The first Parliament of Queen Anne
Second session - begins 3/12/1706

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History of Parliament Trust

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Year published

1742

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45-68

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'The first Parliament of Queen Anne: Second session - begins 3/12/1706', The History and Proceedings of the House of Commons : volume 4: 1706-1713 (1742), pp. 45-68. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=37673 Date accessed: 02 September 2014.


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Contents

Second Session.
Queen's Speech in Parliament. Thanks given to the Duke of Marlborough. ; His Grace's Answer. Commons Address to the Queen. Queen's Answer. Manor of Woodstock settled on the D. of Marlborough. Supplies dispatched in a Week. ; Speaker's Speech on that Occasion. Royal Assent given to several Acts. Queen's Speech. The Commons Address in favour of the D. of Marlborough Queen's Answer. Queen's Message about the Duke of Marlborough. Vote thereon. Resolutions about the Supply. Further Resolutions. A Motion for removing all new Glass Houses, &c. within a Mile of St. James's over-ruled. Papers called for relating to Foreign Subsidies. Sums advanced to the Duke of Savoy and King Charles of Spain, voted to have been expended for the Safety and Honour of the Nation. Queen's Speech to both Houses relating to the Union. Articles of the Union presented to the House. Debates in the House of Commons about the Union. Sir John Packington's Speech. Exceptions taken to it. Major General Mordant's Speech. The first four Articles of the Treaty approved. The Act for Security of the Church of England debated. ; Passed. ; The Treaty of Union approved by the Commons. Queen passes Acts. Commons Resolution in favour of the Universities of England. Resolutions for Drawbacks and Allowances upon English Commodities. Union-Bill passed. Queen passes Acts. Queen's Speech in Parliament. Address of both Houses to the Queen. Queen's Answer A Supply to answer the Equivalent to Scotland. granted. Resolutions about Ways and Means. Resolution in favour of the Leeward Islands. ; Queen's Answer. An Address about buying Cloths and Arms in England. Further Resolutions about Ways and Means. Queen passed Acts. Other Acts passed. Quantities of Wine, Brandy, &c. imported into Scotland. ; A Bill to prevent it. Acts passed. Commons Resolutions about the Madagascat Pirates. And the New foundland Trade. The Parliament prorogued.

Second Session.

On the 3d of December the Parliament was opened at Westminster, and the Queen made the following Speech to to both Houses.

Queen's Speech in Parliament.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

I Hope we are met together at this Time, with Hearts truly thankful to Almighty God, for the glorious Successes, with which he has blessed our Arms, and those of our Allies, through the whole Course of this Year, and with serious and steady Resolutions to prosecute the Advantages we have gained, till we reap the desired Fruits of them, in an honourable and durable Peace

'The Goodness of God has brought this happy Prospect so much nearer to us, that, if we be not wanting to our selves, we may, upon good Grounds, hope to see such a Balance of Power established in Europe, that it shall no longer be at the Pleasure of one Prince to disturb the Repose, and endanger the Liberties of this Part of the World.

'A just Consideration of the present Posture of Affairs, of the Circumstances of our Enemies, and the good Disposition of our Allies, must needs excite an uncommon Zeal, and animate us to exert our utmost Endeavours at this critical Juncture.

'Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

'As I am fully persuaded you are all of this Mind, so I must earnestly desire you to grant me Supplies sufficient for carrying on the War next Year, in so effectual a Manner, that we may be able to improve every where the Advantages of this successful Campaign: And I assure you, I shall make it my Business to see all you give, applied so those Ends with the greatest Care and Management.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'In pursuance of the Powers vested in me by Act of Parliament, both in England and Scotland, I have appointed Commissioners to treat of an Union between the two Kingdoms; and though this be a Work of such a Nature as could not but be attended with great Difficulties; yet such has been the Application of the Commissioners, that they have concluded a Treaty, which is at this Time before the Parliament of Scotland; and I hope the mutual Advantages of an entire Union of the two Kingdoms will be found so apparent, that it will not be long before I shall have an Opportunity of acquainting you with the Success which it has met with there.

'Your Meeting at this Time being later than usual, I cannot conclude without earnestly recommending to you, to give as much Dispatch to the public Affairs as the Nature of them will admit; it being of the greatest Consequence, that both our Friends and our Enemies should be fully convinced of your Firmness, and the Vigour of your Proceedings.

Thanks given to the Duke of Marlborough. ; His Grace's Answer.

The 4th, a Committee of the House of Commons attended the Duke of Marlborough, to give him Thanks for his eminent Services to her Majesty and this Kingdom, in the great and glorious Victory and Successes obtained over the Enemy the last Campaign: And his Grace made them this Answer: 'If any thing could add to my Satisfaction in the Services I have endeavoured to do to the Queen and my Country, it would be, the particular Notice which the House of Commons is pleas'd to take of them, so much to my Advantage.'

The 5th Day also, the House waited upon the Queen with the following Address.

Commons Address to the Queen.

'Most gracious Sovereign,

'We your Majesty's dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons in Parliament assembled, return your Majesty our humble Thanks for your most gracious Speech from the Throne.

'And with all Thankfulness to Almighty God, we congratulate your Majesty upon the signal Victory obtained by your Arms, and those of your Allies, under the Command of the Duke of Marlborough at Ramelies; a Victory so glorious and great in its Consequences, and attended with such continued Successes, through the whole Course of this Year, that no Age can equal.

'And as your Majesty's Allies have shewed their Firmness and good Disposition to carry on the War with Vigour, so the Commons of England are determined, that no specious Pretences of Peace shall divert them from their steady Resolutions, of enabling your Majesty to improve in all Places the Advantages of this successful Campaign.

'The Experience your Commons have had of the prudent Administration, and the great Care and Management in the Application of the public Aids, encourage us to assure your Majesty, that we will cheerfully give such speedy and effectual Supplies, as, by the Continuance of God's Blessing upon your Majesty's Arms, may establish the Balance of Power in Europe, by a safe, honourable, and lasting Peace.

'We beg leave likewise to return your Majesty our hearty Thanks for promoting the Union with England and Scotland, whereby your Majesty shews your great Concern and Tenderness, not only for the present, but the future Happiness of both Kingdoms.'

To which her Majesty was graciously pleased to give the following Answer.

Queen's Answer.

Gentlemen,

'I thank you heartily for this Address, and the Assurances of giving me effectual Supplies to carry on the War, and obtain a safe and honourable Peace. I am glad to find you are so well satisfied with the Application of the public Money. As to the Matter of the Union with Scotland, so in all other Things, I shall still be desirous to promote the present and future Happiness of my People.

Manor of Woodstock settled on the D. of Marlborough.

On the 20th, a Bill from the Lords for an Act for settling the Honours and Dignities of John Duke of Marlborough, upon his Posterity, and annexing the Honour and Manor of Woodstock, and House of Blenheim, to go along with the said Honours, was read three Times by the House of Commons, and passed nemine contradicente.

Supplies dispatched in a Week. ; Speaker's Speech on that Occasion.

There was now so good an Understanding between the Ministry and the House, that they voted all the Supplies for the Fleet, and Army in less than a Week: so that, on the 21st, the Queen came to the House of Peers, and, having sent for the Commons, the Speaker presented the Bills, and made a Speech importing, 'That as the glorious Victory obtained by the Duke of Marlborough at Ramelies was so surprizing, that the Battle was fought before it could be thought the Armies were in the Field, so it was no less surprizing, that the Commons had granted Supplies to her Majesty, before her Enemies could well know that her Parliament was sitting.'

Royal Assent given to several Acts.

After which her Majesty gave the Royal Assent to the Land-Tax Bill (4 s. in the Pound.) The Malt Bill. An Act for settling the Honour and Dignities of the Duke of Marlborough, upon his Posterity, together with the Manor of Woodstock, &c.

And her Majesty afterwards made a most gracious Speech to both Houses, which follows.

Queen's Speech.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

I Am glad of this occasion to repeat to you my great Satisfaction in your several Addresses presented to me in the Beginning of this Session.

'The Zeal and Affection which you expressed in them for my Service, and the Common Cause of Europe, cannot fail of being a great Encouragement to all our Allies.

'The particular Notice which you have taken of the eminent Services of the Duke of Marlborough is also very agreeable to me, and I make no question but it will be so to the whole Kingdom.

'Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

'I am to thank you in a very particular Manner, 'for the more than usual Dispatch of the Bills of Supply, with which you have presented me.

'This will enable me to put all our necessary Preparations for next Year into a great Forwardness, and must needs have a very good Effect for improving the Advantages of the last Campaign.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'I suppose you will think it convenient to make some short Recess during the Holidays.

'The Zeal and Unanimity you have already shewn, are a sufficient Assurance to me, that you will all return in the same good Temper and Disposition to dispatch what remains of the public Business.

During the Holidays, the House had a Recess as usual; but January the 7th assembled again, and having taken into Consideration the eminent Services of John Duke of Marlborough, whereby the Glory of her Majesty's Government, the Honour and Safety of the Kingdom, and the Interest of the common Cause had been so highly advanced, they agreed upon the following Address to the Queen:

The Commons Address in favour of the D. of Marlborough

'Most gracious Sovereign,

'We your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects, the Commons of England in Parliament assembled, taking into our Consideration the many eminent Services of John Duke of Marlborough, whereby the Glory of your Majesty's Government, the Honour and Safety of your Kingdoms and the Interest of the common Cause have been so highly advanced, do, with all Submission, address our selves to your Majesty's most sacred Person, humbly to desire. That, as your Majesty is, at your Expence, graciously pleased to erect the House of Blenheim, as a Monument of his glorious Actions, and the House of Peers, by your Majesty's Permission, have given Rise to a Law for continuing his Honours to his Posterity, We, your Majesty's obedient Commons, may be permitted to express our Sense of so distinguishing a Merit, and our ready Disposition to enable your Majesty to make some Provision for the more honourable Support of his Dignity in his Posterity, in such Manner as shall be most agreeable to your Majesty.

Thus the Gratitude of the whole Kingdom will remain upon Record to After-ages, and encourage others to follow his great Example.

This Address being the next Day presented to the Queen by the whole House, her Majesty was pleased to answer in these Words:

Queen's Answer.

Gentlemen,

'I am very glad you have so just a Sense of the repeated Services of the Duke of Marlborough; I will consider of your Address, and return an Answer very speedily.'

Accordingly, on the 9th, Mr. Secretary Harley delivered to the House the following Message, sign'd by her Majesty:

Queen's Message about the Duke of Marlborough.

ANNE R.

'Her Majesty, in Consideration of the great and eminent Services perform'd by the Lord Marlborough in the first Year of her Reign, as well by his prudent Negotiations as her Plenipotentiary at the Hague, as by his Valour and good Conduct in the Command of the Confederate Armies abroad, thought fit to grant to him and the Heirs Male of his Body, the Title of a Duke, of this Realm; and as a farther Mark of her Favour and Satisfaction with his Services, and for the better Support of his Dignity, her Majesty granted to the said Duke and the Heirs Male of his Body during his Life, a Pension of 5000 l. per Annum, out of the Revenue of the Post-Office; and an Act having passed the Sessions for settling the Honours and Dignities of the Duke of Marlborough upon his Posterity, and annexing the Honour and Manor of Woodstock, and House of Blenheim, to go along with the said Honours, it would be very agreeable to her Majesty if the Pension of 5000 l. per Annum, be continued and limited by Act of Parliament to his Posterity, for the more honourable Support of their Dignities, in like manner as his Honours, and the Honour and Manor of Woodstock and House of Blenheim, are already limited and settled.

Vote thereon.

Kensington, Jan. 9, 1706-7.

Upon the reading of this Message, the House resolved, 'That a Bill be brought in for continuing and settling upon John Duke of Marlborough and his Posterity the Pension of Five thousand Pounds per Ann. (already granted by her Majesty) for the more honourable Support of their Dignities, in like manner as his Honour and Dignities, and the Honour and Manor of Woodstock and House of Blenheim, are already limited and settled; and that Mr. Secretary Harley, Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, Lord Granby, Mr. Sollicitor-General, Col. Strangwayes, Mr. Verney, Mr. Fortman and Mr. Lowndes, do prepare and bring in the Bill.'

The Day before this, that is to say the 8th, there being several Establishments and Accounts relating to the Army, Navy and Victualling, laid before the Commons: the House agreed with the Committee on the same Day in the following Resolutions,

Resolutions about the Supply.

1. 'That a Sum not exceeding 49,000 l. be granted to her Majesty, for the Payment of another Year's Interest of the unsatisfy'd Debentures charged upon the Irish Forfeitures.

2. 'That a further Sum of 10,000 l. be allowed to the Office of Ordnance, towards making a Wharf and Storehouse at Portsmouth.

3. 'That a Sum not exceeding 120,000 l. be granted to her Majesty for the Land-Service, to be perform'd by the Office of Ordnance for the Year 1707.

4. 'That a Sum not exceeding 144,000 l. be granted to her Majesty, towards defraying the Charge of transporting Land Forces.

5. 'That a Sum not exceeding 3,500 l. be granted to her Majesty, for the Charge of circulating Exchequer Bills for another Year.'

Then Mr. St. John presented to the House an Account of some extraordinary Charges of the War, not provided for the last Session of Parliament, or incurred since; and also of the extraordinary Charges of the War in the Years 1705, and 1706, for Horses.

The next Day the Commons went again upon the Supply, in a Committee of the whole House, and came to several Resolutions, which were on the 11th reported to the House, and agreed unto, viz.

Further Resolutions.

1. 'That 37,500 l. be granted to her Majesty to defray her Majesty's Proportion of the Subsidies payable to the King of Denmark, for the Service of the Year 1707.

2. 'That 150,000 l. be granted to her Majesty, to defray her Majesty's Proportion of the Charges of 13,000 Men in the Service of the King of Portugal, for the Year 1707.

3. 'That 160,000 l. be granted to her Majesty, to defray her Majesty's Proportion of the Subsidies payable to the Duke of Savoy, for the Service of the Year 1707.

4. 'That 5,952 l. 7s. 6d. be granted to her Majesty, to defray her Majesty's Proportion of the Subsidies payable to the Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel, for the Service of the Year 1707.

5. 'That 5,952 l. 7s. 6d. be granted to her Majesty, to defray her Majesty's Proportion of the Subsidies payable to the Elector of Treves, for the Service of the Year 1707.

6. 'That 4,761 l. 18 s. 6d. be granted to her Majesty, to defray her Majesty's Proportion of the Subsidies payable to the Elector Palatine, for the Service of the Year 1707.

7. 'That 50,000 l. be granted to her Majesty, to defray her Majesty's Proportion of the Charge of 8000 Men sent to the Assistance of the Duke of Savoy, for the Service of the Year 1707.

8. 'That 445,350 l. 14 s. 2 d. be granted to her Majesty, for defraying the Charge of maintaining 20,562 Men, part of her Majesty's Forces, to be employed in Spain or Portugal; and for the General Officers; Centingences, Hospitals, Forrage and Waggon-Money, and for the Garrison of Glbraltar, and for General Officers serving the King of Portugal, for the Year 1707.

9. 'That 186,296 l. 4 s. 2 d. be granted to her Majesty, for defraying the Charge of maintaining 8,833 Men (additional Forces) to be employed in Spain or Portugal, and for the General Officers and Contingences, for the Service of the Year 1707. And lastly,

10. 'That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, That she will be pleased to give Order, that the Treaty with the King of Prussia in the Year 1706, and also the Treaty with the Landgrave of Hesse-Cassel, may be laid before this House.

A Motion for removing all new Glass Houses, &c. within a Mile of St. James's over-ruled.

On the 13th, Mr. Secretary Harley laid before the House, by her Majesty's Order, the Treaty for Repartition of the Prussian Troops, Hague, November 24, 1706. And also, the Ratification of the Treaty, for the March of the Hessian Troops to Italy, concluded May 20, 1706. The Consideration whereof was referr'd to the Grand Committee for the Supply. And on the 16th the Commons ordered the Commissioners of Trade to lay before their House a State of the Newfoundland Trade, in relation to the Fishery. And Mr. Secretary Harley presented to the House a Representation from the Lords Commissioners of Trade and Plantations, relating to the Trade with Flanders: And Extracts of Letters from Mr. Stepney, her Majesty's Envoy at Brussels, relating to Trade: The Consideration whereof was referred to the Committee for the whole House, who were to consider of the Trade of this Kingdom. Then a Bill for suppressing all new Glass-Houses, Brew-Honses, Dying-Houses, Melting-Houses for Tallow, and Pot-Houses, erected since the Beginning of this Parliament, within a Mile of any Part of the Palaces of Whitehall and St. James's, and for preventing the setting up such Houses within the like Distance for the Time to come, was read a second Time: And a Motion being made, and the Question put, that the Bill be committed, it passed in the Negative.

Papers called for relating to Foreign Subsidies.

The next Day the Commons resolved, 'That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, That she would be pleased to give Order that the Papers relating to the Fifty thousand Pound for the Duke of Savoy, and to the Forty seven thousand five hundred Pound, a Loan to the Emperor: As also the Particulars of the Sixty-three thousand six hundred and sixty-one Pounds, thirteen Shillings, and six Pence for the Pay, Levy-Money and Contingences for the Expedition under the Command of Earl Rivers, might be laid before this House.'

Sums advanced to the Duke of Savoy and King Charles of Spain, voted to have been expended for the Safety and Honour of the Nation.

The Commons having received satisfactory Accounts of these Things, came to several Resolutions in Favour of the Lustring Company, and voted divers Supplies: And a Motion being made on the 27th, and the Question proposed, That the several Sums of Money for the extraordinary Services for the Year 1706, which had been agreed to by the House, had been advanced and expended for the Preservation of the Duke of Savoy, for the Interest of King Charles the Third in Spain, against the Common Enemy, and for the Safety and Honour of the Nation: And the previous Question put, That the Question be now put, it was resolved in the Affirmative. Then the main Question being put, it was resolved, by a Majority of 250 Voices against 150, That the several Sums of Money for the extraordinary Services for the Year 1706, which had been agreed to by this House, had been advanced and expended for the Preservation of the Duke of Savoy, for the Interest of King Charles the Third in Spain against the common Enemy, and for the Safety and Honour of the Nation.

The next Day, the Queen came to the House of Peers, with the usual Solemnity, and the Commons being sent for up, her Majesty gave the Royal Assent to an Act for settling upon John Duke of Marlborough, and his Pasterity, a Pension of Five Thousand Pound per Annum, for the more honourable Support of their Dignities, in like manner as his Honours and Dignities, and the Honour and Manor of Woodstock, and House of Blenheim, are already limited and settled And to Four private Bills; after which her Majesty made the following Speech to both Houses.

Queen's Speech to both Houses relating to the Union.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'Having acquainted you at the Opening of this Session, that the Treaty for an Union between England and Scotland, which had been concluded here by the Commissioners appointed for that Purpose, in Pursuance of the Powers given by the Parliaments of both Kingdoms, was then under the Consideration of the Parliament of Scotland, I can now, with great Satisfaction, inform you, that the said Treaty has been ratified by Act of Parliament in Scotland, with some Alterations and Additions.'

'I have directed the Treaty agreed to by the Commissioners of both Kingdoms, and also the Act of Ratification from Scotland, to be laid before you, and I hope it will meet with your Concurrence and Approbation.

'Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

'It being agreed by this Treaty, that Scotland is to have an Equivalent for what that Kingdom is obliged to contribute towards paying the Debts of England, I must recommend to you, that, in case you agree to the Treaty, you would take care to provide for the Payment of the Equivalent to Scotland accordingly.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'You have now an Opportunity before you, of putting the last Hand to a happy Union of the two Kingdoms, which I hope will be a lasting Blessing to the whole Island, a great Addition to its Wealth and Power, and a firm Security to the Protestant Religion.

'The Advantages which will accrue to us all from an Union, are so apparent, that I will add no more, but that I shall look upon it as a particular Happiness if this great Work, which has been so often attempted without Success, can be brought to Perfection in my Reign.

Articles of the Union presented to the House.

The Lord Coningesby upon the Return of the Commons to their own House, by her Majesty's Command, presented to them the Articles of the Union, agreed upon by the Commissioners, the Act of Parliament pass'd in Scotland, for the Ratification of them, and a Copy of the Minute Book, of the Proceedings of the said Commissioners, which were ordered to be printed; and upon a Motion being made, and the Question being put, That an Address should be presented to the Queen, to order the Minutes of the former Commissioners Proceeding in the first Year of her Reign, about an Union, to be laid before the House, it passed in the Negative; and they afterwards resolved on an Address of Thanks to her Majesty for her Speech, and for communicating the Articles of the Union, and the Scottish Ratification to them: To which the Queen made Answer, 'She was well pleased, what she had done was so much to the Satisfaction of that House.'

Debates in the House of Commons about the Union.

Feb. the 4th, the House resolved itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of the Articles of Union, and Act of Ratification of the Parliament of Scotland, and Mr. Compton being chosen Chairman, Mr. Charles Cæsar open'd the Debate, and raised, tho' modestly, some Scruples against the Union.

Sir John Packington's Speech.

He was seconded by Sir John Packington, who said, That the Business of the Union, that was now before them, being of the highest Importance, required therefore the most deliberate Consideration; that, with Relation thereto, People without Doors had been, for a long time, tongue-tied by a special Order of Council, which not reaching them within those Walls, he would very freely impart his Thoughts about it. That, for his part, he was absolutely against this incorporating Union, which he said, was like the marrying a Woman against her Consent: An Union that was carried on by Corruption and Bribery within Doors, and by Force and Violence without, &c.'

Exceptions taken to it.

Many of the Members taking Offence at these bold Expressions, which so highly reflected both on her Majesty's Ministers, and the Scotish Commissioners and Parliament; Sir J. Packington said he was inform'd, 'That in Scotland they said the Union was carried by Bribery and Force:' Adding, 'That the Promoters thereof, in thus basely giving up their independent Constitution, had actually betray'd the Trust reposed in them, and therefore he would leave it to the Judgment of the House to consider, whether or no Men of such Principles were fit to be admitted to fit amongst them? That, among the many Inconveniences and irreconcilable Contradictions this Union was liable to, he would only take notice of this material one, viz. That her Majesty, by the Coronation Oath, was obliged to maintain the Church of England, as by Law established, and bound likewise, by the said Oath, to defend the Presbyterian Kirk of Scotland, in one and the same Kingdom: Now, said he, after this Union is in Force, who shall administer this Oath to her Majesty? 'Tis not the Business of the Scots, who are uncapable of it, and no Wellwishers to the Church of England: 'Tis then only the part of the Bishops to do it; and can it be supposed those Reverend Prelates will, or can act a Thing so contrary to their own Order and Institution, as thus to promote the Establishment of the Presbyterian Church-Government in this united Kingdom?' He urged, 'That the Church of England being established Jure Divino, and the Scots pretending that their Kirk was also Jure Divino, he could not tell, how two Nations that clash'd in so essential a Point, could unite: And therefore he thought it proper to consult the Convocation about this critical Point.'

Major General Mordant's Speech.

Major General Mordant in Opposition to Sir John Packington said, 'That he knew of no other Jure Divine than God Almighty's Permission: In which Sense it might be said, that the Church of England and the Kirk of Scotland were both Jure Divino. because God Almighty had permitted that the first should prevail in England, and the other in Scotland: And that the Member who spoke last, might, if he thought fit, consult the Convocation, for his own particular Instruction; but that it would be derogatory from the Rights of the Commons of England, to advise on this Occasion, with an inferior Assembly, who had no share in the Legislature.'

The first four Articles of the Treaty approved.

Little was said in Answer to this Speech; only some Members moved, 'That the first Article of the Treaty, which imply'd a peremptory Agreement to an incorporating Union, might be postponed, and that the House should proceed to the Consideration of the Terms of that intended Union contain'd in the other Articles.' Which Motion being rejected by a great Majority, several Members of the opposite side went out of the House, and the rest read and approved, without Opposition, the 1st, 2d, 3d, and 4th Articles of the Treaty, and read the 5th.

On the 8th, the Commons, in a Commitee of the whole House, went through, and approved the remaining Articles of the Treaty. The only Objection the other Party raised on this occasion, was that they went Post-Haste in a Business of the highest Importance. To which it was answered, 'That Deliberation always supposes Doubts and Difficulties but no material Objections being offered against any of the Articles, there was no room for Delays. But some of the Members still crying out, Post-Haste! Post-Haste! Sir Thomas Littleton very smartly pursued the Allegory, and said, 'They did not ride Post-Halte, but a good, easy Trot; and, for his Part, as long as the Weather was fair, the Roads good, and their Horses in Heart, he was of Opinion, they ought to jog on, and not take up till it was Night.'

The Act for Security of the Church of England debated. ; Passed. ; The Treaty of Union approved by the Commons.

Two Days after, the Commons, in a Committee of the whole House, went upon the engrossed Bill from the Lords, intitled, An Act for the securing the Church of England, as by Law established: And a Motion being made, and the Question proposed, That it be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they might receive an Amendment or Amendments, for the particularly naming the Act of the thirteenth Year of King Charles the Second; For the well governing and regulating Corporations, as to so much as was not repealed, and also the Act of the twentyfifth of the said King, For preventing Dangers which may happen from popish Recusants: An Amendment was proposed to be made by adding to the Question these Words, (Although effectually and sufficiently provided for in the Bill.) The Question being put, That those Words should be added to the Question, it was resolved in the Affirmative. Then the main Question being put, that it should be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they might receive an Amendment or Amendments, for particularly naming the Act of the 13th Year of King Charles the Second, For the well governing and regulating Corporations, as to so much as was not repealed; and also the Act of the twenty-fifth of the said King, For preventing Dangers which may happen from popish Recusants, (altho' effectually and sufficiently provided for in the Bill) it passed in the Negative. The next Day the said Bill was read the third time; passed without any Amendments, and sent back to the Lords. After which the Commons received the Report of their Grand Committee, with their Resolutions, containing their Approbation of the Articles of the Union, as amended and ratify'd by the Parliament of Scotland, to which the House agreed, without any Amendment; and order'd a Bill to be brought in to ratify the same.

On the 13th, the Queen went to the House of Peers, with the usual Solemnity, and all the Commons attending, her Majesty gave the Royal Assent to the following Bills:

Queen passes Acts.

1. An Act for securing the Church of England, as by Law established.

2. An Act for repealing a Clause in an Act, intitled, An Act for the better apprehending, prosecuting and punishing Felons that commit Burglaries, House-breaking, or Robberies in Shops, Ware-Houses, Coach-Houses or Stables, or that steal Horses.

3. An Act for regulating and ascertaining the Duties to be paid by the Unfreemen, Importers of Coals into the Port and Borough of Great-Yarmouth, in the County of Norfolk. And,

4. An Act to enable the Lord High Treasurer, or Commissioner of the Treasury for the time being, to compound with Benjamin Nicoll, Citizen and late Merchant of London, and his Sureties, for the Debt owing by him to her Majesty.

Commons Resolution in favour of the Universities of England.

Some Days after, upon Mr. Bromley's Motion, it was ordered, 'That it should be an Instruction to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for an Union between the two Kingdoms of England and Scotland was committed, That they might receive a Clause, that the two Universities of this Kingdom might continue for ever, as they then were by Law established.' Then a Motion being made, and the Question put, 'That it should be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they might receive a Clause to make the like Provision, that the Subjects of this Kingdom should be for ever free of any Oath, Test or Subscription, within this Kingdom, contrary to, or inconsistent with the true Protestant Religion, Government, Worship and Discipline of the Church of England, as then by Law established, as was already provided for the Subjects of Scotland, with respect to their Presbyterian Government;' it passed in the Negative. The same Day Sir Roger Mostyn ludicrously moved, 'That a Clause should be inserted in the said Bill, in Favour of the Convocation of the Clergy, as Part of the Constitution:' Which Assertion and Motion were exploded.

Resolutions for Drawbacks and Allowances upon English Commodities.

The Parliament of Scotland having inserted in the Articles of Union, several Clauses for Drawbacks and Allowances upon divers Commodities of the Growth of that Kingdom, which might have put the English Traders upon an unequal Foot with the Scots, the Commons of England took that Matter into their Consideration, and, in a Committee of the whole House, came to the following Resolutions.

1. 'That all foreign Salt imported into England, Wales, or Berwick upon Tweed, after the first Day of May 1707, shall be cellared and locked up under the Custody of the Merchant Importer, and the Officer imployed for levying the Duties upon Salt, and that the Merchant may have what Quantity thereof his Occasions may require, not under a Weigh or Forty Bushels at a time, giving Security for the Duty for what Quantity he receives, payable in six Months.

2. 'That for all English Salt, which, from and after the first Day of May 1707, shall be shipped to be carried coastwise, the Duties having been paid, or secured according to former Laws, there shall be an Allowance made of the Duties of so much of such Salt as shall be actually wasted in the Carriage for Wastage, upon Certificates to be given Gratis by the proper Officers at the Port of Lading of the true Quantity of Salt, laden or put on board, and a Certificate of the proper Officers at the Port, of Discharge of the Quantity of the said Salt, which shall be there discharged; and upon Proof made upon Oath to verify the said Certificates, which Proof and Certificates being produced to the proper Officers of the Salt Duties, by whom the Duties of the said Salt, so carried Coastwise was paid or secured, he shall be allowed upon the Security, or repaid (in case the Duties be actually paid) so much as the said Allowance for Wastage shall amount to, as aforesaid.

3. 'That, from and after the first Day of May 1707, there shall upon the Exportation of White Herrings, from England, Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed, be the like Allowances as are to be made upon the Importation of White Herrings from Scotland.

4. 'That there shall be allowed for every Barrel of Beef or Pork salted and exported from England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick upon Tweed, after the first of May 1707, for Sale, the like Allowances, as are to be allowed upon Exportation of such Beef and Pork exported from Scotland.

5. 'That there shall be the like Premium given for all Oatmcal and Grain, called Beer alias Big, upon the Exportation thereof, exported after the first of May 1707, from England, Wales, and the Town of Berwick upon Tweed, as are to be given upon the Exportation of Oatmeal and Beer from Scotland.'

Union-Bill passed.

These Resolutions being agreed on by the House on the 29th, and a Bill ordered to be brought in thereupon, they read and passed the Bill for an Union between the two Kingdoms of England and Scotland the next Day; the same being carried by a Majority of 274 Votes, against 116, who were for rejecting it.

Queen passes Acts.

March 6, the Queen gave the Royal Assent to the following public Bills, viz. 1. An Act for an UNION of the two Kingdoms of England and Scotland. 2. An Act for rendering more effectual an Act passed in the first Year of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for the better preventing Escapes out of the Queen's-Bench and Fleet-Prisons. 3. An Act for repairing the Highway between Hockliffe and Wooborne in the County of Bedford. 4. An Act for continuing the Acts formerly made for the repairing of the Highways in the County of Hertford. 5. An Act for enlarging the Passage leading to New-Palace-Yard, through the Gate-House, Westminster.

After which her Majesty made the following Speech to both Houses.

Queen's Speech in Parliament.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'IT is with the greatest Satisfaction, that I have given my Assent to a Bill for uniting England and Scotland into one Kingdom.

'I consider this Union, as a Matter of the greatest Importance to the Wealth, Strength, and Safety of the whole Island, and at the same time as a Work of so much Difficulty, and Nicety in its own Nature, that, till now, all Attempts which have been made towards it, in the Course of above a hundred Years, have proved ineffectual; and therefore I make no doubt but it will be remembered and spoke of hereafter, to the Honour of those who have been instrumental in bringing it to such a happy Conclusion.

'I desire and expect from all my Subjects of both Nations, that from henceforth they act with all possible respect and Kindness to one another, that so it may appear to all the World, they have Hearts disposed to become one People.

'This will be a great Pleasure to me, and will make us all quickly sensible of the good Effect of this Union.

'And I cannot but look upon it as a peculiar Happiness, that in my Reign so full a Provision is made for the Peace and Quiet of my People, and for the Security of our Religion, by so firm an Establishment of the Protestant Succession throughout Great-Britain.

'Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

'I take this Occasion to remind you of making effectual Provision for the Payment of the Equivalent to Scotland within the Time appointed by this Act, and I am persuaded you will shew as much Readiness in this Particular, as you have done in all the Parts of this great Work.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'The Season of the Year being now pretty far advanced, I hope you will continue the same Zeal which has appeared throughout this Session in dispatching what yet remains unfinished of the public Business before you.'

Both Houses of Parliament after this agreed on a joint Address to her Majesty, which was presented on the 8th, and runs thus:

Address of both Houses to the Queen.

'We your Majesty's most dutiful Subjects, the Lords Spiritual and Temporal, and Commons in Parliament assembled, return our most humble Thanks to your Majesty for your gracious Approbation of the Share we had, in bringing the Treaty of an Union between your two Kingdoms of England and Scotland, to a happy Conclusion; a Work that (after so many fruitless Endeavours) seems designed by Providence to add new Lustre to the Glories of your Majesty's Reign: The Success of your Arms having secur'd us from all Attempts from Abroad, and the Care your Majesty has taken of the firm Establishment of the Protestant Succession, having given a great and lasting Security to our Religion, as in the Church of England, by Law established. We beg leave humbly to assure your Majesty, that our Endeavours shall never be wanting to support your Government at Home, and so to establish the Peace of this Island, that no Dispute may remain among us, but how to acknowledge in the most dutiful Manner the auspicious Conduct of so great and so renown'd a Queen.

Her Majesty's most gracious Answer.

Queen's Answer

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'I am glad to find your Opinion so perfectly agrees with mine, concerning the Union; you cannot do me a more acceptable Service, than by using your utmost Endeavours,' to improve all the good Consequences of it.

A Supply to answer the Equivalent to Scotland. granted.

On the 10th, the Commons, in a Grand Committee, resolved to grant a Supply to her Majesty for the Payment of the Equivalent to Scotland: And two Days after came to these Resolutions.

1. 'That the Sum of 398,085 l. 10 s. be granted to her Majesty, to discharge the like Sum mentioned in the 15th Article of the Treaty of Union between England and Scotland, confirmed by Acts of Parliament of both Kingdoms, being the Equivalent to be answer'd by the said Article to Scotland, for such Customs and Excises which Scotland is to be charged with, and will be applicable to the Debts of England.

2. 'That 2641 l. be granted to enable her Majesty to make a Recompence to the Mayor, Aldermen, and Citizens of Carlisle, for such Tolls as they are to be deprived of by the 6th Article of the said Treaty of Union.

3. 'That 5000 l. be granted to enable her Majesty to make a Recompence to Joseph Musgrave, Thomas Musgrave, and George Musgrave, Sons of Sir Christopher Musgrave, Bart. deceased, for such Tolls as they are to be deprived of by the 6th Article of the said Treaty of Union,' which Resolutions were on the 13th reported and agreed to.

Resolutions about Ways and Means.

On the 15th, Mr. Conyers reported from the Committee of the whole House, the following Resolutions about Ways and Means to raise the Supply, viz.

1. 'That towards raising the Supply, the Duties on Low Wines and Spirits of the first Extraction, and the Duties payable by Hawkers, Pedlars, and Petty-Chapmen, which by an Act of the Third Year of her Majesty's Reign, have Continuance until the 24th Day of June 1710, shall be further granted and continued to her Majesty, her Heirs and Successors, from the 23d of June 1710, for the Term of 96 Years from thence next ensuing.

2. 'That there be paid for every Barrel of Sweets made for Sale, from and after the 24th Day of March 1706, for the Term of 99 Years, from thence next ensuing, the the Sum of 1 l. 16s. and so proportionably for any greater or lesser. Quantity, to be paid by the Maker of such Sweets.

3. ' That the Overplus Money arising by the Rates and Duties of Excise, which were granted to their late Majesty's King William and Queen Mary (of glorious Memory) by an Act of the fourth Year of their said Majesties Reign, for the Term of 99 Years therein mentioned, and are liable to the Payment of several Annuities with Benefit of Survivorship, and other Annuities, shall, from and after the 29th Day of September 1710, be appropriated towards raising the Supply.

4. ' That the Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage, and other Sums of Money payable upon Merchandizes imported and exported, which were first granted to King Charles the Second, in the twelfth Year of his Reign for his Life, and by several subsequent Acts of Parliament were continued until the first Day of August 1706; and by an Act of the first Year of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for making good Deficiencies, and preserving the public Credit, are granted to continne until the first Day of August 1710, (excepting such of the said Duties as have been taken away or lessened by Acts of Parliament) shall be further continued to her Majesty, her Heirs and Successors, from the last Day of July 1710, to the first Day of August 1712, and no longer.

5. 'That the several Impositions and Duties upon Wines, Vinegar and Tobacco, which were granted first to King James the Second, in the first Year of his Reign, and and the Impositions upon East India Goods, and other Goods charged therewith, which were first granted to their late Majesties King William and Queen Mary, in the Second Year of their Reign, and by several subsequent Acts of Parliament were continued until the first Day of August 1706; and by an Act of the first Year of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for making good Deficiencies, and preserving the public Credit, are granted to continue until the first Day of August 1710, (except such of the said Impositions and Duties, as have been taken away or lessen'd by Acts of Parliament) shall be further continued to her Majesty, her Heirs and Successors, from the last Day of July 1710, to the first Day of August 1712, and no longer.

6. 'That the Additional Rates, Duties and Impositions, which were at first granted to King William and Queen Mary, in the Fourth Year of their Reign, and by several subsequent Acts of Parliament, were continued until the first Day of August 1706; and by an Act of the first Year of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for making good Deficiencies, and preserving the public Credit, are granted to continue until the first Day of August 1710, (except such of the said Rates, Duties and Impositions as have been taken away by Acts of Parliament) shall be further continued to her Majesty, her Heirs and Successors, from the last Day of July 1710, to the first Day of August 1712, and no longer.

7. 'That the several Impositions and Duties upon Whale Fins imported, which were granted to his late Majesty King William, by an Act of the ninth Year of his Reign, and by an Act of the first Year of her Majesty's Reign, were continued until the first Day of August 1710, be further continued from the last Day of July 1710, until the first Day of August 1712, and no longer.

8. 'That from, and after the Time that all the Principal and Interest, which by the said Act of the first Year of her Majesty's Reign, are charged upon the said Subsidies of Tonnage and Poundage, and the said Impositions, upon Wines, Vinegar, Tobacco, and East-India Goods and upon the said additional Impositions, and upon the said Duties upon Whale Fins shall be paid off and satisfied, or that sufficient Money should be reserved in the Exchequer for that Purpose, the said Subsidies, Impositions and Duties for the Remainder of the Term, to end of the first August 1712, shall be appropriated towards raising the Supply granted to her Majesty.'

These Resolutions being agreed to by the House, it was ordered, ' That it be an Instruction to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for continuing such additional Duties on Goods and Merchandizes, and such of the Duties upon stamp'd Vellom, Parchment and Paper, as are therein mentioned; and for settling and establishing a Fund thereby, and by the Application of certain Overplus Monies, and otherwise, for Payment of Annuities, to be sold for raising a further Supply to her Majesty, for the Service of the Year 1707, and other Uses therein expressed, is committed, That they leave out of the said Bill the additional Duties on Goods and Merchandizes, and in lieu, thereof to insert the said Duties on Low-Wines and Spirits, and the Duties payable by Hawkers, Pedlars, and PettyChapmen, and the said Duties on Sweets, and the said Overplus Monies arising by the Rates and Duties of Excise, as Part of the Fund for Payment of the said Annuities and other the Uses in the said Bill, pursuant to the three first of the said Resolutions.' And ordered, That a Bill be brought in upon the Five last of the said Resolutions.

Resolution in favour of the Leeward Islands. ; Queen's Answer.

The House, on the 18th, proceeded to take into Consideration the Report from the Committee to whom the Petition of several Proprietors of Plantations in the Islands of Nevis and St. Christophers in America, and other Merchants trading to the same, on the Behalf of themselves, and the other Inhabitants and Traders to the said Islands, was referred, and the same being read, it was resolved, 'That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, that she will be pleased to appoint such Persons as her Majesty shall think fit, to enquire into the true State of the Losses of the People of the Islands of Nevis and St. Christophers, in order to lay the same before this House the next Sessions of Parliament; and in the mean Time, that she will be graciously pleased out of the Public Money granted this Session of Parliament, to apply what may be convenient for the better securing those Islands, and supplying them with Necessaries, in order to a Re-settlement.' The said Address being presented accordingly, her Majesty was pleased to answer, ' That she was very well pleased to find the House of Commons had so compassionate a Sense of the Losses of her Subjects in, Nevis and St. Christophers, as also with the Concern they shewed upon this Occasion for the Plantations, which were so justly entitled to their Care, by the large Returns they made to the Public; and her Majesty would give the necessary Orders for what the House had desired in that Matter.' Accordingly her Majesty was afterwards pleased to appoint two Gentlemen of known Ability and Integrity to go to the said Islands to procure an exact State of the Losses of her Subjects there, in order to their being put on such a Footing, as might be most for the particular Benefit of the Inhabitants, and the general Good of these Kingdoms.

An Address about buying Cloths and Arms in England.

An Address, in relation to the buying in England all Cloaths, Arms, and Accoutrement of War for the Army, in her Majesty's Pay or Service, having also been presented to her Majesty, she was pleased to give this Answer, 'That she would endeavour to give Encouragement to the Manufactures of England, upon all Occasions, where it might consist with the Public Service.'

Further Resolutions about Ways and Means.

On the 19th, the Commons agreed to the two following Resolutions, which were reported by Mr. Chancellor of the Exchequer, from the Committee of the whole House, viz. 1. That towards raising the Supply, the Duties (commonly called the third Part of a Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage) which by Act of Parliament of the Fourth Year of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for continuing an additional Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage, and certain Duties upon Coals, Culm, and Cinders, and additional Duties of Excise, and for settling and establishing a Fund thereby, and by other Ways and Means, for Payment of Annuities to be sold for raising a further Supply to her Majesty, for the Service of the Year 1706, and other Uses therein mentioned, were granted, and continued to be paid for, and upon all Wines, which from and after the 8th Day of March 1706, during the Term of ninetyeight Years from thence next ensuing, should be imported or brought into the Kingdom of England, Dominion of Wales, and Town of Berwick upon Tweed; and for and upon all manner of Goods and Merchandizes, which from and after the said eighth Day of March 1706, during the said Term of ninety-eight Years, shall be imported or brought into this Realm, or any her Majesty's Dominions to the same belonging, by way of Merchandize (except as therein is excepted) be further granted and continued to her Majesty, her Heirs and Successorsfrom the Expiration of the said Term of ninetyeight Years, for the Term of one Year from thence next and immediately ensuing.

2. ' That the Overplus Monies to arise yearly by the Funds settled by the Act of the fourth Year of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for continuing an additional Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage, and certain Duties upon Coals, Culm, and Cinders, and additional Duties of Excise, and for settling and establishing a Fund thereby, and by other Ways and Means, for Payment of Annuities to be sold for raising a further Supply to her Majesty for the Service of the Year 1706, and other Uses therein mentioned, which Overplus Monies do belong to her Majesty for the public Use, shall be apropriated as a further security for payment of the Annuites to be purchased to raise Money towards the Supply granted to her Majesty in this Session of Parliament. Then they ordered, That it should be an instruction to the committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for continuing such Additional Duties on Goods and Merchandizes, and such of the Duties upon Stamp'd Vellom, Parchment and Paper, as are therein mentioned; and for settling and establishing a Fund thereby, and by the Application of certain Overplus Monies, and otherwise, for payment of Annuites to be sold for raising a further Supply to her Majesty for the Service of the Year 1707, and other Uses therein expressed, was committed, That they should insert the said Duties and Overplus's as further Securities for the Annuities to be purchased: As also that it should be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they should be impowered to receive a Clause to give further Time for Payment of the Stampt Duties, which had been omitted to be paid, and thereupon to be discharged from the Penalties.

Queen passed Acts.

Her Majestty, on the 24th, in the House of Peers gave her Royal Assent to these public Acts, 1. An Act for continuing the Duties on Houses, to secure a yearly Fund for circulating Exchequer Bills, whereby a Sum not exceeding 150,000 l. was intended to be raised for carrying on the War, and other her Majesty's Occasions. 2. An Act for better recruiting her Majesty's Land Forces and Marines for the Year 1707. 3. An Act of the third and fourth Years of her Majesty's Reign, entitled, An Act for punishing Mutiny and Desertion, and false Musters, and the better Payment of the Army and Quarters. 4. An Act for the better Preservation of the Game. 5. An Act to repeal all the Laws prohibiting the Importation of Foreign Lace made of Thread. 6. An Act for Enrolments of Bargains and Sales within the West-Riding of Yorkshire, in the Register-Office there lately provided, and for making the said Register more effectual.

Other Acts passed.

The Queen also at the same time passed 12 private Bills, and returning to the House on the 27th, gave the Royal Sanction to the three following Bills, 1. An Act for continuing the Duties on Low-Wines and Spirits of the first Extraction, and Duties payable by Hawkers, Pedlars and Petty-Chapmen; and part of the Duties of Stampt Vellom, Parchment, Paper, and the late Duties on Sweets, and the one third Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage, and for settling and establishing a Fund thereby, and by the Application of certain Overplus Money and otherwise for Payment of Annuities to be sold for raising a further Supply to her Majesty for the Service of the Year 1707, and other Uses therein exprest. 2. An Act for the better Encouragement of the Royal Lustring Company. 3. An Act for the better repairing the Highway between Forn Hill in the County of Bedford, and the Town of Stony-Stratford in the County of Buckingham.

Quantities of Wine, Brandy, &c. imported into Scotland. ; A Bill to prevent it.

It being agreed by the 4th Article of the Treaty of Union, That the Subjects of the United Kingdom of Great Britain, should, after the Union, have full Freedom and Intercourse of Trade and Navigation: And by the 6th, That all parts of the United Kingdom, after the Union, should have the same Allowances, Encouragements and Draw-backs, and be under the same Prohibitions, Restrictions, and Regulations of Trade: Hereby it was generally understood, That all Commodities and Goods that should happen to be in Scotland before the first of May 1707, on which Day the Union was to commence, might be imported into England without paying any farther Duties: Upon which Presumption several English and Foreign Merchants imported great Quantities of Wine and Brandy into Scotland. Some other Traders of more unbounded Conscience, fell upon a more unwarrantable Practice, which was the exporting Tobacco, Pepper, Cocoa-nuts, and other Goods, in order to obtain the Drawbacks allowed by Acts of Parliament, and afterwards import the same Commodities into Scotland, from whence, after the first Day of May, they might be imported into England Custom free. These Frauds having been laid before the House of Commons, both by the Court, and the honest Dealers, who were like to be equal Sufferers thereby, a Bill was brought in to prevent and obviate Frauds relating to the Customs, by exporting Tobacco, Plantation and East-India Goods, in order to obtain a Drawback, and afterwards to re-land them in England without payment of Duty, and for better securing the Duties on Goods brought from the West-Indies: Which, on the 5th of April, was ordered to be engrossed.

The next Sitting, the House took into Consideration the Report from the Committee, to whom it was referred to enquire into Frauds committed in Drawbacks of Goods and Merchandizes exported; and the same being read, and it appearing to the House, That several Frauds and Abuses had been committed, in relation to Drawbacks of Custom: It was resolved, that an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, 'That she would please to give Directions to her Attorney-General to prosecute such Persons according to Law, as had been concern'd in the said Frauds and Abuses,' The same Day, the foremention'd Bill was read the third time, and with an Amendment pass'd, and sent up to the Lords for their Concurrence; but this last additional Clause being so unluckily contrived, as to be like to give disgust to the Scots, the Earl of Rochester, very wisely proposed this Expedient, that the Queen should be desired to prorogue the Prliament, and so, putting an end to this Session, and to all the Affairs depending therein, another Bill, to the same Effect, but without such a stumbling Clause, might be set on foot and passed in another Session.

Accordingly, on the 8th of April, the Queen came to the House of Peers, with the usual Solemnity, and gave her Royal Assent to the following public Bills, viz.

Acts passed.

An Act for the Ease of her Majesty's Subjects in relation to the Duties upon Salt, and for making the like Allowances upon the Exportation of White-Herrings, Flesh, Oatmeal, and Grain called Bear, alias Bigg, as are to be made upon Exportation of the like from Scotland.

An Act for the encouraging the Discovery and Apprehending of House-Breakers.

An Act for raising the Militia for the Year 1707, notwithstanding the Month's Pay formerly advanced be not repaid, and for an Account to be made of Trophy-Money.

An Act to explain and amend an Act of the last Session of Parliament for preventing Frauds frequently committed by Bankrupts.

An Act for discharging small Livings from their First Fruits and Tenths, and all Arrears thereof.

An Act for making the Acts more effectual for appropriating the forfeited Impropriations in Ireland; and for the building of Churches and augmenting poor Vicarages there.

An Act to subject the Estate of Thomas Brerewood to the Creditors of Thomas Pitkin, notwithstanding any Composition or Agreement made with the Creditors of the said Thomas Pitkin.

An Act for repairing the Highways between Sheppard Shord, and the Devizes, and between the top of Ashlington Hill and Rowdford in the County of Wilts'.

An Act for the better securing her Majesty's Purchase of Cotton-House in Westminster.

An Act for obliging John Rice to account for Debentures granted to him in the last Session of Parliament.

An Act for the continuance of the Laws for Punishment of Vagrants, and for making such Laws more effectual.

An Act for continuing the Laws therein mentioned relating to the Poor, and to the Buying and Selling of Cattle in Smithfield, and for suppressing of Piracy. And to twenty-three private Bills.

Commons Resolutions about the Madagascat Pirates.

A Representation having been made to the Commons by the Marquess of Carmarthen concerning the Pyrates of Madagascar, with an Offer to go with a small Squadron and suppress them; the House appointed a Committee to take the Matter into Consideration, who came to these Resolutions,

1. 'That a great Number of Pirates have settled themselves in the Island of Madagascar, from whence they have committed many great Piracies, Robberies and Depredations, very ruinous to Trade, and whereby the Lives of many of her Majesty's good Subjects have been destroy'd.

And the New foundland Trade.

2. 'That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, That she would be graciously pleased to take into her Royal Consideration, how the said Pirates may be suppressed, and their further Piracies, Robberies and Depredations may be effectually prevented.' Which Resolutions were on the 8th of April agreed to by the House. The same Day it was resolved, 'That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, that she will be graciously pleased to use her Royal Endeavours to recover and preserve the ancient Possessions, Trade and Fishery in Newfoundland.

The Parliament prorogued.

These things being over, the Lord Keeper of the Great Seal by her Majesty's Command, prorogued the Parliament until Monday the fourteenth Day of the same Month, when her Majesty being come to the House of Peers, and the Commons sent for up, her Majesty made the following Speech to both Houses.