London debates
1795

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London Record Society

Publication

Author

Donna T. Andrew (compiled and introduced by)

Year published

1994

Pages

331-346

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'London debates: 1795', London debating societies 1776-1799 (1994), pp. 331-346. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=38859 Date accessed: 30 August 2014.


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Contents

1905. January 1, 1795 London Forum

CONSTITUTIONAL LIBERTY

'Are Britons, for the blessings of a Free Constitution, principally indebted to King John, for signing Magna Carta, to Harry VIII, for freeing them from the dominion of the Pope, or to James II for abdicating the Throne?'

Morning Chronicle

1906. January 8, 1795 London Forum

'Do not the Decisions of the Juries on the late Trials for High Treason, effectually prove that the political Liberties of this Country exist at present in full vigour?'

Morning Herald

1907. January 13, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Which is the most predominant Principle – Love of Life, Love of the Fair Sex, or the Love of Liberty?'

Morning Herald January 12

1908. January 20, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Which is the most predominant Principle – Love of Life, Love of the Fair Sex, or the Love of Liberty?'

Morning Chronicle

1909. January 26, 1795 Ciceronian School of Eloquence, Globe Tavern, Fleet Street

'Ought the Father of a seduced Daughter totally to disclaim her, as an example to the rest of his Family, and Society at large, or humanely restore her to his former confidence, in the hope of reclaiming her?

A Society of literary Gentlemen, lamenting that there does not exist a respectable institution for the free discussion of liberal and animated subjects, where the Man who is ambitious of making a conspicuous figure in public life, or he who only wishes to attain the pleasing art of public speaking; might at the same time greatly improve and display his talents, have opened for that purpose the Ciceronian School of Eloquence. . . In the course of the season they will propose subjects which shall be found highly interesting to the Moralist, the Historian and the Politician.'

Morning Herald

1910. January 27, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Have the People of England just reason to believe that a Change of Administration would be productive of real benefit to the Country?'

Morning Herald

1911. February 2, 1795 Ciceronian School

'Ought the Assassination of Julius Caesar, by Brutus, to be execrated as a violation of the laws of humanity, or applauded as a meritorious and patriotic deed?'

Morning Chronicle

1912. February 3, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Have the People of England just reason to believe that a change of Administration would be productive of real benefit to the Country?

The Managers of the Westminster Forum can truly say, their Institution is respectable, because impartiality and moderation govern their public deliberations; the Gentlemen who honour them by the delivery of their sentiments, are persons of character and intelligence, their Auditors are some of [the] most opulent and respectable Inhabitants of Westminster; and, not infrequently, persons of the first fashion and distinction.'

Decided 'that a change of Administration would operate for the good of the Nation'.

Morning Chronicle/Morning Herald February 10

1913. February 9, 1795 Ciceronian School

'It was decided (with the exception of two dissentient voices) that an immediate Peace is preferable to a continuance of the War.'

Morning Chronicle February 14

1914. February 10, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Have the Members of the Constitutional and Corresponding Societies, in their proceedings, proved themselves the deluded Followers of Faction, or the true Friends of their King and Country?

The Managers of this Institution, unconnected with any Party, will esteem themselves on this, as on all occasions, happy in being instrumental to confirm just and founded suspicion of public delinquency, or to weed from the actions of their countrymen any illiberal or unjust prejudice against individuals.'

Morning Herald

1915. February 16, 1795 Ciceronian School

'At the present moment of danger and difficulty, which best deserves the Public Confidence, Mr. PITT or Mr. FOX?'

Morning Chronicle February 14

1916. February 17, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Have the Members of the Constitutional and Corresponding Societies, in their proceedings, proved themselves the deluded Followers of Faction, or the true Friends of their King and Country?'

Morning Chronicle

1917. February 23, 1795 Ciceronian School

'At the present moment of danger and difficulty, which best deserves the Public Confidence, Mr. PITT or Mr. FOX?

Notwithstanding a large majority determined the above . . . in favour of MR. FOX, it having been suggested that the decision was unsatisfactory, as two Gentlemen of considerable abilities (Advocates of Mr. Pitt), were from interruption prevented from delivering their sentiments; and many others were disappointed of attending', the question will again be raised.

Morning Chronicle

1918. February 24, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Have the Members of the Constitutional and Corresponding Societies, in their proceedings, proved themselves the deluded Followers of Faction, or the true Friends of their King and Country?'

Morning Chronicle

1919. March 2, 1795 Ciceronian School

'At the present moment of danger and difficulty, which best deserves the Public Confidence, Mr. PITT or Mr. FOX?

Decided almost unanimously that Mr. Fox best deserves public confidence.'

Morning Chronicle February 28

1920. March 9, 1795 Ciceronian School

'Has the conduct of Earl Fitzwilliam been such as to justify the recent alterations made by Mr. Pitt in the Government of Ireland?'

Decided in favour of Earl Fitzwilliam.

Morning Chronicle March 7

1921. March 16, 1795 Ciceronian School

'Would an immediate Abolition of the African Slave Trade, be consistent with the real interests of Great Britain?'

Morning Chronicle

1922. March 17, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Ought Praise or Censure to be ascribed to the MINISTER, for his late BUDGET?

Reduced by a train of public misfortunes, to the necessity of heavy taxation, the objects of that taxation become matters of serious enquiry; the tax on Hair Powder (and its proposed substitute), Tea, British Spirits, &c. &c. will be most minutely examined throughout every effect, and traced to every dependency. A theme of this nature will, we should imagine, awaken general attention: since, however, we may differ with regard to political opinion, all feel the weight of enormous taxation, and the inconvenience of partial and oppressive Imposts.'

Morning Chronicle

1923. March 23, 1795 Ciceronian School

'Would an immediate Abolition of the African Slave Trade, be consistent with the real interests of Great Britain?

It was the unanimous opinion of a numerous and liberal Assembly that the African Slave Trade should be immediately abolished.'

Morning Chronicle March 21

1924. March 24, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Ought Praise or Censure to be ascribed to the MINISTER, for his late BUDGET?'

Morning Chronicle

1925. March 26, 1795 London Forum, Bartholomew lane near the Bank

'This Society will resolve itself into a Committee of the whole House, to consider of the Ways and Means for the current service of the year, for the kingdom of Utopia. The following, among many others equally interesting, will be objects of Discussion: – Tax on Prophecies – Ladies' Lap Dogs, Sad Dogs, Surly Dogs, Snap Dogs, and Puppies of all descriptions – Poll Tax on Monkies – Passport to all Jews going to Jerusalem, their prophet having already appeared at Bethlehem – Tax on Scandal, by a duty on the beverage of Gossips – Limitation of Swine to their Hog – troughs – Annual License for Cuckold–makers, Political Apostates, Hungry Scotchmen, Irish Fortune–hunters, Crimps and Resurrection Men – Bill to restrain the Privilege of Rooks, Pigeons, Tom Tits, Owls and Birds of Passage, from conveying intelligence, free of all expence, from one place to another – Together with the Extraordinaries, Deficiencies, Estimates, &c. &c. &c. and State of the nation of Utopia.'

Morning Chronicle

1926. March 30, 1795 Ciceronian School

'Would Crimes be most effectually prevented by extreme severity or unbounded indulgence?

It was decided (with the exception of one dissentient voice) that Crimes would be most effectually prevented by a system of unbounded indulgence.'

Morning Chronicle

1927. March 31, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Does not sound Policy dictate an Union with Ireland, similar to that with Scotland, and the total Abolition of all Penal and Restrictive Statutes, against Dissenters and Roman Catholics, in both Kingdoms?

At this awful and momentous period, it becomes our interest as well as duty, to ascertain the most probable means of uniting this country, and all its dependencies, in the firmest bands of confidence.'

Morning Chronicle

1928. April 2, 1795 London Forum

'This Evening the House will open its third and last Sitting as a COMMITTEE OF WAYS AND MEANS for UTOPIA. Several Bills were committed in their last sitting; the Bill for the Limitation of Swine in their Hog Troughs was read a first time, with general satisfaction, and its further Consideration unanimously adjourned at a late hour to this evening, when it will open the Committee.

A Tax on Scandal, by a Duty on the Beverage of Gossips; Scolding Wives, and Sulky Husbands; Hungry Scotchmen, Irish Fortune–hunters, and City Toad–eaters; Bill to restrain the Privilege of Hawks, Rooks, Tomtits, Pigeons, Owls, and Birds of Passage, from conveying Intelligence, free of all expence, as heretofore, from one place to another; Reduction of National Spirits, by a Duty on opening the Mouth; with several others, equally interesting, will be brought before the house.'

Morning Chronicle

1929. April 6, 1795 Ciceronian School

'Is the motion recently made in both Houses of Parliament for a Committee to enquire into the State of the nation, justifiable on grounds of sound policy?

To prevent the inconvenience of too crowded an assembly, the tickets will be limited to a certain number. . .

It was almost unanimously decided, that an enquiry into the State of the nation was necessary and expedient.'

Morning Chronicle April 4

1930. April 7, 1795 Westminster Forum

MADNESS!!!

MR. HALHEAD AND THE MINISTER

'Does the Defence of Mr. Halhead, in support of Richard Brothers, or Mr. Pitt's zeal in the prosecution of the present War, evince the greater degree of insanity?

With regard to the latter part of the Question, if we may venture to predict, upon the Madness of War, and all its train of consequent evils, there must arise a discussion of the most animated nature, and replete with every thing that can interest our feelings as men and citizens.'

Morning Chronicle

1931. April 9, 1795 London Forum

'Which has deserved the best of his Country, William Pitt, Charles Fox, or Horne Tooke?

The friends of the Minister may assert his immaculate integrity. The supporters of Mr. Tooke may declaim on his intrepid perseverance in the service of the People; and the friends of Mr. Fox, may pourtray with admiration, that consistent attention to the interests of his country, and that indefatigable zeal for the rights of his fellow countrymen, which has ever marked his public conduct, and entitled him to the applause, gratitude, and veneration of every unprejudiced and disinterested Englishman.'

Morning Chronicle

1932. April 13, 1795 Ciceronian School

'To which of the following causes are we to attribute the present Fermentation in Ireland, the Imprudence of Earl Fitzwilliam, or the Duplicity of Mr. Pitt?

The Question . . . was unanimously decided in favour of Earl Fitzwilliam.'

Morning Chronicle

1933. April 16, 1795 London Forum

'Is the present disastrous situation of Great Britain, attributable to the intrigues of factious spirits at home, the malevolence of our antient inveterate enemies, or the blunders and obstinacy of Administration?'

Morning Chronicle

1934. April 20, 1795 Ciceronian School

FRANCE

'Would the re-establishment of absolute Monarchy, and the restoration of Louis the Seventeenth to the Throne of France, prove beneficial or injurious to the interests of Great Britain?'

Morning Chronicle

1935. April 20, 1795 London Forum

MR. PITT'S TRIAL BEFORE THE PUBLIC

'Has the Minister forfeited, or does he still retain the confidence of the people?

The Audience was uncommonly numerous; and the elegant assemblage of ladies who attended, evince how much even our fair countrywomen begin to feel for the alarming situation into which we have been plunged. – It is, however, but barely justice to observe, that the able and eloquent Defence of Mr. Pitt by two Gentlemen . . . highly merited those reiterated plaudits which they received.'

Morning Chronicle

1936. April 21, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Do not the Letters of Lord Fitzwilliam, Mr. Grattan's Answer to the late Address, and the State both of Ireland and this Country, prove the necessity of repealing the Test and Corporation Acts, and restoring Roman Catholics and Dissenters to those Privileges to which they conceive themselves entitled, as Men and Citizens?'

Morning Chronicle

1937. April 22, 1795 Ciceronian School

FRANCE

'Would the re-establishment of absolute Monarchy, and the restoration of Louis the Seventeenth to the Throne of France, prove beneficial or injurious to the interests of Great Britain?

It was decided with one dissentient voice, that the restoration of French Monarchy, would be injurious to the interests of Great Britain.'

Morning Chronicle

1938. April 23, 1795 London Forum

'Has the Minister forfeited, or does he still retain – the Confidence of the People?'

Morning Chronicle

1939. April 27, 1795 Ciceronian School

PRUSSIAN PERFIDY

'Has not the recent conduct of the King of Prussia fully proved the policy as well as the practicability of negotiating a Peace with the present Government of France?'

Morning Chronicle

1940. April 28, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Which have caused most mischief amongst mankind – Pettifogging Attorneys, Quack Doctors, or Methodist Preachers?'

Morning Chronicle

1941. April 30, 1795 London Forum

'Which ought to be considered the best friends of their Country, those who wear Hair Powder, or those who do not?

In a few days the tax will probably commence, every person will then be obliged, either to discontinue the use of Hair Powder, to mark their dislike to the War and the Minister; or else to continue it, as supporters of Administration; or, perhaps out of pity to the starving thousands it would otherwise rob of employment.'

Morning Chronicle

1942. May 5, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Does the present scarcity of Provision arise from any failure in our national produce, the monopoly of individuals, or the wickedness of Administration in obstinately prosecuting a system of Warfare?

This Society was the first which ventured to revive political discussion; public approval, unbounded patronage, and the most honourable support from many of the first Literary Characters have been the consequence.'

Morning Chronicle

1943. May 7, 1795 London Forum

'Is Connubial Happiness most frequently found in the Upper, Lower or Middle Walks of Life?'

Morning Chronicle

1944. May 12, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Does not the System of Moderation adopted by the French Convention, together with their suppression of the Jacobinic Faction, evince that the present rulers of France are persons with whom Great Britain may safely conclude a permanent and honourable Peace?'

Morning Chronicle

1945. May 14, 1795 London Forum

PRINCE OF WALES'S DEBTS

'Would the House of Commons derive greater honour from discharging the Prince of Wales' Debts, as a mark of national liberality – or from rejecting the measure, on account of the burthens already sustained by the People?

When the above subject was first proposed to the Managers, they felt extreme reluctance at its adoption, on account of its delicacy. Repeatedly urged by some of the first characters that support their Institution, they have complied with the request. . . In the course of the Debate, many opposite sentiments will, doubtless, meet with alternate support; but it is hoped all will unite in paying that tribute of respect due to the illustrious Personage to whom their arguments may allude.'

Morning Chronicle

1946. May 19, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Does Mr. Paine deserve Praise or Censure for his Age of Reason?'

Morning Chronicle

1947. May 21, 1795 London Forum

PARLIAMENTARY REFORM

PITT, HORNE TOOK, DUKE OF RICHMOND

'Which plan of Reform would most effectually promote the Happiness and secure the Liberties of this Country, Mr. Pitt's, Horne Tooke's, or the Duke of Richmond's?'

Morning Chronicle

1948. May 26, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Does Mr. Paine deserve Praise or Censure for his Age of Reason?'

Morning Chronicle

1949. June 2, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Does Mr. Paine deserve Praise or Censure for his Age of Reason?'

Morning Chronicle

1950. June 16, 1795 Westminster Forum

MR. PITT and the CONVENTION

'Which is the greater impediment to an immediate Peace, the wickedness and obstinacy of the Minister, or the factions that prevail in the French Republic?'

Morning Chronicle

1951. June 23, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Will those Members of the London Corresponding Society, who have agreed to convene another Public Meeting, prove themselves, by that measure, the Friends of Liberty – or the imprudent Disturbers of the Public Peace?'

Morning Chronicle

1952. June 30, 1795 Westminster Forum

REVOLUTIONS IN ENGLAND, FRANCE, AND AMERICA

'Which was the most glorious event in the History of Man, the Revolution of England, the Independence of America, or the Emancipation of France?

The Managers of this Institution think it a duty unequivocally to state to the Public their independence of all party, and their determination so to remain. On the present occasion they will most impartially attend to the sentiments of the various Gentlemen who may address the Chair.'

Morning Chronicle

1953. July 7, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Do the Members of the London Corresponding Society deserve the praise or censure of their Fellow-Citizens for holding the late Meeting in St. George's Fields?

The gross calumnies inserted in the Ministerial Prints, relative to the above Meeting, have induced several Gentlemen to propose the subject for unbiassed discussion in the Westminster Forum. They thus publicly challenge the Prostituted Hirelings, who vent the venom of slanderous accusation, to meet them in an independent institution, and (if they can) substantiate their charges against the London Corresponding Society.'

Morning Chronicle

1954. July 14, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Do the Members of the London Corresponding Society deserve the praise or censure of their Fellow-Citizens for holding the late Meeting in St. George's Fields?'

Morning Chronicle

1955. July 21, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Which would be the most effectual method of reducing the high price of Provisions – the retrenchment of the luxuries of the rich, and the cessation of public dinners – the use of brown bread, as advised by his Majesty's Council – or by an immediate Peace to restore the Freedom of Commerce?

The situation of this Country demands the most serious attention of every well–wisher to its interests. It is by peaceable deliberations, and not by open acts of violence, that the British Government will be induced to redress the grievances of a suffering Nation. To ascertain the most effectual means is a Constitutional right and a Patriotic exertion.'

Morning Chronicle

1956. July 28, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Which would, to a Woman of sense and accomplishments, prove the most intolerable Companion in the Marriage State, a Spendthrift, a Miser, a Clown, or a Fop?'

Morning Herald

1957. August 4, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Which would be most advantageous to Great Britain – the Restoration of the Gallic Monarchy in the Person of Louis XVIII – or an immediate acknowledgment of the French Republic?

The failure of the late Emigrant Expedition, and the general situation of this Country, render it a subject of the utmost moment.'

Morning Chronicle

1958. August 11, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Would it not be advantageous to the liberty and happiness of the world, that Woman should equally partake all the Rights and Privileges of Man?

The above interesting and original enquiry is instituted at the particular request of two female citizens, distant relations of Mrs. Woolstonecroft.'

Morning Chronicle

1959. August 18, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Are Annual Parliaments and Universal Suffrage consistent with, or inimical to the true Spirit of the British Constitution?'

Morning Chronicle

1960. August 25, 1795 Westminster Forum

'In the present disastrous situation of this country, which would most effectually insure the blessings of Peace, and secure the happiness of the Empire, – continuing Mr. Pitt in Office – calling Mr. Fox to his Majesty's Councils – or forming a Third Party independent of either?'

Morning Chronicle

1961. August 27, 1795 London Forum

'Does not Mr. Paine's Age of Reason, particularly the assertion, that 'The Bible is an History of Wickedness, calculated to corrupt and brutalize Mankind' deserve the reprobation of every sincere Friend to Civil and Religious Liberty?'

Morning Herald

1962. September 1, 1795 Westminster Forum

'In the present disastrous situation of this country, which would most effectually insure the blessings of Peace, and secure the happiness of the Empire, – continuing Mr. Pitt in Office – calling Mr. Fox to his Majesty's Councils – or forming a Third Party independent of either?

Any advocate for the Minister shall be heard with impartiality. That side of the question, we must confess, wanted supporters.'

Morning Chronicle

1963. September 3, 1795 London Forum

'Does not Mr. Paine's Age of Reason, particularly the assertion, that "The Bible is an History of Wickedness, calculated to corrupt and brutalize Mankind" deserve the reprobation of every sincere Friend to Civil and Religious Liberty?'

Morning Chronicle

1964. September 10, 1795 London Forum

'Which is the more culpable Character – the Man who lives unmarried a number of years with a trusting confidential female, and then forsakes her to marry another – or the wretched Woman, who, unable to endure the separation, desperately punishes his perfidy with death?

It must be sufficiently obvious, that the above interesting and affecting theme arose out of the late unfortunate circumstance of the death of Mr. Errington by Miss Broderick.'

Morning Herald

1965. September 15, 1795 Westminster Forum

THE POPE A JACOBIN

'Does the Letter of the Pope to Louis XVIII, advising him to relinquish his Claims to the Throne of France, "a Sacrifice to restore the Peace of Europe", prove that even his Holiness is infected with Jacobin principles: or that he trembles for the safety of his Temporal Dominions? The Jacobin principles of his Holiness the Pope must strike every person as a most ludicrous idea; and, on the other hand, the victorious arms of the French Republic, extorting Mildness from the source of Intolerance, compelling the Papal Tripod to utter the voice of Peace, instead of breathing the anathema of Slaughter and interdicting the Rights of Human Nature, is a subject every way worthy those talents which the Managers of the Westminster Forum can with certainty assure the Public will be employed on the occasion.'

Morning Chronicle

1966. September 17, 1795 London Forum

'Is it most probable, that the measures now pursuing by the French Convention will terminate in the Establishment of their present Constitution; a Revolution in favour of the Jacobins; or the Restoration of Gallic Royalty?'

Morning Herald

1967. September 22, 1795 Westminster Forum

SHAM PATRIOTS

'Which is hardest to be found – Honesty among Lawyers; Piety among Divines; or Patriotism among the public Professors of Liberty?

We can only say, that we revere real Patriotism; but we esteem it a Duty to hold Pretenders up to public animadversion.'

Morning Chronicle

1968. September 24, 1795 London Forum

'Is it not a duty which every well–wisher of his country owes to its interests, immediately to enter into the London Corresponding Society, while they pursue peaceable and constitutional measures; as the most probable means of procuring a Reform in Parliament, and a termination of the War?'

Morning Chronicle

1969. September 29, 1795 Westminster Forum

'In case of a general Peace, which conduct would a wise and prudent man pursue – emigrate to America – to France – or to remain in England?

We are now approaching the close of a war, the most disgraceful, as to its principle and ruinous as to its tendency, of any in which this country ever was unhappily engaged. The French Revolution must, in case of a general pacification, materially alter the disposition of European politics: what then would be the conduct of any man who valued liberty and safety? would he remain here? or would he emigrate? If he determine on emigration, which must be most eligible to his purpose, and congenial to his opinions, France or America?'

Morning Chronicle

1970. October 1, 1795 London Forum

'Is it not a duty which every well–wisher of his country owes to its interests, immediately to enter into the London Corresponding Society, while they pursue peaceable and constitutional measures; as the most probable means of procuring a Reform in Parliament, and a termination of the War?'

Morning Chronicle

1971. October 6, 1795 Westminster Forum

PITT UNDER PETTICOAT GOVERNMENT

'Which is most likely to subdue the Obstinacy and tame the untoward Disposition of the British Minister – a Peace – a Reform – or a Marriage?

Safe from the Bar, the Pulpit, and the Throne;

Yet touch'd and sham'd by Ridicule alone.

So sung Pope of one of the most distinguished characters of his days. How far the pointed ridicule of the above question may succeed with the Minister is not for us to determine.'

Morning Chronicle

1972. October 8, 1795 London Forum

'Which is the greater Trial of Female fortitude – the Loss of a Lover, or the Death of a Husband?'

Morning Herald

1973. October 13, 1795 Westminster Forum

'With all the acknowledged defects of the British Constitution, is it not a far more happy and secure Form of Government, than that now adopted by the French Nation?

In times like the present when the public mind is agitated on the one hand, by the dire effects of a wicked and inefficient Administration, and on the other, by the fine spun theories of visionary Politicians, it becomes every one who reveres the British Constitution, and among the most zealous of its votaries we would wish to rank ourselves, to point out its abuses, but to defend its glorious principle, its equal laws, its distributive justice.'

Morning Chronicle

1974. October 15, 1795 London Forum

'Is there any real Foundation for a belief in the Devil?

At the particular desire of several Persons, who were disappointed of admission when this question was discussed at the Westminster Forum, the Managers of this Society have consented to its adoption.'

Morning Herald

1975. October 20, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Do the avowed Principles and Political conduct of Mr. Fox entitle him to the Confidence and Support of the real Friends to the Rights and Liberties of Man?

We are authorised by Mr. Jones to announce, that his conduct at the late Meeting of Mr. Fox's Friends, which has been so much vilified, shall be vindicated by himself. Let the diurnal Retailers of Slander forsake their Garrets, meet that Gentleman before the Public, and either substantiate their assertions or apologise for their abuse.'

Morning Chronicle

1976. October 22, 1795 London Forum

A SHILLING FOR A QUARTERN LOAF!

'Ought the present high price of bread to be attributed to a scarcity of grain – a secret monopoly – or the unavoidable consequences of the war?

After the abundant harvest which report says we have experienced, what is the reason why bread is continued at one shill. per quartern loaf? – Does it rest with the earth – farmers and dealers in grain – or with the war and the minister?. . . While they most carefully avoid everything calculated to heat the public mind, they will not shrink back, with cowardly apprehension, from necessary investigation, like the present.'

Morning Chronicle

1977. October 27, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Is it more probable, that the Public Meeting of the London Corresponding Society, will accelerate or retard the Cause of Reform?

Several leading Members of the Corresponding Society, and many distinguished Gentlemen of opposite principles, will assuredly address the audience; and, if reliance can be placed on letters received, a strong opposition will be made to this meeting, as both ill-timed and dangerous. – The Managers recommend moderation, and an early attendance, to all parties.'

Morning Chronicle

1978. October 29, 1795 London Forum

'Which is most entitled to the Pity and Commiseration of Mankind – Mary Queen of Scots, or Antoinette of France?'

Morning Herald

1979. November 3, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Do the avowed Principles and Political conduct of Mr. Fox intitle him to the Confidence and Support of the real Friends to the Rights and Liberties of Man?'

Morning Chronicle

1980. November 5, 1795 London Forum

'Which of the three grand National Events has most contributed to the Happiness and Liberties of this Country, the discovery of the Powder Plot, on the Fifth of November; the Landing of King William, on the Fifth of November; or the Acquital of Thomas Hardy on the Fifth of November?

Mr. Jones has promised to open the Question; and Mr. Bull will deliver an Ode suited to the occasion.'

Morning Chronicle

1981. November 10, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Do the avowed Principles and Political conduct of Mr. Fox entitle him to the Confidence and Support of the real Friends to the Rights and Liberties of Man?

The decision . . . was (by a considerable majority) that Mr. Fox is justly entitled to the confidence and support of the British Nation.'

Morning Chronicle

1982. November 12, 1795 London Forum

'Is it not contrary to Reason and Propriety; that Women should rule in Families?'

Morning Chronicle

1983. November 17, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Is not the prohibition of public discussion, a violation of the spirit of a free constitution?'

Morning Chronicle

1984. November 21, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Is it most probable that the atrocious Insults offered to his Majesty originated in the unredressed Calamities of the Poor – the meetings of the London Corresponding Society – or the vile Artifices of Administration to create a pretext for passing the Convention Bill?

It being very uncertain how many more nights this Society will be permitted to assemble on political subjects, all apology for deviating from the usual evening is unnecessary. With due gratitude for past favours, the Managers now offer the public opportunity to investigate the true source of the transaction.'

Morning Chronicle

1985. November 28, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Ought the Public Debating Societies and the late Meetings at Copenhagen House to be supported, as friendly to the Rights of the People; or suppressed, as the Causes of the Insult offered to His Majesty, and justifiable Reasons for introducing the Convention Bill?'

Morning Chronicle

1986. December 1, 1795 Westminster Forum

NO PITT! NO WAR!

'Is it not the duty of every Friend to the Constitution to petition his Majesty for the immediate Removal of the Minister, and the Discontinuance of the War?'

Morning Chronicle

1987. December 5, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Which ought to be deemed the most injurious Libel on the British Constitution – Mr. Paine's Rights of Man; or the late Pamphlet attributed to Mr. Reeves?'

Morning Chronicle

1988. December 8, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Are not the most probable Means left of saving the Country from the Despotism of the Minister – an immediate Junction of the Whig Interest and the Corresponding Society?'

Morning Chronicle

1989. December 12, 1795 Westminster Forum

'Are not the most probable Means left of saving the Country from the Despotism of the Minister – an immediate Junction of the Whig Interest and the Corresponding Society?

The above Question must be decided This Evening; after which the following important theme will be produced, viz. "Is not the present moment the proper time to conclude a permanent and honourable peace with the French Republic?" – We suppose this will be the Last Political Question that can be debated, before the two Bills now pending in Parliament pass into Law. The strict observance of order is enjoined. The numerous list of disputants that propose to address the Chair, are entreated to observe candour and moderation in their remarks. Thus will this Society have to publish in the face of the country, that to the very last it persevered in exercising a Constitutional Right, without giving one real ground of accusation on which its deliberation should be suspended.'

Morning Chronicle

1990. December 19, 1795 Westminster Forum

[LAST EVENING OF POLITICS]

MR. PITT'S IMPEACHMENT

'Is it not a duty which the House of Commons owe to the People immediately to impeach the Minister?'

Morning Chronicle