Supplementary Records
Mansergh

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

John F. Curwen (editor)

Year published

1926

Pages

299-302

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'Supplementary Records: Mansergh', Records relating to the Barony of Kendale: volume 3 (1926), pp. 299-302. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=49388 Date accessed: 22 August 2014.


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Contents

MANSERGH.

1543 26 April. In the Will of Edward Mansergh of Mansergh, under this date, mention is made of his wife Barbara; his sons Christopher, George and Alexander; his daughter Alice and his grandson Edward the son of Christopher. Surtees Soc., vol. 26, p. 37.

1682/3 28 February. Information against John Bainbrigg of Mansergh who is believed to be an encourager "of that black and terrible troop of notorious malefactors by which the part of the country hath been intolerably infested." His house is believed to be well furnished with men's and women's apparel such as was never bought by him, and also several rapiers, pistols and other weapons. Hist. MSS. Com., 12th Rep., 190.

1690 10 October. Petition of John Peilsburie and Katherine his wife that they were forced to fly out of Ireland through the fear of the Irish Papists and having nothing to live upon save a small cottage in Mansergh: Order for 12d. per week to be paid to them by the Church Wardens and Overseers of Mansergh. K. Indictment Book, 1669–92.

1706/7 17 January. Whereas James Bainbidge, constable of Mansergh, was ordered by warrant of Christopher Hilton, Esq., to apprehend John Bainbridge and Edward Bainbridge within his constablewick, and convey them before Mr. Hilton to answer great misdemeanours laid against them by Margaret the wife of the said Edward, and paid 10s. for assistance in conveying them for the charges of 2 nights and 3 days before they could be conveyed before Mr. Hilton by reason of their obstinancy and 10s. more to the assistants; order to the said John and Edward Bainbridge to pay the petitioner 20s. and for distress on their refusal. Order to the keeper of the common goal to take into custody Edward and John Bainbridge, who hath threatened the death of Margaret wife of Edward and the burning of the houses of some of her neighbours, they having refused to enter recognizances to appear at next Sessions. K. Order Book, 1696–1724.

1707 10 October. Whereas the inhabitants of the manor or lordship of K. Lonsdale contributed £4 2s. 6d. towards the erection of a new bridge at Beckbrow, dividing the lordships of K. Lonsdale and Mansergh, near to Mansergh Hall houses, upon condition that the inhabitants of Mansergh hereafter repair the said bridge at their own charge, this agreement dated 25 August, 1707, is made an Order of Sessions. (Ibid.). The order was confirmed 13 July following. Ibid.

1726 Jacob Dawson of Nether Hall in Mansergh, who built the chapel there in 1726, died in June, 1735. Alex. Pearson, Material for an account of K. Lonsdale.

1825 17 October. Filed, the order with plan annexed for diverting part of a highway in Mansergh for the length of 356 yards; also part of another for the length of 413 yards. (K. Indictment Book, 1824–34). Also on 13 January following for diverting and turning a certain part of the highway from the north end of the bridge near Mansergh Hall to a certain other place near the north-west corner of a small enclosure on the north side of and adjoining to Mansergh Hall for the length of 180 yards. And another order with plan annexed for diverting the highway from the north-west corner of a small inclosure on the north side and adjoining Mansergh Hall for the length of 548 yards. K. Indict. Book, 1824–34.

1827 8 January. Filed the certificate of Edward Tomlinson, Bridge Master, that Bleabeck Bridge is erected in a substantial and commodious manner and is in complete repair. Ibid.

1830 19 April. John Rowlandson, curate of Mansergh, took the oaths of allegiance, supremacy and abjuration and made the declaration required by the Statute 9 George IV. Ibid.

1837 Anthony Battersby Tomlinson and William Talbot were appointed the Commissioners for awarding the lands inclosed in Mansergh according to the Act passed in 7 William IV and 1 Victoria, c. 6. The Award was filed on the Roll of Quarter Sessions 19 October, 1840. (K. Indict. Book, 1839–52). Among the public and private roads set out by the Commissioners we find:—Mansergh School Road, one public bridle and private carriage road of the width of 21 ft. commencing at the end of an ancient lane leading from Old Town to Rigmaden, at the north-east corner of an ancient inclosure called Town Ing belonging to William Thompson, esq. and extending in an easterly direction along the present line of road leading from Old Town to Rigmaden, over St. Andrew's Green, to the south-east corner of an ancient inclosure called Long Field belonging to John Addison, esq. Mansergh Hall Road, one other public bridle and private carriage road of the width of 21 ft. commencing at the Mansergh School Road and extending in a southerly direction along the present line of road leading from Old Town to Mansergh Hall, over St. Andrew's Green, to the north-east corner of an ancient inclosure called Low Town Ing, belonging to William Thompson, esq. Mire Side Road, one other public bridle and private carriage road of the width of 21 ft. commencing at the Scots Driving Road and extending in a westerly direction to the north-east corner of an ancient inclosure called Roundabout belonging to Edward Wilson, esq. Tram Road, one private carriage and occupation road of the width of 12 ft. for the purpose only of leading lime and manure, commencing at Hegholme Road near the Height Fell Gate, and extending in a northerly direction over the allotment set out to John Brunskill to a gate leading to an inclosure called Near Pasture thence nearly in the same direction by the side of an ancient inclosure to the gate leading into the ancient inclosure called the Tram belonging to Edward Wilson, esq. Hazlerigg Road, one other private carriage and occupation road of the width of 12 ft. commencing at the K. Lonsdale and K. Kendale Turnpike Road and extending in a south-westerly direction along the west side of the allotment set out to the Overseers of the Poor of Mansergh, as recreation ground, to an ancient inclosure called Hazlerigg belonging to Edward Wilson, esq. Stangana Moss Road, one other private carriage and occupation road, of the width of 12 ft., commencing at the Mansergh High Road and extending in a northerly direction for the length of 154 yards, thence branching off in northwesterly and north-easterly directions to peat mosses severally set out to William Thompson, Joseph Conder, Edward Wilson, Robert Goad, Robert Baines Armstrong and John Addison in Stangana Moss. Hegholme Moss Road, one other private carriage and occupation road of the width of 12 ft., commencing at the gate near the Height, in Mansergh, and leading out of the Hegholme Road into an allotment set out to Edward Wilson and extending to peat mosses in Hegholme Moss severally set out to the Middleton Curacy, Lady le Fleming and William Moore. Conder's Moss Road, one other private carriage and occupation road, of the width of 12 ft., commencing at the Scots Driving Road, and extending in a westerly direction over an allotment purchased by the late Christopher Wilson from the Commissioners to a peat moss set out to Joseph Conder. Conder Deeds at Terry Bank; also Westmorland Gazette for 24 April, 1847.

1871 5 April. Black Brow Bridge has fallen into decay and is in a dangerous state. The Bridge has never been repaired by the County hitherto. From all enquiries it was certainly in existence in 1803, it has always been used by the public and according to Burn's Justice, 30th edition, i, 504, if no immemorial custom to repair can be proved against the Township or any other person, the County is liable. (K. Minute Book, 1859–75). On 29 June, 1871, the Committee appointed to enquire as to the liability of the County, after examining the oldest inhabitants concluded that the repairs properly belonged to the County. (Ibid.). The work is now let for a cost of about £60. On 11 April, 1872, it was reported as satisfactorily finished. Ibid.

1923 15 May. The South Westmorland District Council wrote to the County Council stating that they had taken over the road leading from Rigmaden gate to the main Sedbergh-K. Lonsdale road, including the bridge over the Lune and asking that the bridge be made a county bridge. It is 151 feet long including the abutments, a stone arch on the east side with a span of 17 ft. 5 ins., one pier and a steel girder bridge of 120 ft. span. The width of the carriage way is 12 ft. 4 ins. The approach roads on the east and west are 75 yards and 100 yards respectively. Resolved that the County be recommended to pay a sum not exceeding one-third of the annual cost of maintenance. C.C. Minutes, 1923–24.