General history
Extinct gentry families

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Daniel and Samuel Lysons

Year published

1814

Pages

118-174

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'General history: Extinct gentry families', Magna Britannia: volume 3: Cornwall (1814), pp. CXVIII-CLXXIV. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50618 Date accessed: 25 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Extinct Families.

Achym of Trenake in Pelynt — extinct in the early part of the last century.

Arms: — Arg. a maunch Sab., a border of the second charged with eight cinquefoils of the first.

Albalanda of Nansavallon or Blanchland, in Kea. — The heiress married Boscawen in the reign of Edward III.

Arms: — Gul. three bendlets Argent.

Arscott of Norton in Launcels, removed to Annery in the parish of Muncklegh, in Devonshire. The Arscotts of Tetcott, now represented by the Molesworths, were some time of Ethy in St. Winnow.

Arms: — Per chevron Az. and Erm. in chief, two stags' heads caboshed Or.

Arundell of Lanherne. — The origin of this family is very incorrectly stated in the peerages, and with great confusion of erroneous dates; nor have we been able to explain it very satisfactorily by any pedigrees to which we have had access. Some accounts make the founder of the Lanherne family marry the heiress of Lanherne, who had married the heiress of Pincerna; others make Arundell and Umphraville marry coheiresses of Pincerna. None of the heraldic writers, who have treated of this family, seem to have been aware that they came from YewtonArundell in Devonshire, which continued to be the property of the Arundells of Lanherne, till about the year 1600. Sir William Pole tells us, that Ralph Arundell was of Yewton as early as the reign of King Stephen. The earliest intimation we have of the Arundells in Cornwall from public records is in 1346, at which time it appears that John Arundell held the manors of Treloy and Trembleth. One of the Arundells (probably Sir Ralph, who was sheriff of the county in 1260) had long before this married the heiress of Trembleigh or Trembleth in St. Ervan, and this we believe was the origin of their settling in Cornwall. Nearly contemporary was Sir Renfrey Arundell, of whom we have intimation in a pedigree of the Roscarrocks, which Sir Renfrey is said to have married the heiress of Treffry (supposed of Treffry in Linkinhorne), and to have had a son, Lawrence Arundell of Blayboll (probably Blable in St. Issey), whose daughter and heir married Roscarrock. It appears that in 1346 John de Umphraville held Lanherne in right of Alice his wife, which Alice, no doubt, was the heiress either of Lanherne or Pincerna, for it appears to have been the same family (fn. 1) . If the pedigree as given by Sir William Pole be correct (as in most particulars it appears to be, though we suspect that a link or two have been lost), it seems probable that John de Umphraville married the widow of Sir Renfrey, and thus held Lanherne jure uxoris (fn. 2) . The name of John does not occur in Sir William Pole's pedigree, but it is certain that in 1346 he possessed Trembleth, the original Cornish seat of the family, and that either he or his heirs soon afterwards became possessed of Lanherne, and removed thither their residence. From the Lanherne stock branched out the Arundells, who were of Tremoderet in Duloe in the fifteenth century; those of Tolverne in Filleigh; those of Trevithick in St. Columb; and those of Wardour-Castle in Wiltshire. The ancestor of the last mentioned family, Sir Thomas Arundell, a younger son of Sir John Arundell of Lanherne, married Margaret, daughter and coheir of Lord Edward, and sister of Queen Catherine Howard. The Lanherne Arundells became extinct, in the year 1701, by the death of Sir John Arundell, who settled his estates on Richard Bealing, Esq., his daughter's son, on condition of his taking the name of Arundell. The sole heiress of this Richard was married, in 1739, to Henry Lord Arundell (fn. 3) , of Wardour, in consequence of which match the present Lord Arundell is representative of the elder as well as of one of the younger branches of Arundell of Lanherne. This family married heiresses of Trembleth, Pincerna or Lanherne, Le Sore, Luscot (fn. 4) , Lambourn, and Tresithney, and coheiresses of Carminow, Chidiock, and Dinham.

Arms of Arundell, anciently of Yewton-Arundell in Devonshire, and afterwards of Lanherne: — Sab. six swallows Argent, three, two, one. — Sir John Arundell of Lanherne, in the reign of Edward III., bore a lion passant between the swallows, as appears by his seal appendant to a deed of that date.

The Arundells of Tolverne in Filleigh, settled there in consequence of the match with Le Sore or Soor in the reign of Richard II., and continued for many descents, having married the coheiresses of Archdekne, Courtenay, Earl of Devon, Penpons, and St. Aubyn. In or about the reign of Charles I., they removed to Trevarnoe and Truthall in Sithney, and were also of Methleigh in Breage, which was sold by John Arundell, Esq. in the early part of the last century. This John, who died in 1718, left a sole heiress married to William Jago, Esq., ancestor of Thomas Jago, Esq., of Launceston (fn. 5) . His younger brother continued the male line, and resided at Marazion. The last of this family, by whose death the name of the Lanherne Arundells expired in Cornwall, was Mr. John Arundell, who died in 1766, being the collector of the customs at the port of Falmouth: his sisters married St. Aubyn of Plymouth, Powell, and Robinson. The Arundells, who were of Tremoderet in Duloe in the fifteenth century, were descended from Sir Renfrey, a younger son of Sir John Arundell of Lanherne (by the heiress of Lambourn), which Sir Renfrey married the heiress of Coleshill of Tremoderet. This family (of which was John Arundell, Bishop of Exeter) became extinct after three descents, by the death of Sir Edmund Arundell. Some pedigrees represent Elizabeth, the aunt and only heir, as married to Whittington, and afterwards to Stradling: others, more correctly, represent two coheiresses married to Whittington and Stradling. Sir John St. Aubyn is descended from the Whittingtons.

The Arundells of Trevithick in St. Columb, a younger branch of the Lanherne family, settled there in or about the reign of Edward VI., and became extinct about the year 1740. The heiress married Rawe of Endellion: Richard Rawe, Esq. is the representative of this branch of the Arundell family.

A younger branch of the Arundells of Trevithick, was of Carvynick in St. Enoder. The sole heiress of this branch married a younger son of the Tanners of Comb in Brannell, from two of whose coheiresses are descended the Rev. Thomas Penwarne of St. Germans, and Richard Taunton, M.D., of Truro.

A younger branch of the Arundells descended from Thomas, a younger son of Sir John Arundell, and Anne Moyle, settled at Clifton in Landulph, about the year 1500, and became extinct about 1620. The coheiresses married Killigrew and Lower.

John Arundell of Trerice, who lived in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, had, by his first wife, the heiress of Coswarth, four daughters, married to Carew of Anthony, Somaster, Coswarth, and Dinham.

Thomas, a younger brother of John Arundell, the brave defender of Pendennis Castle, settled at Tremoderet in Duloe (which, at a former period, had been the seat of a younger branch of the Lanherne Arundells), in the reign of Charles I. This branch of the Arundells became extinct in the early part of the last century.

Tonkin says, that a younger branch of the Arundells of Trerice was settled for some time at Trerice in St. Allen.

The son of Sir John Arundell of Trerice, by the coheiress of Beville, settled at Gwarnick: this branch soon became extinct, by the death of John Arundell, Esq., commonly called Black Arundell, in 1597.

The Arundells of Menadarva in Camborne were descended from a younger son of Sir John Arundell of Trerice, who died in the early part of the seventeenth century. It has been supposed that this was an illegitimate branch, but it is most probable, that the tradition on this subject have arisen from the expression of natural son, applied to the first owner of this estate, in his father's will; but as it is well known, and now generally admitted, that the expression of natural son was at that time never used in the acceptation it now bears, it is, in fact, a proof of the contrary. The immediate descendant of this branch, and the only Arundell remaining in Cornwall, in the male line, is William Harris, Esq., of Pembroke-College in Oxford, whose grandfather, William Arundell, Esq., took the name of Harris on succeeding to the Kenegie estate, as before-mentioned. John, a younger son of William Arundell (grandfather of the present William Harris), retained the name of Arundell, and left male issue, who reside in Devonshire. It is probable that the Arundells of Trevelver in St. Minver, extinct in the latter part of the last century, were descended from a younger branch of the Menadarva family.

Arwenick of Arwenick in Budock: the heiress married Killigrew about the reign of Richard II.

Arms of Arwenick: — Arg. three mascles, Gules.

Barrett, an ancient family of Penquite, afterwards of Penhergie in St. Sampson. The heiress married Prestwood. This family married the heiress of Barnard, and coheiresses of Penhergie and Coryton.

Arms of Barrett: — Gules, a bend Vairé.

Barrett of Tregarden or Tregarne in St. Mabyn, married the coheiress of Bere of Tregarne. One of the coheiresses married Godolphin.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron engrail'd, between three bears passant Sable, muzzled Or.

Battin of Battin in Northill: the heiress married Vincent in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Arms of Battin: — Arg. a chevron between three battle-axes Sable.

Beare or Bere, of Killigarth in Talland, and Bryn in Withiel, married the coheiress of Serjeaux in the reign of Richard II.: the sole heiress of Beare married Beville.

Arms of Beare of Killigarth: — Arg. a bear salient Sable, muzzled Or.

Beare or Bere of Trevedo and St. Neot. — The latter was a younger branch: before they branched off, this family had married the heiresses of Clemens and Bond. The brother to the ancestor of Bere of St. Neot married the heiress of Doyngell. The coheiresses of Bere of St. Neot married Grylls of Lanreath and Bellott of Bochym: the Beres of St. Neot, Trevedo, Pengelly, and Killigarth, bore the same coat, with due difference. The Pengelly family were also of Backlawren in Egloshayle, in the reign of Queen Mary.

Beaupre or Belloprato — extinct in the fourteenth century: the heiress married Trevanion.

Becket of Cartuther married the coheiresses of Cartuther and Menwynyk, and the heiress of Totwell: extinct before 1620.

Arms of Becket: — Sab., semee of cross crosslets fitchée, and a fesse Or, between three boars' heads, couped of the second.

Bellot of Bochym in Cury. — A younger branch of the Bellots of GreatMoreton in Cheshire settled at Corsham in Wiltshire, before their removal to Cornwall, which took place in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when Bochym was given to them in marriage with one of his daughters, by Reginald Mohun, Esquire of the Body to the Queen. Renatus Bellot, the last heir-male, who died about the year 1730, married the heiress of Soure of Trebartha, but had no issue by her; his sister having married Hawkins of Trewinnard and Hele of Exeter, Sir Christopher Hawkins is the present representative of this ancient family. One of the Bellots married a coheiress of Beare of St. Neots, and to his second wife, a sister of General Monk.

Arms of Bellot:—Argent on a chief Sable, three mullets pierced of the field.

Benallack or Benathlack of Benallack in Constantine — extinct in the fourteenth century: the heiress married Gerveys, represented by the Rev. Richard Gerveys Grylls of Helston.

Bennet of Hexworthy in Lawhitton, descended from a Sussex family, settled at Hexworthy in the reign of Queen Elizabeth: extinct in 1786.

Arms:—Gules, three demi-lions rampant, Argent.

Beville of Gwarnicke in St. Allen, and afterwards of Killigarth in Talland, said to have come over to England with William the Conqueror, married the heiresses of Gwarnick, Trelowarren, Tresavis, Beare, Tresithney, and a coheiress of Petit. The coheiresses of Beville married Grenville and Arundell about the year 1500.

Arms of Beville:—Arg. a bull passant Gules, tripped and horned, Or.

Blanchminster or De Albo-monasterio, in some records called Whitminster, of Bynamy Castle in Stratton — extinct in the fourteenth century. The last of the male line was Guy de Blanchminster, rector of Lansallos, younger brother probably of Sir John Blanchminster, who died without issue. The heiress of this family, daughter of Sir Ralph Blanchminster, and sister of Sir John, married Sir Richard Hiwis. Their heir-general, through the families of Hiwis, Coleshill, Arundell, and Whittington, is Sir John St. Aubyn, Bart.

Arms of Blanchminster:—Arg. three bendlets Sable, over all a chevron Ermine.

Blewett of Colan. — A younger branch of the extinct family of HolcombeRogus, in Devonshire, married, about the latter part of the fifteenth century, one of the coheiresses of Colan of Colan; extinct about the middle of the seventeenth century.

Arms of Blewett:—Arg. a chevron between three eagles displayed, Vert.

Bloyowe or Bloyhon, of Tregewell, and of Polrode in St. Tudye, a very ancient family, descended from Blohinus, who held several manors under the Earl of Moreton at the time of the Domesday Survey. This family became extinct in the fourteenth century, when the sole heiress married Tynten, whose heiress married Carminow. One of the Bloyowes married the heiress of Nanshuke.

Arms of Bloyowe or Bloyhon:—Sable, a saltier engrail'd, Argent.

Bodiniel, of Bodiniel in Bodmin, married the heiress of Burnard; the heiress of Bodiniel married Oliver, and the heiress of Oliver, Williams.

Bodrigan or Bodrugan of Bodrigan in Gorrans. — This ancient and opulent family, traced to the reign of Edward I., became extinct in the male line by the death of Otes or Otho, son of Sir Otes Bodrugan, about the year 1331. The heiress married Trevarthian of Trevarthian in Newlyn. Sir Henry Bodrugan, who lost all his lands by attainder, in the year 1485, is said to have changed his name from Trenowth. One of this family married a coheiress of St. Aubyn of Devonshire.

Arms of Bodrugan:—Arg. three bendlets, Gules.

Bodulgate of Bodulgate. — A coheiress of this family married Roscarrock.

Arms:—Az. two lions passant-gardant, Argent.

Bogan of Treleage in St. Keverne, a younger branch of a Devonshire family — extinct in the latter part of the last century: the heiress married Vyvyan.

Arms:—Sab. a cockatrice displayed Arg., member'd and talon'd, Gules.

Boligh of Lansallos. — The heiress married Kellio.

Arms:—Arg. on a chevron Sab., between three torteauxes, as many bezants.

Bonithon, of Bonithon in Cury, which they possessed for many generations, became extinct, in the elder branch, by the death of Richard Bonithon, Esq., who sold Bonithon in 1720. This family had married coheiresses of Durant and Milliton.

Arms of Bonithon:—Arg. a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis, Sable.

A younger branch of the Bonithons settled at Carclew in Milor, in consequence of a match with one of the coheiresses of Daungers, in the reign of Henry IV. This branch, one of whom married the heiress of Pendrea, became extinct in 1697: the heiress married Kempe.

Bosvargus of Bosvargus in St. Just, three generations before 1620; extinct in the last century. The late Rev. Jonathan Toup was their representative.

Bray of Treswithan or Tresuthan in Camborne, an ancient family, became extinct in the reign of Charles I.

Arms:—Arg. three oak-trees, proper, fructed, Or.

Bray, of Trenowth in St. Cleer, and of Tremere in Lanivet, married a coheiress of Tremere; extinct about the year 1770.

Arms:—Arg. three saws, Sable.

Brett, an ancient family, whose heiress married Boscawen in the reign of Edw. II.

Calmady, originally of Calmady in Poundstock, afterwards of Combshead in Stoke-Climsland. The representative of this extinct family is Mr. Calmady Hamlyn, who resides near Bridistow in Devonshire.

Arms: — Az. a chevron between three pears, Or.

Carminow of Carminow in Mawgan (Meneage), said to have been settled there before the conquest, but not traced with any certainty further back than the reign of Henry III. The male line of the elder branch became extinct about the middle of the fourteenth century, when the coheiresses married Arundell, Trewarthian, and Petit. The coheiresses of a younger branch, which settled at Boconnoc as early as the reign of Edward III., married Carew and Courtenay about the latter part of the fifteenth century. A younger branch of the Carminows of Boconnoc settled at Fentongollan, and became possessed of very extensive landed property, which was dissipated about the year 1600. This branch, not long afterwards, became extinct; the coheiresses married Salter and Cole (fn. 6) . The coheiresses of a younger branch of the Carminows of Fentongollan (settled at Resprin in St. Winnow) married Prideaux and Flamanck. This branch, descended from Walter, a third son of Walter Carminow of Boconnoc, married the heiress of Resprin and coheiresses of Trenowth and Champernon; Nicholas, a younger son of this branch, married a coheiress of Wolvedon. The heiresses of another younger branch of the Fentongollan family (settled at Trenowth) married Boscawen and Herle. A third branch of this family was of Polmawgan in St. Winnow, whence they removed to Trehannick in St. Teath, at which place William Carminow, the last male heir of this ancient family, died in the year 1646; Thomas Carminow, of this branch, married the coheiress of Hilliard. The common ancestor of the Carminows married the heiress of Rawleigh. The Boconnoc branch, before the Fentongollan family branched off, married the heiresses of Glynn and Tynten. The Fentongollan branch married the heiress of Resprin and the coheiress of Trenowth, who inherited Fentongollan from Trejago.

The arms of Carminow were Azure, a bend Or. — In the great cause between Scrope and Grosvenor, in the reign of Richard II., respecting the bearing of this coat, it was deposed by one of the witnesses, that the same coat had been long (fn. 7) borne by Carminow, and was allowed by the Earl of Northampton, when the matter was brought before him in France,

Carnsew, originally of Carnsew in Mabe, afterwards of Bokelly in the parish of St. Kew, became extinct in the elder branch in the seventeenth century, when the coheiresses married Prideaux and Godolphin. There was a younger branch at St. Kew. The Carnsews married the heiresses of Nuling, Trecarne, and Stradling.

Arms of Carnsew: — Sab. a goat passant Arg. armed and unguled Or. — The family of Thomas, on purchasing the barton of Carnsew above-mentioned, adopted the name and arms of Carnsew. This family married the heiress of Drew. They afterwards removed to Trewoone in Budock.

Carter of St. Columb, a Staffordshire family, settled at St. Columb for several descents, became extinct in the male line towards the close of the seventeenth century, when one of the coheiresses married Silly, and afterwards Tanner; the others, Hoblyn and Hawkey.

Arms of Carter:—Az. two lions combatant, Or.

Carthew of Canaliggy in St. Issey. — The heiress married Tanner.

Arms:—Arg. a chevron Gules, between three ducks, proper.

Cartuther of Cartuther in Menheniot—extinct before 1400. The coheiresses married Haling and Becket.

Arms of Cartuther:—Arg. a fesse Az. between three etoiles of six points, Sable.

Carveth of Carveth in St. Mabe, whence they removed to Mewdon in Mawnan, and afterwards to Cosawse in Gluvias. — This family, one of whom had married an heiress of Penaluna, became extinct (at least in the elder branch) about a century ago, when the heiress married Leverton.

Arms of Carveth:—Arg. a chevron between three talbots, Sable.

Cavell of Trehaverick or Treharrick in St. Kew married the coheiress of Trehaverick in the reign of Henry VII. The coheiresses of Cavell married Vivian and Hore of Trenowth. This family had married also the coheiresses of Boniface, Knight, and Trecarren.

Arms of Cavell:—Arg. a calf passant Sable. — Hals says, that the Cavells bore also, Az. three sails of a ship, Arg., in consequence of one of the family having been an admiral in the reign of Henry VI.

Chamond of Trenowth-Chamond, and afterwards of Launcells for several descents, married the heiress of Trethegan. Sir Thomas Chamond, elder son of Sir John Chamond of Launcells, married a coheiress of Tregarthian, by whom he had two daughters, the elder married to Arundell of Talverne, afterwards to Trevanion; the other to Tripcony. Richard Chamond, a younger brother of Sir Thomas, married the coheiress of Trevenor; this branch became extinct in 1624. An heiress of this family married Hele or Porter of Launcells, who married Hele. Lord de Dunstanville is descended from this family through the Heles. The Rev. R. G. Grylls is representative of the elder branch by the marriage of his ancestor with the heiress of Trevanion.

Arms of Chamond:—Arg. a chevron between three fleurs-de-lis, Gules.

Champernon, originally De Campo Arnulphi, an ancient family of much note and great possessions in the counties of Cornwall and Devon. Their connection with this county arose from the marriage of Sir Richard Champernon, of ClystChampernon in Devonshire, with Joan Plantagenet, a natural daughter of Richard King of the Romans, by Joan Valletort, as it hath been supposed. John, a younger son of Sir Richard, to whom his father gave the Cornish estates, was ancestor of the Champernons of Inceworth, in the parish of Maker; afterwards, by a match with the heiress of Hamley, of Halwyn in St. Issey. The Champernons of Halwyn became extinct in the male line in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when the coheiresses married Trevelyan, Fortescue of Wood, and Monk of Potheridge (ancestor of General Monk).

Arms: — Gules, billetty Or, a saltier Vairé.

Chenduit of Bodannan in Endellion, sometimes, but improperly, called Cheney (having no connection with the Cheneys of other counties, who derived their origin from the De Caisnetos), a family of considerable antiquity and distinction, became extinct in the reign of Henry VI., when the coheiresses married Roscarrock and Trejago.

Arms of Chenduit:—Gul., four lozenges conjoined in fesse, each charged with an escallop-shell, Sable.

Chiverton of Kerris in St. Pauls, traced five generations antecedent to William Chiverton, the last heir-male, who died before the middle of the seventeenth century; his sister married Trewren, whose descendant is the present representative of this family. The Chivertons had married heiresses of Lower and Butshed, and a coheiress of Kyllehellon.

Arms of Chiverton:—Arg. on a mount in base, Vert., a tower triple towered, Sable. — There was another branch of this family settled at Trehunsey in Quithiock, of which branch was Richard Chiverton, Lord Mayor of London in 1658. He was the last heir-male of his family. The ancestor of this family married the heiress of Kingdon of Trehunsey.

Chynoweth of Chynoweth in St. Erth, afterwards of Mudgan in St. Martin (Meneage), extinct in the last century, married the heiress of Mudgan and a coheiress of Tregoos. The two last male descendants of this family were Anthony, who died without issue, and John, who left three daughters, married to Barfield, Dunscomb, and Trelevan.

Arms of Chynoweth:—Sab. on a fesse Or, three eagles' heads erased, Gules.

Cleather of Fentongimps in Perran-Zabuloe — extinct in the elder branch; the younger branches removed into Devonshire.

Arms: — Vert. a chevron between three swords pointed downwards, Or.

Colan or St. Colan of St. Colan, an ancient family, which became extinct about the latter end of the f_fteenth century, when one of the coheiresses married a younger son of Blewett of Holcombe-Rogus in Devonshire, and Trefusis.

Arms of Colan:—Arg. three torches Sable, flaming proper.

Coleshill, of Bynamy Castle in Stratton, and of Tremoderet in Duloe, originally of Essex, were a family of much note, and of equestrian rank in Cornwall for five or six generations. One of them married the heiress of Upton, another the heiress of Hiwis. The last heir-male of this family was Sir John, grandson of Sir John Coleshill, who was killed at the battle of Agincourt. The heiress of this family married Arundell. Sir John St. Aubyn is one of the representatives of the Coleshills, through the Whittingtons.

Arms of Coleshill: — Checky O. and S., a chief Arg. gutté de sang.

Colquite, described as of Fowey five generations before 1620 — extinct in the male line soon after the year 1700. The heiress of two brothers, who died without issue, married Lamb, and the heiress of Lamb, Graham, but left no male issue. One of this family had married the heiress of Hammett.

Arms:—Arg. a fesse Az. fretté Or, between three cinquefoils G.

Connock of Treworek, and of Treworgy in St. Cleer for more than two centuries — extinct by the death of the late Nicholas Connock, Esq. in the year 1757.

Arms:—Argent, a fesse dauncettée between three spread eagles, Gules. — One of this family had married the heiress of Bill.

Coplestone of Lametton in St. Kaine, and of Warlegh in Devonshire, an ancient and opulent family. They sold most of their Cornish property in the early part of Queen Elizabeth's reign, and have since become extinct. This family was distinguished by being esquires of the White Spur. (fn. 8)

One of the Coplestones married an heiress of Bonville. Another branch of the Coplestones was for some time resident at Lee in Morwinstow.

Arms of Coplestone:—Arg. a chevron engrailed Gules, between three leopards' faces Azure.

Cornwall of Court in St. Stephen-Brannell, descended from a son of Richard, Earl of Cornwall, by Joan de Valletort. The elder branch of this family became extinct, after a few descents, in the fourteenth century: the heiress married Hendower, whose heiress brought Court to the Tanners. From a younger branch descended the Cornwalls of Burford in Shropshire, those of Kings Nymet in Devonshire (ancestors of Lord Fanhope), and the Cornwalls of Herefordshire.

Arms of Cornwall:—Arg. a lion rampant Gules, crowned Or, within a border Sab. bezanty.

Coswarth of Coswarth in Colan for several generations — extinct in the seventeenth century: the heiress married Mynard, whose heiress married Vivian. A branch of the Coswarth family married the coheiress of Penwarne of Penwarne in Mevagissey: the heiress of this branch married Hill in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Arms of Coswarth:—Arg. on a chevron between three falcons' wings Az., five bezants.

Cotehele of Cotehele in Calstock — extinct in the reign of Edward III. The heiress married Edgcumbe.

Arms of Cotehele:—Or, a bend, Gules.

Cotton, of Bottreaux Castle, married the elder coheiress of Hender in the sixteenth century — extinct by the death of Sir John Cotton, grandson of Dr. Cotton, Bishop of Exeter. The heiress married Amy.

Courtenay of Boconnoc, a younger branch of the Courtenays, Earls of Devon, succeeded to that title. The immediate representative of this noble branch of the Courtenay family is Thomas Jago, Esq., of Launceston, as descended through the sole heiress of Arundell of Talverne from the elder sister of Edward Courtenay, the ninth Earl of Devon, who became one of the coheiresses of her great nephew the last Earl: the other coheiresses married Trethurfe, Mohun, aud Trelawney.

In the latter part of the fifteenth century, Sir Edmund Courtenay, second son of Sir Philip Courtenay of Powderham, by Elizabeth, daughter of Walter, Lord Hungerford, and brother of Courtenay, Bishop of Winchester, having married the heiress of that manor, settled at Deviock in the parish of St. Germans. His son, Richard, was of Lostwithiel, and left three sons. Lawrence, the eldest, was of Ethy in St. Winnow, which was sold by his descendant, Francis Courtenay, Esq., in 1634. We have not been able to trace when this branch became extinct, nor that of Courtenay of Deviock, which was continued by William the second son. John Courtenay, the third son of Richard Courtenay of Lostwithiel, settled at Tremeer in Lanivet, married the heiress of Trengove, and was ancestor of the Courtenays of Tremeer and the Courtenays of Lanivet, both now extinct. The former intermarried with Courtenay of Trethurfe, and became possessed of that estate, as will be explained below.

Edward (fn. 9) , second son of Sir William Courtenay of Powderham, by the daughter of Lord Bonville, married the heiress of Wotton of Wotton in Landrake; his son, one of the coheiresses of Trethurfe; his grandson, one of the coheiresses of Roskymer, and his great grandson, a coheiress of Gorges. There were two branches of this family, one of which remained at Wotton, and the other settled at Trethurfe in Ladock, which had been the feat of the family of that name. It is most probable that these branches became again united. The last of the Courtenays of Trethurfe was William Courtenay, Esq. (son of Sir Peter); which William died in 1683, bequeathing his estates to his kinsman and brother-in-law Humphrey Courtenay, Esq., of Tremeer in Lanivet. William, son of Humphrey Courtenay of Tremeer and Trethurfe, married a coheiress of Kelland of Devonshire. This family became extinct, in the male line, by the death of Charles Kelland Courtenay, Esq., in 1761; his sisters and coheirs married the late William Poyntz, Esq., and Edmund, late Earl of Cork and Orrery. The sons of these coheiresses, William Stephen Poyntz, Esq., and Edmund, now Earl of Cork and Orrery, are the present representatives of the families of Courtenay of Trethurfe and Courtenay of Tremeer.

The heiress of Courtenay of Tregellas, a younger branch of Courtenay of Trethurfe, married Williams of Treworgy. The heiress of another younger branch (of Trehane Vean in St. Erme), married Bawden, whose heiress married Beauchamp of Pengreep.

Arms of Courtenay: — Or, three torteauxes. — The Courtenays of Boconnoc had married the heiresses of Dawney and Carminow.

Cowling of Kerthen in Crowan, and of Trevarveneth and Trengwainton in Madron. — An heiress of this family married Godolphin in or about the reign of Henry VIII.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three Cornish choughs.

Dandy of Trewen in Lanreath, descended from a younger branch of the ancient baronial family of Dawney or Danneye of Sheviock, married an heiress of Scawen — extinct by the death of Mr. Thomas Dandy, in the year 1783.

Arms: — Argent on a bend cottised, Sable, three cinquefoils of the field.

Daungers of Carclew in Milor — extinct in the reign of Henry IV. The coheiresses married Renaudin and Bonithon, both now extinct.

Davies, a very numerous family in the seventeenth and the early part of the last century, in the hundred of Penwith, now wholly extinct. The heiress of Davies of Tredrea in St. Erth married the Rev. Edward Giddy, father of Davies Giddy, Esq., M. P. for Bodmin.

Arms of Davies: — Arg. a chevron Ermines, between three mullets pierced, Gul.

Denzell of Denzell in Mawgan, near St. Columb — extinct in 1535: the coheiresses married Holles (fn. 10) and Reskymer. The Denzells had married the heiresses of Trenowith and Skewis. A younger branch of Denzell settled at BucklandPhilley in Devonshire, which passed, with it's heiress, to the Fortescues.

Arms of Denzell: — Sable, a mullet in chief, and a crescent in base, Argent.

Dernford of Rame — extinct about the reign of Henry V., when the heiress married Edgcumbe, ancestor of the Earl of Mount-Edgcumbe.

Arms: — Sable, a ram's head caboshed, Arg., armed Or; being the coat of Rame, whose heiress Dernford married.

Earth of Earth in St. Stephen's, near Saltash, in the reign of Edward III. The heiress married Bond.

Arms: — Argent, three bucks' heads couped, Sable, attired Or, collared of the second.

Egloshayle of Egloshayle — extinct at an early period: the heiress married Kestell.

Arms: — Arg. a cross Sab. in the first quarter, a fleur-de-lis of the second.

Erisey of Erisey in Grade — traced to the reign of Edward I.; extinct in 1722. The heiress married John West, Esq., of whom, and of the Eriseys, the Hon. John Wodehouse, son of Lord Wodehouse, is, through his mother, the representative. This family have married the heiress of Eyre of Gwindreth, and coheiresses of Durant and Militon. A coheiress of one of the Eriseys married into the Vyvyan family in or about King William's reign.

Arms of Erisey: — Sab. a chevron between three griffins segreant, Or.

Esse or De Esse. — This family has been supposed to have derived their origin from the town of Saltash, anciently called Esse; but it appears that they were originally of Rose-Ash in Devonshire, called, at an early period, EsseRaph. Henry de Esse, of a younger branch of this family, settled at Sowton near Exeter, took the name of Trecarrell, from the barton so called in Lezant, which became his residence.

This branch of the family bore the coat of Esse with a variation, giving three instead of two chevrons Argent, on a field, Sable. They became extinct in the sixteenth century. One of the coheiresses married Harris of Mount-Radford in Devonshire.

Fentongimps of Fentongimps — extinct at an early period: the heiress married Penrose.

Ferrers of Newton-Park in St. Mellion. — The heiress married Coryton early in the fourteenth century.

Ferrers of Boswithgy and Trelowarren married the heiress of Trethake. The heiress of Ferrers married Vyvyan (now represented by Sir Carew Vyvyan, Bart.) in the reign of Edward IV. Sir William Pole says, that all the Ferrers families in Devonshire and Cornwall were descended from the ancient stock of Ferrers of Bere-Ferrers in the former county; the heiress of the elder branch of which married Champernon.

Arms of Ferrers of Newton: — Arg. on a chevron Sable, between three cinquefoils Gules, as many horse-shoes Or. — Arms of Ferrers of Trelowarren: — Or, on a bend Sable, three horse-shoes Argent. The latter varies from the coat of Ferrers of Bere, only in having the bend plain instead of being engrailed.

Fitz-William of Bodinneck in Lanteglos, near Fowey, from the reign of Henry II. till the early part of the fourteenth century, descended from the FitzRichards. The heiress married Mohun.

Arms: — Azure, three bendlets Or.

Fleming of Landithy in Madron.—The ancient family of Flandrensis or Fleming, who, at a very early period, became barons of Slane in Ireland, had large possessions in Cornwall and Devonshire, and are supposed to have given name to the parish of Botes-Fleming. Their chief English residence was at Chymwell in Devonshire. They possessed the manor of Ashetorre in Saltash, a seignory with very extensive jurisdiction, till the reign of Edward IV., when the coheiresses of the elder branch married Bellew and Dillon. The barony of Slane, which has since been forfeited by attainder, went to a younger branch, still remaining in Ireland. It is most probable that the Flemings of Landithy, who came from Munster in Ireland, and bore the same arms, were of this family. They became extinct nearly a century ago, and are represented by W. J. Godolphin Nicholls, Esq., of Trereife, near Penzance. One of this family married a coheiress of Cock of Bodmin.

Arms of Fleming: — Vairé, a chief checky O. and G.

Gaverigan of Gaverigan in St. Columb — traced two generations beyond the reign of Henry IV., extinct in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when the coheiresses married Trefusis, and Godolphin of Treveneage. The Gaverigans had married the heiresses of Treluddra, Godio, and Methrose.

Arms of Gaverigan: — Az. a goat passant Argent, attired Or.

Gedy of Trebursey in South-Petherwin. — One of the coheiresses married Sir John Eliot, ancestor of Lord Eliot, in the reign of James I.

Gerveys of Benallack in Constantine, descended from Gervase de Antron, a younger son of the Antrons of Antron, married the heiress of Benallack in the early part of the fourteenth century. The heiress of Gerveys, about the year 1670, married the ancestor of the Rev. Richard Gerveys Grylls of Helston.

Arms of Gerveys: — Arg. a chevron between three garbs Sable.

This family had married also the heiresses of Mewthing and Trevanion, and the coheiress of Treveglos.

Giffard of Helland married the heiress of Esse, of Ralph-Esse in Devonshire, in the fourteenth century: the heiress of Giffard soon afterwards married Biry of Devonshire.

Arms: — Azure, three fleurs-de-lis, two and one, Or, on each a pellet.

Glynn of Morval — extinct in the reign of Henry VIII.: the coheiresses married Coode, Godolphin, and Vyvyan: the heiress of Coode brought Morval to the Bullers.

Glynn of Wendron (1613.), afterwards of Helston and Polkinhorne (having married the heiress of Polkinhorne) — extinct by the death of Thomas Glynn, Esq., in 1777. The Rev. R. Gerveys Grylls married the heiress. Another branch of this family, settled at Broads in Helland, became extinct by the death of the late Dr. Glynn of Cambridge, who had assumed the name of Cloberry, his mother being heiress of the Cloberrys of Bradstone.

Arms, the same as Glynn of Glynn: — Arg. three salmon-spears with the points downwards Sable.

Godolphin of Trewarveneth in St. Paul's, a younger branch of Lord Godolphin's family, of whom some account has been already given (fn. 11) , settled there in or about the reign of Henry VIII, and became extinct in 1689. The coheiresses of this branch (fn. 12) married the ancestor of J. William Godolphin Nicholls, Esq., now of Trereife near Penzance, and Keigwin, whose heiress married Badcock. The ancestor of another younger branch of the Godolphins married a coheiress of Gaverigan, and settled at Treveneage in St. Hilary, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. They became extinct after two descents. The heiress married the ancestor of Sir John St. Aubyn, Bart.

Godrevy of Godrevy in Gwithian. — The heiress married Tregender, whose heiress married Nansperian.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron Gul., between three blackamoors heads in profile, erased, Sable.

Goode of Whitstone, traced eight generations above 1620, had been settled for only three descents at Whitstone, by a match with the heiress of Whitstone, became extinct in the seventeenth century: the heiress married Badcock.

Arms: — Gules, on a chevron between three lions rampant Or, as many cinquefoils of the field.

Goveley of Govelly in Cuby married the heiress of Lansladron: the heiress of Goveley married Trerice before the reign of Edward III.

Grimscot of Grimscot in Launcells. — The heiress married Langdon of Keverell.

Arms: — Sable, three swords in pale, Arg., hilted Or.

Grosse of Liskeard, afterwards, for five descents, of Camborne. — The heiress married Buller of Shillingham.

Arms: — Quarterly Arg. and Az. on a bend Sable, three martlets Or.

Gwavas of Gwavas in Sithney, originally Hicks, took the name of Gwavas in the reign of Queen Elizabeth — extinct in the early part of the last century: the coheiresses married Veale and Carlyon.

Halep of Lamorran, a family of note in the fourteenth and fifteenth centuries: the coheiresses of one branch of this family married Trevanion, Borlase, Trefusis, and Boscawen, in the reign of Edward IV.

Arms of Halep: — Or, three bendlets Sable.

Hatch of Busvisack — extinct about 1620. This family had married heiresses of Workington, Murdake, and Durwyn.

Arms of Hatch: — Gules, two demi-lions passant-gardant Or.

Haweis of Treworgy in Redruth, and of Kelliow in Kea, descended from a Suffolk family of that name, married a coheiress of Tregian: the elder branch married also the heiress of Tresilian and a coheiress of Remfry. The heiress of this branch married the Rev. Joshua Howell, father of the Rev. J. J. Howell, canon of Exeter, &c. The younger branch married the heiress of Vivian of Kelliow, and a coheiress of Harry of Penzance. This branch became extinct by the death of the late David Haweis, Esq. The name is now extinct in Cornwall. There was another younger branch descended from Thomas, a younger son of Reginald, who first settled in Cornwall, by his second wife, which was settled for some generations at Redruth. The representative of this branch is the Rev. Thomas Haweis, LL.D. and M.D., now resident at Bath.

Arms of Haweis: — Azure, a fesse wavy between three lions passant Or, armed and langued, Gules.

Hele of Bennett in Whitstone. — The heiress married John Basset, Esq., ancestor of Lord de Dunstanville, in the reign of Charles II.

Arms of Hele: — Gules, a bend lozengy, Ermine.

Helligan of Helligan in St. Ewe — extinct at an early period: the coheiresses married Trewarthian and Basset.

Arms of Helligan: — Gul. semée of cross croslets Or, a bend, Vairé.

Helligan of Helligan. — The heiress married Trelawney.

Arms of this family: — Gules, on a bend Or, three stags' heads attired, of the field.

Hendower, a Welsh family, married the heiress of Cornwall of Court in Brannell. The heiress of Hendower married Trewarthian about the reign of Henry VII.

Arms of Hendower: — Argent a lion rampant between an orle of escallopshells Or.

The Henders of Bottreaux Castle were most probably a younger branch of this family. The coheiresses of Hender married Molesworth, Robartes, Hele, and Cotton. — Arms granted by Cooke, Clarencieux: — Az. semée of escallopshells, a lion rampant, Or.

Hewis or Hiwis of Tremoderet in Duloe, an ancient Devonshire family, originally of Hiwis, in the hundred of Hartland. Sir Richard Hiwis (son of Sir Richard who died in 1341.), married the heiress of Blanchminster. One of the coheiresses of Sir Richard the younger (his son having died without issue) married Chief Justice Tresilian, and afterwards Coleshill; the other, Petit of Ardevora. The Coplestones of Bowden in Devonshire, now extinct, were heirs-general of Hiwis, through Tresilian and Hawley. One of the Hiwis family, at an early period, married the heiress of Bauceyn.

Arms of Hiwis: — Gules, fretty Argent, a canton of the second.

Hicks of Trevithick in Alternon — extinct in the last century.

Arms: — Arg. a castle between three pole-axes, Sable.

Hill of Helligan in St. Mabyn — descended from Sir John Hill of Kenston in Somersetshire. This family married the heiresses of Fitchett and Fantleroy, who married the heiress of Thomas Flammanck (leader of the rebellion in 1497.), and two coheiresses of Sturton. The heiress of Hill is supposed to have married Nicoll in the seventeenth century.

Arms of Hill of Helligan: — Gules, a saltier Vairé between four mullets Argent.

Hill of Penwarne in Mevagissey — of a Lancashire family. The heiress married into a younger branch of the Carews.

Arms of Hill: — Gules, a chevron between three garbs Ermine.

Hill of Wendron and Trevenethick married the heiress of Seneschall — extinct not many years ago, by the death of John Hill, Esq., who left his estate to a namesake. The Hills bore the arms of the Seneschalls: — Or, a fesse between two chevrons, Sable. — This family married also a coheiress of Bodrigy.

Hornacot of Hornacot in Tamerton — extinct at an early period.

Jenkyn of Trekening in St. Columb — extinct about the middle of the seventeenth century. The coheiresses married St. Aubyn, Slanning, Trelawney, and Cary.

Arms: — Or, a lion rampant-regardant Sable.

Kellio of Kellio in Cornely became extinct in the fifteenth century, when the heiress married Tredenham. A younger branch of the Kellio's, who had WestNorth in Duloe, in marriage with a daughter of Treworgye, became extinct in the reign of Henry VIII., when the heiress married Bastard.

There was another family of Kellio or rather Killiow of Great-Killiow in Lansallos, which had married the heiress of Boligh, and became extinct in 1711. A younger branch of these Killiows was of Trenavisick and Rosilian in St. Blazey: a coheiress of this branch married Vincent.

Arms: — Or, a chevron between two cinquefoils in chief, and a mullet in base, Sable.

Kemiell of Kemiell in St. Paul's married the coheiress of Helligan of Crowan: the coheiress of Kemiell married St. Aubyn.

Arms of Kemiell: — Arg. three dolphins, Sable.

Kempthorne alias Lea, or more properly Legh, originally of Legh in BereFerrers in Devonshire. A younger branch settled at Kempthorne in the same county, whence they removed to Tonacombe in Kilkhampton: the elder line of this branch became extinct about the latter end of the seventeenth century, when the heiress married Waddon. The Kempthornes had married one of the coheiresses of Luny or Lithney. Prince, in his Worthies, says, that some younger branches remained in the adjoining parish of Morwinstow, about the year 1700.

Arms of Ley alias Kempthorne: — Arg. a chevron between three bears' heads couped at the shoulders, Sable, quartering, Argent, three pine-trees fructed, proper.

Kestell of Kestell in Manaccan — extinct in the male line, by the death of two brothers, in 1718. and 1719. The heiresses of these brothers married Langford, and Penrose of Tregethowe.

Arms of Kestell: — Or, three castles Gules.

Keverell of Keverell in St. Martin's, near Loo. — The heiress married Langdon.

Arms of Keverell: — Sable, two lions; the one in chief passant, the other in base, preparing to spring, Or.

Killignock of Killignock in St. Wenn — extinct about the reign of Henry VIII. The heiress married Nanskevil alias Typpet.

Killigarth of Killigarth in Talland — traced to the reign of Edward III. The heiress married Beare about the reign of Henry VI.

Lambesso of Lambesso in St. Clements. — The heiress married Tredenham in the fifteenth century.

Lambourn of Lambourn in Perran-Zabuloe became extinct about the latter end of the fourteenth century. The heiress married Arundell of Lanherne.

Arms of Lambourn: — Arg. a fesse between two chevronels Sable.

Lamellin of Lamellin in Lanteglos, near Fowey — an ancient family, whose heiress, in the sixteenth century, married Trelawney.

Arms: — Arg. a bull passant Sable, horned and hoofed Or.

Langdon of Keverell in St. Martin's, near Loo, originally bore the name of Lizard; that of Langdon was adopted from Langdon in Jacobstow, eight generations before 1620. This ancient family, which became extinct in 1676, had married heiresses of Grimscot, Hender, Bukeden or Trethewey, and Bicton.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three bears' heads erased Sable.

Langford of Langford-hill in Marham-Church, traced, in their pedigree, seven generations before 1620, became extinct in the last century. The heiress married Wollacombe, who left an only daughter, married to the Rev. Charles Hammet. This daughter died without issue in 1783.

Arms: — Paly of six Arg. and Gul. on a chief Az., a lion passant-gardant Or.

There was a branch of this family settled at Tremabe in Liskeard, now extinct.

Lanherne, originally Pincerna — extinct in the reign of Edward I., when the heiress brought Lanherne to the Arundells. Lanherne married the heiress of Fitz-John.

Arms of Lanherne: — Azure, three covered cups, Or.

Leigh of Quithiock — continued for many descents.

Arms: — Argent, a bend lozengy Sable.

This family married the heiress of Isack, and a coheiress of Lower.

Levelis — a family said to have been of great antiquity, and to have settled in Cornwall at the time of the Norman conquest, but not traced with any certainty more than six generations before 1620. They were some time of Castle-Horneck in Madron, whence they removed to Trewoofe in Burian, in consequence of a match with the heiress of that barton. This family, which had married the heiresses of Bosvennen, Trerice, and Trewoofe, and coheiresses of Archer and Nanscoves, became extinct in 1672. The heiress married Vosper, since extinct.

Arms of Levelis: — Arg. three calves heads, coup'd, Gules.

Lower of St. Winnow-Barton, originally of Polscoe, in that parish. — This ancient family is traced in their pedigree thirteen generations above 1620. The elder branch, which removed to Trelask in Lewannick, about or before the year 1500, in consequence of the marriage of John, heir of the Lowers, with the elder coheiress of Upton, continued many years, after the sale of that barton, in reduced circumstances, and became extinct by the death of Alexander Lower, by trade a joiner, who died at Trevenel in Northill, in 1787. This family had married an heiress of Moyle, and coheiresses of Tresithney, Upton, and Reskymer. The posterity of Nicholas Lower, a younger brother, who married the younger coheiress of the Uptons, continued at St. Winnow, and became extinct about the middle of the seventeenth century, when the heiress married Drummond. Other younger branches of the Lowers were settled at Polmawgan in St. Winnow, Tremeere in St. Tudy, Lezant, &c.

The heiress of the Lowers of Tremeere married the grandfather of John Kestell, Esq., representative of the Kestells of Kestell in Egloshayle, and this branch of the Lowers. Another younger branch had a lease of the barton of St. Winnow. Mrs. Hitchings, only daughter of the last of this branch, died not many years ago. The coheiresses of Lower of Lezant married Grosse, Leigh, and Cocke.

Arms of Lower: — Sab. a chevron between three roses Argent.

Lukie of * * * *. — The heiress married Polwhele.

Arms: — Az. three goats' heads erased Arg. attired Or.

Luny of Lithny, or Luny in St. Ewe — extinct in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. One of the coheiresses married Kempthorne alias Lea.

Lyttelton of Lanhidrock — supposed to be descended from Guy Westcote alias Lyttelton, a younger brother of the family of that name at Frankley in Worcestershire, who married the heiress of Gerard. This branch of the Lyttelton family became extinct about the year 1600. The heiress married Trenance.

Arms of Lyttelton of Lanhidrock (being the same as those of Frankley): — Argent, a chevron between three escallop-shells, Sable.

Manning of Stanbury in Morwinstow married the heiress of the elder branch of Stanberie of Stanbury, great niece of Dr. Stanberie, Bishop of Hereford, who died in 1471. This family married also the heiress of Rowland, and coheiresses of Blanchard and Prust. The elder branch became extinct, in the male line, in the year 1601.: the aunts of John Manning, the last of the family, became coheiresses. One of these married Withere, of whom, and of the Mannings, the Rev. John Phillipps, of Mambury in Devonshire, is, through the Barnefields, the representative.

Arms of Manning: — Per pale Az. and Or, a lion rampant counterchanged.

Marrais of Marrais in Week-St. Mary married an heiress of Bottreaux, who married a coheiress of Rosmodros. The heiress of Marrais married a younger son of Rolle of Stevenstone in Devon, who settled at Marrais.

Martin of Bodmin. — The coheiresses married Trefusis and Winter in the reign of Henry IV. The Martins had married the heiresses of Cock and Treuroofa.

Arms: — Arg. three bars Gules.

Mathadarda. — The heiress married Beville.

Arms: — Gules, on three bars wavy Sable, as many swallows Or.

Menwenick or Mynwenick of Menwinnick in Trewen, at least from the reign of Henry IV. to that of Queen Elizabeth. — An heiress of this family married Coplestone.

Arms of Menwenick: — Sable, a chevron between three falcons, rising, Arg.

Michell of St. Columb and Truro. — The heiress of a branch of this family, who were of Harlyn in St. Merrin for several descents, married Peter about the year 1632.

Arms: — Sable, an escallop-shell between three eagles' heads erased, Or.

Michelstowe of Michelstowe or Mixtow in Lanteglos, near Fowey — extinct at an early period: the coheiresses married Treffry of Fowey, and Wollacombe of Devonshire. Michelstowe married a coheiress of Giffard of Thuborough in Devonshire.

Arms of Michelstowe: — Sable, three wings, two and one, Argent.

Matthew, originally of St. Kew, afterwards of Penetenny in Egloshayle, and, by marrying the heiress of Tresonger, of Tresonger in Endellion. — A younger branch of the Matthews was of Middle-Amble in Kew. The elder line of this branch became extinct before the year 1700.: the heiresses appear to have married Tucker, Archer, White, and Chandler. Abednego, a younger son of this family, was Captain-General of the Leeward Islands, about the middle of the seventeenth century; this situation was held also by his son, Sir William Matthew, in 1704, and by his grandson, William Matthew, Esq., in 1733.

Arms of Matthew of Tresonger, &c.: — Sable, a crane Argent, within a border of the second.

Militon of Pengersick in Breage — a Devonshire family; extinct, after a short continuance in Cornwall, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The six coheiresses married, — 1. Erisey and Parker; — 2. Lanyon; — 3. Trefusis and Tregodick; — 4. Trenwith, Arundell, and Hearle; — 5. Bonithon; — 6. Abbot.

Arms of Militon: — Gules, a chevron Or, between three fishes, naiant Arg.

Molenick of Molenick in St. Germans. — The heiress married Scawen in or before the reign of Edward I.

Arms of Molenick: — * * * * a chevron Sab., between three goldfinches, proper.

Murth of Talland, and of Roose in Treneglos — an ancient family, descended from Randall of Bodenna, in the reign of Richard II., whose son assumed the name of Merther or Murther, afterwards called Murth; extinct in the last century. The heiress married Woolcombe of Ashbury in Devonshire. This family had married the heiresses of Carver and Talland, and coheiresses of Tregoos and Butler.

Arms of Murth: — Argent, a lion rampant, between three fleurs-de-lis, Gules.

Mudgan of Mudgan in St. Martin (Meneage). — The heiress married Chynoweth; since extinct.

Arms: — Vert, a chevron Erm., between three escallop-shells, Or.

Nance. — See Trengoffe.

Nanfan of Trethewell in St. Eval — extinct in the reign of Henry VII. The heiress married Trenowth.

Arms of Nanfan: — Sable, a chevron Erm. between three wings displayed Argent.

Nansperian or Nanspian of Gurlyn in St. Erth became extinct in the elder branch, about the year 1600, when the coheiresses married Matthew, Prideaux (fn. 13) , and Vyvyan. A younger branch continued the male line in the parish of Crowan, whether extinct or not, we have not been able to ascertain.

Arms: — Arg. three lozenges in fesse, and a chief Sable.

Nicholls of Trewane in St. Kew — extinct by the death of John Nicholls, Esq., in the year 1709. The heiress married Glynn of Glynn.

Arms of Nicholls of Trewane: — Sable three pheons Argent (confirmed by Camden).

Nicholl or Nicoll of Penrose in St. Tudye came from Guernsey in the sixteenth century — extinct in 1724. One of this family married an heiress of Prideaux of Devonshire.

Arms: — Sable, a pheon Argent.

Noseworthy — a younger branch of a Devonshire family; extinct in 1701.

Arms: — Gules, a pile and chevron Or, counterchanged of the field.

Noy of Pendrea in St. Burian married the heiress of that barton; extinct by the death of the Attorney-General's sons in the reign of Charles II. The coheiresses married Lord Sandys, Willyams, and Davies (ancestor of Davies Giddy, M. P.).

Arms of Noy: — Az. three cross croslets in bend, Argent.

Opie of Pawton in St. Breock — extinct in the elder branch about the middle of the last century. A younger branch was of St. Erme, whence they removed to Redruth. The heiress of the elder line of this branch married Michell of Redruth, and is represented by Dr. Taunton of Truro. Opie, the celebrated painter, is said to have been descended from a younger son of this branch.

Arms of Opie: — Sable, on a chevron between three garbs Or, as many hurts.

There was a branch of the Opies settled at Bodmin, and afterwards of Penhargard in Helland, which married the heiress of Hayden, and coheiress of Way of Lostwithiel.

Owry of Tregonwell married the heiresses of Tregonwell and Edwards. The coheiresses of Owry married Adams alias Polwest, Lithney, and Tregere.

Parker of Trequite in St. Mabyn. — The heiress married Opie.

Pawley, of Gunwin in Lelant for several descents, appear to have become extinct, by the death of Mr. Hugh Pawley, in 1763. The Pawleys had married the heiresses of Brea and Tresteane.

Arms of Pawley: — Or, a lion rampant Sab., on a chief dauncetté of the second, three mullets Argent.

Penalurick of Penalurick in Stythians. — The heiress married Skewis about the time of Queen Mary.

Pencarrow of Pencarrow — attainted in the reign of Henry VIII.

Pendarves of Pendarves in Camborne — extinct by the death of Sir William Pendarves, in 1726: his sister and sole heir married Coster, and to her second husband, Percival.

Arms: — Sab., a falcon rising between three mullets Or.

The families of Pendarves of Roscrowe in Gluvias, and Pendarves of Bodrigy in Phillack, bore the same arms, and were, no doubt, originally from the Pendarves stock. The Roscrowe branch became extinct, by the death of Alexander Pendarves, Esq., in 1725.: his niece and heir, Mary Pendarves, married Francis Basset, Esq., grandfather of Lord de Dunstanville. The Bodrigy family married the heiress of Coswin, of that place, and became extinct also in the last century. The heiress married Williams of Helston, and afterwards Arundell of Trengwainton: by the former, she had three daughters; by the latter, no issue.

Pendrea of Pendrea in St. Erth — extinct in the elder branch in the reign of Henry VI. The coheiresses married Carclew and Noy.

Pengelly of Pengelly in St. Neot. — The heiress married Beare.

Arms: — Or, a chevron between three griffins passant, Gules.

Penhallow of Penhallow in Filleigh — traced to the reign of Edward III.: represented by John Penhallow Peters, Esq. This family has married coheiresses of Vyvyan of Penwarne and Lagher.

Arms of Penhallow: — Vert, a coney squat, Argent.

Some descendants of younger branches of this family reside at Camelford.

Penhellick of Penhellick in St. Clements. — The heiress of the elder branch married Nangothan. A younger branch, some time of Helston and Pengersick, married a coheiress of Militon.

Arms: — Sable, three butterflies, 2, 1, Argent.

Penkevill of Penkevill in St. Michael's Penkevill, traced to the reign of Edward II., married the heiress of Trevilla. A younger branch of this family, which, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, was settled at Roserrow in St. Minver, and had married coheiresses of Mohun, Tregarrick, Raynewarne, and Hernance, succeeded to Penkevill, on the failure of the elder branch, and became extinct by the death of Benjamin Penkevill, in 1699.

Arms of Penkevill: — Arg. three chevronels, and in chief a lion passant-gardant, Gules.

Penpons of Penpons in St. Kew. — The heiress married Arundell of Tolverne.

Arms of Penpons: — Arg. three wolves passant in pale, Sab.

There was another ancient family of Penpons of Treswithan, not extinct in 1531, which had married the heiress of Tregoose, and a coheiress of Trelawney of Wolston.

Arms: — Arg. a fesse embattled, counter-embattled Sab., between three beehives, Gules.

Penneck of Treskawe in Breage, afterwards of Tregember in St. Hilary. — An heiress of this family married Borlase. The Rev. Mr. Penneck, keeper of the reading-room at the British Museum, who died in 1803, was the last of this family.

Pentire of Pentire in Endellion, afterwards of Pentuan in Mevagissey. The heiress married Roscarrock in the sixteenth century.

Penwarne of Penwarne in Mevagissey — extinct in the reign of Henry VIII.; the coheiresses married Coswarth, Penhallow, and Penwarne of Penwarne in Mawnan.

Petit of Ardevora in Filleigh — traced seven generations above 1362. The coheiresses, about the latter end of the fifteenth century, married Arundell of Trerice, Sayer, and Killigrew (fn. 14) . This family had married the heiress of FitzIves, and coheiresses of Hiwis and Carminow.

Arms of Petit: — Argent, a lion salient Gules.

A younger branch of this family continued the male line, and was settled at Pradanack, in 1531.

Peverell of Park in Egloshayle. — We have not been able to connect this family with the Peverells of any other county, nor did they bear the same arms. They were settled in Cornwall as early as the reign of Richard I., and are said to have derived their origin from a natural son of William the Conqueror. This family became extinct in the former part of the fifteenth century. The coheiresses married Basset and Hungerford.

Arms of Peverell of Park: — Gules, a fesse Arg. between six crosses pateé Or.

Phillips of Tredrea in St. Erth. — The heiress married Davies.

Arms of Phillips: — Az. on a cross engrailed between four cross crosslets fitchée Or, a torteaux.

Pincerna — a very ancient family, afterwards bearing the names of Conarton and Lanherne. The heiress married Arundell in the reign of Edward I.

Arms: — Az. three covered cups, Or,

The arms of Pincerna, as quartered by Trelawney (brought in by Powna), are, Gules, on a chevron Sab. three goblets Or.

Polkinhorne of Polkinhorne in Gwinnear — traced to the year 1290. The heiress of the elder branch, about the year 1500, married Williams, who took the name of Polkinhorne; after three descents, this branch became again extinct (in 1665.) on the death of Otho Polkinhorne, whose heiress married Glynn of Helston. The representative of this branch of the Polkinhornes is the Rev. R. G. Grylls, of Helston. A younger branch of this family became extinct by the death of Michael Polkinhorne, Esq. in 1748. Roger de Polkinhorne, the common ancestor of this family, married the heiress of Tregossagh. The younger branch married a coheiress of Vyvyan. One of the Polkinhornes married the heiress of Oliver of Bodmin.

Arms of Polkinhorne: — Arg. three bars Sable.

Pollard of Treleigh in Redruth — descended from Sir Richard, son of Sir Lewis Pollard, one of the justices of the Common Pleas, of an ancient Devonshire family. The Cornish branch became extinct in 1731.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three escallop-shells, Gules.

Polruddon of Polruddon in St. Austell — extinct in or about the reign of Henry VII.

Porter of Launcells. — The heiress married Hele. The Porters were a Norfolk family.

Arms: — Gul. on a fesse Argent, between three wings Or, a bezant charged with a lion passant Gules.

Praed of Trevethow in Lelant became extinct, after several descents, by the death of John Praed, Esq. in 1717. He left his estates to William Mackworth, Esq., a younger son of the family of Mackworth, of the Knoll in Glamorganshire, on condition of his assuming the name of Praed. William Praed, Esq., now of Trevethow, grandson of this William, married the heiress of Backwell of Tyringham in Buckinghamshire, which is his chief residence.

Arms of Praed: — Az. six mullets in pile Argent, quartering Mackworth; — Per pale indented Sab. and Erm. on a chevron G. five crosses patée Or.

Priske of Helston. — The coheiresses married Trewren, Penrose, and Penneck.

Arms of Priske: — Or on a bend Sab., three horse-shoes Argent.

Pyper of Tresmarrow in South-Petherwin — extinct in 1754.: the heiress married Vyvyan.

Arms of Pyper: — Gyronny of four, Or, and Azure. (fn. 15)

Rame of Rame — extinct about the reign of Henry V.: the heiress married Dernford. The representative of these two families is the Earl of Mount-Edgcumb.

Arms of Rame: — Sable a ram's head caboshed Arg., armed Or.

Reskymer or Roskymer of Reskymer or Roskymer in Mawgan (Meneage) — traced in the pedigree for fourteen generations; extinct about the middle of the sixteenth century. The elder coheiress married Trelawney and afterwards Mohun, leaving issue by both; the other coheiresses, Courtenay and Lower. A younger branch continued the male line at Merthen in Constantine. John Reskymer, the son and heir in 1620, had four younger brothers; the estate was sold a few years afterwards, and the name is supposed to have been long since wholly extinct. This ancient family had married the heiresses of Pulyne, Deviock, and Trevarthian, and the coheiress of Denzell.

Arms of Reskymer: — Arg. three bars Gules, in chief, a wolf passant Azure.

Resprin of Resprin. — The heiress married Carminow.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron Sable between three cocks, Gules.

Rise of Trewardreva in Constantine. — The coheiresses, about the year 1500, married Trewren and Glynn. The present representative of this family is Thomas Trewren, Esq. of Trewardreva.

Arms of Rise: — Arg. a chevron Gules between three bean-pods Vert.

Roche or De la Rupe of Roche — traced to the reign of Richard I. Hals says, that this family became extinct, in the male line, in 1357.; that Sir William Blundell, husband of the heiress, took the name of Roche, which continued till the reign of Henry VIII., when the last of the family left four daughters, three of whom married Fortescue, Penkevil, and Boscawen. The Roches had married heiresses of Trevelyan and Page, and a coheiress of Durant.

Arms of Roche: — Sab. three roaches, two, one, nayant, Argent.

Rogers of Lank married the heiress of Haydon of Haydon in Jacobstow — extinct in the elder branch about 1620.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three stags trippant Sable.

Roose of Whitstone, traced to the reign of Henry IV., became extinct about the middle of the sixteenth century: the heiress married Spoure of Trebatha in Northill.

Arms: — Az. four swans, proper.

Roscarrock of Roscarrock in Endellion. — This ancient family is traced in the pedigree twelve generations beyond the year 1620. The first-mentioned is stated to have died in the year 1300. It became extinct about the year 1710. The Roscarrocks had married heiresses of Arundell of Blaybol, and Pentire, and coheiresses of Chenduit, Bodulgate, and Trevenor.

Arms of Roscarrock: — Argent a chevron Gules, between two roses in chief of the second and a sea-tench, nayant, Azure. — There was a younger branch of this family some time settled at Croan in the parish of Egloshayle.

Roscrowe of Roscrowe in Gluvias became extinct in the reign of Henry VI. One of the coheiresses married Carclew.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three roses Gules, seeded Or.

Roscrowe, originally Hary, who, settling at Roscrowe in the reign of Henry VIII., took the name of that barton, and became extinct about the middle of the seventeenth century. The coheiresses married Ustick and Smalley.

Arms: — Party per fesse nebulée, Argent and Sab., three sea-dogs counterchanged.

Rosecassa of Rosecassa in St. Just. — The coheiresses married Treffry and Wollacombe.

Saint Piran of Perran-Zebuloe — extinct at a very early period: the heiress married Kendall.

Sawle of Penrice and Levrean in St. Austell came over with William the Conqueror. — This ancient family became extinct, in the male line, in 1789. The present representative is Joseph Sawle Graves, Esq., of Penrice.

Arms of Sawle: — Az. three falcons' heads erased within a bordure, Or.

Scawen of Molenick in St. Germans. — This family is traced in their pedigree to the reign of Edward I., when they married the heiress of Molenick; they removed into Surrey about the year 1712, and became extinct, in 1801, by the death of James Scawen, Esq., then of Worcestershire. The mother of the last Mr. Scawen was sole heiress of Lord James Russel. His sister married the late Earl Bathurst, whose son, the present Earl, is representative of this ancient family. There was a younger branch settled at Trehane in Probus, in consequence of a match with the coheiress of Trehane. Another younger branch, descended from a younger son of the family in the reign of Henry VIII., was of Adren in Stoke-Climsland.

Arms of Scawen: — Arg. a chevron Gules between three griffins' heads erased Sable.

Scobell of Mevagissey and of Polruddon, Tregonnan and Menagwins in St. Austell — extinct about a century ago. The coheiresses married Hawkins of St. Austell and Hawkins of Pennance. John Scobell, Esq., who married the heiress of Ustick of Leah in Burian, is of the family of Scobell of Nutcombe in EastAllerton, Devonshire.

Arms of Scobell: — Per pale Arg. and Gules, three fleurs-de-lis, and a label in chief counter-changed.

Searle of Penverance. — The heiress married Treffry.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three wood-doves' heads erased, Sable.

Seneschall of Trenethick in Wendron — traced to the reign of Edward III.: the heiress married Hill.

Arms of Seneschall: — Or a fesse between two chevrons Sable.

Serjeaux, written sometimes Sergeaux and Ceriseaux, of Lanreath, Colquite in St. Mabyn, and Killigarth in Talland — extinct by the death of Richard, son of Sir Richard Serjeaux, in the reign of Richard II.: his sisters and coheiresses married Marney, Vere, Passele, and St. Aubyn. After the death of St. Aubyn, the youngest sister married Vere Earl of Oxford, and afterwards Thorley.

Arms of Serjeaux: — Arg. a saltier Sab. between twelve cherries slipped, proper.

Silly, of St. Wenn, of Trevelver in St. Minver, and of Heligan in St. Mabyn, descended from Silly of Rackenford in Devonshire, settled at St. Wenn in the early part of the seventeenth century. The Trevelver branch became extinct in 1712: the heiress married Sheppard. The Heligan branch was not extinct till 1797. The coheiresses married Martyn, Sloggett, Jackson, and Lyddon. The common ancestor of these branches married the heiress of Marke or Marks of St. Wenn. The last of the Trevelver branch married a coheiress of Carter of St. Columb.

The arms used by Silly of Trevelver and Heligan were, Az. a chevron between three mullets Or; the coat of Ceeley. — The ancient arms of Silly or Sully of Devonshire were, Erm. three chevronels Gules.

Skewis of Skewis in Cury. — The heiress married Denzell about the latter end of the fifteenth century.

Arms of Skewis: — Gules, a chevron between three stumps of trees erased, Or.

Skewis of Great Skewis in St. Wenn — extinct in the sixteenth century. The coheiresses married Mohun and Courtenay.

Arms: — Vert, a chevron between three thistle-flowers, Or.

Skory of Walesborowe, afterwards of Lanlivery — traced eleven generations before 1620: supposed to have been extinct in the male line about the middle of the seventeenth century, when a match with Samuel occurs in the parish register. This family had married coheiresses of Laune, Lanyon, and Redris.

Arms of Skory: — Or, on a saltier Sable, five cinquefoils of the field.

Slade of Trevenen in Gorran. — The present representative of this family, which was settled at Trevenen, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, if not at an earlier period, is William Slade Gully, Esq., whose father, * * * Gully, Esq. of Tresilian in Newlyn, married the sister of the late Mr. Slade.

Arms: — Gul. a fesse Erm. between three horses' heads couped, and looking to the dexter, Arg. maned Sable.

Sor, or Le Sore of Talverne in Filleigh. — The heiress married Arundell.

Arms of Le Sore: — Ermine, a saltier, Gules.

Speccot of Anderdon in Launcells — descended from a Devonshire family; extinct about the latter part of the seventeenth century. The heiress married Spoure of Trebartha.

Arms: — Or, on a bend Gul., three mill-rinds pierced Argent.

Speccot of Penhale in Egloskerry — extinct in 1703.

Spoure of Trebartha in Northill married the heiress of Trebartha in the reign of Henry VII.; became extinct in 1729. The Spoures married heiresses of Rouse of Whitstone, and Speccot of Anderdon. The heiress of Spoure married Bellot, and afterwards Grylls.

Arms of Spoure: — Gules, on a chevron Or, a rose of the first, and two mullets pierced Sable.

Stanberie of Stanberie in Morwinstow. — The heiress of the elder branch married Manning. A younger branch was of West Stanberie, and another of Cliff; both of these continued the male line for several descents. Richard Stanberie, Bishop of Hereford, who died in 1471, was a younger son of this family.

Arms: — Per pale Az. and Or, a lion rampant, Sable.

Symons of Hatt in Botesfleming. — The coheiresses married Folkes, and Tucker; extinct in 1802.

Arms: — Per fesse Sable and Or, a pale counterchanged, three trefoils slipped, Vert.

Talland of Talland. — The heiress married Murth about the middle of the sixteenth century.

Arms: — Argent a stag Gules, couchant on turf proper.

Tanner of Court in St. Stephen's Brannell, an ancient Devonshire family, married a coheiress of Tregarthian of Tregarthian in Gorran, and afterwards of Court. This family became extinct about the beginning of the last century. The elder branch expired in the person of the Rev. George Tanner, rector of Carhayes, whose coheiresses released Court to Sir John Baber. One of the coheiresses of a younger branch, who married the heiress of Arundell of Carynick (descended from Anthony, third son of John Tanner), married Nathaniel Taunton, of Liskeard, M.D., descended from the ancient family of Taunton of Somerton in Somersetshire, and grandfather of Robert Taunton, now of Truro, M. D. The other coheiress of Anthony above-mentioned, married the grandfather of the Rev. Thomas Penwarne of St. Germans.

Arms of Tanner: — Arg. on a chief Sab. three moors' heads Or.

Tencreek or Trencreek, of the barton of that name in Creed — an ancient family, extinct in the year 1594. The coheiresses married Carminow, Penwarne, Polwhele, and Mohun.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron with a cross patée issuing from its point Sable.

Thurlebere of Thurlebere in Stratton — extinct in the reign of Edward IV. The heiress married Arundell of Trerice.

Tinten of Tinten in St. Tudye — extinct in the fourteenth century. The heiress married Carminow.

The arms of Tinten as quartered by Trelawney (brought in by Carminow) are, Arg. a chevron between three tents Sable.

Tonkin of Trevaunance in St. Agnes — traced to the reign of Richard II.; extinct by the death of Thomas Tonkin, Esq., (third son of Thomas Tonkin, who made large collections towards a history of Cornwall), about the middle of the last century. The daughter of James Tonkin, second son of the historian (the elder son died unmarried), married Heys, but had no surviving issue. The sisters of the historian married Foss and Doucett: the former had one daughter, who died unmarried. The descendants of his father's sisters, married to Jago, Ley, and Cornish, became heirs-general. The Tonkin family had married heiresses of Carne, Tregeare (fn. 16) , and Bennett (the latter left no issue), and coheiresses of Guise and Kempe. A younger branch of Tonkin settled at Hendra in St. Columb, and became extinct in 1734.

Arms of Tonkin: — Sab. an eagle displayed Or, armed, Gules.

There was a family of Tonkin of Trevalack in St. Keverne existing in 1620, one of whom had married the heiress of Braban.

Trebarfoot of Trebarfoot in Poundstock, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, married the heiress of Sole and a coheiress of Babage. The heiress of Trebarfoot married Burgoyne.

Arms of Trebarfoot: — Sable, a chevron between three bears' feet erased, Or.

Trebartha of Trebartha in Northill — traced to the reign of Edward I.; extinct in the reign of Edward IV. or Henry VII. The heiress married Spoure of Misterton in Somersetshire.

Arms of Trebartha: — Azure, on a bend wavy Argent, three Cornish choughs' heads erased, proper.

Trecalow of Trecalow in Gorran. — The heiress married Hoblyn.

Trecarne of Trecarne: — the heiress married Glynn of Glynn.

Arms: — Or, a bull passant Sable, horns, Argent.

Trecarrell of Trecarrell in Lezant — extinct in the sixteenth century. The elder of the coheiresses married Harris.

Arms: — Arg. three chevronels, Sable. (See Esse.)

Tredenham of Tredenham in Probus, afterwards of Kellio in Cornely, and Tregonan in St. Ewe. This ancient family, which is known to have existed for seventeen generations, became extinct in the early part of the last century (fn. 17) . The coheiresses, sisters of the last male heir, married Nicholls of Trewane and Scobell. The Tredenhams had married heiresses of Tirrel, Trevarthian, Lambesso, Kellio, Trevyas, and Enys. John Tredenham, who died in 1710. without issue, married a coheiress of Lloyd.

Arms of Tredenham: — Arg. a bend lozengy, Gules.

Tredidon of Tredidon, in the reign of Richard II. — The heiress married Windsor, whose heiress married Joliffe of Poughill.

Tredinick of Tredinick in St. Breock married heiresses of Corwen and Hamley, and a coheiress of Gosse. The coheiresses of the elder branch of the Tredinicks married Laheron, Roche, Calwodley, and Castell, before 1531.: a younger branch became extinct in the reign of Charles II.

Arms: — Or, on a bend Sab., three bucks' heads caboshed, Argent.

Tredrea of Tredrea in St. Erth — extinct in the early part of the seventeenth century. The name remains at St. Erth, among cottagers, descended possibly from some younger branch.

Treffry of Treffry in Lanhidrock, afterwards of Place in Fowey. — There is a family-tradition, that this ancient stock came originally from Treffry in Linkinhorne, but there is no evidence to support it; whereas it is certain, that they possessed the manor of Treffry in Lanhidrock, long after they had removed to Place; which removal took place in consequence of a match with the heiress of Boniface five generations before 1380. The first in the pedigree is Roger de Treffry, greatgreat-grandfather of Thomas, who married Boniface. The elder branch of this ancient family became extinct, by the death of John Treffry, Esq., in 1658: his sister married Trefusis. The male line of a younger branch, settled at Rooke in the parish of St. Kew, became extinct also, by the death of John, son of Thomas Treffry, cousin, and by his will, heir of John above-mentioned. John Treffry, the last heir-male of the family, left his estates to his sister's son, William Toller of Fowey, directing that he should take the name of Treffry. Thomas Treffry, Esq., son of William Toller afterwards Treffry, left two daughters married to Austen and Dormer. There was a younger branch of Treffry settled at St. Minver: we have not been able to ascertain whether it is extinct or removed. This ancient family married heiresses of the families of Killigrew, Polgreen, and Daw; and the coheiresses of Boniface, Michelstowe, Searle, Tresithney, and Tremayne of Upcott in Devonshire. The visitation of 1531 gives two or three descents of a branch of this family, one of whom had married a coheiress of Petit of Trengwainton.

Arms of Treffry: — Sab. a chevron between three hawthorn-trees, Arg.

Sir John Treffry, according to family-documents, was made a knight-banneret at Cressy, and had an honourable augmentation to his arms (the lilies of France to be borne quarterly,) and supporters (two armed men), given to him for his signal services in that battle. J. T. Austen, Esq., of Place, the representative of this family in the female line, is descended from the Austens, some time of GreatDeviock in St. Germans, afterwards of Plymouth. (fn. 18)

Treganyan of Treganyan in St. Michael-Penkevil. — The heiress married Halep.

Tregarthian of Tregarthian in Gorran married the heiress of Hendower of Court in Brannell — became extinct about the middle of the fifteenth century. Two of the coheiresses married Tanner and Tripcony; the third married Kelloway, and afterwards Wadham.

Arms of Tregarthian: — Arg. a chevron between three escallop-shells, Sab.

Tregarrick of Tregarrick in Roche. — The heiress married Trenowth, whose heiress married Boscawen.

Arms: — Arg. two chevrons paly, Az. and Or.

Tregender of Tregender in Ludgvan. — The heiress married Nanspian. The Tregenders married the heiresses of Gurlyn and Godrevy.

Arms of Tregender: — Per pale Vert and Or, two bars counter-changed.

Tregenna of Tregenna in St. Ives — not extinct in the elder branch till after the reign of James I. The Rev. John Tregenna, rector of Mawgan, who died in 1754, was of a younger branch of this family, which had settled at Polgreen in St. Columb.

Arms: — Or, a chevron Az. between three moors' heads proper, filleted Argent.

Tregethow of Tregethow or Tregitha in Manaccan. — The heiress married Penrose, in the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Tregewe of Harlyn. — The heiress married Michell about the reign of Henry VII. The present representative of this family is Henry Peter, Esq., of Harlyn.

Arms:—Arg. on a chevron Sab. between three torteauxes, five bezants.

Tregian or Tregyan of Tregian in St. Ewe, afterwards of Golden or Wolvedon in Probus — supposed to have become extinct by the death of Charles, younger son of Francis Tregian, Esq., who was imprisoned, and forfeited his estates, for concealing Cuthbert Mayne, the popish priest, in 1577. One of the sisters and supposed coheiresses married Haweis of Treworgye. The Tregians married coheiresses of Wolverton and Mynors.

Arms of Tregian: — Erm. on a chief Sab., three Jays, Or.

Tregonell or Tregonwell of Tregonell in Crantock became extinct in the male line in the reign of James I.: the coheiresses married Bawden, Pollamounter, and Penpoll. Sir John Tregonwell, of this family, Proctor for King Henry VIII. in his cause against Catharine of Arragon, settled in Dorsetshire. This branch of the family is extinct also: the heiress married Bankes.

Arms:—Arg. three pellets in fesse, cotised Sable, between three Cornish choughs, proper.

Tregoose or Tregoze of Tregoose. — The coheiresses of the elder branch of this family married Murth, Nanspian, and Beauchamp, and the widow of Beauchamp Carnsew, before 1531. A younger branch settled at Trewothick in St. Anthony (in Kirrier) — extinct about a century ago.

Arms:—Or, three bars Az. on a chief, of the second, a lion passant-gardant of the field.

Tregothnan of Tregothnan in St. Michael-Penkevil — extinct in the fourteenth century. The heiress married Boscawen.

Arms of Tregothnan:—Argent a chevron between three cross crosslets, Sable.

Tregury of Tregury in St. Wenn — extinct about the reign of Henry V.

Trehane of Trehane in Probus — extinct in the reign of James I. The coheiresses married Scawen, Kendall of Penkevill, and Verman.

Arms of Trehane:—Arg. on three bars Sable, nine martlets, three, three, three, of the field.

Treharick of Treharick in St. Kew — extinct in the reign of Henry VII.: the heiress married Caval.

Trehawke of Trehawke in Menheniot, afterwards of Rosilian in St. Blazey. — The heiress married Kellio. A younger branch continued the male line; John Trehawke, Esq., of Liskeard, the last of this name and family, died about the year 1790. Samuel Kekewitch, Esq. of Peamore near Exeter, is the representative of this family.

Arms: — Sab. three hawks, Argent, with bells, each perched on a rest, Or.

Trejago of Trejago in Crantock — extinct in the reign of Edward IV.: the heiress married Mynors. The Trejagos of Fentongollan, seated there as early as the reign of Edward II., were, in all probability, a branch of the same family. The Trejagos of Fentongollan married the heiress of Trewethenick and a coheiress of Chenduit: the heiress of Trejago of Fentongollan married Trenowth. The family of Jago are descended from a younger branch of Trejago.

Ancient arms of Trejago: — Arg. on a chevron Sab. between three balls, Gul. five bezants. — They afterwards bore, Or, a chevron between three cross crosslets, Sable.

Treise of Castle-Milford (fn. 19) in Tremayne, afterwards of Levethan. — The heiress married Sir John Morshead's father.

Arms of Treise: — Arg. three bars Azure, in chief as many cinquefoils, per fesse, Gules and Sable.

Trelowarren of Trelowarren in Mawgan (Meneage). — The heiress married Beville.

Arms of Trelowarren: — Gules, on a chief Arg., a bendlet of the field between two fleurs-de-lis, Azure.

Treluddero of Treluddero in Newlyn — extinct in the reign of Henry VIII.: the heiress married Borlase.

Trembleigh or Trembleth of Trembleigh in St. Ervan. — The heiress married Arundel about the reign of Edward I.

Arms of Trembleigh: — - - - - - - a wolf - - - -

Tremere of Tremere in Lanivet — extinct about the end of the fourteenth century: the heiress married St. Aubyn.

Arms: — Arg. three reap-hooks, their bows conjoined in fesse, Sable.

Tremogh of Tremogh in Mabe. — The heiress married Blois of Penryn.

Trenance of Trenance in Withiel, afterwards (by marriage with the heiress of Lyttelton) of Lanhidrock — extinct in the seventeenth century: the coheiresses married Elford, Buckingham, and Randolph.

Arms of Trenance: — Sab. a fesse between three swords erect, Argent.

Trengoff or Trengove of Trengove in Warleggon, married the heiress of Trewdall — extinct about the year 1780. A younger branch, which, on settling at Nance in Illogan, had taken the name of Nance, became extinct in 1720.

Arms: — Arg. a cross couped, Sable.

Trenhale of Trenhale in St. Erth — extinct, in the elder branch, in the reign of Edward IV., when the heiress married Trencreek. Either one of the Trencreek family, possessing the barton of Trenhale, took that name, or a younger branch continued in the parish of St. Erth, till nearly the end of the seventeenth century.

Trenowth of Trenowth in Probus. —One branch of this family, which had removed to Fentongollan in St. Michael-Penkevil, became extinct in 1497: the coheiresses married, — 1. Carminow; — 2. St. Aubyn; — 3. Raynward and Stradling; — 4. Godolphin. Another branch, which continued at Trenowth, became extinct in the reign of Henry VIII., when the coheiresses married Boscawen, Borlase, and Hearle. The Trenowths of Fentongollan had married the heiresses of Trejago, Nanfan, and Tregarthian.

Arms of Trenowth: — Arg. on a fesse Sab. three chevronels palewise, the points to the dexter, Argent.

Trenwith of Trenwith in Lelant —traced to the reign of Edward IV. The elder branch, in consequence of a match with the heiress of Tredenzy of Burian, removed thither. The posterity of the second son of Peter Trenwith, by the heiress of Vincent, continued at Trenwith and became extinct before the middle of the seventeenth century: the heiress married Burgess. This branch married the heiresses of Vincent, Tredenzy, and Caskayes, and a coheiress of Militon. At a later period, Trenwith appears to have reverted to the elder branch, which became extinct by the death of Mr. Thomas Trenwith in 1796.; this branch is represented by Lander.

Arms of Trenwith: — Arg. on a bend cotised, Sab. three roses of the field.

Trerice of Trerice in Newlyn — extinct in the reign of Edward III. The heiress married Arundell. Trerice married the heiress of Govely, who married the heiress of Lansladron.

Arms of Trerice, being those of Lansladron adopted: — A. three chevronels, Sable.

Treroufe of Treroufe in Redruth. — The heiress married Martin of Bodmin.

Tresadern of Tresadern in St. Columb. — The heiress married Bonithon.

Tresavis. — The heiress married Bevill.

Arms: — Arg. a man's head, couped, proper, a fillet round the forehead, Or.

Tresawell of Tresawell in Probus. — The heiress married Polwhele in the sixteenth century.

Arms: — Arg. on a bend O. cotised, Sable, three mullets, Gules.

Tresilian of Tresilian in Newlyn. —Of this ancient family probably was Sir Robert Tresilian, the Chief Justice who was executed in the reign of Richard II. and died seised of large possessions in Cornwall, leaving an only daughter married to Hawley, whose heiress married Copplestone. An heiress of Tresilian of Tresilian, in the reign of Edward IV., married Carne of Glamorganshire, who took the name of Tresilian, and was ancestor of the Tresilians of Wendron, Burian, and St. Levan. The Tresilians of Tresidor in Burian have not been many years extinct: the coheiresses married Pendar (fn. 20) and Jenkins.

Arms of Tresilian: — Gul. a pelican in her nest with wings displayed and feeding her young ones, Or.

Tresithney of Penryn, mentioned by Leland, most probably originally of Tresithney in St. Columb. — The coheiress married Treffry. This family had married the heiresses of Bossoham and Rostylian.

Arms of Tresithney: — Arg. a chevron Sable between three roses, Gules.

Tresteane of Trenouna in Veryan. — The heiress married Pawley.

Arms of Tresteane: — Az. three stone-pillars Arg. on a chief V. three lapwings, proper.

Trethurfe of Trethurfe in Ladock — extinct in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, when one of the coheiresses married Courtenay of Landrake, and afterwards Buller; the other, Vyvyan. The Trethurfes had married the heiress of Trevisa and a coheiress of St. Aubyn of Devonshire, and one of the coheiresses of Courtenay Earl of Devonshire.

Arms of Trethurfe: — Az. a buck's head caboshed Arg. attired, Or.

Trevallaunce of Trevallaunce in Perran-Zabuloe. — The heiress, in the sixteenth century, married Carlyon alias Rosewarne.

Trevarthian of Trevarthian in Newlyn — an ancient family, which had married the heiress of Bodrugan and coheiresses of Helligan and Carminow. The heiress of Trevarthian married Reskymer.

Arms of Trevarthian: — Arg. a boar passant Gules, armed, Or.

Trevenor of Appledore in St. Ive — extinct in 1523. The coheiresses married, — 1. Ninnis; — 2. Mannington and Curtis; — 3. Kempe. A younger branch of Trevenor, settled at Lamorran, became extinct before 1556. The coheiresses married Roscarrock and Chamond.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron Gules between three sea-pies, proper.

Treverbyn of Treverbyn in St. Austell — extinct in the reign of Henry VI. The coheiresses married Courtenay and Trevanion.

The arms of Treverbyn, as quartered by Prideaux, who married an heiress of this family at an earlier period, are, Per pale Arg. and Gules, three castles counterchanged.

Treviados of Treviados in the parish of Constantine. — The heiress married Trefusis in the reign of Edward III.

Treville of Ethy or Tethe in St. Winnow — extinct in the latter part of the seventeenth century. The coheiresses married Burthog, Savery, and Arscott.

Arms of Treville: — Or, a cross engrailed Sab. in the first quarter a mullet, Gules.

Trevisa of Crocadon in St. Mellion, extinct about the latter end of the seventeenth century — married the heiress of Darling.

Arms of Trevisa: — Gules, a garb, Or.

Trevince of Trevince in Gwennap. — The heiress, at an early period, married Beauchamp.

Trevrane of Dryffener married the heiress of Tresowys. The coheiress married Mychell and Kyrres.

Trevroneck. — One of the coheiresses married Trewren about the end of the fifteenth century.

Arms of Trevroneck: — Or, a chevron between three frogs displayed, Gules.

Trewoofe of Trewoofe in Burian. — The heiress married Levelis about the year 1500.

Arms of Trewoofe: — Arg. a chevron S., between three black-birds, proper.

Trewythenick or Trennick of the barton of that name in St. Clements. — The heiress married Trejago.

Arms of Trewythenick: — Arg. a chevron and border indented, Gules.

Tucker of Helland — a younger branch of the Tuckers of Tavistock. The heiress married Glynn.

Arms: — Az. eight barrulets wavy Argent, over all, on a chevron embattled counter-embattled Or, between three sea-horses naiant of the second, five gouts de pois.

Upton of Trelask. — Two brothers of the Lower family married the coheiresses early in the sixteenth century.

Arms of Upton: — Arg. on a cross Sable, five bezants.

Vacye of Fenton-Vacye in Tamerton — traced one generation higher than Henry III.; extinct before 1700.

Arms: — Argent, on a chevron Gules, three bezants.

Vincent of Trelevan in Mevagissey, and Tresimple in St. Clements, and of Batten in Northill. — The Vincents of Trelevan became extinct about the early part of the last century. The heiress of Vincent of Batten married Darley. We have not been able to ascertain whether any of the family are remaining from the other branches.

Arms: — Az. three quatrefoils Argent. — The Vincents of Cornwall were sued in the Earl Marshal's coat for bearing these arms, they being the paternal coat of Vincent, of Stoke-Dabernon in Surrey. Vincent of Cornwall paid costs, but by licence from the Vincents of Surrey continued to bear the arms.

Vyell or Viell of Trevorder in St. Breock — extinct early in the reign of Queen Elizabeth. The last heir-male left six daughters, five of whom married Dennis, Prideaux, Arundell, Bevill, and Risdon.

Arms of Vyell: — Arg. a fesse raguly Gul., between three ogresses.

Waddon of Tonnacomb in Morwinstow married the heiress of Lea alias Kempthorne of that place — extinct in 1768; represented by William Waddon Martyn, Esq.

Arms of Waddon: — Sable a fesse, Or.

Wadham, a Somersetshire family (of which was Nicholas Wadham, founder of Wadham College in Oxford) some time resident in St. Stephen's, Saltash, and Liskeard — extinct in 1707.

Arms: — Gules, a chevron between three roses, Argent.

Walesbury of Walesbury in the parish of Marham-Church. — One of the coheiresses married Trevelyan in the reign of Edward IV.

Arms: — Arg. a fesse lozengy, Gules. — There was also an ancient family of Whalesborough, one of whom married, at an early period, into the Trevarthian family, and who bore, Arg. three bendlets, G. on a border Sab., eight bezants.

Wallis of Fentonwoon in Lantegloss near Camelford, as early as the reign of Queen Elizabeth — extinct by the death of the late John Wallis, Esq., whose heiress married Sir John Thomas Duckworth, K.B. His brother, Samuel Wallis, Esq., Commissioner of the Navy, who died in 1793, left also an only daughter, married to Samuel Stephens, Esq., now of Tregenna-Castle in St. Ives.

Arms of Wallis: — Gules, a fesse and canton, Ermine.

Wayte of Lostwithiel. — The heiress married Kendall about the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Arms: — * * * a chevron between three salmons, proper.

Westlake of Elmworthy in Kilkhampton. — The last of this family died in the parish work-house not many years ago.

Arms: — Per pale Az. and Or, a chevron engrailed between three lions rampant counterchanged.

Williams of Treworgy, afterwards of Trehane — extinct in the early part of the last century. The coheiresses married Prideaux, who died without issue, and the Rev. Dr. Stackhouse, vicar of St. Erme, father of William Stackhouse, Esq., now of Trehane. Williams of Treworgy had married the heiress of Courtenay and Tregellas.

Arms of Williams: — Arg. a grey-hound current Sable.

St. Winnow of St. Winnow. — The heiress married Upton, in the reign of Edward III.

Winslade of Tregarrick in Pelynt, whose family had been hereditary knights of the White Spur (fn. 21) — extinct by the death of the son of John Winslade, who was attainted for rebellion in 1549.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron, barry undy, Arg. and Az. between three lapwings, Sable.

Wolvedon of Wolvedon or Golden in Probus — extinct in 1512. The heiress married Tregian.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three wolves' heads erased, Sable.

Worth of Tremogh in Mabe — descended from the Worths of Worth in Devonshire; extinct in the last century. The heiress married Hooper.

Arms: — Erm., an eagle displayed with two necks Sable, armed Gules.

Worthivale of Worthivale in Minster continued in the male line for twelve descents. Christopher Worthivale, the last male heir, living in 1620, left three daughters coheiresses.

Arms: — Gules, three pigeons Argent, rimmed Or.

Wyvell of Wyvelscomb married a coheiress of Clarke of Somersetshire. — The only daughter and heir of Thomas Wyvell, Esq., the last heir-male of this ancient family, living in 1620, married Gifford Wills of Lanrake, ancestor of Francis Wills, Esq. of Saltash, the present representative of both families.

Arms of Wyvell: — Arg., three mullets in fesse between two bars Sab., a border engrailed Gules.

We here subjoin a brief account of Cornish families, of whom, generally speaking, we know little more than the names and the arms. Many of them became extinct at an early period; of the greater part, even the residence is unknown. Some of them, probably, are not even now extinct in the male line, though we have not been able to ascertain the fact; some, perhaps, have removed into other counties.

Ashton of Lamorran married the heiress of Halep.

Arms: — Arg. an ash-tree proper, issuing from the bung of a ton Or.

Austell or De Austell — sheriff in the reign of Edward III. and Henry VI.

Arms: — Arg., a saltier raguly, Gules.

Baldwin of Colquite in St. Mabyn.

Arms: — Gules, two bendlets Arg. within a border of the second.

Beare, quartered by Borlase: — Arg. a chevron between three bears passant Sable, muzzled Or.

Beaucomb, quartered by Trelawney. — Arms: — Arg. a fesse Sab. between three bats' wings displayed, Gules.

Beele, quartered by Lord de Dunstanville: — Az. three Griffins' heads erased, Argent.

Bill of St. Stephen's near Saltash, traced two generations before 1620, married the heiress of Payne.

Arms: — Az. three griffins' heads erased, Argent.

Bligh of Botadon, as early as the reign of Richard III., married the coheiresses of Ramfry, Bant, and Trevanion of Trevalster. There were younger branches, of Truro and Bodmin.

Arms of Bligh: — Az. a griffin rampant Or, between three crescents, Argent.

Bosavern of Bosavern in St. Just (Penwith) — three generations before 1620.

Arms: — * * * * three escallops between six martlets, three and three, all in pale.

Bosistow of Bosistow in St. Levan — five generations before 1620.

Arms: — Az. three escallops, Vairé.

Bossawsack, of Bossawsack in Constantine as early as the reign of Henry IV., not extinct in 1620, married a coheiress of Browncouse.

Arms of Bossawsack: — * * * * a saltier engrailed * * * *

Braban, of St. Minver and St. Breock three generations before 1620.

Arms: — Arg., on a fesse couped at both ends, Gules, three leopards' faces, Or.

Catcher of Condurra in St. Clement's. — Arms: — Per fesse S. and G., an eagle displayed Erm., gorged with a coronet Or.

Ceeley of St. Ives — descended from a family of that name settled at Congersbury in Somersetshire, afterwards at Plymouth; not extinct in 1620.

Arms: — Az. a chevron Or, between three mullets Arg., quartering the arms of Fulneby, Graunt, and Angeville.

Chapman of Resprin. — Arms: — Per chevron, Az. and Gules, a crescent counter-changed.

Coke of Tregasa in St. Erme. — Arms: — Argent, on a bend cotised Sable, three cats, Or.

Cole married a coheiress of Carminow. — Arms: — Arg. a bull passant, Gules, on a border Sable, eight bezants.

Colyn of Boscarne and of Helland, in the reign of Richard II.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron Sab., between three coots, proper, membered, Gules.

Coryn of Kenwyn — four generations above 1620. — Arms: — A milrind between four martlets Sable.

Cossen of Penzance — five generations before 1620. — Arms: — Az. a lion rampant Or, guttée de sang, crowned Or.

Crane of Camborne, five descents to 1620, married the heiress of Newton.

Arms: — Arg. a crane Sable, on a perch raguly, Vert.

Creffell of Creffell. — The pedigree is traced five descents, in the visitation of 1620.

Crocker of Lynam in Devonshire, some time of St. Agnes. — Arms: — Arg. a chevron engrailed Gules, between three birds Sab.

Crossman of Cross — traced to the reign of Henry VII. — Arms: — Sab. a chevron Or, between three goats' heads erased, Argent.

Curteys of Pyll married an heiress of Fitz-Walter, and a coheiress of Somester; not extinct in 1531.

Arms: — Sable, three fleurs-de-lis, Argent.

Dagg of St. Erth and Trewerget married the heiresses of Smith of Trewerget, Reskere, and Colman; continued for eight generations at Trewerget: not extinct in 1620.

Dart alias Wallis of Pentuan in Mevagissey. — Arms: — Gules, a fesse and canton, Ermine.

Davies of Kellio and Kea — three generations before 1620. — Arms: — Sab. a fesse Or, between three cinquefoils, Arg.

De Cant of Cant in St. Minver.

Deviock of Deviock in St. Germans, quartered by Trelawney.

Arms: — Party per saltier, Arg. and Sable.

Dodson of Hay, traced five generations before 1620, married the heiress of Hay.

Arms: — Arg. a bend engrailed Az., between two birds, Sable; quartering, Arg. an etoile, Gules.

Doynell, quartered by Trelawney. — Arms: — Per pale dancettée, Arg. and Az. a fesse * * *

Ellis of Treveor. — Arms: — Arg. three eels, proper.

Fletcher of Mawgan, three generations before 1620, married the heiress of Hill.

Gamon of Cornwall (Leland). — Arg. three legs, Sable.

Gurlyn of Gurlyn, quartered by Gregor. — Arms: — Arg. on a bend Gules, cotised Az., three fleurs-de-lis of the field.

Hallamore of Gwarder in Gluvias, and of Penryn.

Harvey of Hale in Linkinhorne — three descents before 1620.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three harrows, Sable.

Hawke of Treriven in St. Cleather, married the heiress of Hare, of that place, and the heiress of Prust.

Arms: — Or, three bends Az., a chief, Ermine.

Heart of Trencreek. — Arms: — Gules on a chief, Argent, three human hearts, proper.

Hechyns. — Arms: — Arg. a cross flurty, quarterly Arg. and Gules, between two lions' heads erased, Sable.

Hickes of Luxulion — four generations before 1620.

Hill of Shilston and Truro — a Devonshire family, mentioned in the visitation of 1620.

Arms: — Argent a chevron between three water-bougets, Sable.

Hobbs of Trevince. — Arms: — * * * three eagles displayed Purpure.

Hore of Trenowth married the heiresses of Trenowth and Tregarthian, and a coheiress of Cavell.

Arms: — Az. on a bend Arg., three torteauxes.

Hunkin of South-Kimber and Liskeard — five generations before 1620.

Arms: — Argent, a mascle surmounted by a fesse, Sable.

Janes — a Worcestershire family, settled in St. Winnow; afterwards, for five descents, at Botallack.

Arms: — Arg. a lion rampant Az., between three escallops, Gules.

Joliffe of Tredidon — traced seven generations before 1620. Their ancestor married the heiress of Windsor, who married the heiress of Tredidon.

Jope of Merrifield — three descents before 1620. — Arms: — Arg. two pheons in chief, and a mullet in base, Sable.

Keate of St. Enoder and St. Columb — three generations before 1620; a Berk. shire family.

Knevet of Rosmerin, a younger branch of the Knevets of Buckenham in Norfolk — not extinct in 1620.

Arms: — Arg. a bend, Sable, a border engrailed of the second.

Lampen of Paderda in Linkinhorne — traced seven generations before 1620. (Paderda was sold about 1685.)

Arms of Lampen: — Arg. on a bend engrailed, Sable, three rams' heads caboshed, Argent.

Langherne of Tregavethan near Truro, and of St. Erme — neither branch extinct in 1620.

Arms: — Az., a chevron between three escallop-shells, Or.

Launtyan, quartered by Trelawney. — Arms: — Arg. a bull Sable, a border of the second bezanty.

Launce of Penair near Truro — supposed to have been extinct about the middle of the seventeenth century.

Arms: — Or, on a fesse dauncettée Sable, three cinquefoils of the field.

Leach of Trethewell in St. Evall. — Arms: — Party per fesse engrailed, G. and Erm. in chief three ducal coronets Or.

Leigh or A-Leigh of St. Mary-Week, traced five generations before 1620, descended from the Leghs of High-Legh in Cheshire.

Lenhorgy, quartered by Beville. — Arms: — Az. three grey-hounds passant, Argent.

Levermore of Lanlivery. — Arms: — Gules, three etoiles * * *

Ley of Trevorgan-Vean in St. Erme. — Arms: — Arg. three pine-trees, Vert.

Lynam of St. Kew, afterwards of Cant in St. Minver — traced five generations before 1620. The last of the Cornish family of this name, who died not many years ago, is said to have had distant relations of the name in Ireland.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three porcupines, Sable.

Marke of Liskeard — four generations before 1620.

Mawgan, sometime sheriff of Cornwall. — Arms: — Arg. two bars and in chief two mullets, Sable.

May of High-Cross in St. Austell and of Looe. — Arms: — Gules, a chevron between three crowns, Or.

Maynard of Milton — four generations before 1620.

Arms: — Arg. three sinister hands, Gules.

Medhop of Trenant — Arms: — Erm. a lion rampant Az. crowned Or.

Moyle of Rosegerence, afterwards of Trevisick and St. Austell, bore the same arms as Moyle of Bake, but the connection is not made out in the visitation of 1620.

Munday of Rialton, a younger branch of the Mundays of Derbyshire, descended from a brother of Prior Munday, who settled at Rialton, and married a coheiress of Way of Lostwithiel — not extinct in 1620.

Arms: — Gules, on a cross engrailed Arg., five lozenges Az., on a chief Or, three eagles' legs, alaquise, of the third.

Nancarrow of Nancarrow in St. Allen — continued in the male line, although in a reduced state, at St. Agnes, in Hals's time: — the name is not now known.

Nancarrow of Nancarrow in St. Michael-Penkevil.

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three stags attires, Sable.

Nangarthan — four descents to 1620. — Arms: — Arg. three moles, Sab.

Nankevil alias Tippet, of St. Columb five generations before 1620, married the heiress of Killignock of Killignock in St. Wenn, which was sold by the family in the reign of Charles II.

Arms: — * * * three tippets * * *

Nantian, quartered by Beville. — Arms: — Or, a fesse and in chief two etoiles, Gules.

Paterda of Paterda in St. Germans, quartered by Trelawney.

Arms: — Sable, three lions' tails, Or.

Penquite of Penquite in St. Sampson's.

Penstrasow of Penstrasow in St. Ewe in the reign of Henry IV.

Peverell, quartered by Flamank. — Arms: — Az. three garbs, Arg. a chief, Or.

Polgreen. — Arms: — Argent two chevrons Azure, each charged with two pullets, Or.

Pollamounter of Pollamounter in Newlyn, afterwards of Trevithick in St. Columb. — Arms: — Az. a sea-lion Argent.

Porter of Trematon — five generations before 1620.

Powna, quartered by Trelawney. — Arms: — * * * a chevron Gules, charged with three oak-leaves.

Poyle of Tregony and Castlezance married a coheiress of Tregarthain, traced five generations before 1620. — Arms: — Arg. a hemp-breaker, Sable.

Pulyne, quartered by Reskymer. — Arms: — Gules, semée of cross crosslets * * * a saltier, Vairé.

Quarme of Woodham, Devonshire, of Nancor in Creed, and St. Keverne, settled in Cornwall in the reign of Queen Elizabeth — supposed to be extinct.

Arms: — Barry lozengy Arg. and Gules, counterchanged.

Resogan or Rosogan married the heiress of Tripcony — not extinct in 1620.

Arms: — Argent, a chevron Azure, between three roses Gules, leaves, Vert, seeded, Or.

Rinsey, quartered by Godolphin. — Arms: — Arg. three bars dauncettée, Gules.

Rosewarne of Rosewarne in Camborne married the heiresses of Carlyon and Pencarrow.

Arms: — Arg. three Catherine wheels in pale, between two pallets, Gules.

Rowe of Treganyan in St. Michael-Penkevil. — Arms: — Gules, three holy lambs with banners, Argent.

Saint Margaret of Landrake.

Salter of Treludick. — Arms: — Az. a lion rampant within an orle of mullets, Arg.

Samuel of Liskeard, afterwards of Sheviock and Restormell — traced five generations above 1620. — Arms: — Arg. two squirrels salient addorsée, Gules, a border Sable.

Searle of Thankes — traced to the reign of Richard III. — Arms: — Gules, a chevron Sable, between three wood-doves, proper.

Sharrock of Tregonjohn, five generations before 1620 — not then extinct.

Skenock, quartered by Lord de Dunstanville. — Arms: — Arg. a chevron Sable, between three mullets of six points, Gules.

Smith of Tregonnick in St. Germans, six generations before 1620, married an heiress of Landewarnack, and a coheiress of Killegrew.

Arms: — Azure, a saltier between four martlets Argent.

Sparnon of Sparnon, six generations before 1620 — not then extinct.

Arms: — Az. three falcons rising Argent, on rests proper, raguly.

Speke, an ancient Devonshire family, some time of Bere in Cornwall.

Arms: — Barry of six, Argent and Azure, an eagle displayed with two heads, Gules.

Symons of Treglith in Trenegloss.

Thomas of Lelant and Cury married the heiresses of Hickes, Pawley, Rosmill, Godolphin, and Gwennap, and a coheiress of Penticost — not extinct in 1620.

Arms: — Per pale, nebulée, Argent and Azure.

Thoms or Tomys of Tremayne in St. Martin (Meneage).

Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three talbots, Sable.

Tingcomb of Trehere. — Arms: — Arg. on a chevron Sable, between three mullets pierced Gules, as many mullets of the first.

Tolcarne of Tolcarne in Camborne, four descents to 1620 — Arms: — Or, a fesse Sable, charged with a garb between two cross crosslets fitchée of the field, between three birds (qu. seagulls) regardant, proper.

Transquillet, quartered by Trewren. — Arms: — * * * a chevron between three squirrels * * *

Tredignie, quartered by Beville. — Arms: — Or, a chevron Sable between three Cornish choughs, proper.

Tregagle of Trevorder in St. Breock. — Arms: — Argent three bucks passant, Or.

Tregasawe, quartered by Coryton. — Arms: — Arg. a chevron between three talbots, Azure.

Tregere of Crowan, five descents to 1620, married a coheiress of Owry.

Tregoddick of Tregoddick in South-Petherwin — not extinct in the reign of James I. — Arms: — Arg., a chevron between three buckles, Sable.

Treorilla, quartered by Trelawney. — Arms: — Gules, a pelican in her nest feeding her young, Or.

Trembethow, quartered by Mohun. — Arms: — Azure, three bullocks' heads affrontée, Or.

Tresaher of Trevethen and Budock married an heiress of Petit, who had married a coheiress of Goveley.

Trethake of Trethake in St. Cleer in the reign of Edward III.

Arms: — Sable a goat salient Argent.

Trethewey — an ancient family of St. Stephen-Brannel. — Arms: — A chevron engrailed between three goats.

Trevail, quartered by Boscawen. — Arms: — Arg. a fleur-de-lis, Sable.

Trevenard, quartered by Borlase. — Arms: — Argent, a chevron between three artichokes, Gules.

Treverne, quartered by Carnsew. — Arms: — Gules, a bull passant, Sab.

Trevilla or Trewilla, quartered by Boscawen. — Arms: — Argent, a chevron between three towers tripple turretted, Sable.

Trevysyns of Trevysyns married coheiresses of Martin, Trenwalde, and Coleyne, and the heiress of Tresyny — not extinct in 1531.

Trewithan of Trewithan in St. Wenn — supposed to have been extinct about the reign of Queen Elizabeth.

Trewbody of Castle, four generations before 1620, married an heiress of Coryton.

Arms: — Arg. on a fesse cotised Azure, three fleurs-de-lis, Or; on a chief Gules a demi lion rampant, issuant of the third.

Trewolla of Trewolla in St. Gorran, seven descents before 1620.

Arms: — Sable, three owls Argent, beaked Or.

Tripcony of Tregarthin in Gorran, and of Kenegie, married the heiress of Kenegie.

Arms: — Argent, three conies passant, Sable.

Tubb of Trengoff or Trengove, traced six generations before 1620, married the heiress of Calway. There were younger branches of Bodmin and Gwennap.

Arms: — Argent, a chevron Sable between three gurnets, or tub-fish hauriant, Gules.

Upcott of Devonshire, some time of St. Austell. — Arms: — Argent, on a chevron between three boars passant, Sable, as many roses of the field.

Verman of Lamorran married the heiress of Penant. — Arms: — Sable, three eagles displayed in bend between two cottises, Argent.

Warnysel alias Treneere of Alwerton married the heiresses of Treroufe, Treneere, Nance, and Beville — not extinct in 1531.

White of St. Germans and Ince, three generations before 1620.

Arms: — Or, a chevron Vert, between three goats' heads erased, Sable.

After treating of the Cornish families, Dr. Borlase, in one of his manuscripts, observes: — "It is a melancholy reflection to look back on so many great families (fn. 22) as have formerly adorned the county of Cornwall, and are now no more; the Grenvilles, the Arundells, Carminows, Champernons, Bodrugans, Mohuns, Killegrews, Bevilles, Trevanions, which had great sway and possessions in these parts. The most lasting families have only their seasons, more or less, of a certain constitutional strength. They have their spring, and summersunshine glare, their wane, decline, and death; they flourish and shine perhaps for ages; at last they sicken; their light grows pale, and, at a crisis when the off-sets are withered and the old stock is blasted, the whole tribe disappears, and leaves the world as they have done Cornwall. There are limits ordained to every thing under the sun: Man will not abide in honour. Of all human vanities, family-pride is one of the weakest. Reader, go thy way; secure thy name in the book of life, where the page fades not, nor the title alters nor expires; — leave the rest to Heralds and the ParishRegister."

Footnotes

1 Richard Pincerna had, in 1154, a grant of the manor and hundred of Conarton; his son assumed the name of Conarton, and his immediate posterity, removing to Lanherne, took their name from that barton. (See Mr. Bowles's "Short Account of the Hundred of Penwith.")
2 Sir Renfrey, who married Alice Lanherne, is represented as great grandson of Ralph, who lived in the reign of King Stephen.
3 In his epitaph at Tisbury, in Wiltshire, it is said, "Mariam Arundel, Lanherniæ in Cornubiâ stirpis, noblissimam accepit conjugem; inde filio ex eâ suscepto. clarissima hæc prosapia quæ ultra duo sæcula fuerat divulsa, jam feliciter unita floret."
4 This family had married the heiress of a younger son of Archdekne.
5 Father of the Reverend Francis Vyvyan Jago, rector of Landulph, whose valuable assistance we have had occasion to mention.
6 The widow of Cole married Jenkin.
7 Roll in the Record-Office, Tower. — Little credit, however, is due to this evidence, as the witness, Thomas Fychet, deposed to his having heard from old people, that his relation, Thomas Carminow, proved the arms to have belonged to his ancestors from the time of King Arthur, whilst Mr. Richard Scroop only proved his family to have borne them from the time of William the Conqueror; the latter period being far beyond the time when arms were first borne in this country.
8 Spelman says, that these esquires were created by the King, being invested with a silver collar of S. S. and a pair of silver spurs, whence in the west of England they were called White Spurs. (Glossary). Weever adds, that the rank was hereditary to the elder son only. (Funeral Monuments, p. 596.)
9 This Edward died in 1520.
10 Ancestors of the Earls of Clare, and of the Duke of Newcastle.
11 See p. lxxxvi.
12 Some pedigrees make the ancestor of this branch marry the heiress of Newell or Nevill of Trewarveneth; others, the heiress of Cowling, of that place.
13 The coheiress of Prideaux married Gregor of Trewarthenick.
14 The heiress of Sayer must have married. Grenville, for Leland speaks of the Grenvilles as one of the three families to whom Petit's lands had descended.
15 In Martin's map the coat is, Arg. a chevron Gules, between three magpyes, proper.
16 The heiress of Tregeare was a second wife, and left an only daughter married to Rowe, who died without issue.
17 Sir Joseph Tredenham, who died in 1707, and lies buried in Westminster-Abbey, left two sons, who both married, but died without issue — John, the elder, in 1710.
18 See p. xcix.
19 They were of Castle-Milford in the reign of James I.
20 See Polwhele's Civil and Military History of Cornwall (1806.), p. 34. Mrs. Pendar died in 1793.
21 See p. cxxix.
22 In Norden's time there were twelve seats of the Arundells in Cornwall. The name, we believe, is now quite extinct in the county. (See p. lxxxvi. and cxix, cxxi.) Of the Carminows, who were almost equally numerous, there has not been a male left, for more than a century. Of the Trevanions, who had five seats in Cornwall in Norden's time, J. B. P. Trevanion is the representative in the female line.