Parishes
St Veep - Zennor

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Daniel and Samuel Lysons

Year published

1814

Pages

317-329

Citation Show another format:

'Parishes: St Veep - Zennor', Magna Britannia: volume 3: Cornwall (1814), pp. 317-329. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50653 Date accessed: 02 August 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

St. Veep

ST. VEEP, in the hundred and deanery of West, lies about three miles northnorth-east from Fowey, which is the post-office town; and about five south-east from Lostwithiel. The greater part of Lerrin is in this parish. There is a fair at St. Veep on the Wednesday after June 16, for horned cattle and sheep. King Charles's horse were quartered at St. Veep, just before the Earl of Essex capitulated in 1644. (fn. 1)

The little priory of St. Cyric and St. Juliett, in this parish, on the north side of St. Cyric creek, was founded by William Earl of Moreton and Cornwall, as a cell to the priory of Montacute in Somersetshire. St. Syrus the priest is said by William of Worcester, to have been buried in the church of this cell. Walter de Exon, who wrote a history of Guy Earl of Warwick in the fourteenth century, is said to have been a monk of this house. The site of this small priory, now generally called St. Cadix, is the property and residence of Mrs. Ann Wymond, widow of Richard Wymond, Esq., lately deceased. Here are some remains of the chapel.

The manors of Manely-Durnford, Manely-Fleming, Langunnett, and Polvethan, have been a considerable time in the Rashleigh family, and are now the property of William Rashleigh, Esq., M.P.

Manely-Durnford was in moieties between Carew and Rashleigh in 1620 (fn. 2) : Carew's share was bequeathed to the Rashleighs by Sir Coventry Carew, together with the manor of Langunnett, which, in the reign of Henry VIII., had belonged to Sir Peter Edgcumbe (fn. 3) . Manely-Fleming most probably belonged to the ancient family of Fleming: in 1620 it was in moieties between Glynn and Upton (fn. 4) . The moiety which belonged to the Glynns was exchanged by E. J. Glynn, Esq., with the late Philip Rashleigh, Esq., for a moiety of the manor of Treheire in Lanivet. Polvethan, partly in Lansalloes and Lantegloss, was purchased by Jonathan Rashleigh, Esq. of John Treffry, Esq., who died in 1730.

The manor of Manely-Coleshill is said to have been anciently in the family of Chaworth (fn. 5) : in the reign of Richard II. it belonged to Sir Robert Tresilian, Lord Chief Justice of the King's Bench; and, after his attainder, was granted to Sir John Coleshill, and Emmeline his wife (fn. 6) , who had been Tresilian's widow: in 1620 it was in severalties between the St. Aubyns, who were descended from the Coleshills, and others who derived their title from purchase (fn. 7) : it is now the property of John Tillie Coryton, Esq., in whose family it has been a considerable time.

The manor of Lanestock and Tregenna, in this parish, now the property of David Howell, Esq., a minor, was purchased of the Sawles in 1760. Trevelyan, in this parish, was the original seat of the ancient family of that name, who, on acquiring Nettlecombe in Somersetshire, in marriage with the heiress of Whalesborowe, removed thither in the fifteenth century. John Trevelyan, who lived in the reign of Queen Elizabeth, resided chiefly at Trevelyan: his son rebuilt Nettlecombe, which has ever since been the chief seat of the family. Trevelyan is now a farm-house; the estate belongs partly to Sir John Trevelyan, Bart., and partly to Mr. Avent. Hay, now a divided property, belonging to Nanjulian and others, was formerly a seat of the Dodsons or Dotsons. Collon is the property and residence of Mr. Simon Irving.

In the parish-church are memorials of the family of Avent; and a tablet, commemorating a benefaction of William Bastard, "utter barister of the MiddleTemple," who gave the tenement of Nethercombe, (now let at 6l. 15s. per annum,) to the poor of St. Veep and Duloe, for ever. The impropriation and advowson of the vicarage, which had belonged to the priory of Montacute, were granted by King Henry VIII. to Peter Courtenay of Ethy; and, having passed through the families of Wrey, Tingcombe, Baker, and St. Aubyn, were purchased of Mrs. O'Brien, daughter of the late Francis St. Aubyn, Esq., by the trustees under the will of the late David Howell, Esq., in whom they are now vested.

Veryan

VERYAN, in the deanery and in the west division of the hundred of Powder, lies four miles nearly south from Tregony, which is the post-office town, and 11 from Truro. The principal village in this parish, besides the church-town, is Portloe, a fishing-cove.

The manor of Elerkey, (which was the secular name of this parish,) belonged, together with Ruan-Lanihorne, to the Archdeknes, from whom it passed, by coheiresses, to the families of Lucy and Vaux. At a later period, the Tregians had a moiety of this manor, which was sold in severalties: the other moiety was in the family of Wallop; passed by sale to Maynard, by marriage to Hobart, by sale to Morice, and by gift to Molesworth: in 1790, it was purchased of Sir William Molesworth, Bart., by Francis Gregor, Esq., of Trewarthenick, who has sold the estate in lots to the several tenants, together with the manerial rights.

The manor of Truburrows, in this parish, has belonged many years to the Trevanions, and is now the property of J.P.T. Bettesworth Trevanion, Esq. Trenonna, which passed with the heiress of Tresteane to the Pawleys, is now a farm-house, which belonged to the late John Lemon, Esq., as devisee of the late Colonel Willyams. In this parish are Crugsillack, the seat of John Kempe, Esq., and Behan-park, the seat of the Rev. Jeremiah Trist.

In the parish-church is the monument of Richard Trevanion (son of the governor of Pendennis-castle), 1712. The Dean and Chapter of Exeter have the appropriation, and are patrons of the vicarage. The church of Veryan (by the name of Lerchi) was given to the priory of Montacute by William Earl of Moreton. (fn. 8)

A charity-school is supported in this parish by subscription, aided by a benefaction of about 10l. per annum, from the society for promoting Christian knowledge according to the principles of the church of England.

Warbstow

WARBSTOW, in the hundred of Lesnewth and in the deanery of Trigg-Major, lies about eight miles west-north-west from Launceston, which is the post-office town, and about the same distance nearly north-east from Camelford. The principal villages in this parish are, Downniney, Trelask, and Trengune.

The manor of Fentrigan or Ventrigan belonged to the priory of Tywardreth, and was one of those annexed to the duchy of Cornwall in 1540, in lieu of the honor of Wallingford. Oto Colyn died seised of the manor of Donneny or Downniney, in this parish, in 1466 (fn. 9) : in 1620 it was in the Champernownes (fn. 10) ; afterwards in the Arscotts, from whom it passed, by inheritance, to Sir Arscott Ourry Molesworth, Bart., the present proprietor.

The great tithes of this parish, which were appropriated to the priory of Tywardreth, are now vested in the Honourable William Eliot, M.P. The vicarage is in the gift of the crown. Wardstow is consolidated with Trenegloss. In this parish is the remarkable ancient fortification called Warbstow-burrow.

Warleggan or Warleggon

WARLEGGAN or WARLEGGON, in the hundred and deanery of West, lies about six miles nearly east from Bodmin, which is the post-office town, and about eight north-west from Liskeard. The principal villages in this parish are, Bofindle and the church-town.

The manor of Warleggon, together with the advowson of the rectory, has long been in the family of Gregor, and is now the property of Francis Gregor, Esq., of Trewarthenick. Another manor of Warleggon belonged to the Coryton family, of whom it was purchased, in 1680, by John Trengove, otherwise Nance, Esq., by whose descendant, James Wyard Gooch, Esq. (some time of Trengoffe, now of Orford in Suffolk), it was alienated, in 1803, to Edward Angove, Esq., who at the same time purchased the barton of Trengoffe, (formerly esteemed a manor,) which had been successively in the families of Molins, Hungerford, and Hastings. This manor has been lately offered for sale. Trengoffe or Trengove gave name to an ancient family, by whom the barton was sold to the Tubbs: in Norden's time, it was the seat of John Tubb, Esq.: after continuing in this family for some descents, it was sold to the Parkers, and by the latter to John Trengove alias Nance, said to have been descended from a younger branch of the family, who sold this barton to the Tubbs. (fn. 11)

The manor of Carborro or Carburrow, and the barton of Trevedoe, have been for a considerable time in the family of their present proprietor, Arscott Bickford, Esq., of Dunsland in Devonshire. Part of the old mansion is inhabited as a farm-house; the remainder is reserved for the purpose of holding the manor courts.

Week St. Mary, or St. Mary-Week

WEEK ST. MARY, or ST. MARY-WEEK, in the hundred of Stratton and deanery of Trigg-Major, lies seven miles south of Stratton; about 10 northnorth-west from Launceston, which is the post-office town; and 10 west from Holsworthy in Devonshire. The principal villages in this parish, exclusively of the church-town, are, Bakesdown, Lower-Ex, Kitsham, and Week-Orchard. The church-town is in all ancient records called the Borough of Week St. Mary, and the occupiers of certain fields are still called burgage-holders. The custom of electing a mayor is still kept up; but his office is merely nominal: he has no power. There are fairs at Week St. Mary, September 8, and December 10, chiefly for bullocks and sheep.

The manor of Week St. Mary belonged at an early period to the Blanchminsters, from whom it passed to the Coleshills. Ralph de Blanchminster, who died in the year 1348, was seised of the manor and borough, with the advowson of Week St. Mary, to which were appendant, as members of the said manor, Swannacot, and other tenements. Sir William Bonville was possessed of Wyke St. Mary in 1461. (fn. 12) In process of time, the manerial rights were transferred from Week St. Mary to Swannacot; for we find that in 1620 Sir Warwick Hele held the manor of Swannacot, and Week St. Mary Burgh, as parcel of the same; yet Henry Compton, Esq. then claimed the fee of Week St. Mary. The manor of Swannacot, including Week St. Mary, is now the property of the Right Honourable Lord de Dunstanville, by inheritance from the Heles.

There was formerly a castle at Week St. Mary, of which a field adjoining the church-yard, called Castle-hill, exhibiting the traces of extensive buildings, is supposed to have been the site.

The manor of East-Orchard-Marrais or Marries, in this parish, and MarhamChurch, belonged to the ancient family of Marrais, whose heiress married an ancestor of the Rolles. The late Dennis Rolle sold this manor, with other considerable estates, to the late Sir John Call, Bart., and it is now the property of Sir W. P. Call, Bart. The barton-house, formerly the seat of the Marrais family, for whom there is an ancient memorial in the church, is now a farm-house, belonging to Mr. Richard Burden Bray: his father purchased the barton of the late Mr. Rolle. The manors of Pigsden and Nethercot extend into this parish.

The advowson of Week St. Mary, which belonged formerly, as beforementioned, to the Blanchminsters, appears to have passed, with the manor of Stratton, to Lord Carteret: it now belongs to the master and fellows of SidneySussex college in Cambridge, in consequence of an exchange with Lord Carteret for that of Wilhamsted in Bedfordshire: the latter adjoins the parish of Hawnes near Bedford, in which is his lordship's seat. There was formerly a chapel at Goscote, in this parish, dedicated to St. Lawrence. (fn. 13)

A chantry and grammar-school were founded, in the reign of Henry VIII., at Week St. Mary, by Dame Thomasine Percival, a native of this parish, "with fair lodgings for the schoolmasters, schollers, and officers, and twenty pound of yeerely revennue for supporting the incident charges." Her story, as told by Carew, from whom the above is quoted, is, that her maiden name was Bonaventure, but whether by descent or event he knew not; that "whiles in her girlish age she kept sheepe on St. Mary-Wike moore, it chanced that a London marchant passing by, saw her, heeded her, liked her, begged her of her poore parents, and carried her to his home. In processe of time, her mistres was summond by death to appeare in the other world; and her good thewes, no lesse than her seemely personage, so much contented her master, that he advanced her from a servant to a wife, and left her a wealthy widow. Her second marriage befell with one Henry Gall; her third and last, with Sir John Percival, lord maior of London, whom she also overlived. And to shew that vertue as well bare a part in the desert as fortune in the meanes of her preferment, she employed the whole residue of her life and last widdowhood, to works no lesse bountifull then charitable, — namely, repayring of high-waies, building of bridges, endowing of maydens, relieving of prisoners, feeding and apparelling the poor," &c. Dame Thomasine Percival's will, which bears date 1512, throws light upon some parts of her history; it shews that her family name was Bonaventer; for she leaves 20l. to her brother, John Bonaventer: her first husband's name was Thomas Bumsby. She makes her cousin, John Dinham, who married her sister's daughter, residuary legatee, and commits to his discretion the chantry and grammar-school, which she had founded in her life-time; to the vicar of Liskeard she leaves a little gilt goblet, with a blue flower in the bottom, to the intent that he should pray for her soul; and towards the building of the tower at St. Stephen's, Launceston, 20 marks.

Carew observes, that in Thomasine Bonaventer's grammar-school, divers of the best gentlemen's sons of Devon and Cornwall had been "vertuously trained up in both kinds of divine and humane learning, under one Cholwell, an honest and religious teacher; which caused the neighbours so much the rather and the more to rewe, that a petty smacke onely of popery opened a gap to the oppression of the whole, by the statute made in Edw. the 6 raigne, touching the suppression of chaunteries." Many of our celebrated foundation-schools would have shared the same fate, had they not been protected by well-wishers to their establishment, who pointed out the obvious practicability of correcting the superstitious usages with which they were connected; a practicability which those who coveted their revenues would very gladly have overlooked.

Wendron

WENDRON, in the deanery and in the west division of the hundred of Kirrier, lies about two miles and a half north-north-east from Helston. The principal villages in this parish are Porkellis and Trevonnack: Helston is a chapelry of Wendron; but in most respects may be deemed, and is treated of in this volume, as a separate parish.

The manor of Boskenwyn, in this parish, is in moieties between the Honourable Mrs. Agar and Sir John St. Aubyn, Bart. The barton of Trenethick belonged at an early period to the Seneschalls, from whom it passed, by a female heir, to the family of Hill. John Hill, Esq., about the year 1770, bequeathed this estate to a namesake, (but, as we are informed, no relation,) who resided at Carwythenick in Constantine: it is now the property of Peter Hill, Esq., and in the occupation of the Rev. Thomas Wills, vicar of Wendron. The barton of Nansloe is the property of the Rev. William Robinson; and Higher-Trelil the property and occasional residence of William Harris, Esq., of Helston, in right of his wife, the heiress of J. Rowe, Esq. Lower-Trelil is the property of Stephen Usticke, Esq. The barton of Trenear, on which are now only some small cottages, is said (most probably without any foundation) to have been a hunting-seat of the Earls of Cornwall: it is the property of Richard Johns, Esq., of Helston, by purchase from the Vyvyans.

Bodilly, some time the seat of a branch of the Tresilians, passed, by purchase, to the Glynns; it is now a farm-house, the property of Mrs. Harris of Trelil. Merther-Uny, to which formerly a deer-park was annexed, is now a farm, belonging to Mr. Chilcot of Truro, and retains no trace of its former consequence.

In the parish-church is the tomb of Warin Penhallinyk, prebendary of Glaseney college, rector of St. Just, and vicar of Wendron and Stithians, with his figure on a brass plate, in robes, (the date imperfect.) The great tithes were appropriated to the abbey of Rewley, to which monastery the church was given by Edmund Earl of Cornwall (fn. 14) . They are now in severalties, having been sold in lots, about the year 1800, by the late Lord Falmouth. The patronage of the vicarage is now vested in Queen's college, Oxford, having been purchased a few years ago for the Michell foundation. There was formerly a chapel at Bodilly, in this parish, dedicated to St. Henry; at Tresulla, one dedicated to St. Wendron; and a third, at Merther-park, dedicated to St. Uny (fn. 15) : the tower of the latter was standing within the memory of aged persons: it is mentioned in a subsidy roll of 45 Edw. III. (fn. 16)

St. Wenn

ST. WENN, in the hundred and deanery of Pyder, lies about four miles nearly east-north-east from St. Columb, which is the post-office town, and about eight west from Bodmin, the same distance north from St. Austell, and seven south from Padstow. The principal villages in this parish are, Rosemannon and Tregonetha: at the latter there are two cattle-fairs, April 25 and August 1.

The manor of Borlase-Burgess, formerly the property and seat of the ancient family of Borlase, is said to have been given by King William Rufus to a certain Norman, who was lord of Talfer, in that country, and whose posterity assumed the name of Borlase. (fn. 17) The last heir-male of the elder branch sold this estate, in 1559, to John Hender, Esq., whose heiress brought it to the ancestor of Sir A. O. Molesworth, Bart., the present proprietor: the barton-house is occupied by a farmer.

The ancient manor of Codiford-Farlegh alias Lancorla, belonged, at a remote period, to the priory of Bodmin, under which it was held by Bristitius, in the reign of Edward the Confessor. At the time of the Domesday survey, Bristitius held it under the Earl of Cornwall: at a later period, this manor was in the family of Bottreaux; it has long ago been dismembered. In one of the books of the Exchequer for Cornwall, in Westminster-abbey, says Hals, "was lately to be seen a record relating to this manor, which speaks thus of the punishment of the cucking-stool: — "Man. de Cotford-Farlo alias Lancorla in St. Wenn, temp. Hen. III. Quia per objurgatrices et meretrices multa mala in manerium oriuntur, &c., lites, pugnæ, diffamationes, ac aliæ multæ inquietationes per earum hutefias et clamores; igitur utimur de eisdem quod cum captæ fuerint habeant judicium de la cocking-stole, et ibi stabunt nudis pedibus, et suis crinibus pendentibus, et dispersis, tanto tempore ut aspici possint ab omnibus per viam transeuntibus secundum voluntatem Balivorum nostrorum capitalium." Hals adds, "that there was a walled pool for this purpose, by the highway side, and that the cucking-stool had been in existence within the memory of man. The barton of Codiford-Farlegh, which belonged some time to the Trelawny family, is now the property of Mr. John Tom.

The manor of Cransworth belonged, in the reign of Edward IV., to the family of Bonville (fn. 18) : it is now the property of the Rev. Charles Prideaux Brune. The manor of Lower-Borlase is the property of Mr. Richard, and Mr. George Sandy. There was formerly a manor of Tregonetha in this parish, which has been dismembered.

Great-Skewish, in this parish, gave name to a family, one of whom (John Skewish), in the reign of Henry VI., compiled an abridgment of the chronicles and the wars of Troy. The last of this family, John Skewish, (in the sixteenth century) had two daughters, who married Mohun and Courtenay. This estate, which was inherited by the former, passed successively to the families of Renfry, Parkin, and Vivian (fn. 19) : it is now the property of Thomas Rawlings, Esq.

Tregury, Tregurra, or Tregurtha, was the seat of a family so called, of whom was Michael de Tregury, Archbishop of Dublin, who died in 1471. The last heir-male of the elder branch of this family died in the reign of Henry V., leaving three daughters, coheirs, who sold this barton to the family of Bottreaux (fn. 20) , from whom it passed successively, by inheritance or sale, through the families of Hungerford, Hastings, Edgcumbe, Parkin, and Vivian, to Mr. William Hals, who wrote the Parochial History of Cornwall, and resided here in the latter part of his life. This estate, now called Tregotha, is the property of Thomas Rawlings, Esq.

Killignock was the seat of a family of that name, whose heiress, in the reign of Henry VIII., married Nanskevil alias Typpett. In the reign of Charles II. Matthew Typpett sold this barton to Mr. Joseph Hawkey (fn. 21) : it is now the property of Mr. Richard Vincent. The barton of Damelsa is in severalties.

The great tithes of this parish, which were appropriated to the abbey of Tewksbury in Gloucestershire, belonged to Mr. William Hals above-mentioned: they are now vested in William Rashleigh, Esq. M.P., who is patron of the vicarage. There was formerly a chapel on the North-downs, called CarenzaWortha, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalen: it was destroyed in the civil war. (fn. 22)

Whitstone

WHITSTONE, in the hundred of Stratton and in the deanery of Trigg-Major, lies about seven miles nearly south-south-east from Stratton, and 10 north-northwest from Launceston, which is the post-office town. The only villages in the parish, besides the church-town, are, East and West Balsdon, both very small.

The manor of Wadfast belonged, in the reign of Edward III., to the family of L'Engleis or English: at a later period to the Marquis of Exeter, most probably as heir of the Bonvilles: in Norden's time, it was the seat of George Grenville, Esq.: in 1620 the manor was in moieties between Hardye and Peirce; and afterwards belonged to the Rolles of Stevenstone, of whom it was purchased by the Right Honourable Lord de Dunstanville, who is the present proprietor. The barton of Bennets, now the property and occasionally the residence of Lord de Dunstanville, came into his lordship's family about the year 1670, by inheritance from the family of Hele, whose seat it was for several generations.

The manor of Nethercot, in this parish, and Week St. Mary, belonged to the Rolles of Heanton, from whom it passed, by inheritance, to the present proprietor, Lord Clinton. Froxton, called in old deeds a manor, belonged, in the reign of Edward II., to the Giffords, from whom it passed, by successive female heirs, to the families of Downe, Rouse, and Spoure: it is now possessed by F. H. Rodd, Esq., under the same title as the Trebartha estate. Whitstone, formerly belonging to the Cobham family (fn. 23) , is now the property and residence of Wrey J' Ans, Esq.: it was purchased by his grandfather, Thomas J'Ans, Esq. of Bidiford, of the Badcocks, to whom it had passed in marriage with the heiress of Good. (fn. 24)

The valleys of this parish abound with woodcocks in a remarkable degree; nearly 40 nets (or roads as they are called), being exempted from licence by the last game act, are employed in taking them, and yield considerable profit to the cottagers.

In the parish-church, which is dedicated to St. Nicholas, are memorials of the Heles of Bennets, (1650, &c.;) and on the outside wall, one of the family of Edgcumbe. The Rev. John Kingdon, the present incumbent, is patron of the rectory, the advowson of which belonged, some time since, to the Arundell family.

There is said to have been formerly a chapel at Froxton, probably the chapel of the Holy Trinity, in this parish, mentioned in the registers of the see of Exeter. (fn. 25)

St. Winnow

ST. WINNOW, in the hundred and deanery of West, lies two miles south-southeast from Lostwithiel, which is the post-office town; and from Fowey about four miles by water, and six by land. The principal villages in this parish are, Bofarnell, near Resprin-bridge; Bridge-end, adjoining Lostwithiel; Lerrin, on the creek of that name; Polmenow, and Polschoath or Polscoe. On the beacon-hill, in this parish, not far from Lostwithiel, a square battery was constructed by King Charles's army, not long before the capitulation of the parliamentary forces in 1644.

The manor of St. Winnow is said to have belonged to an ancient family of that name, whose heiress brought it to the Uptons. Leland says, "that after the St. Winnows, the Lords Hastings had this manor; and that the great-grandfather of Sir William Lower, then living, (temp. Hen. VIII.,) purchased it of them." We find that the Bottreaux family, whose Cornish property descended, by succesfive female heirs, to the families of Hungerford and Hastings, were possessed of the manor of St. Winnow in the reign of Henry VI. It is probable that the St. Winnows and Uptons held this manor under the families of Bottreaux and Hastings, and that it was the fee of the manor which was purchased by Lower's (maternal) great-grandfather. The two coheiresses of Upton, about the year 1500, married two brothers of the Lower family, John and Nicholas: the latter possessed St. Winnow. Sir William Drummond married the heiress of Lower of St. Winnow; the coheiresses of Drummond married Trevanion, and Roper of Eltham in Kent. St. Winnow was inherited by the latter: the heiress of Roper married Edward Henshaw, whose coheiresses married Sir Edward Dering, Bart., William Strickland, Esq., and Sir Rowland Wynne, Bart. About the year 1770, the manor of St. Winnow was purchased of the representatives of these coheiresses by John Rashleigh, Esq. of Penquite, whose son, John Colman Rashleigh, Esq., sold it, about the year 1807, to the Rev. Robert Walker, vicar of St. Winnow, who is the present proprietor. A younger branch of the Lowers (of whom the late Mrs. Hitchens was the last survivor) continued to have an interest in the barton, which was for some descents in the immediate occupation of the Robins family: it was purchased, with the manor, by Mr. Walker, who keeps it in his own hands, the house being occupied by a bailiff. The Lower family were of Polscoe, in this parish, before they acquired the manor and barton of St. Winnow.

The manors of Bridge-end, Polmawgan, Ethy, and Polmenow, belong to Earl Mount-Edgcumbe. The two former have been many years in the Edgcumbe family, having been purchased of a younger branch of the Carminows, who had their seat at Polmawgan, now a farm-house. The manors of Ethy, (described as an honor in the Exeter Domesday,) and Polmenow, belonged successively to the families of Stonard, Cayle, and Courtenay. In 1634, Francis Courtenay, Esq. sold these manors to Stephen Treville, Esq. of Plymouth. Two of the coheiresses of Treville married Arscott and Burthogge. By purchase and inheritance, these manors became vested in the former; and having passed, by female descent, to the Molesworths, were purchased of Sir William Molesworth, about the year 1790, by the late Lord Mount-Edgcumbe. Ethy, called by Leland, Teuthey, and by some writers, Tethe and Tethy, was many years the seat of a younger branch of the Courtenays of Powderham: it is, by lease under Lord Mount-Edgcumbe, the seat of Charles Vinicombe Penrose, Esq., RearAdmiral of the Blue, who has now (March 1814) the command on the coast of Spain.

The manors of Bawdah or Bodowe and Dawnet, which belonged to the Courtenays, Earls of Devonshire, and afterwards to the Mohuns, have passed with Boconnoc, and are now, in right of his lady, the property of the Right Honourable Lord Grenville. The manor of Resprin, formerly the property and seat of a family of that name, passed, by a female heir, to a younger branch of the Carminows; and from Carminow, in like manner, to Prideaux of Thuborough: Norden describes it as a seat of the Prideaux family: it was afterwards in the family of Michell. About the year 1750, Mr. Titus Chappel purchased it of Mr. Bradlick; and it is now the property of Mrs. Joyce Chappel of St. Breock. The manor of Polschoath in Lanlivery, formerly belonging to the families of Lyttelton and Trenance, and now to the Honourable Mrs. Agar, as representative of the Robartes family, extends into this parish.

Trevegoe, a farm-house, belonging to Lord Grenville, was a seat of the Knapmans, whose heiress brought it to the Hawkeys: it was, not many years ago, occupied by Nicholas Harley, Esq., and afterwards by his widow. Newham, a farm-house, belonging to William Rashleigh, Esq., M.P., of Menabilly, was some time a seat of the Sawles.

The Dean and Chapter of Exeter have the appropriation of the great tithes of St. Winnow, and are patrons of the vicarage. At St. Nighton is a chapel of ease. There was formerly a chapel at Resprin, dedicated to St. Martin, which was confirmed, by Robert de Cardinham, to the priory of Tywardreth, in the reign of Richard I. (fn. 26) : there was a chapel also at Bodvalgan, dedicated to the same saint. (fn. 27) Resprin was formerly a separate parish, as appears by the Subsidy Roll of 45 Edw. III. (fn. 28) St. Nighton is called a parish in an act of parliament of the reign of James I.; but we have not found it so described in any records of a more remote date.

Withiel

WITHIEL, in the hundred and deanery of Pyder, lies five miles west from Bodmin, which is the post-office town, and about six east-north-east of St. Columb. The principal villages in this parish are, Retire, Tregawen, and Withiel-goose.

The manor of Withiel-goose, to which is annexed the advowson of the rectory, belonged to the priory of Bodmin: it was leased by the crown, in 1539, to Richard Kendall; and, in 1588, granted in fee-farm to Richard Branthwayte and Roger Bromley: it afterwards belonged to the Coswarths, from whom it passed, by marriage, to the Vyvyans, and is now the property of the Rev. Sir Carew Vyvyan, Bart.

Trenance, in this parish, gave name to an ancient family, who removed hence to Lanhydrock, upon marrying the heiress of Lyttelton. This barton was sold by a younger branch of the Trenance family, in the reign of Charles II., to the Mapowders, from whom it passed successively to the families of Bone, Harris, and Hawkins: it is now the property of Sir Carew Vyvyan, Bart.

Brynn, in this parish, now a divided property, was a seat of the Beares, from whom it passed successively to the Bevilles and Grenvilles. The brave Sir Beville Grenville was born here.

In a window of the ancient parsonage-house, are the arms of Thomas Vyvyan, prior of Bodmin, by whom it is said to have been built. The Rev. Sir Carew Vyvyan is patron of the rectory.

Zennor

ZENNOR, in the deanery and in the west division of the hundred of Penwith, is situated on the north coast, about four miles nearly west-south-west from St. Ives, which is the post-office town, and about seven nearly north from Penzance. The principal villages in this parish, exclusively of the church-town, are, Boswednack, Treen, and Trewy. The greater part of this parish is a mass of moor-stone: the only cultivated land is a strip about half a mile in breadth, near the sea; the arable land is particularly noted for its abundant produce of barley.

The manors of Boswednack and Trereen or Treen, are the property of William Arundell Harris, Esq., in whose family they have been for a considerable time. The manor of Trewy belongs to Messrs. Grove and Cornish. The tenement of Treveglos belonged to a family of that name, whose heiress brought it to the Gerveyses: it is now the property of their representative, the Rev. Richard Gerveys Grylls.

The great tithes of Zennor were formerly appropriated to the college of Glaseney. The vicarage, of which the Bishop of Exeter is patron, is endowed with a portion of the great tithes; the remainder is vested in George John, Esq. of Penzance. There was formerly a chapel in a field called the Chapel-field, within the barton of Kerrow and Cornelloe, belonging to the Rev. Anthony Williams, of Treneere, near Penzance, and another at Treen; of both which there are some remains.

Footnotes

1 Walker.
2 Extent. Terrar. Ducat. Cornub.
3 Record in the Augmentation-Office, see p. 26.
4 Extent. Terrar. Ducat. Cornub. 17 Jac. I.
5 Rot. Pat. 15 Ric. II.
6 Extent. Terrar. Ducat. Cornub. 17 Jac. I.
7 Ibid.
8 Dugdale, I. 670
9 Esch. 6 Edw. IV.
10 Extent. Terrar. Ducat. Cornub. 17 Jac. I.
11 Hals.
12 See Esch. 1 Edw. IV., No. 24.
13 Borlase's Collections from the Registers of the see of Exeter.
14 Dugdale, I. 934.
15 Borlase's Collections from the Registers of the see of Exeter.
16 Among the Tower Records.
17 Borlase's MSS.
18 Esch. 1 Edw. IV., No. 24.
19 Borlase's Collections.
20 Ibid.
21 Ibid.
22 Ibid.
23 See Extent. Terrar. Ducat. Cornub. 17 Jac. I.
24 Norden erroneously says, the seat of Richard Gould.
25 Borlase's Collections.
26 Dugdale's Monast. I. 586.
27 Borlase's Collections from the Registers of the see of Exeter.
28 Among the records at the Tower.