Gaer - Gelludie

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis

Year published

1849

Supporting documents

Pages

356-358

Citation Show another format:

'Gaer - Gelludie', A Topographical Dictionary of Wales (1849), pp. 356-358. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=47827 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

G

Gaer

GAER a township, in the parish of CastleCaer-Einion, within the liberties of the borough of Welshpool, locally situated in the Upper division of the hundred of Cawrse, county of Montgomery, North Wales, 3 miles (W.) from Welshpool; containing 82 inhabitants.

Garn

GARN, a hamlet, in the parish of Llandebie, union of Llandilo-Vawr, Upper division of the hundred of Iscennen, county of Carmarthen, South Wales, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from LlandiloVawr: the population is included in the return for the parish. It lies on the right bank, and near the head of the river Loughor.

Garn

GARN, a township, in the parish of Llanvawr, poor-law union of Bala, hundred of Penllyn, county of Merioneth, North Wales; containing 161 inhabitants.

Garth

GARTH, with Ystrad, a township, in the parish of Llandewy-Brevi, union of Trêgaron, Upper division of the hundred of Penarth, county of Cardigan, South Wales, on the banks of the river Teivy; containing 90 inhabitants. The tithes, payable to the perpetual curate of Llandewy-Brevi, have been commuted for a rent-charge of £67.

Garth

GARTH, a hamlet, in the parish of Llanvabon, union of Merthyr-Tydvil, hundred of Caerphilly, county of Glamorgan, South Wales, 8 miles (S. S. E.) from Merthyr-Tydvil; containing 1209 inhabitants. The parochial church is situated in this hamlet, which forms the western portion of the parish. It has much elevated ground, rising above the left bank of the Tâf, and the canal and road from Merthyr-Tydvil to Cardiff both pass here: the river and canal are crossed by bridges on the road to Aberdare; and, immediately adjoining, the canal is conveyed over the Tâf by a well-executed aqueduct. The Tâf-Vale railway, also, passes at no great distance. Many respectable residences lie scattered in different parts.

Garth

GARTH, a hamlet, in the parish, borough, and poor-law union of Merthyr-Tydvil, county of Glamorgan, South Wales 1 mile (N.) from Merthyr-Tydvil; containing 6957 inhabitants. It extends close to the town of Merthyr-Tydvil, the road from that place to Abergavenny passing through it over Blaen-Romney common; and is principally inhabited by workmen employed at iron-works and in coal-mines. The remains of Morlais Castle, an account of which is given in the article on the parish, and the modern mansion of Cyvarthva Castle, with its park, are both situated in this hamlet, which is well wooded on the banks of the Lesser Tâf. Immediately below the ruins of Morlais Castle this river, which foams impetuously over its rocky bed, is crossed by Pont Sarn, a picturesque bridge thrown over a chasm fringed with underwood, thirty feet in breadth. In the limestone rock, a little above the bridge, is a hollow, called Dryford cavern, into which a spring falls from above, in times of flood flowing over, and forming a picturesque cascade.

Garth

GARTH, a hamlet, in the parish of Guilsfield, hundred of Pool, county of Montgomery, North Wales, 2 miles (N.) from Welshpool; containing 252 inhabitants. It lies contiguous to the village of Guilsfield, on the south-west, and a part of it is within the liberties of the borough of Welshpool. There are many respectable residences in different parts of the hamlet, the principal of which is an elegant modern mansion, erected in an early style of English architecture, by the late Rev. Richard Mytton, at a great expense. The impropriate tithes of this hamlet and the hamlets of Gungrog-Vechan and Trêlydan, payable to the Dean and Chapter of Christ Church, Oxford, have been commuted for a rent-charge of £211. 10., and the vicarial tithes for one of £72.

Garth-Beibio

GARTH-BEIBIO, a parish, in the union of Llanvyllin, Upper division of the hundred of Mathraval, county of Montgomery, North Wales, 9 miles (N. W. by W.) from Llanvair-CaerEinion, on the road to Machynlleth; containing 383 inhabitants. This place derives its name from Garth, a ness or promontory, and Peibio, the name of some chieftain of whom nothing is known. It is situated in a hilly district, and is bounded on the north, east, and south by the parish of Llangedvan, and on the west by the parishes of Mallwyd and Cemmes. The parish comprises 7200 acres, of which 4500 are common or waste; there are ten acres of woodland, chiefly fir and birch. The soil is clayey and wet, in some parts boggy and peaty; the upper lands produce oats, and the lower are chiefly pasture, supporting sheep and cattle: butter constitutes part of the disposable produce of the parish. Woollen goods are prepared to a small extent, and a few persons are employed in a corn-mill. The rivers Twrch and Banwy, which unite just below the church, form an interesting feature in the local scenery, and the hills that rise in various directions command finely diversified prospects of the surrounding country.

The living is a discharged rectory, rated in the king's books at £6. 1. 8., and endowed with £200 royal bounty; patron, the Bishop of St. Asaph: the tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £119; and there is a glebe-house, with a glebe of twenty-seven acres. The church, dedicated to St. Tydecho, and supposed to have been originally built about the sixth century, is thirty-six feet in length and twenty-one in breadth, and contains seventy benches, the sittings of which are appropriated to the respective farms and cottages. Near it is St. Tydecho's Well, constructed for a cold bath, the water being considered efficacious in rheumatic and other disorders; formerly every one who bathed in the well, or drank the water, dropped a pin into it, and it was deemed sacrilege to take any of the pins out. Divers bequests have been made for the benefit of the poor, varying in amount from £1 to £20, and producing altogether £61: this sum was lent to the trustees of the second district of the Montgomeryshire turnpike-road, as a mortgage on the tolls, and bears an interest of five per cent., the amount of which, £3. 1., is distributed among poor persons, 10s. being given to the most needy person who has received the least parochial relief, according to the will of one of the donors. There are several cairns in the parish.

Garthbrengy, or Gallt-Brengy (Garth-Brengi)

GARTHBRENGY, or GALLT-BRENGY (GARTH-BRENGI), a parish, partly in the hundred of Merthyr-Cynog, and partly in that of Pencelly, union and county of Brecknock, South Wales, 2½ miles (N.) from Brecknock, on the road to Builth; containing 162 inhabitants. This place until lately constituted a prebend in the Collegiate Church of Christ at Brecknock, rated in the king's books at £3. 6. 8. It is situated on the banks of the river Honddû, in a retired part of the county, the scenery of which is pleasingly varied: the banks of the Honddû present many wooded knolls, which have a beautifully picturesque appearance. The parish comprises about 2000 acres, whereof 262 are common or waste land: the soil generally is well adapted for all kinds of agricultural produce. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £400 royal bounty, and £200 parliamentary grant: net income, £79; patron, the Bishop of St. David's. The tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £200. 16. 6. The church, dedicated to St. David, and situated on an eminence overlooked on the north by a mountain of loftier elevation, was rebuilt in 1834, with the exception of the tower at the west end, containing four bells, which was allowed to remain; the roof, now single, was before double, as there was a north aisle of equal breadth with the nave: the edifice contains 165 sittings. This parish is entitled to participate in the benefits of Games's Hospital in Brecon, but seldom enjoys the advantage, there being so many claimants from St. John the Evangelist's and St. David's parishes on the list, who have the preference under the grant of the benefactress.

Gartheli

GARTHELI, a chapelry, in the parish of Llandewy-Brevi, poor-law union of Trêgaron, Lower division of the hundred of Penarth, county of Cardigan, South Wales, 6 miles (N. by W.) from Lampeter; containing 315 inhabitants. This chapelry contains several respectable residences, and is situated on elevated ground above the Vale of the Aëron, with the Meiric brook flowing into the Teivy at the bottom, over which the prospects are pleasing and picturesque. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £1000 royal bounty; net income, £60 per annum; patron, the Perpetual Curate of Llandewy-Brevi.

Garthewin

GARTHEWIN, a hamlet, in the parish of Llanvair-Talhairn, union of St. Asaph, hundred of Isdulas, county of Denbigh, North Wales, 6 miles (S. by W.) from Abergele; containing 76 inhabitants. It lies on the northern bank of the small river Elwy, and contains an elegant mansion of its own name, the seat of a younger branch of the Wynnes of Melai, which commands a beautiful view of the rich but narrow Vale of Elwy, environed by well-wooded hills. An extensive paddock, well stocked with deer, lies at the back of the mansion; the park is nearly three miles in length. The tithes of Garthewin and four other places have been commuted for a rent-charge of £260.

Garthgarmon

GARTHGARMON, a parochial chapelry, in the union of Llanrwst, hundred of Isdulas, county of Denbigh, North Wales, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Llanrwst; containing 728 inhabitants. This chapelry, also called Capel Garmon, comprises a considerable extent of rugged and barren hills. It contains lead-ore, but the works for procuring it have been discontinued of late years. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £400 royal bounty, and £800 parliamentary grant; total net income, £110; patron, the Rector of Llanrwst. The chapel, dedicated to St. Germanus, and originally a chapel of ease, is of very ancient foundation. The present edifice was built in 1789, near the site of the former chapel, which had fallen into decay, and the burialground was at the same time considerably enlarged; the building is fifty-two feet in length, and twentytwo in width, and contains accommodation for 210 persons. Thomas Wynne, Esq., of Llwynau, in 1677, gave certain lands for the benefit of a minister or curate in holy orders, requiring him to read divine service, &c., and teach ten poor children in the chapel. It is also stated in the Vestry-book, under the date of 1741, that Ann ach Richard bequeathed £10 to the poor, and Morris Hughes £70 for bread, but these two latter gifts are lost, and the only benefit now derived by the poor arises from £3. 5. annually accruing from the charities of Llanrwst parish, of which 30s. are distributed in bread, and the remainder in clothing, forming a portion of the bequests of John Salusbury and Morris Davis. The minister receives a stipend of £20 per annum from the incumbent of Llanrwst, pursuant to act of parliament; although, as regards the performance of ecclesiastical rites, the chapel is entirely independent of the church of Llanrwst. There are places of worship for Calvinistic Methodists, Independents, and Wesleyan Methodists, with a Sunday school held in each of them.

Garthgynyd (Garth-Gynnud)

GARTHGYNYD (GARTH-GYNNUD), a hamlet, in the parish of Gellygaer, union of Merthyr-Tydvil, hundred of Caerphilly, county of Glamorgan, South Wales, 6¾ miles (S. E.) from Merthyr-Tydvil; containing 127 inhabitants. This hamlet occupies a portion of the bleak and barren elevated ground between the rivers Romney and the Bargoed Tâf.

Gellideg (Gelli-Dêg)

GELLIDEG (GELLI-DÊG), a hamlet, in the parish, borough, and union of Merthyr-Tydvil, hundred of Caerphilly, county of Glamorgan, South Wales, 3 miles from Merthyr-Tydvil; containing 4798 inhabitants. It is situated on the bank of the Tâf Vawr, and is principally inhabited by workmen employed in iron-works and coal-mines. There are some well-wooded inclosures scattered over its surface.—See Merthyr-Tydvil.

Gelludie (Gelli-Ddû)

GELLUDIE (GELLI-DDÛ), with Llwynswch, a hamlet, in the parish of Llandarog, Upper division of the hundred of Iscennen, union and county of Carmarthen, South Wales 9 miles (E. by S.) from Carmarthen; containing 202 inhabitants. It is situated on the Gwendraeth Vâch river; and to the north lies the splendid demesne of Middleton Hall, the numerous beauties of which contribute greatly to adorn the scenery, and are viewed in harmonious design from this place.



<--Previous:
Flint - Freystrop
Next:-->
Gelly - Glyn