Hospitals
Stamford

Sponsor

Victoria County History

Publication

Author

William Page (editor)

Year published

1906

Pages

234-235

Annotate

Comment on this article
Double click anywhere on the text to add an annotation in-line

Citation Show another format:

'Hospitals: Stamford', A History of the County of Lincoln: Volume 2 (1906), pp. 234-235. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=38066 Date accessed: 29 November 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

98. THE HOSPITAL OF ST. JOHN BAPTIST AND ST. THOMAS THE MARTYR ON STAMFORD BRIDGE

This hospital was certainly in existence from 1323 until the eve of the Reformation, (fn. 1) but its founder and its purpose are alike unknown.

99. THE HOSPITAL OF ST. GILES, STAMFORD

This hospital, which was built outside Stamford, was intended for lepers. It was undergoing repair in 1304 (fn. 2) and 1319, (fn. 3) and again in 1332 (fn. 4) indulgences were granted for the purpose of increasing the alms of the faithful.

100. THE HOSPITAL OF ALL SAINTS, STAMFORD

The hospital of All Saints was founded by William Brown, merchant of the staple of Calais, for the support of two chaplains, and for the distribution of alms to twelve poor persons, who should pray for the soul of the founder. (fn. 5) The endowment consisted of the manors of Swafield and North Witham, and these now belong to the hospital, which is still in existence. (fn. 6) This was in 1485; and in 1534 the terms of the foundation were still observed, and the sum of £18 4s. was still distributed to the poor of the hospital. (fn. 7)

There is a seal of the hospital (fn. 8) of the fifteenth century, in shape a pointed oval, and representing the Trinity seated in a canopied niche with tabernacle work at the sides. In addition to the figure of our Lord on the cross, held between the knees of the Almighty, the Father is represented holding a cloth in his hands containing three heads, busts, or figures, emblematic of the three persons of the Trinity. In the base, under a round-headed arch, with masonry at the sides, there is a half-length figure of an ecclesiastic in prayer. In the base is a shield of arms, ermine two bars within a bordure ermine (?)

SIGILLŪ: COMUNE: DOMUS: ELEOSINARIE: STAUNFORD

Footnotes

1 The first mention is in Linc. Epis. Reg. Memo. Burghersh, 124; the last ibid. Memo. Longlands, 20. It is several times called the hospital of St. John Baptist and St. Thomas, showing that it was but one house with a double dedication.
2 Linc. Epis. Reg. Memo. Dalderby, 69 d.
3 Ibid. 394.
4 Ibid. Memo. Burghersh, 247.
5 Pat. 2 Ric. III, pt. ii, m. 14.
6 Peck, Antiquities, p. 20 of Appendix; and Wright, Domus Dei (Hospital of William Browne).
7 Valor Eccles. iv, 142.
8 B.M. Seals, lxvii, 42.