William and Mary, 1688
An Act for Establishing the Coronation Oath. [Chapter VI. Rot. Parl. pt. 5. nu. 3.]

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History of Parliament Trust

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John Raithby (editor)

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1819

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56-57

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'William and Mary, 1688: An Act for Establishing the Coronation Oath. [Chapter VI. Rot. Parl. pt. 5. nu. 3.]', Statutes of the Realm: volume 6: 1685-94 (1819), pp. 56-57. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=46292 Date accessed: 28 August 2014.


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Oath heretofore framed in doubtful Words.

Whereas by the Law and Ancient Usage of this Realme the Kings and Queens thereof have taken a Solemne Oath upon the Evangelists at Their respective Coronations to maintaine the Statutes Laws and Customs of the said Realme and all the People and Inhabitants thereof in their Spirituall and Civill Rights and Properties BUT forasmuch as the Oath itselfe on such Occasion Administred hath heretofore beene framed in doubtfull Words and Expressions with relation to ancient Laws and Constitutions at this time unknowne To the end therefore that One Uniforme Oath may be in all Times to come taken by the Kings and Queens of this Realme and to Them respectively Administred at the times of Their and every of Their Coronation.

II. Oath hereafter mentioned to be administered,

by the Archbishop of Canterbury, &c.

May it please Your Majesties That it may be Enacted And bee it Enacted by the King and Queens most Excellent Majestyes by and with the Advice and Consent of the Lords Spirituall and Temporall and the Commons in this p[re]sent Parlyament Assembled and by the Authoritie of the same That the Oath herein Mentioned and hereafter Expressed shall and may be Administred to their most Excellent Majestyes King William and Queene Mary (whome God long preserve) at the time of Their Coronation in the presence of all Persons that shall be then and there present at the Solemnizeing thereof by the Archbishop of Canterbury or the Archbishop of Yorke or either of them or any other Bishop of this Realme whome the King's Majesty shall thereunto appoint and who shall be hereby thereunto respectively Authorized which Oath followeth and shall be Administred in this Manner That is to say,

III. Form of Oath and Administration thereof.

The Arch-Bishop or Bishop shall say,

Will You solemnely Promise and Sweare to Governe the People of this Kingdome of England and the Dominions thereto belonging according to the Statutes in Parlyament Agreed on and the Laws and Customs of the same?
The King and Queene shall say,
I solemnly Promise soe to doe.
Arch Bishop or Bishop,
Will You to Your power cause Law and Justice in Mercy to be Executed in all Your Judgements.
King and Queene,
I will.
Arch Bishop or Bishop.

Will You to the utmost of Your power Maintaine the Laws of God the true Profession of the Gospell and the Protestant Reformed Religion Established by Law? And will You Preserve unto the Bishops and Clergy of this Realme and to the Churches committed to their Charge all such Rights and Priviledges as by Law doe or shall appertaine unto them or any of them.
King and Queene.
All this I Promise to doe.
After this the King and Queene laying His and Her Hand upon the Holy Gospells, shall say,
King and Queene
The things which I have here before promised I will performe and Keepe Soe help me God.
Then the King and Queene shall kisse the Booke.

IV. Oath to be administered to all future Kings and Queens.

And bee it further Enacted That the said Oath shall be in like manner Administred to every King or Queene who shall Succeede to the Imperiall Crowne of this Realme at their respective Coronations by one of the Archbishops or Bishops of this Realme of England for the time being to be thereunto appointed by such King or Queene respectively and in the Presence of all Persons that shall be Attending Assisting or otherwise present at such their respective Coronations Any Law Statute or Usage to the contrary notwithstanding.