Supplementary Records
Scalthwaiterigg and Hay

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

John F. Curwen (editor)

Year published

1926

Pages

116-118

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'Supplementary Records: Scalthwaiterigg and Hay', Records relating to the Barony of Kendale: volume 3 (1926), pp. 116-118. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49348 Date accessed: 02 October 2014.


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SCALTHWAITERIGG AND HAY.

1535 The Hospital or House of Lepers near Kendall. William Harryngton, keeper or master there. The aforesaid Hospital is worth:—

Mansion with divers closes and plough lands annexed to the same per annum £2 7 4
Rent and farms in the same place in the tenure of various tenants per annum 8 16 11
£11 4 3
Reprisals to wit:—
Money paid as of old for the sustentation of the poor and leprous people daily existing under the said Hospital and there remaining 5 0 0
Clear value £6 4 3
A tenth part whereof 12

Valor Ecclesiasticus, vol. 5, p. 268.

1546 On 14 February, 1545/6, the churchwardens of Kendal presented to the bishop of Carlisle that there was a foundation of a house (chantry) and certain land called Spittelle of the yearly value of £11 10s. 3d., as appeareth by the rental thereof. Rentals and Surveys P.R.O. Roll, 846.

1672 13 January. It is ordered that the inhabitants of Hutton in Hay are to join with those of Skalthwayte Rigg and ye Hay as formerly with regard to assessment. K. Indictment Book, 1669–1692.

1687 14 January. The way at Spittell Beck is in decay; order that the inhabitants there ought to repair the same before next Sessions or pay a fine of 5s. for their neglect. K Indictment Book, 1669-92; also K. Order Book, 1669-96.

1696 24 April. The following, being suspected persons, have neglected or refused to make and subscribe the Declaration and take the oaths:—Kath. Beck, widow, Margt. Beck, spr. and Elizth Thompson, widow. (K. Indictment Book, 1692-1724). See Docker under same date.

1707/8 16 January. Presentment that the highway between Minte Bridge and Kendall is very much out of repair; Order to the chief constable to give notice to the Corporation of Kendall to repair the same as also the way leading from Peat Yate to Kendall. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

Then follow several other presentments as to the decay of this road which are all very much the same; e.g. on 12 January, 1711, concerning the "broad way adjoining to Spittle"; on 18 January, 1712, the highway from Laverock Bridge to the Spittle; on 2 May, 1712, the causeway from Mint Bridge to Crossbank End; on 16 January, 1713, the highway between Kendal and Spittle; and on 5 October, 1716, the highway between Mints Feet Bridge and Mints Feet Lane. K. Indict. Book, 1692–1724.

1717/18 17 January. It appearing that the King's highway leading from Spittlehouse to K. Kendall, being 500 yards in length and 4 yards in breadth is in great want of repair, upon a travers in court it appears that Mr. John Wilson of Spittle, gent., John Lancaster of the same, yeo, Thos Wilson, tanner, Ric. Crackanthorpe, gent., Will. Wilson, tanner, Rob. Nicholson, Will. Fletcher, Anthony Garnet and Tho. Hudson, all of K. Kendall, having lands adjoining the said highway on each side, by the jury's verdict, are found liable to repair it and for neglect to do so the court fines them £20 and orders them to repair it before Midsummer on pain of paying the said fine. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

1720/1 13 January. Presentment that the highroad between Mince Bridge and Mince Feet Close is in decay, and that the ground on both sides belongs to Spittle and is in the possession of Mr. John Wilson of Spittle: ordered to be repaired by the possessors before next Sessions. (Ibid.). Also the highway adjoining to the east side of Mincefeet, between the yeat called Shipcoat Yeat and Mincefeet Close, is much damaged by persons laying dunghills or manure: ordered to be forthwith repaired and the dunghills removed. Ibid.

1724/5 15 January. Presentment that the highway between Lowcross Banck and the close at Mincefeet Close, is in decay for want of repair and by dunghills there, and ought to be repaired. Ibid.

1811 The Common Fields known as "Mint's Feet," containing some 105 acres, were inclosed in 1811. Hitherto they had been open tracts of arable or meadow land belonging in separate strips to various owners. These, when under tillage or shut up for hay, were occupied in severalty, but at other times were subject to the exercise of rights of common.

1815 10 July. The Commissioner's Award under the Scalthwaiterigg Inclosure Act inrolled and deposited with the Clerk of the Peace. K. Order Book, 1811–17.

1824 12 July. Part of the common highway, beginning at the south end of a close called the Vineyard, part of Spittle Farm, and ending northwards as far as the north side of farms and grounds called Spittle, in length 1860 yards and in breadth 7 yards, in great decay, and that Will. Ellwood, farmer of Spittle Farm, ought to repair the same. K. Indictment Book, 1824–34.

1825 28 July. John Gough the eminent naturalist died on Wednesday last at Fowl Ing in the 68th year of his age. He was born at Kendal in 1757 and when some three years old was attacked with the small pox which deprived him of sight. He could distinguish day from night but not the image of any object. He went to the Friend's School in Kendal, where, under Mr. Bewley he learnt natural history and became devoted to botany. Wordsworth's Excursion (pp. 6, 7) gives to us a happy portrait of his friend John Gough:—

No floweret blooms

Throughout the lofty range of these rough hills, Or in the woods, that could from him conceal It's birth-place; none whose figure did not live Upon his touch.

1899 10 March. Complaint that the road at a place called Light Water on the Appleby road near Benson Hall, was dangerous, with a request that the stream be covered over and the road made level. Resolved that the County Council be recommended to carry out the improvement on condition that one-half of the cost is subscribed locally. C. C. Minutes, 1899–1900.

1907 13 April. After a similar complaint a Committee found that the water from a runner crosses the road in the open and generally extends a few inches deep to a witdh of several feet, but that after heavy rains the water is considerable and dangerous. They recommend the erection of a culvert across the road and the surveyor was instructed accordingly. C. C. Minutes. 1907–8.