Appendix
Parliamentary boroughs of Wales

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis

Year published

1849

Supporting documents

Pages

449-455

Citation Show another format:

'Appendix: Parliamentary boroughs of Wales', A Topographical Dictionary of Wales (1849), pp. 449-455. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=47893 Date accessed: 22 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Contents

APPENDIX.
No. I. CONTAINING AN ALPHABETICAL LIST of the PARLIAMENTARY BOROUGHS OF WALES; with the BOUNDARIES OF EACH, AS DEFINED BY THE LEGISLATURE, IN 1832. BOUNDARIES OF BOROUGHS. Aberavon.—Vol. I. 4. Aberystwith.—Vol. I. 18. Amlwch.—Vol. I. 25. Asaph, St.—Vol. I. 45. Atpar.—Vol. I. 52. Bangor.—Vol. I. 56. Beaumaris.—Vol. I. 70. Brecknock.—Vol. I. 95. Caergwyrle, or Hope.—Vol. I. 436. Caerwys.—Vol. I. 146. Cardiff.—Vol. I. 151. Cardigan.—Vol. I. 158. Carmarthen.—Vol. I. 180. Carnarvon.—Vol. I. 202. Cnwclas.—Vol. I. 251. Conway.—Vol. I. 254. Cowbridge.—Vol. I. 262. Criccieth.—Vol. I. 266. Denbigh.—Vol. I. 288. Fishguard.—Vol. I. 336. Flint.—Vol. I. 338. Haverfordwest.—Vol. I. 402. Holt.—Vol. I. 421. Holyhead.—Vol. I. 422. Holywell.—Vol. I. 430. Kenvig.—Vol. I. 446. Kevenlleece.—Vol. I. 449. Knighton.—Vol. I. 458. Lampeter.—Vol. I. 460. Llanelly.—Vol. II. 11. Llangevni.—Vol. II. 37. Llanidloes.—Vol. II. 65. Llantrissent.—Vol. II. 105. Llanvyllin.—Vol. II. 151. Loughor.—Vol. II. 176. Machynlleth.—Vol. II. 179. Merthyr-Tydvil.—Vol. II. 208. Milford.—Vol. II. 215. Mold.—Vol. II. 218. Montgomery.—Vol. II. 223. Narberth.—Vol. II. 244. Neath.—Vol. II. 246. Nevin.—Vol. II. 252. Newtown.—Vol. II. 264. Overton.—Vol. II. 271. Pembroke.—Vol. II. 275. Presteign.—Vol. II. 324. Pwllheli.—Vol. II. 328. Radnor, New.—Vol. II. 331. Rhaiadr.—Vol. II. 346. Rhuddlan.—Vol. II. 352. Ruthin.—Vol. II. 364. Swansea.—Vol. II. 376. Tenby.—Vol. II. 390. Welshpool.—Vol. II. 420. Wiston.—Vol. II. 432. Wrexham.—Vol. II. 434.

APPENDIX.

No. I. CONTAINING AN ALPHABETICAL LIST of the PARLIAMENTARY BOROUGHS OF WALES; with the BOUNDARIES OF EACH, AS DEFINED BY THE LEGISLATURE, IN 1832.

The number attached to the name of each place refers to the page in the work in which the Borough is described.

BOUNDARIES OF BOROUGHS.

Aberavon.—Vol. I. 4.

From the point on the south of the town at which the river Avon falls into the sea, northward, along the eastern boundary of the hamlet of Havod-y-Porth, to that part in a stone fence which is immediately opposite a small round pool; thence along the fence to the spot where the same meets a lane or path leading to a small cottage; thence along such lane to the ford across a brook exactly opposite Margam chapel; thence along the road to Dyfryn-Uchav to the point at which the same meets the railway from the Tai-Bâch copperworks to Michaelston; thence, northward, along the railway to the point at which the same crosses a small stream running into the river Avon; thence along the stream to the point where the same falls into the Avon; thence in a straight line to the spot at which a stream that flows through the Cwm-Bychan ravine falls into the Avon; thence along the last-mentioned stream to the place where the same meets the boundary of the parish of Baglan; thence, southward, along the boundary of Baglan to the point at which it meets the boundary of the parish of Aberavon; thence, westward, along the boundary of Aberavon to the point at which the boundary of the municipal borough leaves the same; thence along the boundary of the municipal borough to the point at which the same joins the boundary of the hamlet of Havod-y-Porth; thence, southward, along the boundary of Havod-y-Porth to the point first named.

Aberystwith.—Vol. I. 18.

Commencing at the outermost point of the rock Graiglais on the sea-coast, visible from the point next described, straight to the northern extremity of the stone wall which divides the land called Pant-y-Gyrn from the land termed Vròn; thence along the wall to the point at which the same meets the wall that separates Pant-y-Gyrn from the land Vròn-Uchav; thence, eastward, along the boundary of Vròn-Uchav to the turnstile at the south-eastern corner thereof; thence straight to the mill in the tan-yard near the road leading to Llanbadarn-Vawr; thence in a right line to the wooden dam just above Plâs Greig; thence, southward, along the boundary of the old borough to the sea coast; thence along the coast to the point first mentioned.

Amlwch.—Vol. I. 25.

Commencing at the point on the north-east of the town where the Rhyd Talog brook falls into the sea at Porth Aber Cawell, southward, along the boundary of the parish of Amlwch to the point called Croes Eilian; thence along the Plâs Dulas road to the point named Penllaethdy-Mawr; thence along the road to Pentre Velin, across the Llanerchymedd road, to the point designated Pentre Velin Adda cross roads; thence along a road towards Pary's farm to the point at which the same is met by the first bye road on the right leading to Bôdgadva farm; thence along the bye road, passing Bôdgadva farm, to the point at which the bye road is intersected (between Bôdgadva farm and a cottage styled Yr hên Odyn) by the Lastre brook; thence along the brook, crossing the Holyhead road, to the spot where the brook falls into the river termed Avon Park Llechog; thence along the Avon Park Llechog to a ford in the Cemmes road called Rhyd-carreg-cath; thence along the Cemmes road to the cottage named Bryn-y-Cyll, at which the road is met by the church pathway; thence along the pathway to the stile over a brook that divides the land of the Marquess of Anglesey from the Coed Helen and Llŷsdulas property, which stile is close by a spring designated Casyris; thence along the brook to the point at which the same is met by a boundary fence (a few yards north of a cottage styled Cae-Bâch) running in the direction of Mona mill; thence along the fence to the point at which the same cuts the Porth Llechog road; thence, towards Amlwch, along the road, to the place at which the same is met by the Fynnon-y-Garreg-Vawr pathway; thence along the pathway to the spring termed Fynnon-y-GarregVawr; thence along the stream that proceeds from the spring to the point at which the stream falls into the sea; thence along the sea to the point first noticed.

Asaph, St.—Vol. I. 45.

Commencing at the point at the north-west of the town where the boundary of the township of Talar meets the river Elwy, westward, along the boundary of Talar, to the Green Gate bridge over the brook Nanty-Vranol; thence along the brook to the place at which the same meets the Holyhead road; thence, eastward, along the road to the point where the same is met by the boundary of Talar; thence, eastward, along the Talar boundary to the point where the same joins the boundary of the township of Bryn Paulin; thence, southward, along the boundary of Bryn Paulin to the point where the same meets the upper Denbigh road; thence, northward, along the road to the point at which the same is met by a lane leading to Ysguborgoed; thence along such lane to the spot at which the same meets the river Clwyd; thence along the river to the place at which the same is met by the southern boundary of the township of Cyrchynan; thence in a right line to the point first noticed.

Atpar.—Vol. I. 52.

The municipal borough of Atpar, in the parish of Llandyvriog; and the hamlet of Emlyn, in the parish of Kenarth.

Bangor.—Vol. I. 56.

From the point on the north-east of the town where the road from the park wall of Penrhyn Castle to the Menai straits joins the straits at the high-water mark, along the road to the place at which the same meets the park wall; thence, westward, along the wall to the entrance gate to the Lime Grove; thence straight across the road to the nearest point in the boundary wall immediately opposite, which bounds a field belonging to Lime Grove; thence along the boundary wall to the spot where the river Cegin enters the grounds of Mr. Pennant; thence along the river to the bridge over the Shrewsbury road; thence straight to a square brick seat or monument, situate on a knoll in a field called Cae Pant; thence straight to the nearest point of the road to Velin Esgob; thence in a right line to the nearest point of the road to Brynniau; thence direct to the spot where the road from Bangor to the Menai bridge leaves the road from Bangor to Carnarvon; thence along the road to the bridge, in the direction of such bridge, to the gate on the right-hand side which opens into an occupation road leading to Pen'rallt; thence straight to the point at which the low-water mark in the Straits of Menai would be cut by a right line drawn from the gate last named to the Llandegvan windmill, which is on the opposite side of the straits; thence along the low-water mark to the point thereof which is nearest to the point first described; thence straight to the point first described.

Beaumaris.—Vol. I. 70.

The same as the municipal borough.

Brecknock.—Vol. I. 95.

The municipal borough of Brecknock, and the extraparochial districts of the Castle and Christ's College.

Caergwyrle, or Hope.—Vol. I. 436.

The same as the municipal borough.

Caerwys.—Vol. I. 146.

The same as the municipal borough.

Cardiff.—Vol. I. 151.

The old municipal borough of Cardiff; and so much, if any, of the respective parishes of St. John and St. Mary, as lies without the old borough.

Cardigan.—Vol. I. 158.

The old borough of Cardigan; and also Bridgend and Abbey hamlets in the parish of St. Dogmael's, county of Pembroke.

Carmarthen.—Vol. I. 180.

The same as the municipal borough.

Carnarvon.—Vol. I. 202.

The same as the municipal borough.

Cnwclas.—Vol. I. 251.

The same as the municipal borough.

Conway.—Vol. I. 254.

The same as the municipal borough.

Cowbridge.—Vol. I. 262.

The same as the municipal borough.

Criccieth.—Vol. I. 266.

The same as the municipal borough.

Denbigh.—Vol. I. 288.

The same as the municipal borough.

Fishguard.—Vol. I. 336.

Commencing at the point at which the low-water mark would be cut by a right line drawn thereto from the gate of the fort, through the eastern extremity of the southern wall of the fort, straight to the said gate; thence direct to the north-western corner of Parc-y-Morva meadow; thence along the western fence of the meadow to the south-western corner thereof; thence straight to the highest point of Parc-y-Morva rock; thence in a right line to the north-western corner of the fence that divides the Glyn Amel property from the lands of Mr. Vaughan; thence, southward, along the fence to the point where the same meets the northern stream of the river Gwain; thence up the stream to the point at which the same joins the boundary of the old borough; thence, eastward, along the line of the old borough to the spot where the same meets the lowwater mark; thence, eastward, along the water mark to the point first named.

Flint.—Vol. I. 338.

The same as the municipal borough.

Haverfordwest.—Vol. I. 402.

The boundary commences at the point at which a right line drawn from Saint Thomas's Church to the gate at the north-eastern corner of the field called Hill Park cuts the boundary of the old borough, along such line to the said gate; thence straight to the gate that crosses the road leading to Scotch Well House; thence along the road to the point at which the same reaches Scotch Well House; thence along the road that leads by Sandpool into the Cardigan road to the north-eastern corner of Sandpool; thence direct to the cottage of Philip White; thence in a right line to the left pier of the weir on the river Cleddy; thence along the river to the point at which the same would be cut by a straight line from Prendergast Church to the gate leading from the lane on the north-east of Little Slade farm into the paddock of that farm; thence direct to the gate; thence in a right line to the point at which the boundary of the old borough would be intersected by a line from the gate to the point at which the Poorfield road (otherwise Jury lane) leaves Saint David's road; thence, westward, along the boundary of the old borough to the point first mentioned.

Holt.—Vol. I. 421.

The same as the municipal borough.

Holyhead.—Vol. I. 422.

Commencing at that part of the common called "The Towyn," on the south-east of the Towyn, which is nearest to Holyhead common, along the road to Penrhôs which adjoins the Towyn, (and is to the east of a cottage termed "Pen Towyn,") to the point at which the road is met by another to a piece of waste land styled "The Cyttir;" thence along the road to the Cyttir to the point at which the same meets one that leads across the Cyttir; thence along the said road across the Cyttir to the point at which the same runs into the old post road to Bangor; thence along the old post road to Pentraeth; thence along the road which leads from Pentraeth in a western direction, and south of the new brewery, to the point at which the same joins another; thence, northward, along the road so joined to the spot at which the same meets the Penrhôs Voila road; thence along the Penrhôs Voila road to the place where the same runs into the road that leads by the Ucheldre windmill to the South Stack; thence along the road to the South Stack, including the messuage, with offices and garden, to the westernmost point (near a cottage called "Cerrig-y-Lloi") at which the same is crossed by a stream from the Holyhead mountain; thence along the stream to the point where it falls into the sea; thence along the coast to that part thereof which is nearest to the point first noticed; thence straight to the point first noticed.

Holywell.—Vol. I. 430.

Commencing at the boundary stone on the hill Pen-y Bryn, and on the western side of the hedge (which is between the cottage occupied by William Williams and the south-eastern corner of the plantation of Richard Sankey, Esquire), straight to the boundary stone of the township of Holywell which is on the eastern side of the St. Asaph road; thence direct to a bridge (in the lane leading to and past Greenfield Hall) over a watercourse running into the river Dee; thence, eastward, along the watercourse to the point where it meets the boundary of the township of Greenfield; thence, southward, along the boundary of Greenfield to the spot at which the same meets the Holywell boundary; thence along the eastern and southern or exterior boundary of Holywell to the stone first noticed.

Kenvig.—Vol. I. 446.

The same as the municipal borough.

Kevenlleece.—Vol. I. 449.

The same as the municipal borough.

Knighton.—Vol. I. 458.

The same as the municipal borough.

Lampeter.—Vol. I. 460.

Commencing at the point on the Creithin brook at which the northern limit of the glebe joins the boundary of the old borough, along the northern limit of the glebe to the place at which the same meets again the boundary of the old borough; thence, northward, along the boundary of the old borough to the point first named.

Llanelly.—Vol. II. 11.

Commencing at the point in Wern-y-Goosy meadow on the north-west of the town at which the old course of the stream, which is the old borough boundary, makes a sharp turn, in a straight line to the southern extremity of the western fence of Cae-Mawr Issa field; thence, northward, along the fence to the place where it meets the wall which is the western limit of Furnace Garden; thence along the wall to the spot at which the same meets Pen-y-Vai lane; thence along the lane to the point where the same runs into the Carmarthen road; thence direct to the north-western corner of the garden of Cae-Mawr cottage, lately burnt down; thence along the fence that divides the said garden and the field Cae-Issa from the field Cae-Ucha to the place at which the same meets the fence that separates the Cae-Ucha from Cae-Bank field; thence along the lastmentioned fence to the northern corner of Cae-Bank; thence in a right line through the southern extremity of the north-eastern boundary of Cae-Bank, across the tramroad to the old borough boundary; thence, eastward, along the old boundary to the point first mentioned.

Llangevni.—Vol. II. 37.

The line commences at the point at which the boundary wall between the property of Admiral Lloyd and the lands of Owen Williams, Esquire, meets the old Bangor road, east of a cottage called Min'ffordd, along the wall to the place where the same reaches a spring and a footpath named Llwybyr Tregarnedd-Vâch; thence along a hedge which, running from the spring and footpath, forms a continuation of the line of the wall, and proceeds through the land of John Hampton Lewis, Esquire, to the spot where such hedge meets the river Cevni; thence, southward, along the river to the point at which the same is met by the boundary of the parish of Llangevni; thence, westward, along the boundary of Llangevni to the place where it meets the bye road termed Llidiart-y-Pandy; thence along the road to the spot designated Croeslon-Pen-y-Nant; thence, southward, along the market road to the place at which the same joins the Rhos-y-Meirch road; thence along the Rhos-y-Meirch road to the first point at which the same is cut (beyond the road leading to Clai) by hedges running from each side of the road at right angles; thence along the hedge that proceeds from the last-mentioned point towards Pencraig to the spot at which the same reaches an old quarry; thence along a hedge which runs from the quarry, and forms a continuation of the hedge last described, passing Tŷ'n-y-Coed farm, to the place where the hedge cuts the Llanddyvnan road; thence along the road towards Llanddyvnan, to the point at which the same meets the boundary of the Pencraig-Vawr farm; thence, southward, along the boundary of the farm to the spot where it joins the old Bangor road; thence along the road to the point first noticed.

Llanidloes.—Vol. II. 65.

Commencing at the point on the south-east of the town where Cwm Jonathan rill crosses the Rhaiadr road, southward, along the rill, to the place at which it is met by the hedge on the right hand which is nearest to the spot where the rill crosses the cart lane from Tŷ-Côch to Llanidloes; thence along the hedge to the point at which it meets the Tŷ-Côch stream; thence along the stream to the place where the same reaches the Llangurig road; thence, northward, along the road to the spot where the same is cut by the nearest hedge on the left hand; thence along the hedge to the point at which the same reaches a water-cut bank; thence, southward, along the bank to the place where the same reaches a hedge running in the direction of the turnpike on the Plinlimmon road; thence along the hedge to the point at which the same reaches the river Severn; thence along the river to the spot where the same is cut by a line drawn thereto in continuation of the direction of the hedge on the northern end of Pen-y-Green; thence along the line, and along the hedge in continuation whereof it is drawn, to the point at which such hedge joins the hedge of Mr. Price's wood.

The boundary next proceeds, from the spot last named, straight to the place where the stream called Cevn Cummere dingle meets the Pen-y-Bank road; thence along the dingle to the spot at which the same joins the Clywedog river; thence, westward, along the boundary of the township of Kîlmachalt to the point where the same meets a small watercourse that runs along the western edge of Berth Lwyd coppice; thence along the watercourse to the place where the same reaches the lane from Llanidloes to Gorn; thence, westward, along the lane to the spot at which the same reaches the hedge that bounds the eastern side of the Chapel House; thence along the hedge to the point where the same reaches Lletty-Côch-y-Nant brook; thence, westward, along the brook to the place at which the same is met on the left hand by a small stream; thence along the last-mentioned stream to the spring from which the same proceeds; thence direct to the nearest spot in the road from Llanidloes to the Barn Leasow; thence, westward, along the road to the point at which the same meets the boundary of the borough of Llanidloes; thence, southward, along the borough to the point at which the same meets Cwm Jonathan rill; thence along the rill to the point first noticed.

Llantrissent.—Vol. II. 105.

The same as the municipal borough.

Llanvyllin.—Vol. II. 151.

Commencing at the southern extremity, on the north-west of the town, of the private road that leads from the Llangynog turnpike-road to Bodvach Hall, along the said private way to the point at which the same is met by the boundary of the field Cae Evan Griffith; thence, northward, along the boundary of the field to the place where the same meets the boundary of the field Maes-Ucha; thence, eastward, along the boundary of Maes-Ucha to the spot at which the same meets the limit of the field Cae-Pella Bwlch-y-Llan; thence, northward, along the limit of Cae-Pella Bwlch-y-Llan to the point where the same meets the Llangedwin road; thence along the northern fences of the respective fields Cae-Dû, Cae-Main, and Cae-Dû-Mawr, and along the eastern fence of Cae-Dû-Mawr, to the spot where the last-mentioned fence reaches the Derwlwyn wood; thence in a straight line across the wood to the northern extremity of the eastern fence of Glynie Issa tenement; thence along the fence to the place at which the same meets the Brynelldyn road; thence along the road to the point where the same reaches Green Hall Park; thence, southward, along the boundary of the field Cae'r Vròn to the place where the same meets the boundary of the field Cae'r Gwenithdir; thence, southward, along the boundary of Cae'r Gwenithdir to the spot at which the same meets the river Cain; thence along the river to the bridge called Pont-y-Derwlwyn; thence along Pont-y-Derwlwyn lane to the point at which the same meets the Bachie road; thence along the road to the eastern corner of Garth wood.

After quitting the point just mentioned, the boundary line runs along the south-western fences of the fields Cae'r Garth and Cyvie-Ucha, and of the field Coed Pen-y-Garth, and, westward, along the southern fence of the field Cae Gwenith, to the spot at which such southern fence cuts the occupation road to Pen-yGarth farm; thence, direct to the eastern extremity of the southern fence of the field Llwyn Bricks; thence, westward, along the boundary of Llwyn Bricks to the place where the same joins the fence of the field Cae Bath; thence westward, along the fence to the point at which the same meets the brook Abel; thence along the brook to the spot at which the same is met by the western fence of the easternmost of the fields respectively named Lower Meadow; thence along the western fence of the last-mentioned field to the place at which the same cuts the lane to Tŷ Newedd; thence, northward, along the boundary of the field Llwyn Hîr to the spot where the same touches the boundary of the field Cae-Mawr; thence, northward, along the boundary of Cae-Mawr to the place where the same joins the boundary of the field Cae-Bâch; thence, eastward, along the boundary of Cae-Bâch to the point at which the same meets the boundary of the field Upper Coed Llan; thence, eastward, along the boundary of Upper Coed Llan to the point at which the same meets the boundary of the field Lower Coed Llan; thence, northward, along the boundary of Lower Coed Llan to the spot at which the same meets the occupation road to Pen Coed Llan; thence straight to the point first described.

Loughor.—Vol. II. 176.

The same as the municipal borough.

Machynlleth.—Vol. II. 179.

The township and liberties of Machynlleth; and also that detached part of the township of Is-y-Garreg which adjoins the north-eastern boundary of the liberties.

Merthyr-Tydvil.—Vol. II. 208.

From the point on the north of Merthyr-Tydvil at which the northern boundary of the hamlet of Gellydêg meets the river called the Great Tâf, northward, along the Great Tâf, to the place where the same is cut by the southern fence of Kilsanos common; thence, eastward, along the fence to the spot at which the same cuts the Brecon road; thence, southward, along the road to the point where the same meets the Vainor road; thence, eastward, along the Vainor road to the place at which the same runs into a bye road leading to Cevn-Coedycummer; thence direct to the spot at which the Little Tâf would be intersected by a straight line drawn from the point last described to the southern mouth of a culvert on the eastern side of the Little Tâf; thence, up the Little Tâf, along the boundary of the parish of Merthyr-Tydvil to the place where the Cwm Bargoed stream is joined by a little brook from the Coli ravine; thence in a right line to the northeastern corner of the stone fence of Pendwycae-Vawr farm; thence along the road which passes that farmhouse to the spot at which the same meets the mountain track from Dowlais to Quakers'-Yard; thence, southward, along the track, between the farms of Pendwycae-Vâch and Pendwycae-Vawr, to the point where such track meets a road running nearly due west, by a stone-quarry, to Pen-y-Rhiw Gymra cottage; thence along the road to the place at which the same reaches the southern side of the cottage; thence straight to the spot where the southern boundary of Troed-y-Rhiw farm meets the Cardiff road; thence along the southern boundary to the point at which the same meets the Great Tâf; thence direct to the bridge over the Cardiff canal called Pont-y-Nant Maen; thence, northward, along the canal to the place where the same is intersected by the Cwmdû brook; thence, along the brook to its source; thence in a right line drawn due west to the boundary of the parish of Aberdare; thence, southward, along the boundary of Aberdare to the spot at which the same meets the boundary of the hamlet of Gellydêg; thence, eastward, along the boundary of Gellydêg to the point first named.

Milford.—Vol. II. 215.

Commencing at the point where Prix Pill falls into the sea, along the Pill, to the place at which the same is met by the way coming down by Cwm, and sometimes called Cwm Lane; thence along the lane to the spot where the same meets the road from Haverfordwest; thence along the road to the point at which the same is met by Priory lane; thence along Priory lane to the place where the same runs into, on the left, a road often styled the New road; thence along the New road to the spot at which the same meets White Lady's lane, leading to a field north of the brewery, by some termed Haggard field; thence along White Lady's lane to the point where the same is cut by the fence of Haggard field; thence, northward, along the fence of the field to the north-western corner thereof; thence straight in the direction of the northern fence of the field to Priory Pill; thence in a right line to the white warehouse standing at the head of the rope-walk in Hubberston parish; thence along Spike lane which proceeds from the warehouse to the point at which the same meets Conjwick lane; thence along the lane to the place where the same meets the lane which was lately part of Point field; thence along the lane last noticed to the spot at which the same ends on the common; thence straight through the westernmost point of the Fort to the sea-coast; thence along the coast to the point first mentioned.

Mold.—Vol. II. 218.

The township of Mold.

Montgomery.—Vol. II. 223.

The same as the municipal borough.

Narberth.—Vol. II. 244.

Commencing at the southern end of the turnpikegate house on the Redstone road, westward, along the fence that abuts on the house, and is the northern limit of a field whereof Mr. Thomas Eaton is landlord, to the north-western corner of the field; thence in a right line to the north-eastern corner of a field belonging to Geo. Devonald, Esq., and bounded on the south by the turnpike-road to Haverfordwest; thence along the private road that runs from the last-mentioned field to the point at which the private road meets the road to Haverfordwest; thence straight across the road to Haverfordwest to the place where the same is met by the western boundary of the Town moor; thence, southward, along the western and southern bounds of the moor to the gate of a lane at the south-eastern corner thereof; thence along the lane to the spot at which the same meets the limit of Narberth churchpard; thence, westward, along the limit of the churchyard to the south-western corner thereof; thence direct to the point where the stream from Narberth bridge would be cut by a right line drawn from the point last described to the place at which the road from the parsonage meets the road from Pembroke; thence up the stream to the spot where the same is joined by the rivulet from Narberth mill; thence up the rivulet to the south-western corner of the field of which Baron Rutzen is landlord; thence eastward, along the boundary of the field to the point at which the same meets the southern boundary of the field belonging to Mr. Henry Davies, in which is a turnstile.

Next, the boundary line extends eastward, along the southern boundary of the field of Mr. Davies, and the southern and eastern boundary of an adjoining one, the property of George Phillips, Esq., to the place where the eastern boundary of the field of Mr. Phillips meets the occupation road leading to Blackalder; thence eastward, along the occupation road to the spot at which the same meets the south-eastern boundary of the easternmost of two contiguous fields, of which Daniel Thomas is landlord; thence along the boundary of the last-mentioned land to the point where the same joins the Carmarthen road; thence straight across the road to the south-eastern corner of the field belonging to John Lewis; thence along the eastern boundary of Lewis's field to the place at which the same cuts the Cardigan road; thence direct across the road to the south-western corner of Jesse's Well house; thence straight to the spot where the fence of the grounds attached to the house called Bloomfield's would be intersected by a right line drawn from the point last described to Bloomfield's; thence, westward, along the fence to the place at which the same cuts the Redstone road; thence along the road to the point first noticed.

Neath.—Vol. II. 246.

The boundary begins at the point lowest down the river Neath at which the boundary of the old borough quits the river, along the boundary of the old borough, leaving the river, to the place where Caervwell ditch joins the river; thence along the ditch to the spot at which the same meets the lane called Heol-Morva; thence along the lane to the point where the same joins the high road to Merthyr; thence along the road to the place at which the road to Pont-ar-Tawy leaves the same; thence along the road to Pont-ar-Tawy to the spot where the same is joined by the lane termed Rheoly-Glow; thence along a lane to the point at which the same meets a brook; thence along such brook to the place where the same meets Rheol-Wern-Vraith lane; thence along the lane to the spot at which the same is cut by a fence forming the north-western boundary of Cae-Canddaw field; thence along the fence to the point where the same meets the brook running to Nantlyros; thence along the brook to the place at which the same joins the canal; thence along the canal to the spot where the same crosses the stream Clydach; thence along the stream to the place at which the same joins the Neath; thence along the Neath to the point first noticed.

Nevin.—Vol. II. 252.

The same as the municipal borough.

Newtown.—Vol. II. 264.

The parish of Newtown, and the townships of Hêndidley and Gwestydd in Llanllwchaiarn parish.

Overton.—Vol. II. 271.

The same as the municipal borough.

Pembroke.—Vol. II. 275.

The respective parishes of St. Mary and St. Michael, and also the space comprised within the following boundary (together with all such parts, if any, of the old borough of Pembroke as lie without the said limits):—from the point on the south-west of the town at which the brook called the Taylor's lake meets the boundary of the parish of St. Mary, northward, along the brook to the place where the same joins the Pill near Quoit's mill; thence along the Pill to the spot at which the same meets the boundary of St. Mary's; thence, eastward, along the boundary of St. Mary's to the point first described.

Presteign.—Vol. II. 324.

The ancient lordship, manor, and borough of Presteign, together with such parts, if any, of the township of Presteign, and of the chapelry of Discoed, as are without the lordship, manor, and borough: and also the space included within the following boundary:— from the point on the north of the town at which Norton brook falls into the river Lug, straight to the place where the road to Wigmore and Ludlow is met by that to Kinsham village; thence direct to the spot at which the right hand branch of the Clatter brook falls into the Lug; thence along the Lug to the point first named.

Pwllheli.—Vol. II. 328.

Commencing at the south-western extremity of the boundary of the old borough on the sea-coast, along that boundary (leaving the coast) to the point at which the same is met by a small stream called Avon Goegen; thence along the stream to a bridge termed Sarn, or Pont-Penmaen; thence along the southern branch of the stream to the place where the same meets the boundary of the old borough; thence, northward, along the boundary to the spot at which the same meets a road leading from Denio church into the Carnarvon road; thence along the road from Denio to the point where the same is cut by the fence of a field styled Cae Vynnow, in the occupation of Hugh Williams, of Bryn Crin; thence along the fence to the place at which the same cuts an occupation road leading from Bryn Crin farm-house into the Carnarvon road; thence along the occupation road to the spot where the same joins the Carnarvon road; thence, northward, along the Carnarvon road to the point at which the same is met by a road on the right leading to Abereirch; thence along the road to Abereirch to the place where the same runs into a road from Pwllheli to Trêmadoc; thence in a straight line to the sea, at the nearest point; thence, westward, along the coast to the point first mentioned.

Radnor, New.—Vol. II. 331.

The same as the municipal borough.

Rhaiadr.—Vol. II. 346.

Commencing at the point at which the boundary of the old borough would be intersected by a right line drawn from Rhaiadr church to the bridge over the Gwynllin brook on the new road to Aberystwith, straight to the bridge; thence along the brook to the weir or dam head; thence along the southern bank of the mill dam to the place where the same is cut by the eastern fence of Gwynllin lain field; thence, southward, along the fence to the gate leading into the yard of the grist-mill and woollen-manufactory belonging to David Evans; thence along the road that crosses the yard to another gate at the south-eastern corner thereof; thence direct to the north-eastern corner of the farmhouse called Tŷ-Newydd, or New House; thence straight to the spot at which the boundary of the old borough would be cut by a right line drawn from the new house to the bridge over the river Wye; thence, southward, along the boundary of the old borough to the point first noticed.

Rhuddlan.—Vol. II. 352.

The same as the municipal borough.

Ruthin.—Vol. II. 364.

The same as the municipal borough.

Swansea.—Vol. II. 376.

Commencing at the place where the northern boundary of the parish of St. John is crossed by the road to Llangyvelach church, northward, along that road, to the point at which the same is joined by a lane called Rheol-y-Cnap; thence along the lane, and along one which is a continuation thereof, and which joins the turnpike-road to Neath opposite the Llandwr engine, to the spot where such last-mentioned lane runs into the turnpike-road to Neath; thence, northward, along the road to Neath to the place at which the same is joined, between the Duke's Arms public-house and a blacksmith's shop, by a road leading towards Clâs Mont farm; thence along the last-named road to the point where the same is met, opposite the lane from Pen-lan, commonly termed Pen-lan road, by a track leading to a well head; thence along the track to the spot at which the same reaches the well head; thence along the stream that flows from the well head to the place where the stream falls into the rivulet Nant Velin; thence along the rivulet to the point at which the same crosses the road that leads from Morriston into the road from Llangyvelach church to the bridge over the river Tawy.

The line thence proceeds along the road from Morriston to the spot where the same joins that from Llangyvelach to the bridge over the Tawy; thence along the last-mentioned road to the place at which the same reaches the bridge over the Tawy; thence, eastward, along the turnpike-road to Neath to the point where the same is met near the Star public-house by a lane that leads from the southern extremity of the parish of Llansamlet, over Kilvey hill and by Bon-y-Maen, to Llansamlet church; thence along the lastnoticed lane to the spot at which the same meets the boundary of the hamlet of St. Thomas, near Tregwl; thence, eastward, along the boundary of St. Thomas to the place where the same touches the limit of the town and franchise; thence, westward, along the limit of the town and franchise to the spot at which the same joins the boundary of the parish of St. John; thence, westward, along the boundary of St. John to the point first noticed.

Tenby.—Vol. II. 390.

The In-Liberty of Tenby.

Welshpool.—Vol. II. 420.

The parish of Pool, and the township of GungrogVechan in the parish of Guilsfield; except that part of the township of Cyvronydd in Pool which is detached from the main body of the parish.

Wiston.—Vol. II. 432.

The same as the municipal borough.

Wrexham.—Vol. II. 434.

The respective townships of Wrexham Abbot and Regis; and also such part of that of Esclusham Below as is surrounded either by Wrexham-Abbot or Wrexham-Regis.

END OF THE LIST OF THE BOUNDARIES OF BOROUGHS.