London debates
1790

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London Record Society

Publication

Author

Donna T. Andrew (compiled and introduced by)

Year published

1994

Pages

273-298

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'London debates: 1790', London debating societies 1776-1799 (1994), pp. 273-298. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=38854 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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1572. January 4, 1790 City Debates

'Ought two Lovers (possessed of mutual Affection but devoid of Fortune) to marry, trusting to Providence and their own Industry for Support - or to separate, from Motives of Prudence?

Gentlemen who speak in this Society may depend on Candour and Politeness; every species of illiberality, and all improper allusions from one Speaker to another, are immediately silenced by the chair.'

Daily Advertiser January 2/World January 4

1573. January 6, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Ought not the Legislature, against the next General Election, to follow the Example of the French National Assembly, in apportioning the number of Representatives to the number of Inhabitants in each District, and thereby prevent the rotten Boroughs from maintaining that Influence they at present hold in the British Parliament?'

Daily Advertiser January 5

1574. January 7, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it not dangerous to the Press, and inconsistent with reason, to consider the publication of TRUTH as a LIBEL?

The Liberty of the Press is the most valuable of all the privileges which belong to a free people; because it is the great shield by which all the rest are defended, it is also the refuge of distressed innocence, and the trumpet of virtuous fame. - whatever aims at its destruction, directs a stab against the Constitution.'

Audience decided that Truth ought not to be deemed a libel.

Daily Advertiser January 6

1575. January 11, 1790 City Debates

'Who best deserves the Suffrages of the Electors of Great Britain, at the ensuing General Election, those Members who have supported Mr. Pitt, and Administration, or those who have adhered to Mr. Fox and Opposition?

Such an Investigation cannot be held with more Propriety than in a popular Assembly situated in the very Heart of this great Metropolis. . . The Decision of this Question, which will be announced through the medium of publick Prints, may have no small Influence on many Votes of those respectable Citizens who decidedly patronize this Institution.' Small majority supported Mr. Pitt.

Daily Advertiser January 9

1576. January 13, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Ought not the Legislature, against the next General Election, to follow the Example of the French National Assembly, in apportioning the number of Representatives to the number of Inhabitants in each District, and thereby prevent the rotten Boroughs from maintaining that Influence they at present hold in the British Parliament?'

Daily Advertiser January 12

1577. January 14, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the following assertion of the late Lord Chatham in the House of Lords, and quoted in the notes to Dr. Price's Revolution Sermon, founded in truth, viz. "That the Church of England has a Popish Liturgy, a Calvinistic Creed, and an Arminian Clergy"?'

If the above question should be decided in the affirmative, 'the following question will immediately follow, viz. "Is it not evident from the arguments of Dr. Price and others, that it is unjust and impolitic, to continue the restrictions on the Protestant Dissenters?"

The Society at Coachmakers Hall is held in such high estimation by the friends of mental improvement, that several members of the learned professions, and some of the leading men in the political world, have declared their intention of making it the place, for the free and public discussion of all questions which involve the constitutional rights, or in any wise concern the interest and happiness of society at large.'

Audience thought, by a small majority, that Earl of Chatham was wrong.

Daily Advertiser January 13

1578. January 18, 1790 City Debates

'Is that Indifference which frequently takes place after Marriage to be attributed to the Inattention of Husbands, the Misconduct of Wives, or to the Flattery usually paid to the Fair Sex in Courtship?'

Lady speaks to the question who, in past, spoke in favour of Methodism.

Daily Advertiser January 16

1579. January 20, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Ought a young Lady, whose Choice of a Husband clashes with the Choice of her Parents, to marry the Man of her Heart contrary to their Commands, against her own Inclinations to comply with their Injunctions, or to remain in a State of Celibacy?'

Daily Advertiser January 19/Gazetteer January 19

1580. January 21, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it an impeachment of the character of the Protestant Dissenters, as peaceable subjects to renew their applications to the ensuing Parliament, for the repeal of the Test and Corporation acts?

The Protestant Dissenters have been charged in several of the public prints with having acted inconsistently with the character of real Christians and peaceable subjects, by their late and present exertions to obtain a repeal of the Test Laws. Convinced of the fallacy of this charge, and that they ought to enjoy an equal participation of privileges with the rest of their fellow citizens, the Managers have been requested by some very respectable dissenters to bring forward the above question for a free, candid, and liberal debate before an enlightened audience. Many of the brightest ornaments both of the established church and in the dissenting interest, will it is expected be present.'

Daily Advertiser January 20

1581. January 25, 1790 City Debates

'Ought that Man who accidently discovers the Infidelity of his Friend's Wife to reveal it to, or conceal it from, her injured Husband?

Whether it is better to hazard the ruin of a Friend's Happiness by informing him of the fatal Discovery, or to suffer him in a false Slumber of Security (from which he may one Day terribly awake) to dream of that Virtue and Honour in a Wife which she does not possess, but has criminally lavished on the most depraved Character in Society, the Seducer of a married Lady.'

Daily Advertiser January 23

1582. January 27, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which is the more likely to die an Old Maid - a Prude or a Coquette? The Managers have the more readily adopted . . . [the above question], as from the Wit, Humour, Satire it must produce in Debate, it will form a necessary relief to the fair auditors from the more important Questions which have lately engaged the attention of this Society.'

Daily Advertiser January 26

1583. January 28, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Are the principles of the Protestant Dissenters, such as to justify the Legislature in refusing to repeal the Test and Corporation Acts?

Truth will only be found, by those who seek for it - it is earnestly recommended to every auditor to bear with dispassionate attention, and reflect with calm deliberation before they hold up their hands, remembering, that they sit as Judges in a Court of free Debate, for the trial of a most important cause.'

It was determined 'by a considerable majority of a very crouded and respectable audience, that the principles of the Protestant Dissenters are such as to justify the legislature in repealing the Test and Corporation Acts'.

Daily Advertiser

1584. February 1, 1790 City Debates

'Is the Observation founded in Truth, that a reformed Rake makes the best of Husbands?'

Daily Advertiser January 30

1585. February 3, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Are the Ladies of this Country most distinguished for their beauty, virtue or mental accomplishments?'

Audience were of the opinion that the British Fair were most distinguished by their virtue.

The World/Daily Advertiser February 9

1586. February 4, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the old adage, as quoted by Sir William Temple, true - That good men marry early - Wise men, seldom?

In compliance with the request of several respectable ladies, who constantly attend this society, and who refer ever doubted case, either of a moral or sentimental nature, to the decision of the very numerous and enlightened audience who attend it, the above question is introduced for public discussion.'

Daily Advertiser February 3

1587. February 8, 1790 City Debates

'Which is the happier State, Marriage or a single Life?

It is with pleasure the Managers behold the popularity of these Debates enabling them daily to extend the moral influence of their Society. The liberality observed here to young Speakers, and the utter exclusion of every improper allusion from one Gentlemen to another, has induced many persons of the most distinguished abilities to fix on this Society as a proper place for the exercise of their talents, and the cultivation of their genius. At the same time the delicacy of expression which the law of these Debates enjoins, has not only induced a Lady of high literary fame . . . frequently to speak in this Society, but has gained it a constant attendance and decided patronage of the most respectable Ladies in the City of London, and of several of the most celebrated Amateurs of Literature in the polite Circles.'

Daily Advertiser February 6/Gazetteer February 6

1588. February 10, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is it possible for a Man who really loves a Female to deliberately plot her Seduction?'

Daily Advertiser February 9,

1589. February 11, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is which situation of life is the greatest portion of happiness to be found, in the elevated walks of wealth and grandeur, the busy scenes of trade and commerce, or the humble paths of industry and retirement?' The above question 'was politely transmitted to the managers by an intimate friend of the late Dr. Samuel Johnson, who frequently made it a subject of private conversation'.

Daily Advertiser February 10

1590. February 11, 1790 Temple of Eloquence, Upton's Rooms, Store Street, Tottenham Court Road

'In which Situation is the greatest Portion of Happiness to be found, in the elevated Walks of Wealth and Grandeur, the busy Scenes of Trade and Commerce, or in the humble Shades of Rural Retirement?

This Society is instituted at the request of several Ladies and Gentlemen resident in this Part of the Town. The Managers (although conscious of the powerful alliance promised them by Gentlemen in the habit of public speaking) think it their duty thus to publish a general invitation to Gentlemen of Ability in the honourable and literary Walks of Life; and to assure Ladies and Gentlemen who may honour this rising institution with their presence, that it shall be their constant aim to establish it by an attention to Merit, Liberality, and Public Utility.'

Daily Advertiser February 10/Gazetteer February 10

1591. February 15, 1790 City Debates

'Who best deserves the Suffrages of the Electors at the ensuing General Election - those Members who have supported Mr. Pitt and Administration - or those who have adhered to Mr. Fox and Opposition?

A Society like this, usually honoured with the Presence of from 400 to 600 respectable Citizens of this great Metropolis. . .'

Daily Advertiser February 13

1592. February 17, 1790 Westminster Forum

'In a late difference between the two Celebrated Leaders of Opposition on the subject of the French Politics, which appeared to be influenced by the soundest principles of Patriotism - Mr. Burke or Mr. Sheridan?'

Gazetteer February 16

1593. February 18, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Whether the sentiments of Mr. Burke or Mr. Sheridan, as delivered in the House of Commons upon the Revolution in France, are the more consistent with true principles, liberty, and the happiness and interest of mankind?'

Daily Advertiser February 17

1594. February 18, 1790 Temple of Eloquence, Upton's Great Room, Store Street, Tottenham Court Road

'Are the Corporation and Test Acts a real Infringement upon the Liberties of the Protestant Dissenters, or wholesome Restrictions necessary for the preservation of Church and State?

When we mention that arguments are promised to be delivered not only from Messrs. Madan, Wesley, and other Gospel Ministers, but that the Audience will likewise have the leading sentiments of Drs. Price, Priestley and Kippis, laid before them, any further intimation will be needless, than to solicit the opinion of the serious and well disposed of every denomination. We are under the absolute, though disagreeable necessity, of requesting the Rev. Mr. Huntington, if he delivers his Scriptures on the Arian Dissenter, to confine himself to the law of debate, and reflect who will be there to answer him.'

Daily Advertiser February 17

1595. February 22, 1790 City Debates

'Ought the Test and Corporation Acts to be repealed, as injurious to the Civil and Political Rights of the Protestant Dissenters, retained as necessary Barriers to preserve the Constitution in Church and State, or some other Form of Exclusion appointed to rescue the sacred Elements from that Prophanation to which they are at present liable?

. . . The Request of several popular Divines . . . that Dr. Priestley, Price or Kippis will . . . meet them . . . and prove (if they can) that Men who deny the first Principle of our Religion, the Divinity of Christ, are not dangerous to be admitted to any share of the Government of a Christian Country.'

Daily Advertiser February 20

1596. February 24, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which is the strongest Obligation in the Marriage Covenant, Love, Honour, - or Obedience?'

Gazetteer February 23

1597. February 25, 1790 Temple of Eloquence

'Are the Corporation and Test Acts a real Infringement upon the Liberties of the Protestant Dissenters, or wholesome Restrictions necessary for the preservation of Church and State?'

Daily Advertiser February 24

1598. February 25, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Would it not be better if Young Men after the age of 18, and Young Women after the age of 16, could Marry without being subject to any censure from their Parents, their Friends, and the World?

Matrimony is described to be a state capable of the highest degree of human happiness, if hands are joined where hearts agree. Many are of opinion that the Marriage act is repugnant to the Laws of Nature, and has been a bar to the felicity of thousands.'

Daily Advertiser February 24

1599. March 1, 1790 City Debates

'Who best deserves the Suffrages of the Electors at the ensuing General Election - those Members who have supported Mr. Pitt and Administration - or those who have adhered to Mr. Fox and Opposition?

It was impossible last Evening to collect any Decision, as many Gentlemen very unfairly held up both Hands.' A celebrated nobleman laid a wager on the outcome.

In favour of Opposition.

Daily Advertiser February 27

1600. March 3, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is the Conduct of Mr. Fox, in supporting, or of Mr. Burke in opposing the Repeal of the Test and Corporation Acts the better Proof of the Independence and Patriotism of their respective Principles?'

Gazetteer March 2

1601. March 4, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it consistent with Reason and the Christian Religion to believe that Dreams foretell any future Events, and that there are at the present Day any such Appearances as Spirits or Apparitions?'

The present Question 'comes with peculiar Propriety at a Time-when Numbers are urged by a Confidence in their Dreams to risk their whole Property in the Lottery'.

Daily Advertiser March 3

1602. March 4, 1790 Temple of Eloquence

'Are there any just Grounds for supposing that any Intimation from departed Spirits are communicated to Mankind by way of Apparitions or other supernatural Tokens?

Besides the Arguments of Gentlemen who have made this their peculiar Study, the Publick will have an Opportunity of hearing some remarkable recent Cases. The Death of the Gentleman at Highgate, by the Appearance of the Woman lately murdered at Pancras, will be circumstantially related by a friend of his.'

Daily Advertiser March 3

1603. March 8, 1790 City Debates

'Which is more likely to die an Old Maid - a Prude or a Coquette?'

Daily Advertiser March 6

1604. March 10, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which is the more criminal Conduct in a Lady - to condescend to become Mistress to the Man she loves, or to marry the Man to whom she has an Aversion?'

Gazetteer March 9

1605. March 11, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the assertion of Dr. Price true, that the Methodists have mistaken the service acceptable to God, for a system of faith souring the temper, and a service of forms supplanting morality?'

Daily Advertiser March 10

1606. March 11, 1790 Temple of Eloquence

'Are the calvinistical Doctrines taught by the late Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his Successors, Messrs. Knight, Huntington, and the Arminian tenets held by Mr. Wesley, or the novel System of Universal Salvation maintained by Mr. Winchester, the most consistent with Revelation, and most productive of moral Purity?'

Daily Advertiser March 10

1607. March 15, 1790 City Debates

'Which ought more to be avoided in the Marriage State, a great Disproportion of Years, or a total Contrariety of Temper and Disposition?

The Audience in this Society never yet withheld their Approbation from a juvenile Speaker.'

Daily Advertiser March 13

1608. March 17, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is the Assertion of Dr. Barry's late Letter to the King true, That Boxing is repugnant to the Laws and Maxims of a civilized State, evinces but little if any Courage, discovers much Barbarity, is not instrumental to any Service, but certainly productive of many Evils?

The Rev. Dr. Barry, A.M. Chaplain to the Lord Bishop of Kildare will open and close the debate.'

The decision was in favour of Dr. Barry's treatise.

Daily Advertiser

1609. March 18, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it true that a Married Woman ceases to Love her Husband after he becomes Jealous of her without a Cause?'

Daily Advertiser March 17

1610. March 22, 1790 City Debates

'Is there most Hypocrisy practiced in Love, Religion or Politicks?'

A cleric will argue (from the example of the Methodists and other sectaries) that most hypocrisy in religion. Methodists will come to disagree. Fox supporters (looking at Pitt) will say most in politics.'

Daily Advertiser March 20

1611. March 24, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which is most absurd, a Belief in Apparitions, a Reliance on Dreams, or an implicit Faith in the Predictions of Judicial Astrology?'

Daily Advertiser March 23

1612. March 25, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the assertion true, that Men are more given to Inconstancy in Love, and that Women are more apt to assume the appearance of that passion when they do not feel it?

A young Lady who is shortly to be married has expressed an earnest wish to bring the matter to a public trial, and has therefore done, as Ladies now do (who have a taste for rational entertainment) sent the cause to Coachmakers Hall.'

Daily Advertiser March 24

1613. March 29, 1797 City Debates

'Has not Mr. Fox by coalescing with Lord Hood betrayed the Whig Interest, and deserted the Rights of the Electors of Westminster?'

Daily Advertiser March 27

1614. March 31, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Was the late Compromise of Candidates between Mr. Fox and the Minister a correct decision, or a Betrayal of the Rights of the Electors of Westminster?'

The audience 'upwards of 300' were decidedly of the opinion that the compromise was a betrayal.

Daily Advertiser April 2

1615. April 1, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Whether the Agreement to bring in Lord Hood and Mr. Fox for Westminster, ought to be deemed a disgraceful barter of the Rights of the whole body of Electors, or a measure of commendable Policy, to preserve the Peace of that City?

The Public are respectfully informed, that several Independent Electors of Westminster, feeling, as they ought, the importance of the Rights of Election, have, instead of listening to party invective, thought it the most fair and honourable way to submit the above question to the judgment of their fellow Subjects, after a full and free investigation of its merits.

The Question was determined Ten to One, in favour of Mr. Fox's late conduct.'

Daily Advertiser March 31

1616. April 3, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which is the most dangerous Character, a faithless Lover, or a pernicious Friend?'

Daily Advertiser April 2

1617. April 5, 1790 City Debates

'Which implies the greatest Weakness, a Belief in Apparitions, a Reliance on Dreams, or an implicit Faith in the Predictions of Judicial Astrology?'

The Managers 'have invited Mr. Sibley and several other eminent Professors of the Astral Science, and . . . the celebrated Female Conjuror Mrs. Williams has now an Opportunity (consistent with Propriety) of publicly defending her claims to Foreknowledge.'

Daily Advertiser April 3

1618. April 7, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Was the Minister more censurable in offering, or Mr. Fox in accepting, the Proposal of nominating but one Candidate of each party?'

Audience thought the Minister was more censurable than Mr. Fox.

Daily Advertiser April 6

1619. April 8, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Which Character is the most truly amiable, the FRIEND - the PATRIOT - or, the CITIZEN OF THE WORLD?

This truly interesting Question was introduced at the request of a Friend of the ever memorable and godlike Mr. HOWARD, in hopes that some Gentlemen in the course of the debate, will take occasion to exhibit his virtue before a public audience - and that others animated by his glorious example may begin a life of beneficence of immortal honour, and unspeakable felicity.'

Daily Advertiser April 7

1620. April 12, 1790 City Debates

'Which implies the greatest Weakness, a Belief in Apparitions, a Reliance on Dreams, or an implicit Faith in the Predictions of Judicial Astrology?

The celebrated Dr. Ranger, Professor of the Astral Science, will explain and vindicate the Practice of foretelling future Events by the Position of the Stars.'

Daily Advertiser April 10

1621. April 14, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Would not the Electors of Westminster evince a becoming Spirit by rejecting at the next Election Lord Hood and Mr. Fox, and returning two independent Characters to Parliament?'

Daily Advertiser April 13

1622. April 15, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Has Mr. Pitt by introducing the Tobacco Act, and extending the Excise Laws, adopted Measures destructive of the Interests of Great Britain, and subversive of the inestimable Blessings of Liberty?

The Publick are respectfully informed that in compliance with the Solicitations of many respectable Electors, this very popular Institution will, for the remainder of the Season, be dedicated to the Discussion of a Series of important political Subjects, including a free investigation both of the public Conduct of the Minister and on the Opposition, in order that at the ensuing General Election the People may be the better able to know to whom they ought to give their Suffrages.

It was determined almost unanimously that Mr. Pitt, by introducing the Tobacco Act, and extending the Excise Laws, had adopted measures destructive of the interests of Great Britain.'

Daily Advertiser April 14

1623. April 19, 1790 City Debates

'Which implies the greatest Weakness, a Belief in Apparitions, a Reliance on Dreams, or an implicit Faith in the Predictions of Judicial Astrology?'

More than 300 Gentlemen voted for adjournment.

Daily Advertiser April 17

1624. April 21, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is the Increase of Methodists to be ascribed to the Supineness of the Church of England Clergy, the Zeal and Ability of Methodist Preachers, or the Ignorance and Folly of their Hearers?'

Daily Advertiser April 20

1625. April 22, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is unhappiness in the Marriage State more to be attributed to the exercise of too much power by the Men, or of too little obedience on the part of the Women?'

Daily Advertiser April 21

1626. April 26, 1790 City Debates

'Which implies the greatest Weakness, a Belief in Apparitions, a Reliance on Dreams, or an implicit Faith in the Predictions of Judicial Astrology?

Dr. Ranger and Mr. Urton, Astrological Professors, will explain the Science, and demonstrate from the Nativity of a Gentleman (who denied the Power of Astrology, and whose Hour of Birth they have taken) the Truth of the Science.' One of the largest attendances in the history of the institution.

Daily Advertiser April 24

1627. April 28, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is the Increase of Methodists to be ascribed to the Supineness of the Church of England Clergy, the Zeal and Ability of Methodist Preachers, or the Ignorance and Folly of their Hearers?'

Gazetteer April 27

1628. April 29, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Which is the greater Affliction to a man of Sensibility, the loss of a Good Wife, or the plague of a Bad One?

As the great end of the Managers in every question they adopt, is to diffuse knowledge, correct the judgment, and amend the heart, it is hoped, from the well-known abilities and moral views of the Gentlemen who speak in this much esteemed Society, that the Debate will in some measure tend to lead some Married Ladies to review their conduct, and that good Husbands will learn to bear with Philosophic patience both the Afflictions to which the Question refers.'

Daily Advertiser April 28

1629. May 3, 1790 City Debates

'Is the following Assertion mentioned by Dr. Johnson in his Rambler true: That most Persons who marry repent their Engagement, and secretly repine at the Happiness of those who remain single?'

Daily Advertiser May 1

1630. May 5, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which is the greater Disgrace to Humanity, the Ruffian who drags the Female African from her Family, her Kindred and her native Country, or the Monster who has lately wounded and terrified many Ladies in this Metropolis?'

Daily Advertiser May 4

1631. May 6, 1790 City Debates (open for a charitable purpose)

'Which is most consistent with Revelation and Reason, the Arminian tenets of the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, the Calvinistick Decrees upheld by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his other Opponents, the theology propagated by late Emmanuel Swedenburgh under the Title of the New Jerusalem, or the Doctrine of Universal Salvation maintained by the Rev. Mr. Winchester?'

Mr. Winchester to conduct the debate.

Daily Advertiser May 1

1632. May 6, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Does not a late melancholy event, among many other fatal consequences of Duelling, tend to prove, that no point of honour can justify a Man's accepting a Challenge who has a Wife and Family?

The sentiments of mankind upon the practice of Duelling, are various; the rigid Moralist totally condemns it. Some Philosophers do not disapprove of it, many men of honour lament its necessity. A respectable family, some of whose relations belong to a profession, and are at the present moment under such peculiar circumstances as to render a challenge probable, have solicited the Managers to adopt the above Question.'

Daily Advertiser May 5

1633. May 10, 1790 City Debates

'Which is most consistent with Revelation and Reason, the Arminian tenets of the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, the Calvinistick Decrees upheld by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his other Opponents, the theology propagated by late Emmanuel Swedenburgh under the Title of the New Jerusalem, or the Doctrine of Universal Salvation maintained by the Rev. Mr. Winchester?'

Daily Advertiser May 8

1634. May 12, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Who best deserves the suffrages of the Electors of England at the ensuing General Election - those Members who have supported Mr. PITT and Administration - or those who have adhered to Mr. FOX and Opposition?'

Gazetteer May 11

1635. May 13, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is Female Ruin most to be attributed to the Errors of Education, to the Treachery of the Male Sex, or the young People not being sufficiently guarded against the Consequences of their Passions?'

Daily Advertiser May 12

1636. May 17, 1790 City Debates

'Which is most consistent with Revelation and Reason, the Arminian tenets of the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, the Calvinistick Decrees upheld by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his other Opponents, the theology propagated by late Emmanuel Swedenburgh under the Title of the New Jerusalem, or the Doctrine of Universal Salvation maintained by the Rev. Mr. Winchester?

A most curious and interesting Enquiry will be made into Count Swedenburgh's Assertions "that for 14 Years he held Converse with the Angels, the Patriarchs and the Apostles; and that the Apostle Paul told him he repented having written certain passages in his Epistles", with matters equally mysterious'.

At this debate, there 'were upwards of 50 Divines of various Persuasions'.

Daily Advertiser May 15

1637. May 19, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is that Brother justifiable, who punishes with Death the Seducer of his Sister's Honour?

Two alarming incidents, in the opposite walks of life, have occurred in less than a twelvemonth, of a Brother's avenging the wrongs of a Sister, by the death of her Betrayer. The one a Tradesman, near Whitechapel; the other in the late fatal duel between Mr. Reid and Mr. Ross.'

Gazetteer May 18

1638. May 20, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Which has the greater Reason the rejoice, the Widow who has lost a bad Husband, or the Lady who by marrying loses the reproachful appellation of Old Maid?

The Ladies who sent the above Question have done the Managers the Honour to say, that the Fair Sex consider this popular Society not only as an admirable School of Eloquence, but as a Court of Equity, in which the Causes of young Maidens, Wives, Widows, neglected Old Maids, and every other Subject that concerns the Happiness and Interest of Mankind, are fairly investigated and decided by a respectable and enlightened Audience.'

Daily Advertiser May 19

1639. May 24, 1790 City Debates

'Which is most consistent with Revelation and Reason, the Arminian tenets of the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, the Calvinistick Decrees upheld by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his other Opponents, the theology propagated by late Emmanuel Swedenburgh under the Title of the New Jerusalem, or the Doctrine of Universal Salvation maintained by the Rev. Mr. Winchester?'

Daily Advertiser May 22

1640. May 26, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is it possible to foretell marriage - good or bad fortune - and other events in life, by the science of Judicial Astrology?'

Gazetteer May 25

1641. May 27, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the Assertion of Mr. Gibbon, the celebrated Historian, true, that Female Fortitude is commonly artificial, and seldom steady or consistent?'

Gazetteer May 26

1642. May 31, 1790 City Debates

'Which is most consistent with Revelation and Reason, the Arminian tenets of the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, the Calvinistick Decrees upheld by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his other Opponents, the theology propagated by late Emmanuel Swedenburgh under the Title of the New Jerusalem, or the Doctrine of Universal Salvation maintained by the Rev. Mr. Winchester?'

Daily Advertiser May 29

1643. June 7, 1790 City Debates

'Which is most consistent with Revelation and Reason, the Arminian tenets of the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, the Calvinistick Decrees upheld by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his other Opponents, the theology propagated by late Emmanuel Swedenburgh under the Title of the New Jerusalem, or the Doctrine of Universal Salvation maintained by the Rev. Mr. Winchester?'

Daily Advertiser June 5

1644. June 14, 1790 City Debates

'Which is most consistent with Revelation and Reason, the Arminian tenets of the Rev. Mr. John Wesley, the Calvinistick Decrees upheld by the Rev. Mr. Whitfield and his other Opponents, the theology propagated by late Emmanuel Swedenburgh under the Title of the New Jerusalem, or the Doctrine of Universal Salvation maintained by the Rev. Mr. Winchester?'

In favour of Mr. Winchester's system.

Daily Advertiser June 12

1645. June 21, 1790 City Debates

'Will the Electors of Great Britain (from a Review of the whole publick Conduct of the Rt. Hon. William Pitt) be justifiable in returning a Parliament devoted to his Administration, or one in Opposition to his Measures?

Conscious that the Debate in a Society like this, supported by Gentlemen of the most splendid abilities in the liberal professions, and numerously attended by the most respectable Merchants and Citizens of this great Metropolis, must have considerable influence on the electors of the kingdom in general ... it is ... necessary to acquaint the public, that the grand outlines of the debate will be an examination into Mr. Brook Watson's Pension, an investigation of the public principles of all the city candidates, and a complete review of Mr. Pitt's whole administration, (including his extension of the Excise) by a Barrister of eminence.'

Daily Advertiser June 19/Gazetteer June 19

1646. June 28, 1790 City Debates

'Do the well-known Facts of the Apparition of Julius Caesar to Brutus before the Battle of Philippi; that of Samuel to the Witch of Endor; and other Occurrences in Sacred and Prophane History, justify a belief in Witches and Apparitions?'

Daily Advertiser June 26

1647. July 5, 1790 City Debates

'Do the well-known Facts of the Apparition of Julius Caesar to Brutus before the Battle of Philippi; that of Samuel to the Witch of Endor; and other Occurrences in Sacred and Prophane History, justify a belief in Witches and Apparitions?

We have been sent a Relation of the extraordinary Case of George Lukins, the Bristol Daemoniack, out of whom the Rev. J. Wesley is said to have cast seven Devils. We are at a loss to express our Gratitude to a Gentleman who was present during a great Part of the Affair of the Cock-Lane Ghost, and who will . . . communicate many valuable particulars of that astonishing Transaction. . . The Apparition which was seen by the Rev. Mess. Madan, Whitfield and Wesley has already been mentioned but from such an authority as the Rev. Mr. K (the old Associate of the Rev. Mr. Whitfield) a second Relation by Way of Confirmation is certainly admissable.'

Daily Advertiser July 3/Times

1648. July 12, 1790 City Debates

'Did the late extraordinary Conduct ascribed to Rynwick Williams (commonly called the Monster) originate in an unfortunate Insanity a diabolical Inclination to injure the Fair Part of the Creation - or in the groundless Apprehensions of some mistaken Females?'

Determined to come about because of a diabolical inclination.

Daily Advertiser July 10

1649. July 19, 1790 City Debates

'Ought not the Legislature (in protection of the Ladies of Great Britain) immediately to pass an Act rendering the Crime of Rhynwick Williams, commonly called the Monster, a capital Offense?'

Daily Advertiser July 17

1650. July 26, 1790 City Debates

'Which is the most distressing Situation, a Ship-wrecked Mariner, a condemned Criminal, or a seduced Female abandoned by her Betrayer?'

Daily Advertiser July 24

1651. August 2, 1790 City Debates

'Which is the more reasonable Conduct in an Old Maid past the Age of 40, patiently to bear the Reproach which the World annexes to her Situation, or run the hazard of marrying when Love cannot be supposed to be the Foundation of the Union?

There is in this Metropolis a Society of Spinsters called the Thoughtful Sisters; one of their Members received a Matrimonial Overture from a young Gentleman of 25; the Lady (as is customary among them) submitted her Case to the Society; but not being satisfied with their Decision, has boldly appealed to the publick Voice, through the Medium of this popular Institution. . . The whole Society of Thoughtful Sisters have signified their Intention of attending this Debate. . . The uncommon Extent of publick Patronage and literary Support we have received, compel us to continue these Debates during the whole Year.'

Daily Advertiser July 31

1652. August 23, 1783 City Debates

'Supposing a Father to have three Daughters, the eldest possessed of uncommon beauty, the next of superior understanding, and to leave his who fortune to the youngest, who is devoid of either - Query, which of the three Ladies stands the best chance for a Husband?'

Daily Advertiser August 21

1653. August 30, 1790 City Debates, Capel Court

'Are the religious Doctrines and general Practices of the People called Methodists consistent with or repugnant to the grand Tenor of Revelation, the Principles of Reason and Philosophy, and the Articles, Homilies and established Disciplines of the Church of England?

A calvinistick Divine of considerable Eminence has promised to answer a Gentleman's Oration against the Methodists, wherein he accused them of taking out licenses as Dissenters, and then professing themselves to be Churchmen. . . We think it our Duty ... to acquaint the Rev. Mr. Forster, that it was asserted in the Debate by a Gentleman, that the words "Foster and Jesus Christ" were used as a Label on some of the Coaches of his Party at the late Clerkenwell Election.'

Daily Advertiser August 28

1654. September 2, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Would Mr. Pitt have acted like a wise and Patriotic Minister, if instead of submitting to a procrastinated negotiation, he had turned the Power and Arms of This Country against Spain, in vindication of our insulted Honour?'

Audience thought Mr. Pitt had acted like a wise and patriotic minister in regard to Spain.

Daily Advertiser September 1

1655. September 6, 1790 City Debates

'Are the religious Doctrines and general Practices of the People called Methodists consistent with or repugnant to the grand Tenor of Revelation, the Principles of Reason and Philosophy, and the Articles, Homilies and established Disciplines of the Church of England?'

Daily Advertiser September 4

1656. September 9, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the love of the mental or personal charms of the Fair Sex that is more likely to induce men to enter into the married state?'

Question sent by a 'a number of females who style themselves Ratiocinians; those Ladies hold a Lodge in the West End of the Town, and communicate to each other such observations as they have made upon the manners and conduct of both sexes, particularly when such conduct regards the married state.'

Daily Advertiser September 8

1657. September 13, 1790 City Debates

'Was the Assertion of Milton (when he parted from his Wife) true, that a confirmed Dislike is as just a Ground of Divorce as Infidelity?'

Daily Advertiser September 11

1658. September 16, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Has the preaching of the people called Methodists been productive of more good or harm to society?'

Almost unanimously determined that the preaching of the Methodists has been productive of good.

Daily Advertiser September 15/The World September 23

1659. September 20, 1790 City Debates

'In which Situation of Life do the Ladies enjoy most Happiness, Virginity, Marriage or Widowhood?'

A Lady who wishes to speak to this subject seems 'to doubt the Propriety of a Lady's addressing the Chair, she is respectfully informed that this Assembly having been honoured with many elegant Orations from several Females of great Character and Ability, her Sentiments may be delivered with the strictest Decorum, and will confer an Obligation.'

Daily Advertiser September 18

1660. September 23, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Do the Irish Jury who decided in opposition to the opinion of the Judge, that Truth ought not to be deemed a Libel, deserve the thanks of every friend to the Liberty of the Press, and the Rights of Mankind? A Question in which every man who values his life, liberty, or property is immediately concerned. . . English Juries have been called upon in the public prints to follow the late example of the Irish, and a great number of Jurymen are very anxious to know whether they would be justified in so doing.'

Carried by a very great majority in the affirmative.

Daily Advertiser September 22

1661. September 27, 1790 City Debates

'Which is the greater Deviation from real Manhood, the Effeminacy of a Man-Milliner, or the Brutality of the modern Boxer?'

Daily Advertiser September 25

1662. September 30, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Which is more conspicuous at the present day, the vanity of the Women or the treachery of the Men?

In compliance with the request of an amiable young Lady, whose sister fell a victim to the treachery of an officer in the army, this Question is appointed for debate. . . A young Gentleman complains to the Managers of the vanity of no less than six Ladies, to whom he has paid his addresses, and to which he imputes his celibacy.'

Daily Advertiser September 29

1663. October 4, 1790 City Debates

'Can any Motives justify a Person of either Sex in passing through Life in a State of Celibacy?'

Daily Advertiser October 2

1664. October 7, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is it more distressing for a virtuous Lady to be in Love with an unworthy man, who has the same affection for her; or him who possesses honour and integrity, but cannot return her love?'

Daily Advertiser October 6

1665. October 11, 1790 City Debates

'Can any Motives justify a Person of either Sex in passing through Life in a State of Celibacy?'

Daily Advertiser October 9

1666. October 14, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Has Mr. Pitt proved himself possessed of sufficient Spirit, Wisdom and integrity, as a Minister to carry on a War with Spain, in a manner consistent with the dignity and safety of this country?'

Daily Advertiser October 13

1667. October 18, 1790 City Debates

'Is the present critical Posture of Affairs an Honour or a Disgrace to the Minister of this Country?

The political Hemisphere of Europe seems convulsed with Doubt and Irresolution, and the Fate of France apparently is still trembling upon the Balance.'

Daily Advertiser October 16

1668. October 21, 1790 City Debates, Kings Arms Building Cornhill 'Which is the more depraved and dangerous Character, a faithless lover or a perfidious friend?

This popular and much admired Society having long since obtained a decided Pre-eminence both in the Number and Abilities of the Gentlemen who support it, the Managers now felicitate the Publick in obviating the many complaints of Ladies and Gentlemen against the State of their late Room, its intolerable heat, from lowness of the Cieling, etc. It is with Pleasure they announce that Gentlemen of the first Ability will now have the Opportunity of addressing the Audience, at once numerous and respectable, in an Hall (on the Decoration of which they have spared no Expence), the most elegant, capacious, and central in this great Metropolis. A most numerous company of Ladies, who may now depend on ... Accomodations (the Room containing Seats for between 600 and 700 Persons). . .'

Daily Advertiser October 20

1669. October 21, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Has Mr. Pitt proved himself possessed of sufficient Spirit, Wisdom and integrity, as a Minister to carry on a War with Spain, in a manner consistent with the dignity and safety of this country?'

Decided that Mr. Pitt was possessed of sufficient wisdom and integrity.

Daily Advertiser October 20

1670. October 25, 1790 City Debates

'Ought not the Word Obey to be struck out of the Marriage Ceremony? It is now above two Years since the above Question was debated in this popular Society. A young Lady and Gentleman who accidently met commenced an Acquaintance from that Time, and are now upon the Tapis of Marriage; the Lady being ever since firmly of Opinion that the word Obey is entirely unnecessary, few of her Sex ever pronouncing it at the Altar, and still fewer practicing it after they become Wives, has made preliminary Condition with her Lover that he should, before she gives him her Hand, depend on her loving and honouring him as a Husband, but publickly renounce all Claims to the slavish System of Obedience.'

Daily Advertiser October 23

1671. October 28, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Ought Marriage to be considered as a Divine Institution, a meer Political Contract or an innovation of Priestcraft subversive of the natural liberty and happiness of mankind?

Several Students from the two Universities, after the example of those great and admired Advocates, Messrs. Dallas, Garrow, Serjeant Cockrell, &c. intend to make this Society their school for acquiring the useful art of addressing a public Assembly with ease and elegance.'

Daily Advertiser October 27

1672. October 28, 1790 City Debates, Kings Arms Building, Cornhill

'Which is the wisest Man, he who marries for Love, he who marries for Money, or he who runs the Hazard of dying an old Bachelor by remaining single till he meets with a Wife, in whom both Qualifications are united?

This Society being now the constant Resort of the Wise, the Intelligent and the Learned (the Successors of those brilliant Supporters of this Institution, when held in another Place, Messrs. Erskine, Dallas, Garrow, &c. the Honour of whose Assistance attaches itself to this Society ... it is now become the fashionable Practice for private Persons to refer any doubtful Case to the Gentlemen who support it for their Decision.' This question sent by three brothers.

Daily Advertiser October 27

1673. November 1, 1790 City Debates

'Has the Conduct of Mr. Pitt (from the time he was warned by Lord Stormont of the danger of not including Spain in the Treaty with France for disarming, down to the present Moment of Negociation) been such as merits the Confidence, or deserves the Indignation, of the Sovereign and the People?

This Society, which has been established more than Half a Century, the most ancient as well as the most respectable Institution for free debate in the Kingdom; cannot present the Publick with more decisive Proofs of its Superiority, than the Pretensions of others (who have instituted Societies in the Places from whence it has removed) to that Credit and Originality which a discerning Publick has long since rendered its exclusive Privilege.'

Daily Advertiser October 30

1674. November 4, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Do the Members of the English and Irish Whig Clubs, deserve to be considered as the friends and assertors of the Constitutional rights of the people - or as a body of men actuated by a party spirit, and who assemble to oppose the necessary measures of Government?'

Proper accommodation available for 'the Marchioness of L— and her daughter'.

Daily Advertiser November 3

1675. November 4, 1790 City Debates

'Has the Conduct of Mr. Pitt (from the time he was warned by Lord Stormont of the danger of not including Spain in the Treaty with France for disarming, down to the present Moment of Negociation) been such as merits the Confidence, or deserves the Indignation, of the Sovereign and the People?'

Attendance of the Cherokee Chiefs.

Daily Advertiser November 3

1676. November 9, 1790 City Debates

'Do Mr. Burke's reflections on the French Revolution, his comparison between Dr. Price and Hugh Peters, his strictures on the Doctor's sermon, on the meeting at the London Tavern, and the general tendency of the publication, breathe that spirit of freedom and liberality for which Mr. Burke has long been famous, or evince a total deviation from his former sentiments?

One of the Cherokee Chiefs who attended these debates on Thursday last . . . having expressed his intention by his interpreter of frequently visiting this Society during his stay in the metropolis, the Rev. Mr. B. must now retract his charge of deception; we never yet announced any circumstance in our advertisements that did not take place, nor are we answerable for those Societies who advertise the attendance of exalted characters merely to deceive the public.'

Daily Advertiser November 6

1677. November 10, 1790 Westminster Forum, Panton Street

'Are the Reflections in Mr. Burke's pamphlet on the French National Assembly and the Protestant Dissenters, an insidious Attack on the Friends of the English Revolution of 1688, or the noble Emanations of a Heart anxious to preserve the Happiness of the People and the Honour of the Crown?'

Has undergone repair. Respectability of Society and decor 'is suited to Persons of Fashion and distinction'.

Daily Advertiser

1678. November 11, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Are the Observations in Mr. Burke's Pamphlet upon the sermon of Dr. Price and the French Revolution, consistent with his former professions and favourable to the just rights and liberties of mankind?

The public know too well that this institution is the only established and respectable one in the kingdom for free debate, to be deceived by the contemptible suggestions of falsehood and folly which disgrace the advertisements of an inferior mushroom Society.'

Times

1679. November 11, 1790 City Debates

'Is it consistent either with female prudence or delicacy to advertise for a husband?' [if the Lady who was to address the Society is well; if not] 'Can a man who really loves a female, deliberately seduce her?'

Daily Advertiser November 10

1680. November 15, 1790 City Debates

'Can a man who really loves a female, deliberately seduce her?'

A merchant and father of seven daughters, asks this question.

This Society is now frequented by Gentlemen of the first Independence and Ability: the Barrister here condescends to unfold the Arcana of Constitutional Knowledge; the Philosopher explores the latent Principles of Nature, whilst several Divines of popular Esteem quit the Pulpit of Instruction, and here communicate a System of Ethicks, diffusive as the vital Principle, and sacred as the hallowed Beam of Truth. It is with reluctance we descend to notice the vulgar and contemptible attack of a sinking Society (once respectable by the orations of these dignified characters, who now confine their abilities to this Institution, and who, at our removal from thence, left nothing original but the stools and benches, together with some other wooden appurtenances.). . . The patronage of a generous public therefore compels us to assert our own dignity, to disclaim such a contemptible conduct as actuates our angry opponents, and to declare, we wage no war with Bedlam or the Mint.'

Daily Advertiser November 13/The World

1681. November 17, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Are the Reflections in Mr. Burke's pamphlet on the French National Assembly and the Protestant Dissenters, an insidious Attack on the Friends of the English Revolution of 1688, or the noble Emanations of a Heart anxious to preserve the Happiness of the People and the Honour of the Crown?

As the City Debates were honoured with the Presence of the Cherokee Chiefs, and we have received Intimation that they will probably attend us Tomorrow Evening, every necessary Preparation will be made for their Reception. This being a subject in which the Protestant Dissenters are peculiarly interested, and as Numbers of their Clergy are expected to be Present, no private Gentleman can be heard in preference either to the Divines of that Persuasion or those of the Establishment.'

Daily Advertiser November 16

1682. November 18, 1790 City Debates

'Is the Assertion of the celebrated poet, Prior, true, That after marriage Husbands sigh for liberty, and Wives for Power?

Such is the Celebrity of this Institution, that the Managers are happy in declaring the Tedium of a Pause is unknown in the Society, scarcely a Minute passing but what is occupied by Sentiments which, while they promote the Interests of Virtue, support the Dignity of Truth, and relieve the Mind in Proportion as they improve its Powers.'

Daily Advertiser November 17.

1683. November 18, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the Assertion of the celebrated poet true, viz. That after marriage the men always sigh for liberty, and their wives for Power?'

Daily Advertiser

1684. November 22, 1790 City Debates

'Which will make a Lady of Sensibility the worst Husband, a Spendthrift, a Miser, a Clown or a Fop?'

Daily Advertiser November 20

1685. November 24, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which must be more irksome to a Female of Sensibility, Indifference from the Man she loves, or the most tender Assiduities of him whose Affection she is incapable of returning?

A Lady of literary Eminence, who frequently speaks in the City Debates' will speak on the topic.

Daily Advertiser November 23

1686. November 25, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the common observation true, that women love their first husbands, and men their second wives, with the strongest affection?'

Daily Advertiser November 24

1687. November 25, 1790 City Debates

'Which will render women of sensibility most unhappy, to be married to a spendthrift, a miser, a clown, or a fop?'

Daily Advertiser November 24

1688. November 29, 1790 City Debates

'To which of the following causes is Mr. Pitt most indebted for his present Popularity - his being the immediate Descendant of the immortal Chatham, his own Ability as a Minister, or that Folly and Credulity which Foreigners describe as the striking Characteristick of the British Nation?

It is expected the Address from the City on the Spanish Convention will be followed by most of the Corporate Bodies in the Kingdom. Several Gentlemen, however, who profess no other Design than to open the Eyes of the People, have signified their Intention of availing themselves of this Opportunity publickly to convince Persons who may be applied to for their Signatures to such Addresses . . . that the Whole of the Minister's Conduct deserves the Reprobation of every Friend of his Country.'

Audience concluded that Mr. Pitt owes his popularity to his own Abilities.

Daily Advertiser

1689. December 1, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is the assertion of Mr. Addison (in the Spectator) true, that the happiest days of human life are those spent in courtship?

The managers have the honor to acquaint the public that this society is now frequented by persons of the first fashion and ability.'

Times

1690. December 2, 1790 City Debates

'Is it the fault of Husbands or of Wives, that there are so few applications for the Dunmow Flitch of Bacon?'

Daily Advertiser December 1

1691. December 2, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Which is the greater affliction to a man of virtue and sensibility; the infidelity of a beloved wife, or the seduction of an only daughter?

A free debate upon the above question will be productive of the end for which it is intended, namely, in guarding the unsuspecting and generous female against the arts of seduction, and to point out to the married of both sexes, that when they depart from conjugal fidelity they forsake the road to honour and real felicity; the subject was suggested to the managers by a worthy clergyman who lately witnessed the miserable fate of a beautiful young lady seduced under a promise of marriage, and whose death broke the heart of her affectionate father.'

Daily Advertiser December 1

1692. December 6, 1790 City Debates

'Which ought to be considered as the chief Authors of Female Misery, the artful Seducers of Virgin Innocence, or those inexorable Parents who abandon their unfortunate Daughters in Consequence of that Seduction?'

Daily Advertiser December 4

1693. December 6, 1790 Theological Society

'Ought the people called Methodists to be considered as Members of the Established Church - as Dissenters from it - or as a Religious Body of Men unconnected with either?'

Gazetteer December 4

1694. December 8, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Is the Assertion mentioned by Dr. Johnson in the Rambler true, that most persons who marry, repent their Engagement, and secretly repine at the happiness of those who remain Single?'

Gazetteer

1695. December 9, 1790 City Debates

'Which ought to be considered as the chief Authors of Female Misery, the artful Seducer of Virgin Innocence, or those inexorable Parents who abandon their unfortunate Daughters in Consequence of that Seduction?

The Grave and the Gay, the Aged and the Juvenile, joined in shedding the Tear of Sensibility for the unhappy Victim of Seduction.'

Daily Advertiser December 8

1696. December 9, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Has Dr. Price in his Revolution sermon published opinions injurious to the cause of the Protestant Dissenters, and contrary to the principles of the British constitution?'

Daily Advertiser December 8

1697. December 13, 1790 Theological Society, Capel Court, Bartholemew Lane

'Which is more consistent with the general Tenor of the Scriptures, that Tenets of Calvinism, that only a Part of the Human Race were elected to eternal Life, or those of the Arminians, that all Mankind were redeemed, and none but the Unbelieving or Disobedient will perish? This Institution may be considered as a School of Theology, in which religious Knowledge will be promoted, Error detected, and Infidelity defeated. It has no Connection with a Society lately held in this Place, and will be conducted with Decorum; Levity and Ridicule will be discountenanced; the Doctrines of the Gospel will be treated with Reverence, and its Ministers with Respect.'

Daily Advertiser

1698. December 13, 1790 City Debates

'Which is the greater Object of Pity, the Lady left in a hopeless State of Virginity by the Perfidy of her Lover, or the married Man rendered an Object of Scorn through the Infidelity of his Wife?'

Daily Advertiser December 11

1699. December 15, 1790 Westminster Forum

'Which is more blameable, the disobedience of the daughter who elopes with her lover, or the tyranny of that father who compels her to marry contrary to her own inclinations?'

Gazetteer

1700. December 16, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Has Dr. Price in his Revolution sermon published opinions injurious to the cause of the Protestant Dissenters, and contrary to the principles of the British constitution?'

Daily Advertiser December 15

1701. December 16, 1790 City Debates

'A Mariner Shipwrecked (with his Mother, Wife and Child) was, after leaving the Vessel, in an open Boat, that unfortunately overset, unable to save more than one of them. Which ought to have been the Object of his Choice?'

Daily Advertiser December 15

1702. December 20, 1790 Theological Society

'Which is more consistent with the general Tenor of the Scriptures, that Tenets of Calvinism, that only a Part of the Human Race were elected to eternal Life, or those of the Arminians, that all Mankind were redeemed, and none but the Unbelieving or Disobedient will perish?'

Daily Advertiser

1703. December 20, 1790 City Debates

'Ought Mr. Home Tooke's Petition to be considered as a libelous attack on the House of Commons, or a just statement of the defects of the British Constitution, arising from the unequal representation of the people?

Mr. Home Tooke is a gentleman whose political sentiments have been the constant theme of misrepresentations and abuse both from Opposition and Administration. Several Gentlemen who wish impartially to investigate the merits of the petition, transmitted the above question to the managers, with the most positive assurance of the probability of Mr. Home Tooke's attendance. The managers have the more readily adopted it, as they recollect, that Gentleman has formerly delivered his sentiments in these Societies; they take the liberty to add their most respectful solicitations for the honour of Mr. Home Tooke's attendance. In the House of Commons he could not answer the invective levelled against his petition. In this Society (before a numerous selection of the most judicious part of the public) he may.'

Times

1704. December 22, 1790 Westminster Forum, Panton Street Haymarket

'Ought Mr. Home Tooke's Petition to be considered as a libellous attack on the House of Commons, or a just statement of the defects in the British Constitution, arising from the unequal representation of the people?'

Times

1705. December 23, 1790 City Debates

'Ought two Lovers, possessed of mutual affection, but devoid of fortune, to marry, trusting to Providence and their own industry for support, or to separate on motives of prudence?'

Daily Advertiser December 22

1706. December 23, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Ought the Petition of Mr. Home Tooke to be reprobated as an impudent Libel on the most important branch of the British Legislature, or supported by the people, as containing bold truths, and founded on constitutional principles?'

Daily Advertiser, December 22

1707. December 27, 1790 City Debates

'Every Woman is at Heart a Rake. Did Mr. Pope, in the above Sentence, utter an unwelcome Truth, or publish a scandalous Libel on the Fair Sex?'

Question determined as a libel on the Fair Sex.

Daily Advertiser December 25

1708. December 30, 1790 City Debates

'Is the present stagnation of matrimony owing to the levity of the women, the depravity of the men, or that want of harmony in those already married, which renders single persons of both sexes afraid to engage in the connubial state?'

Daily Advertiser December 29

1709. December 30, 1790 Coachmakers Hall

'Is the Passion of Jealousy stronger in the Breast of the male or the Female Lover?'

Daily Advertiser December 29