RELIGIOUS HOUSES
Introduction

Sponsor

Victoria County History

Publication

Author

William Page, Granville Proby (editors) assisted by H.E. Norris

Year published

1926

Supporting documents

Page

377

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'RELIGIOUS HOUSES: Introduction', A History of the County of Huntingdon: Volume 1 (1926), pp. 377. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=38141 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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THE RELIGIOUS HOUSES OF HUNTINGDONSHIRE

INTRODUCTION

THE religious houses of Huntingdonshire were few in number, but their paucity was counterbalanced by the wealth, antiquity and importance of Ramsey abbey, which well deserves study. Those houses of the Benedictine order, besides Ramsey and its cell at St. Ives, were the priory of St. Neots and the small nunnery at Hinchinbrook. Of houses of other orders there were the Cistercian abbey at Sawtry St. Judith (fn. 1) and two priories of Austin canons, one at Huntingdon and another at Stonely. The Austin friars had a house in Huntingdon, but none of the other mendicant orders were represented. Hospitals must have existed in connection with the larger towns; but at present only three can be traced, and they were all in Huntingdon.

Footnotes

1 The student of history finds it almost impossible to write the official 'Sawtry St. Judith': and this informal canonization of modern times seems hard too on the Countess, who, with all her pride of Norman blood, never laid claim to any special sanctity.