Supplementary abstracts to charters in volume 2
1578-1606

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

J.D. Marwick (editor)

Year published

1897

Supporting documents

Pages

28-55

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'Supplementary abstracts to charters in volume 2: 1578-1606', Charters and Documents relating to the City of Glasgow 1175-1649: Part 1 (1897), pp. 28-55. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=47928 Date accessed: 22 September 2014.


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1578–1606

365 [77a]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL finding that Matthew, Earl of Lennox, Lord Darnley, Regent of the realm, and his forbears were kindly bailies of the lordship and regality of Glasgow, past all memory, and that Sir John Stewart of Mynto was constituted bailie of the said lordship and regality by letter of bailliary granted by the said Earl; that nevertheless Robert, Lord Boyd, had usurped the said office in 1573 and dispossessed the said Sir John Stewart; and ordaining King James VI., as Earl of Lennox, to be repossessed in the said office. Edinburgh, 14 May 1578.

Printed Register of Privy Council, vol. ii., p. 697.

366 [80a]. ACT of CONVENTION of BURGHS, held at Aberdeen, finding Glasgow and other burghs liable in an unlaw of £20 for not attending the convention. 11–16 July 1580.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 97.

367 [80b]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL on complaint by the bailies, council and community of Renfrew, against the bailies, council, and community of Glasgow and Dumbarton for having seized and retained a quantity of salt, with the boats containing the same, on the Clyde, remitting to the Lords of Council and Session the decision of the questions at issue between the parties, involving the rights, liberties, and privileges of the respective burghs. Stirling, 23 August 1580.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. iii., p. 300.

368 [80c]. SEAL of CAUSE by the Town Council in favour of the Fleshers, Glasgow, 6 October 1580.

This deed is lost. The Town Council Minutes bear under the above date "The Fleschouris lettir of dekynheid was selit witht the commoun sele."

Printed Extracts from Council Records of Glasgow (Scottish Burgh Record Society), vol. i., p. 80.

369 [80d]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL setting forth that, at the request of the King, George Elphingstoun, William Cunninghame, and Robert Rowat, who had been elected bailies at Michaelmas, had, for the love and favour which they bore towards Esme, Earl of Lennox, Lord Darnley and Aubigny, voluntarily demitted their said office, and consented to such other persons being nominated thereto as the Earl thought good, without prejudice always to the election of public magistrates and officers within the said City yearly in time coming, conform to their privileges and order observed in such cases in times by past. And the king and the council accepted the said demission, acknowledging the demitters' goodwill to his Highness. Holyrood House, 15 October, 1580.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. iii., p. 325.

In 1581, Robert Montgomery, minister of Stirling, was presented to the Archbishopric of Glasgow, on the death of Archbishop Boyd, and granted a bond that so soon as he was admitted bishop he would dispone the lands, lordships, and whatsoever belonged to the archbishopric, to the Duke of Lennox and his heirs for yearly payment of £1,000 Scots, with some horse corn and poultry.

Spottiswoode, ii., p. 282.

A general synod of the church, held at Glasgow in April, 1582, formulated an accusation under fourteen heads against Montgomery, and required him to answer them at the next assembly. Montgomery having denied the articles of accusation, proof was taken, and the assembly ordered that he should continue his ministry at Stirling and meddle no more with the bishopric under pain of excommunication. Meanwhile the presbytery of Stirling were enjoined to try his conversation, and how he exercised discipline, and to report their finding to the synodal assembly.

Spottiswoode, ii., p. 284. Book of the Universal Kirk, part ii., pp. 542, 545, 546–7.

The presbytery of Stirling having cited Montgomery to appear before them, and he having failed to attend, the presbytery suspended him from his function. Nevertheless he continued to preach and exercise his ministerial functions, whereupon he was cited to appear before the assembly at St. Andrews. Moreover, in respect that, notwithstanding the inhibition of the previous assembly, he was "labouring to secure the bishopric of Glasgow, and had cited the chapter of the cathedral before the privy council for refusing to convene for his election, the presbytery charged him to appear before the synod of Lothian to hear sentence of excommunication pronounced against him." The King thereupon required the synod to appear before the privy council at Stirling on 12 April, 1582, and meanwhile discharged it from further proceeding with Montgomery. The synod accordingly appeared before the privy council, but declined its jurisdiction, and the council inhibited the synod from further procedure against Montgomery.

Spottiswoode, ii., pp. 282–286.

370 [85a]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL, setting forth the arrangements made between certain royal commissioners and the general assembly of the kirk at Leith, in January, 1571, and approved by the King and the Regent Mar, under which arrangements the King, on the decease of Archbishop Boyd, had ordered the chapter of Glasgow to elect Mr. Alexander Montgomery, minister, to the archbishopric. The chapter had, however, not given effect to the King's licence, though charged to do so, and had not shown reasonable cause for non-compliance. It was, therefore, declared that the right of disponing the bishopric had devolved into the King's hands by the neglect of the chapter to elect Montgomery. Stirling, 12 April 1582.

Privy Council Register, vol. iii., pp. 474–5.

Book of the Universal Kirk, vol. ii., p. 571.

371 [85b]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL, discharging the presbyteries of Edinburgh, Stirling, Dalkeith, and all other presbyteries, as well as provincial synods and general assemblies of the kirk, from proceeding against Montgomery for aspiring to the bishopric, but reserving the right to proceed against him for any other cause touching his life, doctrine, manners, and conversation, as accords. Stirling, 12 April 1582.

Privy Council Register, vol. iii., pp. 476–7.

Book of the Universal Kirk, vol. iii., pp. 573–4.

372 [85c]. ACT of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY, held at St. Andrews, setting forth that Montgomery had been cited to appear before it, and had attended, but in a contumacious mood, and finding that the suspension pronounced against him by the presbytery of Stirling was valid. It was about to proceed farther in the case, when a letter from the King was delivered by Mr. Mark Ker, master of requests, charging the assembly to desist from interfering with his Majesty's jurisdiction; and this letter was followed by a peremptory claim by an officer of arms, requiring them, under pain of being held rebels and put to the horn, to desist from farther proceedings against Montgomery. Nevertheless, the assembly deprived him of his ministerial office, and were to proceed to excommunicate him when he appeared and confessed his error, and promised future obedience to the orders of the assembly. Under these circumstances, authority was given by the assembly to the presbytery of Glasgow to see that Montgomery did not meddle with the bishopric, and, if he did, to report to the presbytery of Edinburgh, who were empowered to excommunicate him should this be found necessary. St. Andrews, 24 April 1582.

Book of the Universal Kirk, vol. ii., pp. 558–60, 561–4, 565.

Privy Council Register, vol. iii., p. 486.

373 [85d]. ACT of the EXTRAORDINARY GENERAL ASSEMBLY, held at Edinburgh, empowering certain commissioners to pass to the Duke of Lennox and remonstrate with him for having entertained Montgomery in his society after sentence of excommunication had been passed upon him, and to warn him of the consequences of violating the acts of assembly passed against the receivers and maintainers of excommunicated persons. The duke, however, declared that his action was in conformity with the King's command, and that he would not remove Montgomery. Edinburgh, 27 June 1582.

Book of the Universal Kirk, part ii., pp. 578–581.

374 [85e]. LETTER from the KING, presented to the general assembly, requiring that proceedings instituted by Mr. John Howieson against the laird of Mynto, provost of Glasgow, and certain of the magistrates and citizens of that city should be left to the decision of the privy council. Nevertheless the assembly continued their proceedings, in the absence of all, save John Graham, who denied the accusation against him, and remitted the matter to three brethren to take proof. Afterwards the assembly found the complaint by Howieson proved, and deserving of excommunication; nevertheless, at the King's request, the pronouncement of sentence was delayed till 6th July following. Edinburgh, 27 June 1582.

Book of the Universal Kirk, part ii., p. 580.

375 [85f]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL, charging certain persons, under pain of rebellion, to appear before them on 10th September, 1582, and answer for riots in Glasgow, in opposition to Montgomery as bishop-designate. Perth, 11 July 1582.

Privy Council Register, vol. iii., p. 490.

376 [85g]. PROCLAMATION by the KING, dated at Perth, setting forth that notwithstanding the discharge given by his Majesty and the privy council to all ministers convened in the general assembly, synodal assemblies, presbyteries, elderships, and others from using citations or pronouncing sentence of excommunication against Montgomery or otherwise troubling him for causes of which he had not been orderly convicted, yet these ministers had pronounced sentence of excommunication against him to his great slander and derogation of the royal authority, wherefore, and in order that the said sentence should not prejudge the archbishop till a lawful and formal order was made by the estates, letters under the signet had been issued on 12 June, granting Montgomery licence to pursue and defend all causes depending or to be pronounced by or against him before any judges of the realm, notwithstanding the sentence of excommunication pronounced against him. By that letter it was also declared that though neither he or any persons resetting, supplying. or intromitting with him, should incur any danger by reason of the excommunication, the elders and presbytery of Stirling had cited various persons to appear before them at Stirling on a certain day to answer, at the instance of the kirk, for entertaining Montgomery after his excommunication, and the elders and presbyteries of Glasgow and other towns intended to adopt similar proceedings, not only to the hurt and slander of Montgomery, but to the derogation of the royal authority. Charge was accordingly given to the moderators and elders of Stirling, Glasgow, and other burgh towns where elderships existed, to desist from all such procedure. Perth, 13 July, 1582.

Book of the Universal Kirk, part ii., pp. 607–9.

377 [85h]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL, setting forth that whereas Robert, bishop of Glasgow, was lawfully provided to the archbishopric with all its lands and revenues of temporality and spirituality, nevertheless the feuars, tenants, and others of the archbishopric, would not make payment of the fruits and duties to the bishop unless compelled, charge had accordingly been given to Sir Mathew Stewart of Mynto, knight, George Elphinstoun of Blythswood, and others, to appear before the Regent and council and show cause why further proceedings should not be taken against them. They had failed to appear, however, and new letters in four forms were ordered to be issued against them, charging them to pay the archbishop the several sums due by them for crops and years 1581, 1582, and all the subsequent years of his life. Perth, 20 July 1582.

Privy Council Register, iii., pp. 496, 497.

378 [85i.] ACT of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY, held at Edinburgh, setting forth that as the laird of Mynto had appeared personally, confessed his fault, and made submission to the kirk, the discipline to be used against him and others involved in the same offence was referred to the judgment of the presbytery of Glasgow. Edinburgh, 9 October, 1582.

Book of the Universal Kirk, vol. ii., pp. 598–600.

379 [86a]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL charging inter alios the inhabitants of the barony and city of Glasgow to obey Ludovic Duke of Lennox, and his great uncle and tutor Robert, Earl of March, as bailie of the said barony and city, vice John, Earl of Montrose, who had demitted the said office. Holyrood, 9 December 1583.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. iii., p. 614.

380 [86b]. CHARTER by James VI., under the Great Seal, with the advice of the privy council, granting to William Erskine, rector of Campsie, for his life, the archbishopric of Glasgow, with churches, lordships, baronies, the privilege of regality, offices, teinds, rents, &c., as well spiritual as temporal, wherever situated within Scotland, vacant by the decease of James Boyd, last archbishop, or by the forfeiture of James, sometime archbishop. The entry of the said William commencing with the fruits of the year 1585; reserving the pension granted by the King to Nicholas Carncors. Moreover, the King presented the said William to the archbishops and bishops of his realm, to the superintendents and commissioners of presbyteries, and to the dean and chapter of Glasgow, desiring them to inaugurate and consecrate him, Linlithgow, 21 December 1585.

Great Seal Register, 1580–1593, p. 290, No. 903.

381 [89a] ACT of the CONVENTION of BURGHS on the cause between Ayr, Glasgow, &c., against Kirkcudbright. Citation produced of witnesses who failed to appear, and cause continued till next general convention. Aberdeen, 3 July 1586.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 484.

382 [89b]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL, setting forth that the King had presented William Erskine to the archbishopric of Glasgow, but that meaning to employ Archbishop Beaton, he had restored him to all the lands, benefices, and possessions which he had enjoyed previous to the pronouncing of the sentence of forfeiture and barratry against him. It was, however, declared that Erskine should have right to all the emoluments of the office previous to the date of the Act, and till Archbishop Beaton was fully restored by the King and Parliament. Holyrood, 17 March 1586–7.

Privy Council Register, vol. iv., p. 154.

383 [90a]. ACT of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY of the KIRK, referring to the slander of admission of [Erskine] Bishop of Glasgow, by the brethren of the west, and finding that admission to be unlawful, and ordaining the brethren, admitters of Erskine to the bishopric, to cause it to be annulled with all possible diligence and previous to Michaelmas then next, so that the slander might be removed from the kirk. Edinburgh, 20 June 1587.

Book of the Universal Kirk, part ii., p. 693.

Privy Council Register, vol. iv., p. 191.

384 [90b]. ACT of the GENERAL ASSEMBLY, receiving Mr. Robert Montgomery, 'without further ceremony," to the fellowship and favour of the kirk. Edinburgh, 20 June 1587.

Book of the Universal Kirk, part ii., p. 700.

385 [90c]. ACT of CONVENTION of BURGHS, held at Dundee, undertaking to relieve the burghs of the west country, such as Glasgow, Irvine, Ayr, and Dunbarton, of such sums as they might disburse in "outredding" a ship or bark for the suppression of piracy. Dundee, 6 July 1587.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 242.

386 [94a]. DECREE of the LORDS OF COUNCIL AND SESSION in favour of Walter, commendator of Blantyre, Lord Privy Seal, against all and sundry heritors, feuars, tenants, tacksmen, rentallers, parishioners, and others, intromitters with the teind sheaves, profits, emoluments, &c., pertaining to the parsonage of Glasgow, for payment of the teind sheaves, profits, &c., of the same—the commendator having right thereto by tack and assedation. Dated 12 August 1587.

Acts and Decreets, vol. cxii., fol. 365.

387 [97a]. CHARTER by Sir William Herbertsoun, prebendary of the prebend of St. Anne, within the church of Paisley, with consent of Walter, commendator of Blantyre, proprietor of the lands of Cardonald, and as such patron of said prebend, to George Huchesoun, of the yard in the burgh of Glasgow called "Ronaldisyaird," adjoining the lands of Rammishorne and Denesyde; with the "ludge" built thereon. Blantyre, 18 and 22 November 1588. Confirmed by King James VI., under his great seal, 1 January 1589–90.

Original in the Archives of the City.

Great Seal Register, 1580–93, p. 588, No. 1718.

388 [98a]. FEU RIGHT granted by the provost, bailies, and town council of Glasgow to Robert Chirnside, burgess of Glasgow, of all and whole that piece of their common land where the wall had been near the West Port of the burgh, with the wall and stones thereof, containing in length three roods and in breadth twenty-four feet, in the middle whereof the said wall stood; with power to the said Robert to build houses thereon; for payment of five shillings of annual feu-duty. Glasgow, 2 May 1589.

Original in the Archives of the City.

Inventure of Wrytes and Evidents of and concerning the Burgh of Glasgow, p. 50, D. E., b. 21, No. 1.

See act of council for removal of West Port to "Stokwalheid," 2 December 1588. Glasgow Records, i., p. 125.

389 [98b]. INSTRUMENT of SASINE following on the feu-right in favour of Robert Chirmside, dated 2 May 1589 [No. 388]. Glasgow, 2 May 1589.

Original in the Archives of the City.

Inventure of Wrytes and Evidents of and concerning the Burgh of Glasgow, p. 51, D. E., b. 21 No. 2.

390 [98c]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL referring to acts of parliament and privy council against such persons as had not professed obedience to the king, and given confession of their faith, and ordaining that these acts should receive effect against the bishops of Glasgow (Archbishop Beaton), Ross (John Leslie), and Dunblane (William Chisholm), and other persons against whom sentences of forfeiture, barratry, or excommunication had been led, and discharging all dispensations or other indulgences obtained by these persons, contrary to the terms of the said acts, dispensing with their not giving confession of their faith during their absence. Edinburgh, 29 May 1589.

Privy Council Register, vol. iv., pp. 388–9.

391 [98d]. CHARTER by Mr. John Hay, rector of Renfrew, with consent of Mr. Andrew Hay, last rector, and of the dean or president of the chapter of Glasgow, granting in feu farm to John Rankene, mason, citizen of Glasgow, and Elizabethe Knox, spouses, a waste and ruinous tenement, called the manse of Renfrew, with yard and enclosure, lying near the castle (between the manse of the earl of Lennox, called Stable-green, on the west and north, and the manse of the prebend of Govan on the south). Paying yearly to the rector, for relief of an annual rent to St. Nicholas Hospital, 7 merks and 12d. of augmentation. Glasgow, 20 May 1590. Confirmed by King James VI. (when feu duty payable to the crown) 4 November 1598.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 259, No. 795.

392 [100a]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under his great seal, whereby he granted in feu farm to James Forret of Borrowfield, and Jean Ogilvie, his spouse, a tenement of land, with kitchen and yard, called the manse of the rector of Erskine, in the city of Glasgow, on the west side of the street leading from the High Church to the "Drygait-brig" (between the lands of the late James Wat or St. Nicholas Hospital and the lands of the late James Forret, burgess, called the "Caitchepuill"); also, the lands called Brumewaird, with the teinds, of old belonging to the rector of Glasgow (adjoining the lands of the said James Forret of Borrowfield, and sometime the common muir of Glasgow); which lands were possessed by the said James Forret and his predecessors as native tenants. Paying yearly for said tenement, 13s. 4d., and for Brumewaird, 15s. Holyrood, 2 March 1590–91.

Great Seal Register, 1580–93, p. 622, No. 1833.

393 [100b]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under his great seal, whereby he granted in feu farm to William Cruikis, alias Fowlar, a yard (formerly held by him in farm) lying behind the collegiate church of St. Mary, in the city of Glasgow, and sometime part of the patrimony of said church. Paying yearly, 26s. 8d. of old farm, and 4d. of augmentation. Dalkeith, 31 March 1591.

Great Seal Register, 1580–93, p. 628, No. 1856.

394 [100c]. CHARTER granted by MALCOLM WILSON and eleven others, hospitallers and poor men of the hospital of St. Nicholas, founded by Andrew, bishop of Glasgow, within the city, by which, with the consent of Bartholomew Symson, preceptor of the hospital and the dean and chapter of Glasgow, they granted to James Leneax, and his heirs and assignees, two rigs of arable land in the croft of St. Tenew, near the city of Glasgow, given to the said hospital by John Smyth, sometime chaplain. To be held of the said poor men in feu farm. Paying therefor thirty-two shillings of ancient farm duty and twelve pence of augmentation. Glasgow, 2nd May 1591. This charter was confirmed by King James VI. by charter under the great seal, dated 14th June, 1592.

Great Seal Register, 1580–1593, p. 718, No. 2105.

395. [103a]. ACT of the TOWN COUNCIL of GLASGOW setting forth that there were within the lands of Westercraigs, belonging to Sir Mathew Stewart of Mynto, sundry kilns, the owners whereof purchased and brought furth of the country about the town much bear which was presented to the market, and thus the farmers of the ladle custom lost the duty thereon; and, therefore at the earnest desire of the council, Sir Mathew set to the town and its farmers, during his lifetime, the duty of the ladles of all bear to be brought to these kilns in Westercraigs; and the town agreed to pay twenty pounds Scots yearly therefor. Glasgow, 11 May 1592.

Extract Act in the Archives of the City.

Inventure of Wrytes and Evidents of and concerning the Burgh of Glasgow, p. 35, B. C., b. 9, No. 1.

396. [103b]. CHARTER by Adam Crux, alias Fowlare, to Henry Gibsoun, clerk of the commissariat of Glasgow, of the yard mentioned in No. 393; here described as lying in the Trone-gait, and bounded by the cemetery of the church of St. Mary and the passage called the "Alaye." Edinburgh, 13 May 1592. Confirmed by King James VI., under his great seal, 31 May 1592.

Great Seal Register, 1580–93, p. 711, No. 2088.

397 [103c]. ACT of PARLIAMENT, passed on 5th June, 1592, by which, after referring to the act of pacification concluded at Perth in February, 1572–3, ratified by Parliament in April, 1573; the act of abolition, passed in December, 1585 [1585, c. 21, Acts of Parliament, III., 383]; and the act passed in July, 1587, by which the acts of pacification and abolition were ratified, and it was declared that these acts of pacification and abolition and the act of 1587 were only extended to such persons as professed the true religion, as professed in Scotland, and had acknowledged the king's authority [1587, c. 60, Acts of Parliament, III., 467], it was declared that no person who had been convicted of barratry, or who had lost his benefices or pensions, ipso facto, might obtain the benefit of these acts, or any of them, before professing the true religion as professed in Scotland. The act was farther extended, not only against all persons who had been convicted of barratry and lost their benefices at any time before its date, but also to all persons who might afterwards be convicted of barratry or lawfully lose their benefices and pensions. 1592, c. 18.

Acts of Parliament, vol. iii., p. 548.

398 [103d]. ACT of the PARLIAMENT of KING JAMES VI. ratifying the Act 1567, cap. 13 [No. 343], (1592, c. 89). Edinburgh, 5 June 1592.

Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, vol. iii., p. 586.

Ratified by the Acts 1641, c. 108, Ibid., vol. v., p. 415; 1661, c. 331.; Ibid., vol. vii., p. 303.

399 [104a]. ACT of the CONVENTION of BURGHS, on supplication by Glasgow against Ayr for uptaking greater duties than those granted to them for upholding their bridge. Ayr to produce its gift at next convention. Kirkcaldy, 17 June 1592.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 390.

400 [105a]. ACT of CONVENTION of BURGHS, held at Dysart, imposing on Kirkcudbright an unlaw of £20 for not appearing to answer complaint of Ayr, Glasgow, and others, presented at last convention, on 15th June, 1592. Dysart, 11 June 1593.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 398.

401 [106a]. ACT of CONVENTION of BURGHS, on supplication by Glasgow against Ayr. Gift to Ayr produced, in terms of order of 17th June, 1592. In respect of the failure of the commissioners for Ayr to implement the order of the convention, its agent was directed to concur with Glasgow in proceedings to have gift suspended and annulled. Dysart, 12 June 1593.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 399.

402 [106b]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL on Complaint by the provost, bailies, community and inhabitants of Glasgow and Renfrew against George Smollett, burgess of Dumbarton, discharging Smollett of a commission which he had succeeded by sinister and wrong information in obtaining from the King, without advice of the council, under colour of which he seized the goods brought by the inhabitants of the Isles and other parts of the Highlands, to the said burghs by sea and land, apprehended their persons, and sometimes pursued them "be way of deid"; and ordaining Smollett to be denounced rebel. Holyrood House, 21 June 1593.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. v., p. 87.

403 [110a]. ACT of CONVENTION of BURGHS, held at Stirling, admitting to proof the allegations of Kirkcudbright in answer to complaint of Ayr, Glasgow, and others. Stirling, 29 June 1594.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 434.

404 [110b]. ACT of CONVENTION of BURGHS, on complaint by Dunbarton against Glasgow for receiving unfreemen and regraters, and for suffering, them to trade within the burgh to the prejudice of Dumbarton. Case continued till next convention. Stirling, 1 July 1594.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 437.

405 [110c]. DISCHARGE by KING JAMES VI., with advice of the Lords of the Secret Council, in favor of the City of Glasgow, of £4000 received by William Symmer and Mr. John Ros, as Commissioners for the City, with interest thereon at the rate of ten per cent. per annum, the said £4000 being part of the King's tocher of £100,000, delivered by the King and his Comptroller in July 1590 to the City and several burghs of the realm, and which sum of £4000 the King now required to provide for the baptism of the Prince and other urgent and weighty affairs. Edinburgh, 31 July 1594.

Printed Register of the Privy Council vol. 5, pp. 160, 161, 171.

406 [110d]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under his great seal, whereby he granted in feu farm to Alexander Stewart, son of the deceased Malcolm Stewart, burgess of Glasgow, the fore waste tenement, with yard adjoining, commonly called Morbotles manse, on the west side of the street leading from the Metropolitan Church to the Wyndhead (between the lands of St. Nicholas Hospital, the Stablegrene yards, and the yard of David Wymis), sometime belonging to the rector of Morbotle. Paying yearly, 5s. of old farm, and 20d. of augmentation. Holyrood, 20 January 1594–5.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 69, No. 206.

407 [110e]. CHARTER by the provost, bailies, and town council of Glasgow to Archibald Faulls, Merchant burgess, Glasgow, whereby for his good and faithful service and labour in attending to the re-edifying of the Trone Church without any fee, for three years preceding, and in part recompense therefor, the Magistrates and Council feued to him two booths or houses, one laigh and the other high, which are parts of their new kirk steeple, for the yearly payment of £8 Scots of feu-duty. Glasgow, 22 February 1594–5.

Original in the Archives of the City.

Inventure of Wrytes and Evidents of and concerning the Burgh of Glasgow (1696), D.E., p. 50, b. 20, No. 1.

408 [111a]. INSTRUMENT of SASINE following on the Charter dated 22 February, 1594–5 [No. 407], under the hand of Henry Gibson, town clerk, dated 28 March 1595.

Original in the Archives of the City.

Inventure of Wrytes and Evidents of and concerning the Burgh of Glasgow (1696), D.E., p. 50, b. 20, No. 2.

409 [112a]. ACT of the CONVENTION of BURGHS, setting forth that Kirkcudbright had cited certain witnesses in the cause between Ayr, Glasgow, and other burghs, and it, but they had not appeared. The cause continued till next convention. 27 June 1595.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. i., p. 455.

410 [114a]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under his great seal, whereby, on the narrative that the several lands therein described were formerly part of the temporality of the archbishopric, which, after the act of annexation, were disponed to Walter, commendator of the priory of Blantyre, Lord Privy Seal, had been set by the commendator, at the desire of the king, in feu farm to the natives or kindly rentallers of the same (notwithstanding that these rentals had been beyond the memory of man regarded to be as sufficient as if the lands had been disponed in feu), after the resignation of these lands by Ludovic, Duke of Lennox, with the consents therein mentioned, and after the resignation of the same, ad remanentiam, made by the commendator, a number of these infeftments in feu farm were ratified, and the lands were of new granted in feu farm to the king. Edinburgh, 17 February 1595–6.

Register of the Great Seal, 1593–1608, pp. 137–8, No. 406.

411 [114b]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., proceeding on the same narrative as that in No. 410, and ratifying an infeftment in feu farm granted by the commendator of Blantyre in favour of Thomas, Lord Boyd, a kindly tenant of the archbishopric, of the lands of Badley and Mollanis, Proveisthaugh (between the lands of Borrowfield, the lands of the rector of Glasgow, the lands called Dasie-greene and the water of Clyde), also 4 acres of land called Cunninglaw (between the lands of Glasgow-burge and the green of Glasgow or Brumelaws), and others, in the barony and regality of Glasgow. Holyrood, 8 March 1595–6.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 142, No. 417.

412 [114c]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., proceeding on the same narrative as that in No. 410, and ratifying an infeftment in feu farm of lands of the barony of Glasgow, lying within the barony of Lilliesleaf, in the sheriffdom of Roxburgh, granted by Walter, commendator of Blantyre, in favour of sundry persons, kindly rentallers, after the Duke of Lennox had resigned the same ad remanentiam. Holyrood, 24 March 1595–6.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 143, No. 422.

See also Charters, ibid., Nos. 451–480.

413 [114d]. COMPLAINT to the lord provost and bailies of the city by Henry Gibsoun for himself and in name of the other feuars of Lwnyngis hauch against Jonat Blair and others, setting forth that he owned the sixth part of Lwnyngis hauch adjacent to the burn of Malyndoner, which by inundation of spaits had taken away a great part of his land, and that the persons named, who were owners on the other side of the burn, had for some years bygone appropriated his land to their yards, and had that year of new dug his land, and sown hemp and other seeds and put plants thereon. Deliverance thereon by the provost and bailies signed by "Mynto kt."remitting matter to the liners of the burgh and sworn men of the Partick ward, because the complaint concerned tenants both of the barony and the burgh. The liners decided in favour of Gibson resuming possession of the land claimed. Glasgow, April 1596.

Original Complaint and relative proceedings in the Archives of the City.

414 [117a]. GRANT to the provost, bailies, council, and community of the Burgh of Irvine for five years of a right to exact duties on goods entering or passing furth of the ports of Ayr, Glasgow, and Dumbarton, or passing up and down the waters or any part to and from the said town and waters, or betwixt the said towns, as well the highlands as lowlands. Edinburgh, 29 July 1596.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. v., p. 305.

415 [117b]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under his great seal, to Sir Mathew Stewart of Mynto, knight, of a tenement of land called the manse of the archdeacon of Glasgow, with close and yard, lying on the south side of the Drygait. Paying yearly 40s., with 3s. 4d. of augmentation. Holyrood, 22 March 1596–7.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 181, No. 544.

416 [118a]. SEAL of CAUSE by the provost, bailies and council of the burgh and city of Glasgow, whereby on the supplication of the Bonnetmakers of the town, they ratified and approved the following articles:—(1) The bonnetmakers to have power to elect yearly on 22 September a deacon, and he to have power to elect masters, who should examine all bonnets, wylicoats, woollen socks or hose, &c., made in or brought into the town for sale, and punish insufficient work by a fine of 20s. for support of poor decayed brethren and the common charges of the craft. (2) No stranger or unfreeman's son to be admitted until he became a freeman, and paid an upset of £5, with a little banquet and test drink, not exceeding £5. (3) A freeman's son or son-in-law to be admitted on payment of 30s. of upset with a little banquet and drink as above. (4) Each freeman to pay one penny weekly to the craft. (5) Apprentices and servants, who have not been apprentices, pay 10s. on entry. (6) Freemen and servants to pay at their entry two shillings to the officer of the craft. (7) All persons using the craft to give their oath of fidelity to the king's majesty, provost, bailies, and council of the town, and of obedience to the deacon; and any one disobeying the deacon or officers to pay a fine of 10s. for the first offence, 20s. for the second, 40s. for the third, and so on, doubling the fine for every offence. (8) No unfreeman to stand between a freeman's stand and the cross at market time; and the deacon and masters to have power to choose an officer yearly and to make statutes, and they to have an officer of the town concurring with their own officer in poinding. Glasgow, 29 October 1597.

Original in the Archives of the Incorporation of Bonnetmakers and Dyers.

Notes on Incorporation of Bonnetmakers and Dyers of Glasgow, 1886, p. 3.

417 [118b]. OBLIGATION by the PRESBYTERY of GLASGOW in favour of George, James, and Archibald Erskine, whereby in consideration of their having granted out of the thirds of the bishopric a chalder each of malt and of meal to John Cowper and John Bell, ministers of Glasgow, the Presbytery bound themselves not to ask more out of the said thirds. Glasgow, 14 November 1597.

Original in the Archives of the Duke of Montrose.

Historical MSS. Commission. Appendix to Third Report, p. 395.

The Lennox, by William Fraser, vol. ii., p. 339.

418 [118c]. ACT of PARLIAMENT, dated 16th December, 1597, setting forth that the greatest number of the vassals, free tenants, and heritable feuars of the temporal lands pertaining to the archbishopric were of such mean rent and quality that they were unable to bear the expense of resignation of these lands in the king's hands and entries thereto by the royal chancellary; that, in consequence, many of the feuars remained unentered to these lands; and that the rent and patrimony of the archbishopric were so heavily exhausted by tacks, pensions, and other dispositions, so that little thereof remained except the superiority and casualties of the same, therefore the king and estates granted to the Duke of Lennox during his life the right of the superiority of the estate, temporal lands, &c., of the archbishop, with all the casualties belonging thereto which were at the disposition of the crown, wherever the same had fallen since the act of annexation, or should afterwards fall during the duke's lifetime, and the duke and his commissioners were authorised to receive and enter all vassals, feuars, free-holders, tenants, and their heirs and successors, and to grant them new infeftments and dispositions of the said lands, and to apply all the profits of the grant to his own use, or as he might dispose of the same. And all infeftments, conveyances, and entries granted by the duke or his commissioners were declared to be as valid as if granted by the king, with the advice of his officers.

Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland (1595, c. 49), vol. iv., pp. 146–7.

419 [118d]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under his great seal, granting in feu farm to John Otterburne and spouse, a tenement of land and yard in the Rattounraw, sometime belonging to the vicars of the choir. Paying 33s. 8d. of feu farm and 16d. of augmentation. Holyrood, 16 February 1597–8.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 217, No. 660.

420 [118e]. ACT of a CONVENTION of the ESTATES, held at Holyrood on 29th June, 1598, setting forth that, in consideration of the great service done by Archbishop Beaton, not only to Queen Mary, but to the king; of the great love which the archbishop bore to his native country; of the great honour done to the king and the country by the archbishop as ambassador for many years; that the king had employed, and was to employ him as ambassador for treating of weighty affairs with foreign kings and princes, which would put him to great expense; and that through the death of Queen Mary he had been deprived of the greatest part of his substance by which he sustained his office of ambassador; further, considering that the king could not, consistently with his honour, employ the archbishop without providing sufficient means to enable him to sustain the burden of his position as ambassador, and that such provision could best be secured by restoring him to his honours, dignities, and benefices; therefore, the king and the estates restored the archbishop to all the heritages, honours, dignities, benefices, &c., which had at any previous time belonged to him in Scotland, and that notwithstanding any forfeiture, decree of barratry, horning, acts of parliament, and excommunication. The act and benefit of pacification made at Perth in February, 1572 years, ratified by parliament in April, 1573; the act of pacification and abolition made at Linlithgow in December, 1585; and the act made in July, 1587, in favour of those persons who had been banished, troubled, or exiled, since Queen Mary's return to Scotland, were appointed to be extended to the archbishop, who was authorised to enjoy all the benefits of these acts, as if his name were expressed in them, as any of the lieges might do, specially the Act of Parliament, 1592, c. 18 [Act of Parliament, III., 548]. Notwithstanding which act and all others made against beneficed persons, the king and the estates declared that the archbishop should enjoy his whole benefices, &c., although he had never made confession of his faith or acknowledged the religion professed within the realm. The act further provided that the archbishop should nowise be subject to making such confession, nor to any penalties which might result from his not making the same during his absence from the country, nor for a year after his return.

Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland (1598, c. 14), vol. iv., pp. 169–170.

421 [118f]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL ordaining, inter alios, the inhabitants of the burghs of Dumbarton, Glasgow, Air, Irvine, Renfrew, Rothesay, and Paisley, to meet the King at Dumbarton on 20 August 1598, and accompany His Majesty to Kintyre and other parts of the Isles and Highlands of Scotland, to compel the obedience of the inhabitants of these parts. Holyrood House, 30 June 1598.

Acts of the Parliament of Scotland, vol. iv., pp. 172, 173.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. v., p. 466.

422 [121a]. ACT of the CONVENTION of BURGHS ordaining Glasgow to send four men to examine into the estate of the town and common rent of Rutherglen, and to report to the next convention. Glasgow, 4 July 1598.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. ii., p. 37.

423 [121b]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL, referring to the Act of date 30 June 1598 [No. 421], and directing all the masters, owners, skippers, and mariners of ships, crears, barks, and vessels, within the towns of Glasgow, Ayr, Irvine, Dumbarton, and other towns and ports on the West Coast, on nowise to depart with their said vessels but to remain at home until choice was made of them for the convoy and transport of His Majesty and his army. Edinburgh, 5 August 1598.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. v., p. 475.

424 [121c]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL on complaint of Archibald Symonetoun, skinner, at the south side of the bridge of Glasgow, against David Andrew, deacon, and other skinners in the city of Glasgow, finding that the defenders did wrong in intromitting with the complainer's goods, they having no power to do so and no declarator having been given, whether the lands and houses of Gorbals and Bridgend were a suburb of the city or not. The defenders were accordingly ordained to enter in ward in Blackness within six days after the charge, to remain there till relieved, under pain of treason. Dumbarton, 24 August, 1598.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. v., p. 482.

425 [122a]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under his great seal, granting and quit-claiming to Archibald Gibsoun, clerk of the commissariat of Glasgow, (1) the Subchanter's Croft, extending to 4 acres, adjoining the lands of the vicars of the choir, the Belcroft, and the Molendinar Burn; (2) the east half of Parsonslands next the Brumelands (between Borrowfield and the Proveistishauch), with the teinds; (3) a tenement in the Drygaitheid (between the lands of the chaplainry of St. Michael on the east and the manse of the prebendary of Cambuslayng on the south) which Bartholomew Sympsoun resigned; (4) a tenement of land with houses and yards on the north side of Rattounraw, a tenement with yard on the south side thereof, an annual rent of 36s. furth of a tenement in Rattounraw, and 9 acres of land, with a piece called the Holmes, lying in Provansyde; (5) 2½ acres called Boilliscroft and Swainnisyett (between Medowflatt and Glasgow Burn), which Mr. Henry Gibsoun, town-clerk, resigned; (6) a tenement with yard at the Wyndhead. Paying yearly for (1) 4 merks; (2) 12s. 6d. for land, and 2 firlots meal (or 6s. 8d.) for teind; (3) £4 Os. 12d.; (4) 20s. (also to the college, £23 6s. 8d.); (5) 6d. (to the college, 10s. 4d.); and (6) 6s. 8d., with 6d. of augmentation. Holyrood, 28 May 1599.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, pp. 300–1, No. 918.

426 [123a]. LETTER of GIFT by KING JAMES VI., under his Privy Seal, whereby he granted full power to the chirurgians and professors of medicine within the city of Glasgow to examine all persons practising chirurgery, and to license such as should be found duly qualified; prohibiting such as do not hold the license of a university in which medicine is taught, or a license from the chirurgians of Glasgow, from practising in the city; prohibiting the sale of drugs in the city, except such as is sighted by the chirurgians, and prohibiting the sale of rat poison except by the apothecaries, who should be caution for the persons to whom the same was sold. Holyrood, 29 November 1599.

Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, vol. viii., p. 184.

Ratified by Act of Parliament, 1672, c. 127 (11th September, 1672), Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland, vol. viii., p. 184.

427 [123b]. OBLIGATION by JAMES VI. to maintain Ludovick, Duke of Lennox, in the possession of all offices and privileges which the house of Lennox had before enjoyed of the archbishopric of Glasgow during the lifetime of archbishop James Beaton, and after his death to erect the said archbishopric into a temporal lordship, to remain with the house of Lennox for ever. 9 March 1600.

Original in the Archives of the Duke of Montrose.

The Lennox, by William Fraser, vol. ii., p. 343.

Hist. MSS. Commission, App. to Third Report, p. 395, No. 185.

428 [123c]. SEAL of CAUSE by the provost, bailies, and council of Glasgow, whereby, on the supplication of the Wright Craft, including glazing wrights, boat wrights, painters, bowyers, and sawyers, narrating the increase in their numbers, the inconvenience of masons judging wright work and wrights judging mason work, they disjoined the supplicants from the masons and ratified and approved the following articles:— (1) The craft to elect yearly a deacon who shall choose half of the quartermasters and one box-master, leaving the deacon to elect the other half of the quartermasters and the other box-master. (2) No person to set up booth till admitted a burgess and freeman, and found a sufficient workman, and to pay, if son of a burgess and freeman, and an apprentice, five merks (£3 6s. 8d.) of upset; if son of a burgess, and apprenticed outwith the town, or a stranger's son, and apprenticed within the town, ten merks (£6 13s. 4d); if a stranger and unfreeman (not being an apprentice nor freeman's son), £20. (3) Every apprentice, if freeman's son, to pay 20s. at entry; if unfreeman's son, 40s. (4) Every freeman of the craft to pay a penny weekly for the poor. (5) Every unfreeman presenting made work of 20s. value to the market to pay a penny each time. (6) Every out-townsman not being apprentice within the town, before being admitted to serve, to be examined, to produce a testimonial from his former master that his apprenticeship was completed, and to pay 40s. to the box, and not to be admitted freeman until he served three years thereafter. (7) Each craftsman absent from four quarter conventions yearly to pay a fine of 8s.; for absence for every other small convention, 4s. (8) No freeman to take an apprentice for a shorter period than seven years, and only one at a time. (9) Deacon and two or three chosen from the worthiest of the craft to examine made work, and forbid such as is insufficient. (10) No master to take another man's servant without licence of the previous master. (11) Strangers to sell made work within the city on Mondays only (market fair days being excepted) under penalty of forfeiting one-fifth thereof—a half to the bailies and a half to the craft. (12) If a craftsman disobeys the deacon or his officer, he is to pay a new upset to the box and 40s. to the bailies. (13) The officer of the craft, with an officer of the town, to enforce payment of fines. The deacon and masters of craft to have power to make acts and statutes. (14) A craftsman to have no more than one hired servant in his house continually from year to year beside his apprentice. (15) No persons to sell, make, or work, the work of the said crafts within the city, unless they were free with the town and the craft, and if they did so the bailies to intervene. (16) No stranger apprentice to be admitted a freeman until he had served with a freeman for two years after the expiration of his apprenticeship. (17) None of the said crafts to do any work except that which he served apprenticeship in at the beginning, unless where freemen of that craft cannot be had. (18) This erection to be read four times yearly at the quarter conventions of the whole brethren of the craft. Glasgow, 3 May 1600.

Original in the Archives of the Incorporation of Wrights.

The Incorporation of Wrights in Glasgow, by J. A. Reid, 1889, p. 39; 1883, p. 13.

429 [123d]. MINUTE of COUNCIL declaring that the Seal of Cause granted to the Wrights should not prejudice craftsmen working both mason craft and wright craft, and such as "biggis with poist and pan and layes with blak morter in tyme cuming as thai wont of befoir." Glasgow, 3 May 1600.

Council Records.

Printed Extracts from Council Records of Glasgow (Scottish Burgh Records Society), vol. i., p. 206.

430 [129a]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL prohibiting, inter alios, the inhabitants of the burgh of Glasgow from aiding the traitor Tyrone and his rebellious accomplices in Ireland against their Sovereign Queen Elizabeth of England, by transporting and carrying furth of Scotland for the said rebels, men, munition, armour, victual, powder, and bullets. Edinburgh, 11 June 1601.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 252,

431 [129b]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL setting forth that the infection of the plague of pestilence having lately entered within the city of Glasgow, it is very suspicious and dangerous that any traffic should be entertained between the said city and the burgh of Edinburgh, and discharging, under pain of death, all the inhabitants of Glasgow from resorting to Edinburgh, the Canongate, or Leith, or the suburbs of Edinburgh, so long as there is any suspicion of the plague in Glasgow, and till by a new proclamation there is license to that effect. Conversely the inhabitants within these places in the east were forbidden to repair to Glasgow, or to receive any wares thence, during the same space, under the same pain. Edinburgh, 21 December 1601.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 323.

432 [129c]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL on complaint of the treasurer and king's advocate, against certain persons in Glasgow and Irvine, for having contravened the Act of 11th June, 1601 [No. 430], by conveying goods to the Irish traitors. The Glasgow defenders having failed to appear, the complaint, as regarded them, was remitted to Ludovik, Duke of Lennox. Holyrood house, 22 December 1601.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 324.

433 [129d]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL setting forth that, as the plague still continues within the city of Glasgow, and has spread and daily breaks out in sundry parts and parishes of the West Country, all actions and causes concerning any of the inhabitants of Glasgow raised and depending before the Lords of Secret Council, Session, and Criminal Courts (except only causes in which pursuers and defenders are now waiting in Edinburgh) are to rest till a new warning by public proclamation be made to the contrary. Holyrood House, 26 January 1602.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 338.

434 [129e]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL ordaining the provosts and bailies of the towns of Glasgow, Renfrew, Dumbarton, &c., to compear personally before the King and Council to answer for their bypast oversight and negligence in suffering the respective inhabitants of these towns to carry on trade with the Irish rebels, in contravention of the previous acts thereanent, and to find surety against the continuance of such unlawful trade in future. Holyrood House, 27 May 1602.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 384.

435 [129f]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL referring to a debate and altercation which had fallen out between the Magistrates of Glasgow and the Masters of the College in regard to the spending of the yearly rents, entertaining of the due number of "fundat personis," and hearing of the yearly accounts of the College, and to the danger of greater animosity and trouble arising between these parties therefrom, certain persons were appointed commissioners to convene in Glasgow on 25 August 1602, and visit the College, inspect the foundations thereof, call for rentals of the revenues and other information, and thereafter report the result to the King, with a view to His Majesty taking order in regard to their differences, and promoting the weal and quietness of the city, and the furtherance of virtue in the College. Perth, 29 June 1602.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 408.

436 [132a]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL setting forth that His Majesty being accustomed in this present season of the year to repair to the West Country and remain there for a time for pastime and recreation, and willing that, during the time of his visit his subjects who were distressed and grieved by theft, reif, open and manifest oppression, and other insolences committed upon them, should receive some comfort from his presence, had therefore appointed certain of his Privy Council to meet at Glasgow on 30 August 1602, to receive and hear complaints and to do justice as accords of law and reason. Intimation of this was accordingly ordered to be made by proclamation at the market crosses of Glasgow and Dumbarton. Stirling, 20 August 1602.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 451.

437 [132b]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL appointed by special commission of the King to quiet debates and altercations between the Magistrates of Glasgow and the Masters of the College there, in which act are set forth, inter alia, various regulations for the government of the College, for the rations of the masters and bursars, and for the future management of the revenues of the College. Glasgow, 27 August 1602. Approved by the King on 29 August 1602.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 452–4.

438 [132c]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL containing a bond by William Stirling, citizen of Glasgow, who had been appointed oeconomus of the College by the principal and masters thereof, with consent of the lords commissioners appointed by the King for the visitation thereof, binding himself with two cautioners for the performance of his duties in all the particular therein set forth. Glasgow, 30 August 1602.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 455.

439 [132d]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL on complaint by Mr. John Ross and William Stirling, customers depute of the Water of Clyde, setting forth that they had been charged by the tacksman of the customs to pay the last year's duty for the customs of Clyde; that by the tack it was provided that the tacksman should be free of the customs in the event of war or plague intervening during the endurance of the tack; that the City of Glasgow, which was the principal place on the Clyde for exporting and importing goods paying custom, had for a long time been visited with "the plague of pestilence," and that no traffic was used during that period, which was the special season of the year when wares paying custom were imported and exported; and that therefore the City being enclosed, and all traffic being suspended, the duty ought to be deducted in the interest of the complainers. The Council, after hearing the customers depute and the customers, ordained the latter to deduct for the complainers 300 merks on last year's duty for the customs of the Clyde, in consideration of the loss during the said time of plague. Holyrood House, 28 December 1602.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vi., p. 510.

440 [132e]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., under the great seal, whereby he confirmed to Ludovic, Duke of Lennox, Earl Darnley, Lord Torbolton, Methven, and Aubigny, &c., Great Chamberlain and Admiral of Scotland, the dukedom, earldom, lordship, barony, and regality of Lennox, comprehending the lands therein specified; with the office of sheriff of Dunbarton; as also the castle of Glasgow, and heritable right specified in the charter dated 17th November, 1600 [No. 129]; and as administrator for his son, Henry, Duke of Rothesay, &c., he confirmed to the said Ludovic the lands of Cruikisfie and Darnlie, &c., under the reservation therein specified. Farther, the king of new granted to the said Ludovic the offices of admiral and chamberlain of Scotland, and the castle of Dunbarton, and the several lands therein specified, and incorporated the whole into a free dukedom, earldom, lordship, barony and regality of Lennox; giving to the said Ludovic the power to create burghs of barony or regality in any part of the said dukedom, and exempting the inhabitants of the dukedom from the jurisdiction of the sheriffdom of Stirling, Linlithgow, and Perth. Rendering for the castle of Glasgow, as in No. 129, for the remainder of the dukedom two pence in blench farm, and for the earldom of Darnlie one penny in blench farm. Holyrood, 21 February 1603.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, pp. 501–2, No. 1413.

441 [132f]. CHARTER by JAMES VI., under the great seal, whereby he confirmed and for his good service of new disponed to John Stewart, of Rosland, one of the ushers of his chamber, and his heirs and assignees, the lands of Whiteinch-meadow, as well arable as unarable, occupied by the said John and his tenants in the barony and regality of Glasgow and sheriffdom of Renfrew, which the said John had personally resigned:— For payment to the king, instead of the Archbishop of Glasgow, of £4, with sixty threaves of straw and one hundred stones of hay (petris feni), for the use of his horses whensoever the king, on premonition of forty days, shall reside within the castle and city of Glasgow for forty days; and if he shall remain for a shorter period, for each day one and a-half threaves of straw and four stones of hay; or otherwise paying twelvepence for each threave, and sixpence for each stone; and doubling the feu farm amounting to £10 on the entry of heirs; and rendering three suits at their head courts in the city of Glasgow, and appearing in the other courts of the said regality when required. Holyrood, 15 March 1603.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 511, No. 1426.

442 [134a]. CHARTER by KING JAMES VI., whereby he granted in feu farm to Adam Law, goldsmith, burgess of the Canongait, and Abigail Lundy, his spouse, an acre of land, called Sparrow-aiker, in the Provansyid, which sometime belonged to the chaplainry of the Holy Cross. Paying 30s. yearly. Holyrood, 20 September 1603.

Great Seal Register, 1593–1608, p. 542, No. 1484.

443 [135a]. ACT of the CONVENTION of BURGHS setting forth that James Forrett, commissioner of Glasgow, had desired the convention to nominate that burgh as one of the number of eight who should pass to England for the matter of the Union. Perth, 9 July 1604.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. ii., p. 183.

444 [135b]. ACT of CONVENTION of BURGHS setting forth that James Forrett, commissioner for Glasgow, dissented from that burgh paying its part of the 16,000 merks granted by the burghs for defraying the charges of the four commissioners of burghs and three lawyers appointed to go to London on the matter of the Union. Perth, 10 July 1604.

Printed Records of Convention, vol. ii., pp. 185–6.

445 [135c]. ACT of PARLIAMENT, dated 11th July, 1604, ratifying all acts of Parliament made by the King or by Queen Mary in favour of the kirk and religion then professed and established in Scotland, and specially all acts of Parliament made against Jesuits, seminary priests, and their resetters. It further declared that the commissioners appointed to treat as to Union with England should not treat, deliberate, or do anything prejudicial to the religion professed in Scotland.

Acts of the Parliaments of Scotland (1604, c. 2), vol. iv., p. 264.

446 [135a]. EIK to the SEAL of CAUSE by the provost, bailies, council, and "commonaris" between the merchants and crafts of Glasgow in favour of the Skinners, whereby it is statuted and ordained:—None within this burgh to hereafter work any kind of Skinner work except Skinners freemen, under the penalty of ten pounds money to be paid one half to the Crafts Hospital and the other to the craft. None within the said burgh to fringe or decorate gloves with lace, shape or horn points, shape or make purses, nor have servants to do the same under the foresaid penalty, toties quoties. And none within this burgh to pull any skins to sell the wool and the skin under the foresaid penalty; but freemen and freemen's wives to have liberty to pull skins, and with the wool thereof to make clothes for their own use and wearing only. Glasgow, 5 February 1605.

Original in the Archives of the Skinners Incorporation.

Annals of the Skinners Craft in Glasgow, 1875, p. 119.

447 [136]. DECREE arbitral in submission between the merchants and craftsmen of the burgh and city of Glasgow, entituled "Letter of guildry, deacon convener, visitor of maltmen and mealmen," whereby it was ordained that there shall be in all time coming a dean of guild, a deacon convener, and a visitor of the maltmen "quhois electionis statuts and prevelegis followis," viz., (1) The dean of guild to be a merchant, and to be elected yearly by the provost, bailies, council and deacons of the burgh. (2) The dean to be elected from a leet of three named by the dean of the year preceding, with twenty—four merchants, and not to bear office above two years together. (3) The dean's council to be composed of four merchants (the preceding dean being one) and four craftsmen. (4) The dean and his council to convene every Thursday at 10 a.m., and those absent to be fined. (5) In the dean's absence the old dean of guild or one of his council to fill his place; and additional members may be elected to fill the place of any who are absent. (6) The dean to be a town councillor, and to keep a key of the town's charter chest. (7) The dean and his council to have power to decern in all matters committed to his office, and to elect a clerk yearly. (8) The parties themselves, and no procurator for them, to plead before the dean. (9) The dean to have power to judge in all actions between merchants in matters of merchandise. (10) The dean and his council, with the master of works, to judge in all questions of neighbourhood and lining within the burgh, and any party aggrieved to be allowed to complain to the town council. (11) The dean and his council to have power to prohibit and punish all unfreemen using the liberties of freemen within the burgh. (12) The dean and his council to oversee and reform the measures great and small, and to punish transgressors. (13) The dean and his council to have power to tax the guild brethren for the maintenance of their estate, and the help of their distressed brethren and dependents. (14) Every burgess dwelling and bearing burden within the town to pass guild brother on payment of 3s. 4d. to the hospital of their calling, and to follow any lawful trade, excluding all kind of infamous and debauched men of evil life, but after their death allowing the children of such men, if they be found worthy, to have the like benefit as other guild brethren's children have. (15) A guild brother's son to be admitted on payment of 20s. for his guildry, and 5s. to the hospital of his calling on condition that if a merchant he be worth 500 merks, and if a craftsman 250 merks; the dean to keep a book of those who are unworthy of admission. (16) The first husbands of the lawful daughters of guild brothers to have the same benefits as sons. (17) The children of guild brethren who had died within the previous ten years, to have the benefit of entry on the above terms on being booked before May then next. (18) Burgesses' widows to have the benefit of guildry as if their husbands were alive, they paying 13s. 4d. to the dean and 3s. 4d to the hospital of their husband's calling. (19) Apprentices to serve two years to a freeman for meat and fee after the expiry of their terms, and then to be admitted burgesses on payment of ten merks; and four years thereafter to be admitted guild brethren on paying ten merks; but if an apprentice marries a guild brother's daughter he to be admitted at any time on payment of 20s., with 5s. to the hospital of his calling. (20) An out townsman to pay for his guildry after he is burgess £30, and 13s. and 4d. to the hospital of his calling, but one marrying a guild brother's daughter to pay 20s. for his guildry and 40s. to the hospital. (21) Any person entering burgess gratis to pay £40 for his guildry, with 40s. to the hospital of his calling. (22) The entry-money for merchants to be expended by the dean and his council for the weal of the merchants' hospital and their decayed brethren, and any other good and godly work; and the entry-money for craftsmen to be expended by the deacons and their assistants in the same way. (23) No guild brother thereafter entering to be allowed to tap tar, oil, butter, eggs, green herring, pears, apples, corn, candles, onions, kail, straw, bread (except bakers), milk, and such like small things, which are not agreeable to the honour of the calling of a guild brother. (24) No single burgess who is not a guild brother to be allowed to tap silk, spices, sugars, drugs, confections, lawns, cambric, nor stuffs above 20s. the ell, foreign hats, or hats lined with velvet or taffatie that come out of France, &c., iron, brass, copper, or ache, wine, great salt, wax, grain, and dye, nor to buy or sell wholesale salt beef, salmon, or herring (or to salt these for retail), cloth, tallow, skins, wool, yarn, &c. (25) Cramers (i.e., stance-holders) to sell upon the street on Mondays and Fair days only, and merely such wares as a single burgess could sell. (26) Burgesses or guild brethren not to be allowed to buy with other men's money. (27) Booth-holders (with certain exceptions) not to have crames on the streets. (28) Unfreemen to hold stands on the highway only from 8 a.m. to 2 p.m., except sellers of linen and victuals other than bread, who could remain till evening. (29) A burgess remaining a simple burgess to pay to the hospital of his calling 5 merks; but if a gratis burgess 10 merks. (30) A merchant burgess before entry to be proved worth £100, and a craftsman £20. (31) The dean and his council to have power to impose fines, and to make, with the approval of the provost, bailies and council, laws and statutes for the good of the town. (32) All fines to be applied by the dean and his council to such good and godly work as they may think fit. (33) The dean and his council to have power to elect one of their number yearly to be treasurer or collector of entry-money and fines. (34) Also to elect an officer for putting in force their acts and statutes, poinding for rents, &c. (35) The dean to have power to convene the merchants. (36) The back almshouse to be equally divided between the merchants' and crafts' hospitals. (37) A common measurer of cloth to be elected yearly by the dean and his council. (38) The dean and his council to get acts beyond those above expressed approved by the town council, to whom they are to produce their book once a year. (39) Mathew Trumble to be dean next year. (40) A deacon convener over the rank of craftsmen to be chosen yearly by the town council and deacons of crafts from a leet to be named by one of the worthiest of the craftsmen, with the deacon of the previous year. The deacon not to bear office above two years together, and to be a councillor and keep a key of the town's charter chest. He to convene the deacons of crafts, judge between them, make acts with the approval of the town council and the rest of the deacons, and choose an officer. (41) Craft prentices to pay at entry 40s. and 20 merks of upset (but burgesses' sons old use and wont only), and, when freemen, to pay 2d. weekly. Out-townsmen entering freemen to pay £20, with 13s. 4d. to the hospital, and 2d. weekly. (42) The deacon convener, with advice of the other deacons, to elect collectors, and to produce his act book to the council yearly for ratification. (43) Duncan Sempill, skipper, to be deacon convener next year. (44) A visitor of maltmen and mealmen to be elected yearly by the council from a leet of four given in by the whole maltmen and mealmen. (45) He to take trial of those who profane the Sabbath in their callings. He to try all meal and bear in kilns or houses, and, along with others, to fix the price of insufficient stuff shown in the market. (46) Neither maltmen nor others to buy malt, meal, or bear in the town to sell again. (47) No person to buy stuff on the way to the market (except freemen for their own use), nor to keep stuff indoors during market time, unless compelled by foul weather. Cake bakers buying meal before eleven to be fined. (48) Persons then burgesses to have power to make malt for use or sale, and burgesses' sons and sons-in-law to have that power on paying 20s.: And every unfreeman entering to the calling of maltmen to pay to the visitor 20 merks for their decayed brethren. Freemen to make meal without entering. (49) If unfreemen sell stuff out of the market, the visitor to report it to the dean of guild, who will fine such sellers. (50) The visitor to fine rubbers of meal. The visitor with his brethren to make statutes subject to the approval of the council. (51) Burgesses entering thereafter not to make malt for 3 years, and then only on paying the visitor if a simple burgess 10 merks, or if a guild brother 20s. (52) Maltmen to pay for every making of malt for sale 8d. for the benefit of their decayed brethren. (53) The visitor to produce his act book yearly to the council for ratification. (54) John Wallace to be visitor next year. Glasgow, 9 February 1605.

Copy in the Minute Book of the Incorporation of Dyers and Bonnetmakers in Glasgow.

McUre's History of Glasgow, p. 166.

Gibson's History of Glasgow, p. 338.

View of the Merchants' House of Glasgow, p. 59.

History of Cordiners of Glasgow, p. 260.

448 [136a]. RATIFICATION by the provost, bailies and council of the Decree Arbitral known as the Letter of Guildry [No. 447]. Glasgow, 9 February 1605.

Same as No. 447.

449 [136b]. SEAL of CAUSE by the provost, bailies, council and community of the burgh and city of Glasgow, whereby on the supplication of the deacon, headsmen, and masters of the Websters Craft narrating, inter alia, that the fines were applied of old to certain superstitious uses, which now cannot be applied by reason of the reformation thereof, and that these should now be applied to such good and godly uses as are underwritten, they ratified and approved the following articles:— (1) Apprentices to serve 5 years. (2) Apprentices, if freemen's sons, to pay at their entry, 13s. 4d.; and if not so, 40s. (3) None to set up booth till he has been found sufficiently expert and has paid, if an out-townsman and not an apprentice within town, £20; if an apprentice within town, 20 merks; and if a burgess' son, £4; to be applied in support of decayed brethren. (4) None to take another man's servant until free of his former master's hands, under a penalty of 16s. (5) Each freeman holding a booth or house in burgh should pay 2d. weekly towards the upkeep of the hospital newly erected by the crafts. (6) No craftsman to take any man or woman's work, unless he has sufficient and good worklooms. (7) None to take another man's work which he has warped without leave of the deacon. (8) Any out-town's webster taking work out of the burgh to pay each time twopence and give a free dinner to the deacon and masters, or pay 26s. 8d. in place thereof, and pay 6s. 8d. instead of the pound of wax contained in their old letter of deaconhead. (9) Any out-towns webster bringing work into the town to pay each time twopence, and they to pay twopence for every web they bring to the market. (10) The head masters and remanent of the craft to elect a deacon yearly. (11) Any craftsman disobeying the deacon to pay 40s. to the craft, with an unlaw of 16s. to the bailies. (12) An officer of the craft, with an officer of the town, to have power to poind and recover the unlaws. Glasgow, 16 February 1605.

Original in the Archives of the Incorporation of Weavers.

Printed Laws and Regulations of the Incorporation of Weavers (1888), pp. 9, 10.

450 [136c]. OBLIGATION by JOHN, ARCHBISHOP of GLASGOW, whereby he bound himself and his successors in the benefice of the parsonage and vicarage of Glasgow to make payment (1) to Mr. Robert Scot, one of the ministers of the burgh, of 300 merks money and 28 bolls victual yearly, beginning with crop 1604; (2) to Mr. John Bell, his colleague, likewise a minister of the burgh, of other 28 bolls victual yearly, for augmentation of his stipend, "swa lang as the saidis twa ministeris servis the cwir of the said kirk within the said brucht and cietie of Glasgw." But it was provided that the acceptance of said money and stipend should not prejudice the two ministers with regard to any benefit that might accresce to them through the decease of Mr. David Wemis, or through any other means or occasions. Glasgow, 7 March 1605.

Original Obligation in the Archives of the City.

451 [136d]. The RENTAL of the College Living, comprising inter alia the tron of Glasgow, £50; from the tolbuith of Glasgow for "The Haly Blood Chaplanrie," 53s. 4d.; and The Song Scole in Trongait, 4s. 8 April 1605.

Munimenta Alme Universitatis Glasguensis, vol. i., pp. 157, 174, 182, No. 93.

452 [136e]. LETTERS by KING JAMES VI., under his privy seal, granting to John archbishop of Glasgow, during his lifetime, the parsonage and vicarage of the parish and parish kirks of Glasgow, for his service and the provision of the remanent of the ministers serving the cure at the said kirk; with the whole mansions, houses, yards, fruits, rents, teinds, profits, casualties, emoluments, and duties of the same, then vacant in the King's hands and at his disposal by demission of Mr. David Weymes, last parson, vicar, and possessor thereof. Edinburgh, 18 April 1605.

Original in the Archives of the City.

453 [136f]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL ordaining charge to be given, inter alia, to the inhabitants of the burghs of Glasgow, Ayr, Irvine, Renfrew, and Dumbarton, to attend and wait upon David, Lord of Scone, comptroller, at Loch Kilkerrane, on 15 July 1605, "weill bodin in feir of weir" in their most substantious and warlike manner, and with 20 days victual and provision, there to follow the Comptroller's direction in all things tending to the furtherance of His Majesty's authority and service. Edinburgh, 27 June 1605.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vii., pp. 68, 69.

454 [136g]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL containing warrant to charge the provost and bailies of Glasgow, Ayr, Irvine, Renfrew, and Dumbarton, to assist, within their bounds, the comptroller and others, his Majesty's officers and servants, in pressing mariners for the king's service in Kintyre and other parts of the South and West Isles. Edinburgh, 27 June 1605.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vii., pp. 69, 70.

455 [136h]. ACT of the PRIVY COUNCIL ordaining the bailies of the regality of Glasgow to deliver up to Robert Hepburn, lieutenant of the King's guards, the arms and ammunition that Colonel William Stewart had after his expedition against the men of Kintyre put in the custody of the said bailies. Edinburgh, 27 June and 4 July 1605.

Printed Register of the Privy Council, vol. vii., pp. 74, 76.

456 [137a]. DEED granted by the provost, bailies, and council of Glasgow, narrating that it was the godly intention of the deacons and remanent craftsmen to repair and erect an hospital for the comfort and supply of their decayed brethren, and to mortify yearly alms thereto; that these craftsmen had acquired right to the chaplainries of St. John and St. Nicholas, with a house and yard lying without the North Port (erroneously described in the deed as the East Port) of the burgh, founded by the late Sir Roland Blakadir, subdean of Glasgow, and had paid great sums of money therefor to Thomas Cloggie, who had the gift thereof, and had applied to his own use the fruits and profits of the chaplainries, house, and yard, "quhilk appertainit to the puir of befoir." The magistrates and council, therefore, willing to advance the purposes of the craftsmen, renounced to the master of the hospital, for behoof thereof, all right or interest they possessed in the two chaplainries, houses, lands, and pertinents thereof, by virtue of Queen Mary's gift, or otherwise. Farther, they granted for the purposes of the hospital, "ane peice of waist grund, now being ane unprofitabill myre in the heid of the commoune lone that passis to the Provanesyd, callit Dobbies Lone, nixt adjacent to the yeard of the said hospitall," as stobbed and marched off, conform to an Act of Council, dated 27 April 1605. Glasgow, 3 July 1605.

Original in the possession of the Trustees of the Andersonian University.

See Foundation by Rolland Blacadyr, No. 310; also Acts of Council, dated 8th November and 30th December, 1589 [Council Records, i., pp. 147–8], referring to Cloggy's gift.

457 [137b]. INSTRUMENT of SASINE in favour of the deacons, visitors, collectors, and assisters of crafts in the burgh of Glasgow, in the south half of a piece of waste ground, described as "ane waist foir frunt called Moirbottillis Manse," with yard and pertinents adjacent thereto, lying within the burgh of Glasgow, and west side of the street which leads from the Metropolitan Church to the Wyndhead, between the lands of Arthur Fischer, Peter Patersoune and others on the south, the lands of the hospital and yard commonly called the "Almous Hows" on the north, the lands of David Wemys on the west, and the street on the east; all as "stobit and merchit," conform to disposition or contract made between Alexander Stewart, on the one part, and the said deacons, visitors, collectors, and assisters of crafts, on the other part, dated 30th July, 1605; and that for the purpose of the crafts founding and building an hospital for the use of their poor. Glasgow, 30 July 1605.

Protocol Book of Archibald Heygait, iv., p. 48.

458 [137c]. DEED by the deacon convener, deacons of crafts, and visitor of maltmen and mealmen of Glasgow, narrating the acquisition of a decayed hospital outside the [north] port of the burgh, founded by Sir Rolland Blacadyr, and their intention to build it anew for the comfort of poor decayed craftsmen, for the support of which hospital they bound themselves to contribute thereto twopence weekly for each craftsman, thirteen shillings and fourpence for the upset of each apprentice, the half of all fines levied by them, eightpence for each making of malt, twenty shillings for each burgess' son who enters to make malt to sell, and twenty merks for each unfreeman who becomes free and makes malt, and also a yearly payment, varying from thirty pounds to fifty-three shillings, from each craft, and amounting to upwards of £150 Scots yearly. The poor placed in the hospital were required to render daily prayers for the king and queen, the provost, bailies, council, and community of the burgh, and the craftsmen thereof. The provost and bailies interpone their authority and order the deed to be registered in their burgh court books. Glasgow, 3 August 1605.

Original in the possession of the Andersonian University, Glasgow.

459 [137d]. INSTRUMENT of SASINE in favour of Mr. Peter Low, chirurgeon, burgess of the burgh of Glasgow, as attorney for and in name of the poor of the Crafts Hospital, in a house, with chambers, offices, yard and pertinents, lying within the territory of the burgh, without the North Port, at the head of the lone called Dobbies Lone, between the said lone on the west, a common passage on the north, and the public way which leads from the said port to Garngadhill on the east; also in a piece of waste, sometime a myre, adjacent to the said yard, and to be added thereto, as the same is marched off by the council of the burgh; and that conform to a letter of gift by the provost, bailies, and councillors of the burgh in favour of the said poor, dated 3rd July 1605 [No. 456]; and also according to the tenor of disposition by Thomas Cloggie, messenger, in favour of the said poor. Glasgow, 4 September 1605.

Protocol Book of Archibald Heygait, iv., p. 62.

460 [138]. LETTER by JAMES VI., dated at Hampton Court, 27th September, 1605, setting forth that in consideration of "the present estate of our city of Glasgow "being in quantitie and number of trafficquers, and other inhabitants within the same, "inferior to few of the cities and burrows of that our kingdome," he had been moved to cause the Duke of Lennox to give up his claim to "ony superioritie abone the said citie "in election of thair magistrates." To remove any misunderstanding which the "obscurity" of the writ they granted might occasion, the king by this letter declared that nothing was meant by that writ further than that any claim of superiority which might be asserted by the duke in the nomination or election of the magistrates should be given up. Such claim having been freely renounced by him, while he reserved entire his right of justiciary and bailiary of regality, the king accordingly declared by this letter that the city "sall have als frie electioun of thair magistrates yeirlie as athir Edinburgh, Perth, "Dundie, Striviling, or ony uther frie burgh or citie within that our kingdome, and als "frie as ony burgh of regalitie quhatsumevir." In token of his approval of the letter and his surrender of his claim of superiority in the election of the magistrates, the duke subscribed the letter with his own hand, and it was ordained to be registered in the books of the privy council ad futuram rei memoriam. On 4th November, 1605, the letter was presented by the king's advocate to the privy council, and ordained to be registered in the council books.

Glasgow Charters, No. lxxxix., part ii., p. 269.

Privy Council Register, vol. vii., pp. 141–2.

461 [138a]. CHARTER by Bartholomew Simpsoun, preceptor of St. Nicholas Hospital, with consent of John, archbishop of Glasgow, patron of the said preceptory, and of the dean and chapter of Glasgow, in favour of William Flemeing, merchant, burgess of Glasgow, and Margaret Flemeing, his spouse, of a tenement, with enclosure, sometime belonging to James Flemeing, burgess of Glasgow, lying in the burgh of Glasgow, on the west side of the great street leading from the Market Cross to the Metropolitan Church (adjoining a passage at the place of the Friars Minors). 22 April 1606. Ratified by King James VI., 9 June 1618.

Register of the Great Seal, 1609–20, p. 663, No. 1833.