall be merciful to us. And we shall be careful to root out all Heretics and Enemies to the true Worship of God, that shall be convicted by the true Kirk of God, of the aforesaid Crimes, out of our Lands and Empire of Scotland. And we faithfully affirm the Things above-written by our solemn Oath.'

Feb. the 18th, the King having taken possession of the Throne, made the following Speech to both Houses:

The King's Speech to both Houses.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'I Have lately told you how sensible I am of your Kindness, and how much I value the Confidence you have reposed in me. And I am come hither to assure you, that I shall never do any thing that may justly lessen your good Opinion of me.

'I think it necessary to acquaint you, That the Condition of our Allies abroad, and particularly that of Holland is such, that unless some speedy care be taken of them, they run a greater hazard than you would have them exposed to.

'You yourselves must be sensible, that the Posture of Affairs here require your serious Consideration, and that a good Settlement at home is necessary, not only for your own Peace, but for the Support of the Protestant Interest, both here and abroad.

'And particularly the State of Ireland is such, that the Dangers are grown too great, to be obviated by any slow Methods.

'I must leave it to you to consider of the most effectual ways of preventing the Inconveniences which may arise by delays, and to judge what Forms may be most proper to bring those things to pass for the good of the Nation, which I am confident are in all your Minds, and which I on my part shall be always ready to promote.'

Sir H. Capel.

The 20th, Sir Henry Capel acquainted the House that he and the rest of the Members who were Privy Counsellors, having waited on his Majesty with the Thanks of the House for his gracious Speech, his Majesty was pleased to reply,

The King's Answer to the Address of Thanks.

'That he was very glad whenever he said any thing that was to the Satisfaction of the House: That he would endeavour to do so always, and did desire that this House would hasten those things, which he had mentioned in his Speech.'

The same day, the House having resolved into a Committee, the following Question was stated from the Chair, viz. Whether a King, elected and declar'd by the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons assembled at Westminster, Jan. 22. 1688. coming to and consulting with the said Lords and Commons, did not make as complete a Parliament, as if the said King should cause new Summons to be given out, and new Elections to be made by Writs: And after a warm Debate, in which Sir Edward Seymour, Sir Christopher Musgrave, Sir Thomas Clarges and Heneage Finch maintained the negative; the House resolv'd, That the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons, now sitting at Westminster, are the two Houses of Parliament.

Sir Robert Howard's Report of Money paid Grahme and Burton.

The 22d, Sir Robert Howard, Auditor of the Exchequer, delivered to the House, according to Order, an Account of such Sums of Money as had been paid out of the Exchequer to Mr. Grahme and Mr. Burton for Prosecution of Law-Suits; which from May 31, 1679, to Nov. 10, 1688, amounted to 47887 l. 14s.