Third Parliament of Great Britain
Second session - begins 21/3/1712

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History of Parliament Trust

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Year published

1742

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294-334

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'Third Parliament of Great Britain: Second session - begins 21/3/1712', The History and Proceedings of the House of Commons : volume 4: 1706-1713 (1742), pp. 294-334. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=37681 Date accessed: 16 September 2014.


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Contents

Resolutions on Ways and Means. ; New Duty on Paper. ; Duty on printed Books. ; Duty on Soap. ; Acts passed by Commission.
Duty on the chequer'd or striped Linnens. ; Address for an Account of the Money issued for the Navy. ; Resolutions about the Trade to Africa. And on the Supply. Resolutions on Ways and Means. Complaint against Mr. Sam. Buckley, for printing the Memorial of the States-General. ; Resolutions thereupon. ; Mr. Buckley ordered into the Custody of the Serjeant at Arms. Resolutions on Ways and Means. ; Order for strict Summons to be sent to the absent Members to attend on the first of May. Resolutions about the Licetiousness of the Press. Resolutions on the Supply. Agreed to except the 4th Bill to prevent multiplying of Votes in Elections for Knights of the Shires, sent up to the Lords. Bill to appoint Commissioners to enquire into the Value of the Grants made by the Crown since 1688 committed to the Committee of the Lottery-Bill. ; Resolution on Ways and Means. Clauses for Drawbacks on Soap and Learned-Books exported, &c. The intended Taxon Building-Materials laid aside. The Call of the House of Commons put off. Drawbacks of the Duty on Paper in the Universities. The Grants-Bill untack'd from the Lottery-Bill. Commissioners to execute the Grants-Bill chosen. Resolutions on Ways and Means for laying further Duties on East-India Goods. Recommitted. The Case of the East-India Company. Resolutions on Ways and Means. Royal Assent given to several Acts. The Earl of Strafford comes over. ; Bold Speech of Mr. Hampden about the unactive Campaign, and trifling Negociations of Peace. Motion made by Mr. Pulteney in the House of Commons rejected. ; Resolution for putting an entire Confidence in the Queen. Her Majesty's Answer. Address in favour of the episcopal Clergy in Scotland. Resolutions about Part of the 35 Millions &c. unaccounted for. An Account of the Negociations at the Hague and Gurtrydenberg, called for. ; Clauses added to the Bill to raise 1,800,000 l. by Classes. ; A larger Place for the keeping the Journals ordered to be provided. ; Bill to restrain the Licentiousness of the Press, ordered to be brought in. The Bill to regulate the African Company dropt. Two other Clauses added to the Bill to raise 1,800,000 l. by Classes. Acts passed. Queen's Speech. The Commons vote an Address of Thanks. The Address. The Queen's Answer. The Preface to the Bishop of St. Asaph's four Sermons, read. Censure past upon it. A Letter from the States-General to the Queen, dated Hague, June 5. 1712. (N. S.) Resolutions of the Commons against the Letter from the States-General. Report of the Surveyor General, about a Place for keeping the Records of the House of Commons. A remarkable Motion made by Mr. Hampden, for the Allies to be Guarantees of the Protestant Succession, rejected. ; Resolution about the Protestant succession. The Queen's Answer to the same. Thanks ordered to be returned to the Queen. Mr. Secretary St. John reports the Queen's Answer to three Addresses. Royal Assent given to several Bills. The Queen's Speech. Both Houses adjourn to the 8th of July, whereby Mr.Walpole and others are continued in Custody. Footnotes

Resolutions on Ways and Means. ; New Duty on Paper. ; Duty on printed Books. ; Duty on Soap. ; Acts passed by Commission.

On the 21st, the House, in a grand Committee on Ways and Means to raise the Supply, resolved to lay a Duty on all Paper made in Great-Britain, or imported into the same, over and above the present Duties upon Paper imported; which new Duty they ascertained according to the different sorts of Paper made abroad; and further resolv'd, 'That the Duty upon all other Paper imported and not specified, be after the Rate of 20 l. per Cent. ad Valorem:' They also resolv'd, 'That the Duties upon all Books, Prints and Maps, printed or wrought off in any Parts beyond the Seas, and imported into Great-Britain, bound or unbound, be after the Rate of 30 l. per Cent. ad Valorem:' And, having ascertained the Duty upon the most usual sorts of Paper made in Great-Britain, resolv'd, 'That the Duty upon all other Paper, not particularly charg'd, be after the rate of 15 l. per Cent. ad Valorem; That the said Duties be granted for the Term of 30 Years; That all Stocks of Paper for Sale, on the 21st of March, 1712, be charged with the said Duties. That a Duty be laid on all Soap made in Great-Britain, or imported into the same, viz. two Pence per Pound Weight Auverdupois, on all foreign Soap imported, over and above the Duties already payable upon the Importation thereof; and one Penny per Pound, only upon all Soap made in Great-Britain; that the said Duties be granted for the Term of of 32 Years, and that all Stocks of Soap, In the Hands any Person trading therein, be chargeable with the like Duties:' Which Resolutions were reported and agreed to on the 24th of March. The next Day the LordKeeper of the Great-Seal, the Lord-High-Treasurer and some other Lords, gave the royal Assent to the Bill entitled, An Act for punishing Mutiny and Desertion, and false Musters, and the better Payment of the Army and Quarters; and to two private Bills: Being authorised for that Purpose by her Majesty's Commission under the Great-Seal of Great-Britain.

Duty on the chequer'd or striped Linnens. ; Address for an Account of the Money issued for the Navy. ; Resolutions about the Trade to Africa.

On the 26th. in a grand Committee on Ways and Means to raise a Supply, it was Resolved, 'That an additional Duty be laid upon the Importation of all striped Linnens, and upon the Importation of all Linnens, painted, stained or dyed, after the Manufacture, or in the Thread or Yarn, before the Manufacture: that the said additional Duty be after the Rate of 15 per Cent. ad Valorem; that the said Duty be granted for 32 Years; that one half of the said Duties be charg'd upon all the Stocks of the said Linnens for Sale; that the Duties upon Bricks, Tyles, Slate, Lime and Stone, made or brought within the Bills of Mortality, to be used in Building or Paving, be granted for 32 Years: And that the said Duties upon Bricks, Tyles, Slate, Lime and Stones, be extended to all Places within 10 Miles of the Cities of London and Westminster; and granted for the said Term of 32 Years:' Which Resolutions were reported and agreed to the 27th. The same Day the Commons resolv'd to address her Majesty, 'That an Account of what Money issued last Year, and to which Uses the same had been applied, might be laid before the House;' and then, in a Committee of the whole House, they took into Consideration the Trade to Africa; and having heard both the separate Traders, and the Royal African Company, they came to these Resolutions: '1. That the Trade to Africa ought to be free to all her Majesty's Subjects of Great-Britain, and the Plantations, in a regulated Company. 2. That for the better preserving, better carrying on and improving the Trade to Africa, it is necessary that Forts and Settlements be maintained and enlarged on that Coast. 3. That the Charge of maintaining the said Forts and Settlements be borne out of the said Trade. 4. That it is necessary the Contracts already made with the Natives be maintained, and other Alliances, from time to to time made, for the Enlargement of the Trade to Africa. 5. That it is the Opinion of this Committee, that the Plantations ought to be supplied with sufficient Quantities of Negroes at reasonable Rates. 6. That a considerable Stock is necessary for the carrying on the Trade to Africa to the best Advantage of her Majesty's Subjects, and for enlarging and improving the same. 7. That it is necessary an Export of one hundred thousand Pounds, at least, in Merchandize, be annually made from Great-Britain to Africa.' These Resolutions were, on the last Day of March, reported to the House, by Mr. Farrar, Chairman of the grand Committee; and the first fix being severally read a second time, were severally agreed to: But the last of the said Resolutions being read a second time, and the Question put, that the House do agree with the Committee in the said Resolutions, it passed in the Negative: After which, a Bill was ordered to be brought in upon the fix Resolutions agreed to.

And on the Supply.

Three days before, (viz. the 28th,) the House, in a grand Committee on Ways and Means to raise the Supply, resolved, 'that a Fund of 168,003 l. per Annum for 32 Years, be charged upon, and made payable out of the several Duties granted in this Session of Parliament, and to be paid upon all Soap and Paper made in Great-Britain, or imported into the same, and upon all Silks, Callicoes, Linnens, and certain Stuffs, printed, painted, stained, or dyed, and upon Bricks, Tiles, Slate, Lime and Stone, used for Building or Paving, for raising the Sum of 1,800,000 l. by Way of Lottery:' Which Resolution was, on the 29th, reported and agreed to by the House; and a Bill was ordered to be brought in thereupon, and upon the Resolutions from the Committee of the whole House on Ways and Means, agreed to, the 11th, 24th, and 27th of March.

On the last day of March, the House in a grand Committee on the Supply, resolved, 'That the Sum of 328,956 l. 16s. 7 d. be granted to defray her Majesty's Proportions of Subsidies payable to the Allies, pursuant to Treaties, for the Service of the Year 1712. 2dly, 80,000 l. towards defraying the the Charge of transporting Land-Forces, for the Service of the Year 1712. And 3dly, the Sum of 589,839 l. 17 s. 4d. to make good the Deficiencies of the Grants for the Year 1711: Which Resolutions were the next day reported and agreed to by the House.

Resolutions on Ways and Means.

April the 4th, the House in a grand Committee, on Ways and Means, resolved to lay a Duty on all Wrought-Silks, and upon all such Stuffs as are made of Silk mixed with Incle, Thread, Cotton or Worsted; and all Stuffs made of, or mixed with Cross-grain Yarn, or Cotton, and upon all manner of Fringes, Tapes, and Wrought-Incle, which shall be imported into Great-Britain, except Wrought-Silks, Bengals, and Stuffs of Persia, China, and the East-Indies, and, in thirty distinct Resolutions, settled the Rates of the said Duties, on the several Stuffs and Manufactures therein-mentioned: Which Resolutions were the next day reported and agreed to.

Complaint against Mr. Sam. Buckley, for printing the Memorial of the States-General. ; Resolutions thereupon. ; Mr. Buckley ordered into the Custody of the Serjeant at Arms.

Three days after, a Complaint being made to the House of a printed Pamphlet, entitled The Daily Courant, Monday April 7, 1712, reflecting upon the Proceedings of this House, the same was brought up to the Table, and the Title of the pretended Memorial there inserted, and a Paragraph therein were read: After which it was resolved, That the pretended Memorial printed in the said Daily Courant is a false, scandalous, and malicious Libel, reflecting upon the Resolutions of this House, and the Address of this House to her Majesty thereupon, in breach of the Privilege of this House. And a Committee was appointed to enquire who was the Author, Printer, and Publisher of the said Libel, with Power to send for Persons, Papers, and Records. On the 11th, Mr. Hungerford made his Report from that Committee, importing in substance, That Samuel Buckley, the Writer and Printer of the Daily Courant, had owned the having translated and printing the said Memorial. Whereupon, the Question was put, That it appearing to this House, That Samuel Buckley is the Printer of the pretended Memorial printed in the Daily Courant of the 7th Instant (which hath been adjudged by this House to be a false, scandalous and malicious Libel, reflecting upon the Resolutions of this House, and the Address to her Majesty thereupon, in Breach of the Privilege of this House) he, for the said Offence, be taken into the Custody of the Serjeant at Arms attending this House: Upon which the House divided; but the same was carried in the Affirmative by a Majority of 188 Voices against 57.

Resolutions on Ways and Means. ; Order for strict Summons to be sent to the absent Members to attend on the first of May.

The 9th, the House in a grand Committee, considered further of Ways and Means to raise the Supply, and resolved, That two pence per Pound Weight (Part of the Duties on Tobacco) be retained upon Exportation of any Tobacco from Great-Britain into Ireland, or the Isles of Man, Jersey, or Guernsey, over and above the Half-Subsidy, which is retained by the Laws now in Force. Which Resolution was, two days after, reported and agreed to. On the 12th, the House ordered their Speaker to write his circular Letters to the Sheriffs and Stewards of the several Counties of Great-Britain, requiring the Attendance of the Members of the House, on Tuesday Fortnight, the first of May next following, and it be signified in the circular Letters, That the House would proceed with the utmost Severity against all such Members, who should then be absent, and whose Excuses should not be allowed, This strict Summons occasioned a Report, and raised a general Expectation, That on the first day of May, the Queen would come to the Parliament, to communicate to both Houses the final Proposals of France for a general Peace.

Resolutions about the Licetiousness of the Press.

Some Members were so exasperated at the Dutch Memorial being published in a News-Paper, that on the 12th, the House being resolved into a grand Committee, to consider of that Part of the Queen's Message to the House, the 17th of January last, which relates to the great License taken in Publishing false and scandalous Libels, Sir Gilbert Dolben being the Chairman, they came to these two Resolutions, 1. That the great Liberty taken in printing and publishing scandalous and impious Libels, creates Division among her Majesty's Subjects, tends to the Disturbance of the public Peace, is highly prejudicial to her Majesty's Government, and is occasioned for want of due regulating the Press. 2. That all Printing-Presses be registered, with the Names of the Owners, and Places of Abode; and that the Author, Printer, and Publisher of every Book set his Name and Place of Abode thereto. These Resolutions were ordered to be reported the Tuesday following; but the said Report was then put off till that day se'nnight, and afterwards further adjourned from time to time: Some Members having, in the grand Committee on Ways and Means, suggested a more effectual Way for suppressing Libels, viz. the laying a great Duty on all News-Papers and Pamphlets.

Resolutions on the Supply.

The 14th, the House, in a grand Committee on the Supply, resolved to grant her Majesty, I. The Sum of 4980 l. 15 s. 6 d. for the extraordinary Allowance of green and dry Forage, for the several Regiments of Dragoons quartered in North-Britain, between the 22d of December 1710, and the 22d of December 1711. II. 23,637 l. 13 s. and 2d. ½. for the Pay of several Officers in New-England, sent under the Command of Brigadier Nicholson, and of other Officers and Soldiers of the Troops formed here, for the taking of PortRoyal, with the incident Charges relating to that Expedition. III. 1473 l. 9 s. and 9d. ½. for one hundred days ForageMoney in the Spring, 1711, and one hundred days more for the Winter, 1711, for Colonel Kerr's Regiment of Dragoons sent from North-Britain to Flanders. IV. 2460 l. for 123 of the English Light-Horse, killed and lost in the Service of the last Campaign in Flanders.

V. 50,000 l. upon Account, for her Majesty's Proportion of the extraordinary Charge of Forage to the Troops in their Winter-Quarters in Flanders 1711-12, and for Magazines of dry Forage, to enable the Troops to take the Field early in the Spring. VI. 4285 l. 15 s. for the ordinary and extraordinary Expence of the Battalion of Ottinghen taken into the Service of her Majesty in the Year 1711, on Account of the Neutrality. VII. 2133 l. 17s. and 6 d. for her Majesty's Share, being a Moiety of the Charge of two Regiments formed in Flanders out of French Deserters, from their raising to the 31st of October 1711. VIII. 7142 l. 17 s. and 2 d. for her Majesty's Proportion, being a Moiety of 60,000 Crowns to be paid the Elector Palatine in Consideration of the Expence in sending his Troops into the LowCountries, in the Campaign 1711. IX. 986 l. 1 s. towards her Majesty's Proportion of Forage or Bread for the four Palatine Battalions of the Corps of Neutrality, X. 2425 l. for the Pay of three Commissioners, and their Secretary, to inspect the Accompts relating to the War in Spain, Portugal, and Italy, to the 2d of December 1711, and for Contingencies of their Office upon Accompt. 60,000 l. upon Accompt, for defraying the Charges incurred, or to be incurred, for the Support of the Royal-Hospital at Chelsea, and of the Invalids, Out-Pensioners thereunto belonging, over and above the Poundage and Days applicable to that Use, and also to defray the Charge of Cloathing, and pay off the Invalid-Companies. XII. 6205 l. for the Pay of the Commissioners for inspecting the Accompts relating to the War in Italy, Spain and Portugal, and of their Secretary, for the Year 1712. XIII. 5663 l. 11s. 8d. for the Pay of the several Officers employed with the Troops in New-England, (sent thither with Brigadier Nicholson in 1710, and of 30 Lieutenants sent thither in 1711, upon Ensigns-Pay) for the Year 1712. XIV. 1350 l. upon Accompt, for her Majesty's Bounty to Volunteers and Imprest-Men, raised, and to be raised, for Recruits, for the Service of the Year 1712. XV 1914 l. 5 s. for Forage, Waggon-Money, and Bread-Waggons, for Colonel Kerr's Regiment of Dragoons and a Batallion of Foot-Guards serving in the Low-Countries. XVI. 7555 l. 10 s. for the Pay of two additional Troops, and additional Men, to the other Troops of the Earl of Staire's and General Ross's Regiment of Dragoons. XVII. 8700 l. upon Accompt, for the Pay of several Officers en Second in Britain and of others serving in Spain and Flanders, for the Year 1712. XVIII. 34,000 l. upon Accompt for Half-Pay, to the Officers of several Regiments of Foot and Dragoons, reduced and to be reduced, upon the Establishment of Spain and Portugal, in the Year 1712. And in the XIXth and last Place 8417 l. 1s. 8d. for Pay of the General and StaffOfficers serving in Portugal for one Quarter of a Year, from Christmas to Lady-Day 1712.

Agreed to except the 4th Bill to prevent multiplying of Votes in Elections for Knights of the Shires, sent up to the Lords.

And for Contingencies for the Army and Hospitals, and for Forage and Waggon and Baggage-Money for the same time. These Resolutions being on the 15th of April reported, and read a second time, were all (except the fourth) agreed to by the House. The same day the House read the third time, and passed the Bill for more effectually preventing fraudulent Conveyances, in order to multiply Votes for electing Knights of Shires, to serve in Parliament; And ordered Mr. Cholmondley to carry it up to the Lords.

Bill to appoint Commissioners to enquire into the Value of the Grants made by the Crown since 1688 committed to the Committee of the Lottery-Bill. ; Resolution on Ways and Means.

The 21st, the House read a second time, a Bill to appoint Commissioners to examine the Value of all Lands, and other Interests, granted by the Crown since the 13th Day of February 1688-9, and upon what Considerations such Grants were made, and committed the same to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill to raise Money by Way of a Lottery, was committed. It appearing by this, that the House designed to tack these two Bills, notwithstanding a former Resolution of the House of Lords against such a Practice; which made the Court apprehensive, that the same might occasion unhappy Differences between both Houses; some Members of the House of Commons endeavoured to prevent it, but the Majority were of a contrary Opinion. The same day, in a Committee of the whole House, on Ways and Means, the House resolved, first, That certain Stamp-Duties be laid upon Vellum, Parchment, and Paper, whereupon shall be engrossed, written, registered, or entered, several Matters and Things not heretofore charged with any Stamp-Duties either in England or Scotland; Which Matters and Duties were specified in seven other Resolutions.

Then in the 9th place it was resolved, that a Duty be laid upon all Pamphlets, and News-Papers, printed or written. 10. That the said Duty be 1 d. on every single Half-sheet printed or written. 11. That a Duty of 1 s. be charged for every Advertisement in any printed Paper. 12. That a Duty of 2 d. be laid on every Whole-sheet of any Pamphlet or News-Paper printed or written. 13. That the aforesaid Duties upon all Stamp'd-Vellom, Parchment, and Paper, be granted to her Majesty for the Term of 32 Years. 14. That a Duty be laid upon all Stock in hand of Cards and Dice, that has not already paid the former Duty thereon. 15. That the said Duty be 6 d. per Pack on Cards, and five Shilling a Pair for Dice. 16. That a farther Duty be laid upon all Pastboards, Millboard and Scaleboards made in Great-Britain, or imported into the same. 17. That the said farther Duty on the said Commodities imported, be after the Rate of thirty per Cent. ad Valorem, and upon those made in Great-Britain, after the Rate of twenty per Cent. ad Valorem. 18. That the said farther Duties be granted to her Majesty for the Term of 32 Years.

The Resolutions were, the next day, reported; and the 1st, and 2d, being severally read a second time, were agreed to by the House; the 3d, 4th, 5th, 6th, and 7th were recomitted; the 8th, 9th, 10th, 11th, 12th, 13th, and 14th, were agreed to, the 15th was re-committed; the 16th was agreed to; the 17th was amended, and (so amended) agreed to by the House, as follows, viz. That the said farther Duty on the said Commodities imported, be after the Rate of 8 s. for every hundred Weight, and upon those made in Great-Britain, after the Rate of 6 s. for every hundred Weight. And the last Resolution was agreed to by the whole House. After this a Motion being made, and a Question being proposed, that it be an Instruction to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill to raise Money by way of a Lottery, was committed, that they do leave out of the said Bill, such Clauses as relate to the laying a Duty on Bricks Tiles, Slate, Lime, and Stones, and to receive such Clauses as are necessary to substitute an Equivalent for the same out of the Duties upon Stamps, agreed to by the House, and a Debate arising thereupon, a Motion was made, and the Question put, That the Debate be adjourned, but it passed in the Negative. However, after some farther Debate, a Motion was made for adjourning the same to the next day, which was carried in the Affirmative. Accordingly, on the 23d, the House, in a grand Committee on Ways and Means considered of the Resolutions re-committed the day before, and also the Report of the Committee about the Petitions of the Manufacturers in Copper Oar, Lapis Calaminaris, WroughtBrass, Battery, &c. in Great-Britain, and of the Braziers, and other Artificers in and about the Town of Derby, and resolved, First, That the new Duty for every Piece of Vellom or Parchment or Sheet, or Piece of Paper, upon which shall be engrossed, or written, any principal or original Instrument of Surrender, or Resignation of any Messuages, Houses, Lands, Tenements, Hereditaments, Tithes, Mills, Fishings, and other heretable Rights, or any of them, to be made to any of her Majesty's Subjects, who are, or shall be the Superiors thereof, or to any City, Town, Burgh, or Corporation, or to any Magistrates, or others, who have Power to receive such Surrenders, or Resignations in Scotland, be the Sum of 2s. 3d. 2. That the Duty of every Piece of Vellom, Parchment, or Sheet, or Piece of Paper, upon which shall be engrossed, or written, any Charter of Resignation, Confirmation, Nevodamus or Charter, upon Apprising or Adjudication made or granted by such Superior, or others, as aforesaid, in Scotland, be the Sum of 2 s. 3 d. 3. That the Duty for every Piece of Vellom, or Parchment, or Sheet, or Piece or Sheet, or Piece of Paper, upon which shall be engrossed, or written, any principal original Retour of any Service of Heirs, or any Precept of Clare constat in Scotland, be the Sum of 2 s. 3 d. 4. That the Duty for every Piece of Vellom, or Parchment, or Sheet, or Piece of Paper, upon which shall be engrossed, or written, any principal or original Saisine, taken, or following upon any Mortgage, Wadset, Heretable-Bond, Alienation, or Disposition, or upon any Charter, Precept of Clare constat Retours, Apprisings, or Adjudications in Scotland, be the Sum of 2 s 3 d. 5. That the Duty for every Piece of Vellom, or Parchment, or Sheet, or Piece of Paper, upon which shall be engrossed, or written, any principal or original Instrument of Surrender, or Resignation, Services, or Cognitions of Heirs, Charter, or Saisines of any Houses, Lands, Tenements, or Hereditaments holding Burgage, or of Burgage-Tenure in Scotland, be the Sum of 2 s. and 3 d. 6. That where more than one of any the Matters, or things aforesaid, shall be engrossed, written, entered, or registered, upon one Piece of Vellom, Parchment, or Paper, that then the said respective Duties be charged on every one of such Matters and Things. 7. That the Duty upon Stock in Hand of Cards and Dice that have not already paid the former Duty, be an Half-penny per Pack, for Cards, and 6 d. a Pair for Dice. 8, That a certain Time be limited for the bringing into the Office for Stamp-Duties, all the Stock in Hand of Cards and Dice that have not already paid the former Duty, to be Stamp'd. 9. That the said Duties be granted to her Majesty for the Term of 32 Years. 10. That a farther Duty be laid on Wrought Brass, called Black-Lattin, and Metal prepared, imported, into Great-Britain. 11. That the said farther Duty upon Black-Lattin imported, be 11 s. per Hundred. 12. That the said farther Duty upon Metal prepared, imported be 8 s. and 4 d. per Hundred. Which Resolutions were on the 24th of April reported, and agreed to by the House; and ordered, that a Bill or Bills be brought in upon the said Resolutions; and the Resolutions from the Committee, who were to consider of Ways and Means for raising the Supply granted to her Majesty, that were agreed unto by the House the 23d of February last, and 22d, Instant; and that Mr. Conyers, Sir Thomas Powis, Mr. Attorney-General Mr. Sollicitor-General, and Mr. Lowndes, do prepare and bring in the same.

Clauses for Drawbacks on Soap and Learned-Books exported, &c.

On the 25th, the Commons ordered; that the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Lottery-Bill; &c. was committed, have Power to receive four Clauses, viz. One for allowing a Drawback for Soap used in the Woollen-Manufacture exported: Another, for the Relief of such Persons as had neglected to bring and prove their Benefit LotteryTickets in due time, upon the Lottery-Acts for 1710, and 1711, or any of them: A Third, for Relief of such Persons as were entitled to any Money due, and unpaid, upon any Exchequer-Bills, or Lottery-Tickets, which had been lost, burnt, or otherwise destroyed; And a Fourth, for a Drawback to be allowed for the Duties laid upon all Paper used in the Printing any Books in the Learned Languages, upon the Exportation thereof. Then the House having resolved itself into the said Committee, made some Progress in the said Bill, and put off that Matter till the 28th following, when, in a grand Committee, they made some further Progress in it.

The intended Taxon Building-Materials laid aside.

The next day, A Bill for laying several Duties upon such Stamped-Vellom, Parchment, and Paper, therein-mentioned; and for Licensing an additional Number of Hackney-Chairs, and for charging certain Stocks of Cards, and Dice, in the Hands of the Dealer therein, was read a second time, and committed to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for laying several Duties upon Soap and Paper made in Great-Britain, or imported into the same; and upon chequered and stained Limens imported; and upon certain Silks, Callicoes, Linnens and Stuffs printed, painted, or stained; and upon Bricks, and other things thereinmentioned, to raise Money by Way of a Lottery towards her Majesty's Supply, And also to whom the Bill to appoint Commissioners to examine the Value of all Lands, and other Interests granted by the Crown since the 13th Day of February, 1688, and upon what Considerations such Grants were made, were committed; and it was ordered, That it be an Instruction to the said Committee, that they do leave out of the Bill for laying the several Duties on Soap and Paper made in Great-Britain, or imported into the same; and upon chequered and stained Linnens imported; and upon certain Silks, Callicoes, Linnens and Stuffs printed, painted or stained; and upon Bricks, and other things therein mentioned, to raise Money by way of a Lottery towards her Majesty's Supply, such Clauses therein, as relate to the laying a Duty on Bricks, Tiles, Slate, Lime, and Stones, and insert in lieu thereof, the Duties on Stamp'd Vellom, Parchment and Paper, and that they do alter and make the said Bills in one. Then a Bill for laying Duties on black Lattin, and Metal prepared, was read a second Time. And a Motion being made, and the Question put, That the Bill be committed, it passed in the Negative.

The Call of the House of Commons put off.

It has been mentioned before, that the strict Summons sent by the Speaker of the House of Commons to the several Counties of Great Britain, requiring the Attendance of the Members of the House on the first of May, raised a general Expectation, that the Queen would then communicate to her Parliament the Terms of a general Peace; but when that Day came the call was further adjourned to the 8th of May, then to the 15th, and then again to the 22d: The Negociation between our Ministers and France not being yet brought to such a Consistency as to be thought fit to be laid before the two Houses.

Drawbacks of the Duty on Paper in the Universities.

The 3d (of May) the House ordered that it be an Instruction to the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for laying several Duties on Soap and Paper, &c. was referred to receive two Clauses, one, That for the Encouragement of Learning, there be a Drawback of the Duty on Paper used in the two Universities in the printing Books in the Latin, Greek, Oriental and Northern Languages; The other to reduce the Rates of Brocage for Transfers upon the selling of public Stocks, so far as not to exceed two Shillings and nine Pence upon every hundred Pounds.

The Grants-Bill untack'd from the Lottery-Bill.

It was hinted before, that some Members of the House of Commons, did, on the 21st of April, endeavour to prevent the tacking of the Bill to appoint Commissioners to examine the Value of all Lands, &c. granted by the Crown since the 13th of February, 1688-9, to the Lottery-Bill; but tho' they then failed therein, yet (as the Report was then current) upon a Promise made by a great Minister, to several leading Men, that he would use all his Interest to procure the passing of the first of these Bills, single, in the House of Lords, on the 6th of May, the Commons resolved, 'That the Committee of the whole House be discharged from the Instruction to alter and make these two into one; which was carried by a Majority of three hundred Voices against eighty-one.'

Commissioners to execute the Grants-Bill chosen.

'Four Days after the Grants-Bill, with the Amendments made to it, both by the Committee of the whole House, and the House itself, was ordered to be engrossed; after which the Commons resolved, '1. That the Commissioners for putting in Execution the Trusts and Powers in the said Bill, be seven. 2. That no Person should be a Commissioner who had any Office of Profit, or was accountable to her Majesty, or has, or holds, under any Grant from the Crown, since the 13th of February, 1688-9. 3. That the Commissioners might be Members of the House. 4. That they be chosen by Ballotting: which, according to order, was done on Tuesday, the 13th of May, and the Majority of Voices fell upon John Hind Cotton Esq; the honourable James Murray Esq; the Right honourable Henry, Viscount Down, of the Kingdom of Ireland; Charles Cholmondley Esq; James Bulteel Esq; William Levinz Esq; and Sir Edmund Bacon Bart. The next Day the Commissioners Names were inserted in the Blank left for them in the Bill, which being engrossed, was read the third Time, passed, and sent to the Lords, where it was lost.

Resolutions on Ways and Means for laying further Duties on East-India Goods.

The 16th, the House in a grand Committee on Ways and Means, came to several Resolutions which the next Day were reported as follows.

'1. That towards raising the Supply granted to her Majesty, farther Duties be laid upon all Callicoes and Muslins, and all Dimities, and other white Manufactures of Cotton, and upon all Coffee, Tea and Drugs (dying drugs excepted) which shall be imported into Great Britain, over and above all Duties already chargeable on the said Commodities, or any of them.

'2. That the said farther Duties upon Callicoes Muslins, Dimities, and other white Manufactures of Cotton imported, be after the Rate of Ten per Cent. ad Valorem, to be ascertained by the Sale at the Candle.

'3. That the said farther Duty upon Coffee imported, be after the Rate of twelve Pence per Pound Weight Avoirdupoiz.

'4. That the said farther Duty upon Tea imported, be after the Rate of two Shillings for every Pound Weight imported from Places within the Limits of the Charter granted to the East-India Company, and five Shillings for every such Pound Weight of Tea imported from any of the other Places.

'5. That the said farther Duties upon Drugs imported (except as aforesaid) be after the Rate of twenty per Cent. as they are valued in the Book of Rates.

'6. That the said farther Duties be granted to her Majesty for the Term of thirty-two Years.'

Recommitted.

The first Resolution being read a second time, and a Debate arising thereupon, the same was adjourned till Tuesday the 20th of May, when the House having resumed the said Debate, it was resolved, 'That the said Resolutions be recommitted to the Committee of the whole House.'

The united East-India Company used all possible Means to prevent the laying the further Duties before mentioned; and among the rest, delivered to the Members of the House of Commons the following printed Case.

The Case of the East-India Company.

The said Company advanced (Anno 1698) for the Service of the Government, two Millions Sterling, at which time the Duties on East-India Goods were, viz.

On Muslins and Callicoes 32 l. 10s. per Cent.

On Coffee 15 per Cent ad Valorem.

On Tea 15 per Cent. ad Valorem.

Since then the Parliament have added the following Duties viz,

Fifteen per Cent. on all Muslins and Callicoes on the gross Price at the Candle.

More 5 per Cent. on all Muslins and Callicoes.

More 3 d. per Yard, on all Callicoes printed in England, by a Bill now passing.

On Tea 2 s. a Pound; also 5 per Cent. which with the former 15 per Cent to be payable at the Candle Price.

On Coffee 5 per Cent. ad Valorem, and 1 s. per Pound.

Anno 1700. The Parliament prohibited the wearing or using in England of any wrought Silks, Bengalls, and Stuffs mixed with Silk, or Herba, of the Manufacture of Persia, China, or East-India, and all Callicoes painted, dyed, printed or stained there.

Anno 1707. The said Company advanced for the Service of the Government, twelve hundred thousand Pounds Sterling without any Interest for the same.

The Company do annually Export to the East-Indies, about one hundred and fifty thousand Pounds value in Woollen Goods and other English Product.

The Company being informed, a Vote is passed in the honourable Committee for Ways and Means, for laying a further Duty of 10 per Cent. at the Candle on all Muslins, Callicoes, Dimities, and other white Manufactures of Cotton; of 20 per Cent. on all Drugs, except for dying; of 2 s. a Pound on all Tea, and of 1 s. a Pound on all Coffee:

Do humbly pray the said Duty may not be laid, for the following Reasons.

'1. It will amount to an utter Prohibition of their Trade, whereby the great Duties now payable to her Majesty, will be sunk.

'2. It will encourage the clandestine bringing in of these Goods from Holland, which will pay no Custom.

'3. It will prevent the sending out Woollen Goods, and other English Product, and thereby the Employment of large defensible Ships.

'4. And, on the whole, will effectually give up this valuable Trade to the Dutch and other Europeans.'

Note, Anno 1698, when the Company advanced the two Millions for the Trade, a Piece of Callicoe of 18 Yards, which now sells for about 20 s. paid for Customs, &c. Duties.— 0 5 6
Now pays (the printing Duty included) more 0 8 2
The now proposed Duty will amount to more 0 2 0
0 15 8

There was also published and dispersed, the following Account of the Funds, for the Payment of which the Duties on East-India Goods are appropriated.

DUTIES. To what appropriated.
Subsidy of Tonnage and Poundage, and Additional Duties on Linnens, &c. Half for Annuities.
Half for cancelling Exchequer Bills.
A farther Subsidy Civil List.
One third Subsidy Annuities.
Two third Subsidy Cancel. Exchequer Bills.
Fifteen per Cent. on Muslins. Cancel. Exchequer Bills.
Fifteen per Cent. on Callicoes. Cancel. Exchequer Bills.
New Duties on Coffee and Tea. Cancel. Exchequer Bills.
Twelve per. Cent. on China-Ware. Cancel. Exchequer Bills.
New Duties on Drugs rated and unrated Cancel. Exchequer Bills.
Twenty per Cent. old Impost South Sea Company.
The new Additional Impost South Sea Company.

The Duties payable to her Majesty on the Goods imported by the Company's Ships the last two Years, between March 1709-10, and March 1711-12, amount to 758,156 l. 9 s. 10 d.

If any further Duty should be laid, it will put a full Stop to the greatest Part of the Company's Trade, and consequently sink the greatest part of the Produce of the above Funds.

But notwithstanding these Reasons, on the 21st, the House in a Committee on Ways and Means, came to the following Resolutions:

Resolutions on Ways and Means.

'1. That towards raising the Supply granted to her Majesty, a Duty be laid upon all Starch made in Great Britain, or Imported into the same.

'2. That the said Duty upon all foreign Starch imported, be after the rate of two Pence per Pound Weight Averdupoiz, over and above the present Duties, payable upon the Importation thereof.

'3. That the said Duties upon all Starch made in Great Britain, be after the rate of one Penny per Pound Weight Averdupoiz.

'4. That the said Duties be granted to her Majesty for the Term of thirty two Years.

'5. That all Stock of Starch, in the Hands of any Persons trading or dealing therein for Sale, be chargeable with the like Duties.

'6. That farther Duties be laid on all Coffee, Tea, and Drugs (dying Drugs excepted) which shall be imported into Great Britain, over and above all Duties chargeable on the said Commodities, or any of them.

'7. That the said farther Duty upon Coffee imported, be after the rate of twelve Pence per Pound Weight Averdupoiz.

'8. That the said farther Duty upon Tea imported, be after the rate of two Shillings for every such Pound Weight, imported from any Places within the Limits of the Charter granted to the East-India Company, and five Shillings for every such Pound Weight of Tea imported from any other Places.

'9. That the said farther Duties upon Drugs imported (except Dying Drugs) be after the rate of twenty per Cent. as they are valued in the Book of Rates.

'10. That the said farther Duties upon all Coffee, Tea, and Drugs, be granted to her Majesty for the Term of thirty two Years.

'11. That all Stock of Coffee, Tea, and Drugs, (except as aforesaid) in the Hands of such Persons trading or dealing therein for Sale, be chargeable with the like Duties.

'12. That towards raising the Supply, certain additional Rates or Duties be laid on all Hides and Skins, and pieces of Hides and Skins; and upon all Vellum and Parchment to be imported into Great Britain, or to be tanned, tawed, or dressed within the same; to be paid over and above all Duties already charged, or chargeable upon the same Commodities respectively. The Rates of which Duties were ascertained in 37 other Resolutions.

'50. That all the said new or additional Rates and Duties, be granted to her Majesty for the Term of thirty two Years.

'51. That all Stocks of such Hides and Skins, and all Stocks of such Vellum and Parchment within the Realm of Great-Britain for Sale, be charged with so much Money as one fourth Part of the additional Rates intended to be imposed after the Commencement of the said Term upon the like Commodities, as aforesaid, shall amount unto.

'52. That a further Duty be laid on all gilt and silver Wire.

'53. That the said farther Duty on gilt Wire imported be after the rate of one Shilling per Ounce, and on gilt Wire made in Great-Britain, eight Pence per Ounce.

'54. That the said farther Duty laid upon silver Wire imported, be nine Pence per Ounce; and upon silver Wire made in Great-Britain six Pence per Ounce.

'55. That the said Duties be granted to her Majesty for the Term of thirty two Years.

'56. That all Stock of gold and silver Wire in the Hands of any Dealers therein for Sale, be charged with one half of the like Duties.

'57. That towards raising the Supply granted to her Majesty, a Duty be laid upon all Policies of Assurance to be made or entered within the Cities of London and Westminster, or in any Places within the weekly Bills of Mortality, over and above all such Duties as are already chargeable upon them or any of them, by any Act or Acts of Parliament formerly made in that behalf.

'58. That the said Duty so to be laid, be the Sum of two Shillings and four Pence for every such Policy.

'59. That the said Duty be granted to her Majesty for the Term of thirty two Years.

'60. That for better securing the said Duty, the said Policies of Assurance shall be written or printed upon Paper, to be stump'd with Stamps denoting the Payment, or charging of the Duty aforesaid.

'61. That a Fund of one hundred sixty eight thousand and three Pounds per Annum be charged upon the several Duties aforesaid, for raising the Sum of one Million eight hundred thousand Pounds, by Contribution for Exchequer Orders payable in Course, with certain Increase of Principal and Interest, according to the several Classes, with the Addition of Chances.'

These Resolutions being the next day reported, were agreed to by the House, and a Bill was ordered to be brought in thereupon. The same Day, the Queen came to the House of Peers, with the usual State and Solemnity, and the Commons being sent for up, and attending, her Majesty gave the Royal Assent to the following public Bills. viz.

Royal Assent given to several Acts.

1. An Act for laying several Duties upon all Soap and Paper made in Great-Britain, or imported into the same; and upon chequered and striped Linnens, and Stuffs printed, painted, or stained; and upon several kinds of Stamped Vellum, Parchment and Paper; and upon certain printed Papers, Pamphlets, and Advertisements, for raising the Sum of one Million eight hundred thousand Pounds by way of a Lottery, towards her Majesty's Supply; and for Licensing an additional Number of Hackney Chairs; and for charging certain Stocks of Cards and Dice; and for better securing her Majesty's Duties to arise in the Office for stamped Duties, by Licenses for Marriages, and otherwise; and for relief of Persons who have not claimed their Lottery Tickets in due time, or have lost Exchequer-Bills, or Lottery-Tickets; and for borrowing Money upon Stock (part of the Capital of the South-Sea Company) for the Use of the Public.

2. An Act for enlarging the Time given to the Commissioners, appointed by her Majesty, pursuant to an Act for granting to her Majesty several Duties on Coals, for building fifty new Churches, in and about the Cities of London and Westminster, and other Purposes therein mentioned, &c.

3. An Act for better collecting and recovering the Duties granted for the Support of the royal Hospital at Greenwich, &c.

4. An Act to restore the Patrons to their ancient Rights of presenting Ministers to the Churches vacant, in that Part of Great-Britain called Scotland.

5. An Act for repealing part of an Act passed in the Parliament of Scotland, entitled, An Act for discharging the Yule Vacance.

6. An Act for repealing a Clause in the Statute made in the 21st Year of the Reign of King James I. entitled, An Act for the farther Description of a Bankrupt, and for Relief of Creditors, &c.

7. An Act for raising the Militia for the Year 1712, &c. and for rectifying a Mistake in an Act passed this Session of Parliament, entitled, An Act for punishing all Mutiny and Desertion, &c.

8. An Act for the more effectual preventing fraudulent Conveyances, in order to multiply Votes for electing Knights of Shires to serve in Parliament.

9. An Act for regulating, improving and encouraging the Woollen Manufactuure of Mix'd or Medley Broad Cloth, and for the Payment of the Poor employed therein.

10. An Act for erecting a Work-House in the City and County of the City of Norwich, &c.

11. An Act for prolonging the Term for Payment of certain Duties granted by an Act made in the 12th and 13th Years of King William, entitled, An Act for recovering, securing and keeping in Repair the Harbour of Mine-head, &c.

12. An Act for repairing certain Highways, &c.

13. An Act for making the River Avon, in the Counties of Somerset and Gloucester, navigable, from the City of Bath, to or near Hanham's Mills.

14. An Act to give farther time for enrolling such Leases granted from the Crown, as have not been enrolled, &c.

15. An Act for compleating a Chapel of Ease in the lower Town of Deal, in the County of Kent, by a Duty on Water-born Coals to be brought into the said Town.

16. An Act for reviving and continuing several Acts therein mentioned, for the preventing Mischiefs which may happen by Fire, for building and repairing County Jayls, for exempting Apothecaries from serving Parish and Ward Offices, and serving upon Juries, and relating to the returning of Jurors.

17. An Act for the Relief of Merchants, importing Prize Goods from America.

18. An Act for the better supplying the Town of Boston, in the County of Lincoln, with fresh Water.

19. An Act for the better repairing and amending certain Roads leading from Ipswich to Cleydon.

20. An Act to prevent Abuses in making Linnen Cloth, and regulating the Lengths, Breadths, and equal sorting of Yarn for each Piece made in Scotland, and for whitening the same.

21. An Act for the Relief of Insolvent Debtors, by obliging their Creditors to accept the utmost Satisfaction they are capable to make, and restoring them to their Liberty. And to twenty-one private Bills.

The Earl of Strafford comes over. ; Bold Speech of Mr. Hampden about the unactive Campaign, and trifling Negociations of Peace.

It was by many expected that the Queen would, that day, have laid the State of the Negociation of Peace before the Parliament, the rather because the Earl of Strafford, one of her Majesty's Plenipotentiaries at Utrecht, arrived here some days before: But it seems some Points were not yet fully settled between our Court and that of France, so that her Majesty did not think fit to make a Speech to her Parliament. It was observ'd, that, at the presenting of the Money-Bill, the Speaker of the House of Commons insinuated, in his Compliment to the Queen, that her faithful Commons were in hopes, that what they had so cheerfully given for her Majesty's Occasions, would enable her Majesty to put an end to this present War, by a safe and honourable Peace. But however, these Hopes were somewhat abated by her Majesty's Silence. As soon as the Commons were returned to the House, Mr. Benson, Chancellor of the Exchequer, having mov'd that the Call of the House be farther adjourn'd 'till Wednesday the 14th of June, one of the leading Members of the moderate Party complain'd, 'That we had an unactive and lazy Campaign, and a trifling Negociation of Peace: So that we were amused by our Ministry at home, and trick'd by our Enemies abroad.' Mr. Secretary St. John, highly piqued at, and resenting that Expression, said, 'It reflected on her Majesty and her Ministers, and that some had been sent to the Tower for less Offences.' But Mr. Thomas Onflow, Mr. Lechmere, and some other Members interposing, the Debate went no farther, and the Call of the House was accordingly put off 'till the fourth of June.

Motion made by Mr. Pulteney in the House of Commons rejected. ; Resolution for putting an entire Confidence in the Queen.

The 8th, Mr. Pulreney made a Motion in the House of Commons, That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, that her faithful Commons are justly alarm'd at the Intelligences received from abroad, that her General in Flanders has declined to act offensively against France, in Concurrence with her Allies; and being under the deepest Concern for the dangerous Consequences which must arise from thence to the common Cause, do with all humility beseech her Majesty, that speedy Instructions may be given to her General in Flanders, to prosecute the War with the utmost Vigour, in conjunction with her Allies, as the best Means to obtain a safe and honourable Peace for her Majesty, and all of them; and to quiet the Minds of the People, who cannot but be extremely apprehensive of the fatal Consequences of such a Division.' But after a Debate, in which Mr. Secretary gave Assurances much to the same purpose as the LordHigh-Treasurer had done in the House of Lords, the Motion being form'd into Question, and the Question put, it was carried in the Negative, by a Majority of 203 Voices against 73. After which, it was resolved, 'That this House hath an entire Confidence in her Majesty's most gracious Promise, to communicate to her Parliament the Terms of the Peace before the same shall be concluded; and that they will support her Majesty in obtaining an honourable and safe Peace, against all such Persons, either at home or abroad, who have endeavoured, and shall endeavour to obstruct the same: And that the said Resolution be laid before her Majesty by the whole House.'

The said Resolution being accordingly laid before the Queen, on the 30th of May, her Majesty was pleased to return this Answer:

Her Majesty's Answer.

'Gentlemen, I thank you most heartily for this Resolution, which is dutiful to me, honest to your Country, and very seasonable at this time, when so many Artifices are used to obstruct a good Peace, or to force one disadvantageous to Britain.'

Address in favour of the episcopal Clergy in Scotland.

This Answer being the next day reported to the House, it was resolved, that the humble Thanks of the House, be returned to her Majesty for the same.' It was also resolv'd, upon a Motion made by Mr. Murray, 'That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, that she would be pleased to apply the Rents of the late Bishop's Lands in North-Britain, that remain in the Crown, for the support of such of the episcopal Clergy there, as shall take the Oath to her Majesty.'

Three Days before, upon the reading of the Report of the Committee, to whom it was referred to enquire into the Account, shewing how much the Sum of 35,302,107 l. 18s. and 9d. of the Money granted by Parliament, and issued to the public Service to Christmas 1710, which appeared to remain unaccounted for the last Session of Parliament, has been since accounted for, before the Auditors of the Imprests, and by whom, and when, and what Obstructions have arisen in accounting for the same, it was resolved,

Resolutions about Part of the 35 Millions &c. unaccounted for.

'1. That if it shall appear to her Majesty by the proper Officer, that the Payments have been actually made, for which Mr. Bridges (Pay-master of her Majesty's foreign Forces) craves Allowances, and which are contained in the Draught of a Privy-Seal for the Year 1706, and that the Money was applied to the Service for which the same was given; that then the said Pay-master has a Right to such Privy-Seal.

'2. That if it shall appear to her Majesty, by the proper Officer, that the Payments have been actually made by the Earl of Ranelagh, deceased, late Pay-master of her Majesty's Forces, which are contained in the Draught of a Privy-Seal for making him Allowances in his Accompts, and that the Money was apply'd to the Services for which the same was given, that then the Executors or Administrators of the said Earl of Ranelagh have a Right to such Privy-Seal.

An Account of the Negociations at the Hague and Gurtrydenberg, called for. ; Clauses added to the Bill to raise 1,800,000 l. by Classes. ; A larger Place for the keeping the Journals ordered to be provided. ; Bill to restrain the Licentiousness of the Press, ordered to be brought in.

June the 2d, it was resolved to address the Queen, That she would be pleased to order an Account to be laid before the House of the Negociation and Transactions relating to the Articles preliminary to the Treaty of a general Peace, in 1709; and also an Account of the Negociation and Transactions at Gertrydenberg; and who were employ'd as her Majesty's Plenipotentiaries in transacting the Negociations. The same day it was ordered, That the Committee of the whole House, to whom the Bill for laying several Duties on Hides, &c. was committed, should receive two Clauses, viz. One to prohibit the Importation of Gold and Silver-Thread, Lace, and Fringe, and other Works made thereof, and of Gold and Silver wrought up Silks; and another to prohibit the Use of Lime, Alabaster, Stone, Plaister of Paris, Chalk, Whiting, and Marble-dust, in making Powder for Hair. The next day, the Commons being acquainted, That the Places where the Journals, Records, and Papers, belonging to the House, and in the Custody of the Clerk, were very strait and inconvenient, since the great Additions made to them of late Years, by the constant, annual, and long Sessions of Parliament; it was ordered, that John Manley Esq; SurveyorGeneral, do consider of some more convenient Place, near the House, to be set apart for the keeping the Journals, Records, and other Papers, and report the same to the House. The same day Sir Gilbert Dolben reported from the Committee of the whole House, to whom it was referred to consider of that Part of her Majesty's Message to this House, the 17th of January last, which relates to the great Licence taken in publishing false and scandalous Libels, the Resolutions which they had directed him to report to the House:

'1. That the great Liberty taken in printing and publishing false, scandalous, and impious Libels, creates Division among her Majesty's Subjects, tends to the Disturbance of the public Peace, to the Encrease of Immorality, Prophaneness, and Irreligion, and is highly prejudicial to her Majesty, and her Government.

'2. That the Want of a due Regulation of the Press, is a great Occasion of the said Mischief.

'3. That all Printing-Presses be registered, with the Names of the Owners, and their Places of Abode.

'4. That to every Book, Pamphlet, and Paper, which shall be printed, there be set the Name and the Place of Abode of the Author, Printer and Publisher thereof.

'5. That no Bookseller, or other Person, shall sell or disperse any Book, Pamphlet, or Paper, to which the Name and Place of Abode of the Author, Printer, and Publisher shall not be set.' And ordered a Bill to be brought in, upon the said Resolutions.'

The Bill to regulate the African Company dropt.

The same day an engrossed Bill for establishing a Trade to Africa in a regulated Company, was read the third time; and a Motion being made, and the Question put, that the Bill do pass, it was carry'd in the Negative.

Two other Clauses added to the Bill to raise 1,800,000 l. by Classes.

The 4th, it was ordered that two Clauses be inserted in the Bill for laying several Duties upon Hides, &c. to raise a further Sum of 1,800,000 l. viz. One to explain the Act lately passed, for laying Duties upon Soap, and other things thereinmentioned, in such Manner, that the Makers of Hard CakeSoap shall not be obliged to put up the same, upon the making thereof, into Casks, of such Gage as are prescribed by the Act last mentioned, for the Makers of soft Soap. And the other Clause for preventing the setting up or continuing unlawful Lotteries, and the new invented Offices of Insurances on Marriages, Births, and other Contingencies; and the Offices, or Contrivances, set up under the Denomination of Sales by Numbers, Gloves, Fans, Pictures, or the like, upon pretence of improving small Sums of Money, as being prejudicial to Trade, and tending to defraud her Majesty's Subjects: Then the House resolved itself into a grand Committee, to consider of that Bill, and to make a further Progress in it.

Acts passed.

The 6th, the Queen came to the House with the usual Solemnity, and having given the Royal Assent to three public, and six private Acts, her Majesty made the following Speech to both Houses of Parliament.

Queen's Speech.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'THE making Peace and War is the undoubted Prerogative of the Crown; yet such is the just Confidence I place in you, that, at the opening of this Session, I acquainted you, that a Negociation for a general Peace was begun, and afterwards, by Messages, I promised to communicate to you the Terms of Peace, before the same should be concluded.

'In pursuance of that Promise, I now come to let you know, upon what Terms a general Peace may be made.

'I need not mention the Difficulties which arise from the very Nature of this Affair, and it is but too apparent, that these Difficulties have been encreased by other Obstructions, artfully contrived to hinder this great and good Work.

'Nothing however has moved me from steadily pursuing, in the first Place, the true Interest of my own Kingdoms, and I have not omitted any thing which might procure to all our Allies what is due to them by Treaties, and what is necessary for their Security.

'The assuring of the Protestant Succession, as by Law established, in the House of Hanover, to these Kingdoms, being what I have nearest at heart, particular Care is taken, not only to have that acknowledged in the strongest Terms, but to have an additional Security, by the Removal of that Person out of the Dominions of France, who has pretended to disturb this Settlement.

'The Apprehension that Spain and the West-Indies might be united to France, was the chief Inducement to begin this War, and the effectual preventing of such an Union, was the Principle I laid down at the Commencement of this Treaty.

'Former Examples and the late Negociations sufficiently shew, how difficult it is to find Means to accomplish this Work. I would not content myself with such as are speculative, or depend on Treaties only; I insisted on what is solid, and to have at hand the Power of executing what should be agreed.

'I can therefore now tell you, That France at last is brought to (fn. 1) offer, that the Duke of Anjou shall, for himself, and his Descendants, renounce for ever all Claim to the Crown of France. And that this important Article may be exposed to no Hazard, the Performance is to accompany the Promise.

'At the same time, the Succession to the Crown of France is to be declared, after the Death of the present Dauphin and his Sons, to be in the Duke of Berry and his Sons, in the Duke of Orleans and his Sons, and so on to the rest of the House of Bourbon.

'As to Spain and the Indies, the Succession to those Dominions, after the Duke of Anjou and his Children, is to de scend to such Prince as shall be agreed upon at the Treaty, for ever excluding the rest of the House of Bourbon.

'For confirming the Renunciations and Settlements before mentioned, it is further offered, That they shall be ratified in the most strong and solemn Manner, both in France and Spain; and that those Kingdoms, as well as all the other Powers engaged in the present War, shall be Guarantees to the same.

'The nature of this Proposal is such, that it executeth itself. The Interest of Spain is to support it, and in France, the Persons to whom that Succession is to belong, will be ready and powerful enough to vindicate their own Right.

'France and Spain are now more effectually divided than ever. And thus, by the Blessing of God, will a real Ballance of Power be fixed in Europe, and remain liable to as few Accidents as human Affairs can be exempted from.

'A Treaty of Commerce between these Kingdoms and France has been entered upon, but the excessive Duties laid on some Goods, and the Prohibitions of others, make it impossible to finish this Work so soon as it were to be desired. Care is however taken to establish a Method of settling this Matter, and in the mean time Provision is made, that the same Privileges and Advantages as shall be granted to any other Nation by France, shall be granted in like manner to us.

'The Division of the Island of St. Christopher between us and the French, having been the Cause of great Inconvenience and Damage to my Subjects, I have demanded to have an absolute Cession made to me of that whole Island; and France agrees to this Demand.

'Our Interest is so deeply concerned in the Trade of North-America, that I have used my utmost Endeavours to adjust that Article in the most beneficial Manner. France consents to restore to us the whole Bay and Streights of Hudson; to deliver up the Island of Newfoundland, with Placentia, and to make an absolute Cession of Annapolis, with the rest of Nova Scotia, or Accadia.

'The Safety of our Home-Trade will be better provided for by the Demolition of Dunkirk.

'Our Mediterranean-Trade, and the British-Interest and Influence in those Parts, will be secured by the Possession of Gibraltar and Port-Mahon, with the whole Island of Minorca, which are offered to remain in my hands.

'The Trade to Spain and to the West-Indies, may in general be settled, as it was in the Time of the late King of Spain, Charles the Second, and a particular Provision be made, That all Advantages, Rights or Privileges, which have been granted, or which may hereafter be granted by Spain to any other Nation, shall be in like manner granted to the Subjects of Great-Britain.

'But the Part which we have borne in prosecution of this War, entitling us to some Distinction in the Terms of Peace, I have insisted and obtained, That the Assiento, or Contract for furnishing the Spanish. West-Indies with Negroes, shall be made with us for the Term of 30 Years, in the same manner as it has been enjoy'd by the French for these 10 Years past.

'I have not taken upon me to determine the Interests of our Confederates; these must be adjusted in the Congress at Utrecht, where my best Endeavours shall be employ'd, as they have hitherto been, to procure to every one of them all Justice and reasonable Satisfaction. In the mean time, I think it proper to acquaint you, that France offers to make the Rhine the Barrier to the Empire; to yield Brisac, the Fort of Kehl and Landan, and to raze all the Fortresses, both on the other side of the Rhine, and in that River.

'As to the Protestant Interest in Germany, there will be, on the part of France, no Objection to the resettling thereof on the Foot of the Treaty of Westphalia.

'The Spanish Low-Countries may go to his Imperial Majesty; the Kingdoms of Naples and Sardinia, the Duchy of Milan, and the Places belonging to Spain on the Coast of Tuscany, may likewise be yielded to the Emperor by the Treaty of Peace.

'As to the Kingdom of Sicily, tho' there remains no Dispute concerning the Cession of it by the Duke of Anjou, yet the Disposition thereof is not yet determined.

'The Interests of the States-General, with respect to Commerce, are agreed to, as they have been demanded by their own Ministers, with the Exception only of some very few Species of Merchandize, and the entire Barrier, as demanded by the States in 1709, from France, except two or three Places at most.

'As to these Exceptions several Expedients have been proposed, and I make no doubt but this Barrier may be so settled, as to render that Republic perfectly secure against any Enterprize on the part of France, which is the Foundation of all my Engagements upon this Head with the States.

'The Demands of Portugal depending on the Disposition of Spain, and that Article having been long in Dispute, it has not been yet possible to make any considerable Progress therein; but my Plenipotentiaries will now have an Opportunity to assist that King in his Pretensions.

'Those of the King of Prussia are such, as I hope, will admit of little Difficulty on the part of France, and my Endeavours shall not be wanting to procure all I am able to so good an Ally.

'The Difference between the Barrier demanded for the Duke of Savoy in 1709, and the Offers now made by France, is very inconsiderable: But that Prince having so signally distinguished himself in the Service of the Common-Cause, I am endeavouring to procure for him still further Advantages.

'France has consented that the Elector Palatine shall continue his present Rank among the Electors, and remain in Possession of the Upper-Palatinate.

'The Electoral Dignity is likewise acknowledged in the House of Hanover, according to the Articles inserted, at that Prince's Desire, in my Demands.

'And as to the rest of the Allies, I make no doubt of being able to secure their several Interests.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'I have now communicated to you not only the Terms of Peace, which may, by the future Treaty, be obtained for my own Subjects, but likewise the Proposals of France for satisfying our Allies.

'The former are such as I have reason to expect, to make my People some Amends for that great and unequal Burden which they have lain under thro the whole Course of this War; and I am willing to hope, that none of our Confederates, and especially those to whom so great Accessions of Dominion and Power are to accrue by this Peace, will envy Britain her Share in the Glory and Advantage of it.

'The latter are not yet so perfectly adjusted, as a little more Time might have rendered them; but the Season of the Year making it necessary to put an end to this Session, I resolved no longer to defer communicating these Matters to you.

'I can make no doubt but you are all fully persuaded, that nothing will be neglected on my Part, in the Progress of this Negociation, to bring the Peace to an happy and speedy Issue, and I depend on your entire Confidence in me, and your chearful Concurrence with me.'

The Commons vote an Address of Thanks.

The House being returned, and one or two Members opening their Mouths, to propose the taking the important Matters, mentioned in her Majesty's Speech, into Consideration, they were presently stopped by a general Cry for an Address of Thanks: Whereupon it was resolved, Nemine Contradicente, 'That an humble Address be made to her Majesty, acknowledging her great Condescension in communicating the Terms upon which a general Peace might be made; expressing the Satisfaction of this House in what her Majesty had already done, and their entire Confidence in her Majesty's steady pursuing the true Interest of her Kingdoms, and in her Majesty's Endeavours to procure for all her Allies what is due to them by Treaties, and necessary for their Security; and humbly to desire her Majesty, that she would be pleased to proceed with the present Negociation, for the obtaining a speedy Peace.' Hereupon a Committee was appointed to draw up the said Address; and being, according to order, immediately withdrawn into the Speaker's Chamber for that purpose, Mr. Freeman, their Chairman, did soon after report the Address, which, with some Amendments, was agreed to as follows:

The Address.

'Most gracious Sovereign, we your Majesty's most dutiful and loyal Subjects the Commons of Great-Britain in Parliament assembled, beg leave most humbly to acknowledge your Majesty's great Condescention, in communicating to us the Terms upon which a general Peace may be made.

'Our Hearts are full of Gratitude for what your Majesty has already done, and we want Words to express the Satisfaction, with which we have received all that your Majesty has been pleased to impart to your Commons.

'We have an entire Confidence in your Majesty, that you will steadily pursue the true Interest of your own Kingdoms, and that you will endeavour to procure for all your Allies what is due to them by Treaties, and what is necessary for their Security.

'These Assurances are the least Returns which your faithful Commons can make to so much Condescension and Goodness; and they humbly desire your Majesty, that you will please to proceed in the present Negociations, for the obtaining a speedy Peace.'

This Address being, on the 9th, presented to her Majesty, by the whole House, she was pleased to return the following Answer.

The Queen's Answer.

'I have the Safety and Interest of all my People so much at Heart, that I cannot but take a great deal of Pleasure in this your Dutiful and Prudent Address; and thank you most kindly for it.

'I have study'd your Welfare, and by this you will find the good Effects of that Confidence which you place in me, and which ought always to remain between so affectionate a Prince, and such faithful Subjects.'

Which being the next Day reported to the House by their Speaker, it was resolved, 'That the Thanks of this House be returned to her Majesty, for her most gracious Answer to the Address of this House.'

The 10th, after the Bill for restraining the great Licence taken in publishing false and scandalous Libels, was read the first time, and ordered to be read a second time, a Complaint being made to the House, of the Preface to a Book, entitled, four Sermons. 1. On the Death of Queen Mary, 1694. 2. On the Death of the Duke of Gloucester, 1700. 3. On the Death of King William, 1701. 4. On the Queen's Accession to the Throne, in 1702. By William, Lord Bishop of St. Asaph.

The Book was brought up, and the Preface was read as follows:

The Preface to the Bishop of St. Asaph's four Sermons, read.

'The publishing a few Sermons whilst I live, the latest of which was preached about eight Years since, and the first above seventeen, will make it very natural for People to enquire into the Occasions of doing so; and to such I do very willingly assign these following Reasons.

'1. From the Observations I have been able to make for these many Years last past, upon our public Affairs; and from the natural Tendency of several Principles and Practices, that have, of late, been studiously revived; and from what has followed thereupon, I could not help both fearing and presaging, that these Nations would, some time or other, if ever we should have an enterprizing Prince upon the Throne, of more Ambition than Virtue, Justice and true Honour, fall into the way of all other Nations, and lose their Liberty.

'Nor could I help foreseeing, to whose Charge a great deal of this dreadful Mischief, whenever it should happen, would be laid; whether justly or unjustly, was not my Business to determine: But I resolved, for my own particular part, to deliver myself as well as I could, from the Reproaches and Curses of Posterity, by publicly declaring to all the World, that altho', in the constant Course of my Ministry, I have never failed, on proper Occasions, to recommend, urge, and insist upon the loving, honouring, and the reverencing the Prince's Person, and holding it, according to the Laws, inviolable and sacred, and paying all Obedience and Submission to the Laws, tho' never so hard and inconvenient to private People: Yet did I never think myself at liberty, or authoriz'd to tell the People, that either Christ, St. Peter, or St Paul, or any other holy Writer, had, by any Doctrine delivered by them, subverted the Laws and Constitutions of the Country in which they lived; or put them in a worse Condition with respect to their Civil Liberties, than they would have been, had they not been Christians. I ever thought it a most impious Blasphemy against that holy Religion, to father any thing upon it, that might encourage Tyranny, Oppression, or Injustice, in a Prince, or that easily tended to make a free, and happy People, Slaves and miserable. No: People may make themselves as wretched as they will: but let not God be called into that wicked Party. When Force and Violence and hard Necessity, have brought the Yoke of Servitude upon a People's Neck, Religion will supply them with a patient and submissive Spirit under it. till they can innocently shake it off: But certainly Religion never puts it on. This always was, and this at present is my Judgment of these Matters; and I would be transmitted to Posterity (for the little share of time such Names as mine can live) under the Character of one who loved his Country, and would be thought a good Englishman, as well as a good Clergyman.

'This Character I thought would be transmitted, by the following Sermons, which were made for, and preached in a private Audience, when I could think of nothing else but doing my Duty on the Occasions that were then offered by God's Providence, without any manner of Design of making them public: And for that Reason I give them now, as they were then delivered; by which I hope to satisfy those People who have objected a Change of Principles to me, as if I were not now the same Man I formerly was. I never had but one Opinion of these Matters, and that I think is so reasonable and well grounded, that I believe I never can have any other.

'Another Reason of my publishing these Sermons at this Time, is, That I have a mind to do myself some Honour, by doing what Honour I could to the Memory of two most excellent Princes, and who have very highly deserved at the Hands of all the People of these Dominions, who have any true. Value for the Protestant Religion and the Constitution of the English Government, of which they were the great Deliverers and Defenders. I have lived to see their illustrious Names very rudely handled, and the great Benefits they did this Nation, treated slightly and contemptuously. I have lived to see our Deliverance from Arbitrary Power and Popery, traduced and vilify'd by some, who formerly thought it was their greatest Merit, and made it part of their Boast and Glory, to have had a little Hand and Share in bringing it about: And others, who, without it, must have lived in Exile, Poverty and Misery, meanly disclaiming it, and using ill the glorious Instrument thereof. Who could expect such a Requital of such Merit? I have, I own it, an Ambition of exempting myself from the Number of unthankful People; and as I loved and honoured those great Princes living, and lamented over them when dead, so I would gladly raise them up a Monument of Praise, as lasting as any thing of mine can be; and I chuse to do it at this time, when it is so unfashionable a thing to speak honourably of them.

'The Sermon that was preached upon the Duke of Gloucester's Death, was printed quickly after, and is now, because the Subject was so suitable, join'd to the others. The Loss of that most promising and hopeful Prince was, at that Time, I saw, unspeakably great; and many Accidents since have convinced us, that it could not have been over-valued. That precious Life, had it pleased God to have prolonged it to the usual Space, had saved us many Fears and Jealousies, and dark Distrusts, and prevented many Alarms that have long kept us, and will keep us still waking and uneasy. Nothing remain'd to comfort and support us under this heavy Stroke, but the Necessity it brought the King and Nation under, of settling the Succession in the House of Hanover, and giving it an Hereditary Right by Act of Parliament, as long as it continues Protestant. So much good did God, in his merciful Providence, produce from a Misfortune, which we could never otherwise have sufficiently deplored.

'The fourth Sermon was preached upon the Queen's Accession to the Throne, and in the first Year in which that Day was solemnly observed, (for by some Accident or other it had been overlook'd the Year before) and every one will know, without the Date of it, that it was preached very early in this Reign, since I was able only to promise and presage its future Glories and Successes, from the good appearances of Things, and the happy turn our Affairs began to take, and could not then count up the Victories and Triumphs, that, for seven Years after, made it, in the Prophet's Language, a Name and a Praise among all the People of the Earth. Never did seven such Years together pass over the Head of any English Monarch, nor cover it with so much Honour: The Crown and Scepter seemed to be the Queen's least Ornaments. Those other Princes wore in common with her: And her great personal Virtues were the same before and since. But such was the Fame of her Administration of Affairs at home; such was the Reputation of her Wisdom and Felicity in chusing Ministers; and such was then esteemed their Faithfulness and Zeal, their Diligence and great Abilities in executing her Commands: To such a Height of Military Glory did her great General and her Armies carry the British Name abroad: Such was the Harmony and Concord betwixt her and her Allies: And such was the Blessing of God upon all her Councils and Undertakings, that I am as sure as History can make me, no Prince of ours was ever yet so prosperous and successful, so loved, esteemed, and honoured by their Subjects and their Friends, nor near so formidable to their Enemies. We were, as all the World imagined then, just entering on the Ways that promised to lead to such a Peace, as would have answered all the Prayers of our Religious Queen, the Care and Vigilance of a most able Ministry, the Payments of a willing and obedient People, as well as all the glorious Toils and Hazards of the Soldiery; when God, for our Sins, permitted the Spirit of Discord to go forth, and by troubling sore the Camp, the City, and the Country, (And oh that it had altogether spared the Places sacred to his Worship!) to spoil, for a time, this beautiful and pleasing Prospect; and give us, in its stead, I know not what——Our Enemies will tell the rest with Pleasure. It will become me better to pray to God to restore us to the power of obtaining such a Peace as will be to his Glory, the Safety, Honour, and the Welfare of the Queen and her Dominions, and the general Satisfaction of all her High and Mighty Allies.'

After the reading of this excellent Preface, the Commons resolved,

Censure past upon it.

'1. That the said Preface is malicious and factious, highly reflecting upon the present Administration of public Affairs, under her Majesty, and tending to create Discord and Sedition amongst her Subjects.

'2. That the said Preface be burnt by the Hands of the common Hangman, upon Thursday next, at twelve of the Clock, in the Palace Yard, Westminster; and that the Sheriffs of London and Middlesex do assist the Serjeant at Arms attending this House in the Execution thereof.'

'The same Day a Complaint being made to the House of a printed Paper entitled, A Letter from the States-General to the Queen of Great Britain; the same was brought up, and read as follows,

A Letter from the States-General to the Queen, dated Hague, June 5. 1712. (N. S.)

MADAM,

AFter all the Proofs which your Majesty has given during the Course of your glorious Reign, of your great Zeal for the public Good, and of your Adherence to the common Cause of the high Allies; after so many Marks you have had the Goodness to give us, of your tender Affection, and of your Friendship to our Republic; and after the repeated Assurances you have given us, and that very lately too, of your Intentions, That your Troops should act against the common Enemy, until the War was concluded by a general Peace: It is impossible we should not be surprized and afflicted by two Declarations we have lately received, one after another, in the Name of your Majesty; the first by the Duke of Ormond, your General, that he could undertake nothing without new Orders from you, the other by the Bishop of Bristol, your Plenipotentiary to the Congress at Utrecht, that your Majesty perceiving that we did not answer as we ought the Proposals which you had made us, and that we would not act in Concert with your Ministers, on the Subject of Peace, you would take your Measures apart: And that you did not look upon your self to be now under any Obligation whatever, with Respect to us.

'As soon as we had notice of those Declarations, we sent Orders to our Minister, who has the Honour to reside at your Majesty's Court, to represent to you the Reasons of our Surprize, and the Consequences of those Declarations, and to request you, with that Respect which we always had, and which we shall for ever entertain for your Royal Person, that you would give other Orders to the Duke of Ormond, that he may act with all possible Vigour, according to the Exigency of the War; and that your Majesty would have the Goodness to entertain other Sentiments of us, than those which the Bishop of Bristol has declared to our Plenipotentiaries at Utrecht.

'But the more we consider those Declarations, the more important we find them, and the more we apprehend their Consequences: Therefore we could not forbear applying our selves by this Letter directly to your Majesty, hoping, that you will consider it, as we promise ourselves you will, both from your Prudence and Wisdom, and from your so much fam'd Zeal for the public Welfare; particularly from your usual Friendship and Affection for us and our Republic.

'We protest before all things, that, as we ever had a true Friendship as well as the highest Respect for your Majesty, and a sincere Affection to all your Interests, with an earnest Desire to live in a perfect good understanding and Union with you, we have still the same Sentiments, and shall always preserve them, wishing for nothing more, than to be able to give your Majesty the most convincing Proofs of it.

'After this, we pray your Majesty to consider, according to your great Penetration, whether we have not just Ground to be surprized, when we see a Stop put, by an Order in your Majesty's Name, without our Knowledge, to the Operations of the Confederate Army, the finest and strongest, which, perhaps, has been in the Field during the whole Course of the War, and provided with all Necessaries to act with Vigour, and this, after they had marched, according to the Resolution taken in Concert with your Majesty's General, almost up to the Enemy, with a great Superiority both as to the Number and Goodness of Troops, and animated with a noble Courage and Zeal to acquit themselves bravely; so that, in all human Appearance, and with the divine Assistance, which we have experienced so visibly on so many other Occasions, we should have been able either by Battles or Sieges, to gain great Advantages over the Enemy, to have bettered the Affairs of the Allies and to facilitate the Negociations of Peace.

'We flatter ourselves indeed with the Hopes which the Duke of Ormond has given us, that in a few Days he expects other Orders; but in the mean time, we are sorry to see one of the finest Opportunities lost, being uncertain, whether we shall have another so favourable, since the Enemy have time given them to fortify themselves, and take their Precautions, while the Army of the Allies lies still without Action; and consuming the Forage all round, deprive themselves of the Means of Subsisting for time to come in those Places, where, by Concert, the Operations of the Campaign were designed; which may make such Enterprizes impossible hereafter, as were practicable now, and consequently render the whole Campaign unsuccessful, to the inestimable Prejudice of the common Cause of the High Allies.

'Certainly, when we consider the Army as it really is, compos'd of the Troops of your Majesty and the other Allies, joined together by common Concert, to act for the greatest Advantage and Furtherance of the common Cause, and the Assurances which your Majesty had given us by your Letters, by your Ministers, and last of all, by your General the Duke of Ormond, of your Intentions, that your Troops should be ordered to act with their usual Vigour, as well as the Engagements into which your Majesty is entered, not only with respect to us, but also separately and jointly with us, in respect to the other Allies. 'Tis very difficult for us to conjecture and conceive how an Order so prejudicial to the common Cause, given so suddenly, without our Knowledge, and undoubtedly too without the Knowledge of the other Allies, can agree and consist with the Nature of an Alliance, and with those Assurances and Engagements just now mentioned. For tho', according to the Declaration of the Bishop of Bristol, your Majesty holds yourself to be disengaged from every Obligation with regard to us, 'tis plain, that the Matter now in question is not our particular Interest or Advantage, but that of all the Allies, who will suffer by the Prejudice which an Order so little expected must needs bring to the common Cause.

'But, Madam, we cannot forbear telling your Majesty, that the Declaration made by the Bishop of Bristol, at Utrecht, has no less surprized us than that of the Duke of Ormond in the Army. It appears to us so extraordinary that we know not how to reconcile it with the great Goodness and Kindness which your Majesty has always honour'd us with; and not being able to conceive how such a sudden Change could happen, with respect to us, we are not only surprized but afflicted at it. We have carefully examin'd our Conduct, and find nothing in it that can have given ground to that Dissatisfaction which your Majesty expresses with us by this Declaration.

'From the very first Day that your Majesty ascended the Throne, we testify'd all the Deference that you could desire from a State in Friendship and Alliance with you. We carefully sought after your Amity and Affection, and, considering the happy Effects which a good Intelligence, Harmony and Union betwixt your Majesty and us, and the two Nations, might produce, and have really produc'd, and the Advantage which resulted from thence to both, as well as to the common Cause of all the Allies, we made it our Business heartily to cultivate 'em, and more and more to gain your Majesty's Confidence, and to conform ourselves to your Sentiments as much as possibly we could.

'We think that we gave a signal Proof of this, particularly, with regard to the Negociations of Peace; since not only after we were inform'd of the Conferences formerly held in England upon this Subject, we did expect that your Majesty would give us an Account of them; having this firm Confidence in your Friendship for our Republic, and in your Zeal for the Good of the common Cause, that nothing would be done to prejudice us, nor the other Allies; but also when your Majesty communicated to us the preliminary Articles sign'd by M. Mesnager in England, and when you propos'd to us the calling and holding a Congress for a general Peace, and required of us to grant for this End necessary Passports for the Enemy's Ministers, we consented to it tho' we had many Reasons, which to us seem'd very well grounded, not to enter into such a Treaty without a better Foundation, or at least, without the Concurrence of the other Allies: But, we prefer'd your Majesty's Sentiments to our own, in order to give you a new Proof of our Deference.

'We did no less, with respect to the Difficulties which were started on the Subject of the Treaty of the mutual Guaranty for the Succession of the Protestant Line to your Majesty's Kingdoms, and for our Barrier; a Treaty of such Importance to the two Nations, that we look upon it as the strongest Tie that could be thought on to unite for ever the Hearts and Interests of both; concluded after the maturest Deliberation, and ratify'd on both sides in the most authentic Form: For tho' we might have stood to the Treaty as it was, yet we entered into a Negociation upon those Difficulties, and particularly on the Point of the Assiento, concerning which we gave our Plenipotentiaries such Instructions, that we no longer doubted but all the Difficulties would have been adjusted to mutual Content, and that we should thereby have entirely regain'd your Majesty's Confidence; and so much the more, because in the first Place, when the meeting of a Congress for a general Peace was in hand, your Majesty declar'd to us by your Ambassador, That you desir'd no more than our Concurrence in that single Point, and this only Mark of our Confidence, and that then you would give us strong and real Proofs of your Affection towards us, and of your upright Intentions, with respect to the common Cause of all the Allies: and that afterwards, when the Difficulties about the Succession and the Barrier were rais'd, your Majesty did likewise assure us, that if we would remit something upon the most essential Points, and particularly about the Affair of the Assiento, it would be the true way to reestablish a mutual Confidence; which being once restored, your Majesty would take particularly to heart the Interests of this State, and act in Conjunction with us in the whole Negociation, to obtain an honourable, good and sure Peace.

'But, we find our selves very much out in our Expectation, since at the very same time, when we made the greatest Advances towards your Majesty, and that we did verily believe we should come to an Agreement about the Points in difference, we see the Earl of Strafford gone without finishing that Affair: we see the Army stopp'd in the beginning of its Career, and we hear a Declaration, by which your Majesty looks upon yourself to be disengaged from all Obligations with us; for which the Reasons alledg'd are, that we have not answered, as we ought, the Advances which your Majesty made towards us, and that we would not act in Concert with your Ministers about the Peace.

'If your Majesty would be pleas'd to look with a favourable and equitable Eye upon our Conduct, we flatter ourselves, and have a firm Confidence, that you will find nothing in it which can give you such disadvantageous Ideas and Thoughts of us; but, that you will rather find, that we have performed, and do still perform all that we owe, as good and faithful Allies; and particularly to your Majesty.

'What we have said already, might perhaps be sufficient to persuade you of it; but we must add, that having always esteem'd your Majesty's Affection, and a good Harmony betwixt the two Nations, as one of the strongest Supports of our State, and of the Protestant Religion, and as one of the most effectual Methods to maintain and advance our common Interest, and those of the whole Confederacy; and this sincere Opinion being firmly imprinted on our Hearts, we were never backward to communicate and consult in all Confidence with your Majesty and your Ministers, upon the Affairs of the Peace, according to the Foundations laid down in the grand Alliance and other Treaties. We declare, that we have always been inclinable and ready to do it, and are so still, as far as we can, without Prejudice to the Allies, and without departing from, or acting against the Engagements, Treaties and Alliances which we have enter'd into.

'But, Madam, all the Proposals hitherto made to us upon that Subject, were couch'd in very general Terms, without communicating to us the Result of the Negociations betwixt your Majesty's Ministers and those of France; nor even your Majesty's Thoughts about the Subject, which we ought to have concerted together. 'Tis true, that in some of the last Conferences, your Majesty's Ministers demanded to know whether ours were furnish'd with a full Power, and authoriz'd to draw up a Plan for the Peace; but it had been just, before such a thing was demanded of us, that they should have communicated the Result of the Negociations so long treated of betwixt your Majesty's Ministers and those of the Enemy; or at least, they should have told us your Majesty's Thoughts.

'Had that Plan related only to your Majesty's Interest and ours, we should perhaps have been in the wrong not to have forthwith come into it, tho' even in that Case the Affair would not have been without its Difficulties, since the least Notice of it which should have come to the Enemy, must have been very prejudicial: But, as the Plan in question concerned the Interest of all the Allies, and almost all Europe, we had very strong Apprehensions, that as the particular Negociations betwixt your Majesty's Ministers and those of France, and the Readiness with which we consented to the Congress at Utrecht, and to the giving of Passports to the Enemy's Ministers, had already occasioned abundance of Suspicions, and much Uneasiness to his Imperial Majesty and the other Allies: We say, we apprehended that his Imperial Majesty and the other Allies coming to know (which would have been very difficult to conceal from 'em) the Concert betwixt your Majesty's Ministers and ours for a Plan of Peace, and that before the Ministers of France had given a specific Answer to the Demands of the Allies, their Suspicions and Uneasiness would have increas'd, and that way of Proceeding might have given them ground to entertain prejudicial Thoughts, as if it had been the Intention of your Majesty and us to abandon the Grand Alliance and the common Cause, or a least, that we alone took upon us to determine the Fate of all the other Allies, by which his Imperial Majesty and the other Confederates, might have been pushed on to separate Measures, and to take such Steps as would be no ways agreeable to your Majesty's Interest.

'We thought these Reasons strong enough to justify our Conduct to your Majesty on this Head, and if we did not enter with all the Readiness which you might have wished for, into the Concert propos'd, we hope that at most your Majesty will look upon our Backwardness only as an Excess of Prudence or of Scruple, and not in the least as a Want of Confidence in your Majesty; while the Allies might have considered it as a departing from the Treaties, and particularly from the eighth Article of the grand Alliance. We also hope, that your Majesty, for the Reasons here alledged, will lay aside those hard Thoughts of us, as if we had not answer'd, as we ought, the Advances which your Majesty made towards us, and that we would not act in Concert with your Ministers upon the Subject of the Peace: But, Madam, tho' your Majesty should not acquiesce in our Reasons (of which however we cannot doubt) we pray your Majesty to consider, whether that be sufficient for your Majesty to think, that you are disengaged from all Obligations with respect to us.

'Had we acted against and contravened the Engagements and Treaties which we had the Honour to conclude with your Majesty, we might have expected from your Goodness and Justice, that you would have represented those Contraventions to us, and not have looked upon yourself to be disengaged, till such Time as we had refused to give all necessary Redress. But, as we did no ways engage to enter with your Majesty into a Concert to draw up a Plan of Peace without the Participation of the other Members of the grand Alliance, the Backwardness we have shewn upon that Head, cannot be looked upon as a Contravention of our Engagements, and therefore cannot serve to disengage your Majesty from yours, with respect to us, since we are verily persuaded, that we have fully answered all our Treaties and all our Alliances, both with your Majesty, and with the High Allies in general; and that we have done more in this present War, than could in Justice, and Equity, have been expected from us. All the Difference betwixt your Majesty and us in this Point, is no more, if rightly considered, than a Disparity of Sentiments.

'In truth, Madam, if for such a Cause betwixt Potentates, allied and united together by the strongest and strictest Ties of Alliance, Interest and Religion, any one of those Potentates could quit all their Engagements, and disengage themselves from all their Obligations, there's no Tie so strong, which mayn't be broke at any time, and we know of no Engagements that could be relied on in Time to come.

'We assure ourselves, that when your Majesty considers the Consequences, you will not persist in the Declaration which the Bishop of Bristol has made: We beseech you, with all the Respect and all the Earnestness of which we are capable, that you would not; and also that you would be pleased to revoke the Order given to the Duke of Ormond, if it be not revoked already, and that you would authorize him to act according to Occurrences, and as the Exigency of the War, and the Advancement of the Common-Cause shall require.

'We also request you, Madam, to communicate to us the Result of the Conferences betwixt your Ministers and those of the Enemy, or at least your Thoughts upon the Peace, and we will endeavour to give your Majesty all imaginable Proofs of our Deference for your Sentiments, and of our sincere Desire to preserve your valuable Friendship as much as we can, without acting contrary to the Faith of the Engagements into which we have entered by Treaties and Alliances with your Majesty and other Potentates.

'We are firmly persuaded, that it is not your Majesty's Intention in any manner to break them, since you have always been of the same Opinion with us, and the other Allies, that a good Union betwixt the Allies, not only during the present War, but also after the Peace shall be concluded, is, and always will be, the most solid, and even the only Method to preserve the Liberty and Independency of all together, and of every one in particular, against the great Power of France.

'We again renew to your Majesty the Assurances of our high and perfect Esteem for your Person and Friendship, as also of our Intentions and sincere Desires to entertain with your Majesty the same good Correspondence, Harmony and Union, as before, and to cultivate the same betwixt the two Nations, as far as it shall lie in our power: And we pray your Majesty, to preserve likewise for us and our Republic, your former Affection. We refer for the rest, to what the Sieur Van Borselle, our Envoy-Extraordinary, has further to say to your Majesty on this Subject. And pray the Almighty, &c.

Hague, June 5, 1712. N. S.

Resolutions of the Commons against the Letter from the States-General.

After the reading of this Letter the Commons resolved, 'That an humble Address be presented to her Majesty, assuring her Majesty of the just Sense this House has of the Indignity offered to her Majesty, by printing and publishing a Letter from the States General to her Majesty; and humbly to desire her Majesty, that she will so far resent such Indignities, as to give no (fn. 2) Answer for the future to any Letters or Memorials that shall be so printed and published; and ordered that the said Address be presented to her Majesty by such Members as are of her Majesty's most honourable PrivyCouncil.'

Report of the Surveyor General, about a Place for keeping the Records of the House of Commons.

On the 13th of June, Mr. Manley, her Majesty's Surveyor-General, made his Report to the House, pursuant to their Order of the 3d of this Month, relating to the setting apart a more convenient Place for the keeping the Journals, Records, and other Papers belonging to the House, in the Custody of the Clerk; That he had viewed the Places adjoining to, or near this House; and that, in his Opinion, the Rooms in that Part of the old Palace in Westminster, which is over the Passage from the House of Commons, leading into the Court of Requests, would be most useful for the Purpose aforesaid. And the House being moved, That an humble Application may be made to ber Majesty, that she would be pleased to direct the said Rooms might be fitted up, and set apart accordingly: The Lord Willoughby acquainted the House, from the Lord Great Chamberlain, That he having understood, Mr. Manley had viewed the said Rooms, in order to report them as most convenient for the Service of the House, his Lordship had acquainted her Majesty therewith; and had humbly desired to know her Majesty's Pleasure therein; and that thereupon, her Majesty had been pleased to give her Consent, and had directed the said Rooms to be fitted up, and set apart for the Accommodation of the House.

A remarkable Motion made by Mr. Hampden, for the Allies to be Guarantees of the Protestant Succession, rejected. ; Resolution about the Protestant succession.

The 17th Mr. Hampden made a Motion, That an humble Address be made to her Majesty, humbly acquainting her, That this House has a grateful Sense of her Majesty's Care for her People, in the Assurances she so lately made from the Throne, That the Protestant Succession in the House of Hanover, is nearest at her Heart; and being convinced, that the Safety of the Protestant Succession must, in a great measure, depend on the Event of the present Treaty for a general Peace, do most humbly beseech her Majesty, That she will be pleased to give particular Instructions to her Plenipotentiaries, that, in the Conclusion of the said Treaty, the several Powers in Alliance with her Majesty, may be Guarantees for the Protestant Succession to the Crowns of these Realms, as settled by Act of Parliament, in the Illustrious. House of Hanover. Endeavours were used to have that Motion dropp'd, but Mr. Hampden, and some of his Friends, insisting to have the Question put, the same was done accordingly, and carry'd in the Negative, by a Majority of 133 Voices against 38. After which it was resolved, 1. That this House has such an entire Confidence in the repeated Declarations her Majesty has been pleased to make, of her securing to these Kingdoms the Protestant Succession, as by Law established. in the House of Hanover, that they can never doubt of her Majesty's taking the proper Measures for the Security thereof; and that this House will support her Majesty against Faction at home, and her Enemies abroad; and that this House does humbly beseech her Majesty, that she will be pleased to discountenance all those who shall endeavour to raise Jealousies between her Majesty and her Subjects, especially, by misrepresenting her good Intentions for the Welfare of her People. 2. That the said Resolution be laid before her Majesty by the whole House.

The Commons having attended the Queen with the said Resolution, her Majesty was pleased to return the following Answer:

The Queen's Answer to the same.

'Gentlemen, I return you hearty Thanks for this Resolution, which is very becoming you, who truly represent all my Commons.

'You have shewn yourselves honest Assertors of the Monarchy, zealous Defenders of the Constitution, and real Friends to the Protestant Succession.

'What I have said and done, is sufficient to satisfy any Person who is in earnest for the Succession, as by Law established in the House of Hanover, that I need not be put in mind of doing any thing which may contribute to render that Succession secure.

Thanks ordered to be returned to the Queen.

This Answer being the next day reported by Mr. Speaker, it was resolved, That the humble Thanks of the House be returned to her Majesty, for her said most gracious Answer, by such Members of this House as are of her Majesty's most honourable Privy-Council.

Mr. Secretary St. John reports the Queen's Answer to three Addresses.

The Day before, Mr. Secretary St. John reported to the House, that their Address of the 31st of May last, relating to the Rents of the Bishops Lands in North-Britain, that remain in the Crown, having been presented to the Queen, her Majesty had commanded him to acquaint this House, That the Profits arising from the Bishops Estates in Scotland, which remain in the Crown, shall be apply'd to the Support of such of the Episcopal Clergy there, as shall take the Oaths to her Majesty, according to the Desire of this House.

Mr. Secretary St. John also reported to the House, That their Address of the 10th Instant having been presented to her Majesty, assuring her Majesty of the just Sense this House had of the Indignity offered to her Majesty, by printing and publishing a Letter from the States-General to her Majesty, and humbly desiring her Majesty, that she would so far resent such Indignity, as to give no Answer for the future, to any such Letters or Memorials that should be so printed and published, her Majesty had been pleased to command him to acquaint this House, That her Majesty thanks this House for the particular Mark they have given her upon this Occasion of their Duty to her, and of their Concern for her Honour.

Mr. Secretary St. John likewise reported to the House, That their Address of the 2d Instant having been presented to her Majesty, that she would be pleased to order an Account to be laid before this House, of the Negociation and Transactions relating to the Preliminaries in 1709; and also an Account of the Negociations and Transactions at Gertrydenburg, and who were employ'd as her Majesty's Plenipotentiaries, in transacting those Negociations: That her Majesty had been pleased to give Order therein; but that by reason of the Length thereof, they could not be sooner prepared; and that he was now commanded to lay them before the House: And he presented the same, with a List of the Titles to the House, accordingly. Whereupon it was ordered, That the said Accounts do lie upon the Table, to be perused by the Members of the House.

That Day the House adjourned to Saturday the 21st of June, when the Queen came to the House of Peers with the usual State; and the Commons being sent for up, and attending, her Majesty was pleased to give the Royal Assent to the following public Bills, viz.

Royal Assent given to several Bills.

1. An Act for laying additional Duties on Hides and Skins, Vellom and Parchment; and new Duties on Starch, Coffee, Tea, Drugs, gilt and silver Wire, and Policies of Insurance, to secure a yearly Fund, for Satisfaction of Orders to the Contributors of a further Sum of one Million eight hundred thousand Pounds, towards her Majesty's Supply; and for the better securing the Duties on Candles, and for obviating Doubts concerning certain Payments in Scotland; and for suppressing unlawful Lotteries, and other Devices of the same Kind; and concerning Cake-Soap; and for Relief of Mary Ravenal, in relation to an Annuity of 18 l. per Annum; and concerning Prize Cocoa-Nuts brought from America; and certain Tickets, which were intended to be subscribed into the Stock of the South-Sea Company; and for appropriating the Moneys granted this Session of Parliament.

2. An Act for continuing the Trade to the South-Seas, granted by an Act of the last Sessions of Parliament, altho' the Capital Stock of the said Corporation should be redeemed.

3. An Act for appointing Commissioners to take, examine, and determine the Debts due to the Army, Transport-Service, and Sick and Wounded.

4. An Act for continuing the Trade and Corporation-Capacity of the United East-India Company, altho' their Fund should be redeemed.

5. An Act for explaining several Clauses in an Act passed the last Sessions of Parliament, for the Relief of the poor Sufferers of the Islands of Nevis and St. Christopher, by reason of the Invasion of the French there, in the Year 1705.

6. An Act for appointing the Circuit-Courts in that Part of Great-Britain called Scotland, to be kept only once in a Year.

7. An Act for enlarging the Time for the Ministers, Advocates, and other Members of the College of Justice in Scotland, to take the Oaths therein mentioned.

8. An Act for ascertaining and securing the Payments to be made to her Majesty for Goods and Merchandizes to be imported from the East-Iadies, and other Places within the Limits of the Charter granted to the East-India Company: And to 11 private Bills. After which her Majesty made the following Speech to both Houses of Parliament:

The Queen's Speech.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

'THE last Time I was here, I spoke so fully, and afterwards received from both Houses such satisfactory Addresses, that there remains little more for me to say at the Close of this meeting of Parliament, but to repeat my hearty Thanks for your late solemn Assurances. They will give me Strength to struggle with any Difficulties which may yet be raised; and I hope, that neither they who envy the making a good Peace, nor who think it their Interest to continue the War, will be able to defeat our joint Endeavours for the Honour and Advantage of Britain, and the Security of all our Allies.

'Gentlemen of the House of Commons,

'At the same time that I thank you most kindly for the Supplies you have chearfully granted, I cannot but let you know my Satisfaction in the near View I have of a Peace, since it will, in some measure, recompence my Subjects for their vast Expences, and also lighten that heavy Burden they have borne during the War.

'My Lords and Gentlemen,

' You have expressed how sensible you are of the Advantage and Security which accrue to Great-Britain, and our Allies, by the Terms proposed for a Peace. And I need not mention to you the Mischiefs which must follow the breaking off this Treaty. Our Burdens will be at least continued, if not increased; the present Opportunity would be irrecoverably lost, of Britain's establishing a real Balance of Power in Europe and improving our own Commerce; and if any one of our Allies should gain something by such a Proceeding, the rest would suffer in the common Calamity. But I hope, by God's Blessing, such fatal Designs will be disappointed.

'You are now returning into your respective Countries, and I persuade myself, you will not be wanting in your Endeavours, to obviate the Designs of any ill-minded Persons, who may attempt to sow Sedition amongst my Subjects, and under specious Pretences, carry on Designs they dare not own.

'I hope, at your next Meeting, there will be an Opportunity of perfecting what I have recommended to you, which you have left unfinished in this Session.

'I cannot conclude without assuring you, that nothing shall move me from steadily pursuing the true Interest of so dutiful and affectionate a People.

Both Houses adjourn to the 8th of July, whereby Mr.Walpole and others are continued in Custody.

Afterwards, the Lord-Keeper of the Great-Seal signify'd her Majesty's Pleasure, that both Houses should forthwith severally adjourn, until Tuesday the 8th day of July next, which they did accordingly. And were then prorogued.

Footnotes

1 It is hardly to be imagined how strangely the Generality of People, even among the High-Church Party, were surprized at the Condition of Peace proposed in her Majesty's Speech; insomuch that the public Funds, which, upon the Expectation of far better Terms, had suddenly risen 4 or 5 per Cent. fell immediately to their former Value.
2 But the day before, the House came to these Resolutions, the Queen had thought fit to answer the Letter from the States-General, in the following Manner:
'High and Mighty Lords, Frienas, Allies, and Consederates, THERE is nothing dearer to us than the Preservation of a good Understanding and a perfect Union with your State, 'This has been the principal Object of our Care; and we have so little ground to accuse ourselves of having in the least contributed to the lessening of the same, that we reflect with Pleasure on the Pains we have taken, and on all the Instances we have made, that the Disputes which have happened, with relation to the Interests of the two Nations, should be amicably determined, so as we might communicate our Thoughts to one another, without Reserve, upon those of the Public; for in the present Conjuncture of Affairs, there ought to be an equal Frankness on both sides, and a mutual Confidence.
'We suppose the Alarms which you took on account of the Declarations made by the Duke of Ormond and the Bishop of Bristol, are now over; and we repeat to you what we have so often declared, That it will be your own Fault, as it has been in Time past, if all our Measures about War or Peace be not taken in Concert with your State.
'The Earl of Strafford will be with you in a few Days, with full Instructions concerning our Intentions. Our Ministers will be disposed and authorised to do all that is incumbent on us, to renew an entire Confidence with you, and to prevent, for the future, such Misunderstandings as have been fomented with so much Artifice and so little Foundation.
'But, we cannot pass over in Silence our great Surprize, to see that your Letter of the 5th Instant, N. S. was printed and published almost as soon as we received it from the Hands of your Minister; a Proceeding whith is equally contrary to good Politics and Decency. 'Tis a Remonstrance instead of a Representation. and an Appeal to the People instead of an Address to the Sovereign. We hope that you will not suffer the like to be done again, for our Honour will engage us to give no Answer to any Letters or Memorials which shall be published in that Manner. For the rest, We pray, &c.' Kensington, June the 9th. 20th. 1712.