Alvanley - Amble

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

49-53

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'Alvanley - Amble', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 49-53. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50754 Date accessed: 19 September 2014.


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Alvanley

ALVANLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Frodsham, union of Runcorn, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 3 miles (S. S. W.) from Frodsham; containing 314 inhabitants, and comprising 1532 acres of land, whereof the soil is clay and sand. The manor was held under the earls of Arundel at an early period by Richard de Pierpoint and Robert de Alvanley, who sold it to Sir Philip de Orreby; and it came by marriage, in the reign of Henry III., to the Arden family. When Sir Richard Pepper Arden, master of the rolls, was created a peer, in 1801, he took the title of Lord Alvanley from this place; and it is now held by his son and successor, the present lord. The living is a donative; net income, £47; patron, Lord Alvanley. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary. A Sunday school has been established.

Alvaston

ALVASTON, a township, in the parish, union, and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Nantwich; containing 40 inhabitants. The ancient manor of Alvaston was possessed by the Bromley family, but no manor now exists: in 1788 the principal estate came by purchase to the Fosters. In the township is the common of Croach or Beam-heath, which in 1285 was given by Richard Alvaston to the whole community of the town of WichMalbank, now Nantwich; but it being deemed more for the benefit of the persons interested, the common was inclosed by act of parliament, in 1803. The township comprises 610 acres, of which 450 are in Beamheath; the soil is partly sand and partly clay. Races are held annually. The tithes have been commuted for £82. 7. 6.

Alvaston

ALVASTON, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Michael, Derby, union of Shardlow, hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 3½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Derby; containing 493 inhabitants. The manor, then called Alewoldestune, was held by Tochi at the time of the Domesday survey; and belonged afterwards to Ralph Fitz-Germund, founder of Dale Abbey, whose descendant Matilda gave Alvaston to that monastery. In 1547 it was granted to the Needham family, from whom it passed to various hands. It was esteemed a chapelry in the 12th century. The area is 1355 acres; the chapelry is pleasantly situated near the river Derwent, on the London road, and the Derby canal runs through. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the parishioners, with a net income of £116: the tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1802; the glebe here consists of about 67 acres, and portions of land have been purchased in Leicestershire and Derbyshire by an allowance from Queen Anne's Bounty. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and schools are aided by the trustees of Gilbert's charity, which provides also for the repair of the chapel.

Alvechurch (St. Lawrence)

ALVECHURCH (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Bromsgrove, forming a detached portion of the Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, locally in the Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Northfield and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 4½ miles (E. N. E.) from Bromsgrove; containing 1633 inhabitants. This was the occasional residence of the bishops of Worcester, who had a palace here in the reign of Henry II., which after the sale of the manor by the parliament, in 1648, was suffered to fall to decay, and has now entirely disappeared. The parish comprises 6599 acres, and the Birmingham and Worcester canal runs through it. Needles are made here in the rough state, and taken to Redditch to be finished. A sandstone-quarry is in operation. Fairs for cattle and sheep are held on the 22nd of April and 10th of August. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24. 16. 8., and in the gift of the Bishop of Worcester: the tithes have been commuted for £1100, with 96 acres of glebe, and a house. The church has Norman pillars, but the chancel displays the early English style, and the tower is more modern; in the interior is a monument dated 1315, of Sir Thomas Blanchfont, represented as a cross-legged knight. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Baptists. £36 per annum are appropriated to the instruction of children; the original benefactor is not known, but Dr. Warth left £100 in augmentation. A school-house was built in 1839; the school is on the national plan, for 50 boys and 30 girls, and is well supported by subscription. There is also an excellent Sunday school. An hospital for a master, six brethren, and two sisters, was incorporated by Queen Elizabeth; it is endowed with £33. 6. 8., exclusively of keeping the tenements in repair. The Roman Ikeneld-street passes through the parish, in its course from Alcester towards Lichfield. The learned Dr. Hickes, author of the Thesaurus Septentrionalium Linguarum, was incumbent here.

Alveley (St. Mary)

ALVELEY (St. Mary), a parish, partly within the liberty of the borough of Bridgnorth, but chiefly in the hundred of Stottesden, union of Bridgnorth, S. division of Salop, 6½ miles (S. S. E.) from Bridgnorth; containing, with Nordley-Regis township, and Romsley liberty in the borough of Bridgnorth, 1062 inhabitants. It comprises 6435 acres, including Romsley, which contributes one-third towards the churchrate, but is independent of the parish in other respects: the road from Shrewsbury to Cheltenham passes through it, and the river Severn is its boundary on one side. There are some works for the manufacture of iron, and several quarries, the stone of which is used for building, and made into wheels for mills and manufactures. Alveley was one of the five prebends in the royal free chapel of the castle of Bridgnorth, valued, in the reign of Henry III., at sixty marks, and is still reputed and rated as such in the Office of the First Fruits. The living is a perpetual curacy, recently endowed with £300, the donations of various persons, which were placed in the hands of the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, by whom, in consideration thereof, the net income, previously £90, was augmented £17; patron and impropriator, Col. Gatacre. The church is a fine edifice, a mixture of Norman and early English architecture, with a curious old painted window in the clerestory, supposed to have been built in the time of the Tudors. In the south wall of the chancel, three fine early English sedilia and a piscina were recently discovered, in a mutilated state, by the incumbent; they were concealed by plaster: the patron has had them restored. There is a private chapel attached to Coton Hall, in the parish. A free school was endowed in 1616, by John Grove, to whom is a monument of brass on the floor of the chancel of the church, bearing the date 1616; the master resides in a house rent-free, and receives £20 per annum. Five "decayed labourers" receive £6 each, annually, from property bequeathed by the same individual. Thomas Grove, his son, also conveyed some land to trustees, for "the poorest of the poor people," the proceeds to be distributed yearly.

Alverdiscot (All Saints)

ALVERDISCOT (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Torrington, hundred of Hartland, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 4½ miles (N. E.) from Torrington; containing 332 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the old road from Torrington to Barnstaple, comprises by computation 2000 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 3. 11¼., and in the gift of William Lee, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £156. 8., and the glebe comprises 36 acres. The church contains some elegant marble monuments to the families of Hoody and Welch, former proprietors of the manor: it has been recently repewed and beautified, and a small vestry-room has been added. There is a place of worship for a congregation of Wesleyans.

Alverstoke (St. Mary)

ALVERSTOKE (St. Mary), a parish, comprising the sea-port town of Gosport, the watering-place called Anglesey, and the chapelry of Forton, in the liberty of Alverstoke and Gosport, Fareham and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; and containing 13,510 inhabitants. This place is situated on the shore of Alverstoke bay. According to an ancient chronicle, Henry de Blois, Bishop of Winchester, and brother of King Stephen, on his return from Normandy, being overtaken by a storm in the bay, between the Isle of Wight and Alverstoke, made a solemn vow to build a church on the spot where he should first land in safety; and, having landed at this place, is said to have erected the parish church, in fulfilment of his vow, about the year 1130. The parish comprises 3031 acres, whereof 142 are common or waste: the scenery is varied, and in the western part of the parish are several small rural villages which have a pleasing aspect, and contrast finely with the more stately edifices in other parts of it. The village of Alverstoke is pleasantly situated about half a mile from the bay, and within a quarter of a mile from the elegant new buildings of Anglesey.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 6. 0½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £1250, and the glebe consists of 45 acres. The church, which occupies a site in the village beautifully secluded by trees, has undergone many changes since its foundation, and is now in a state of renovation, which has been effected with a judicious regard to its original character: a tablet was erected in 1844, to the memory of the officers and soldiers of the 44th regiment, who fell in the Affghan war. There are several churches and chapels in the parish; one at Gosport, consecrated in 1696, and dedicated to the Holy Trinity; a small chapel closely adjoining the liberty of Gosport; another at Elson, on the northern side of the parish; one, lately erected, very near to the parish church, among the new buildings at Anglesey; and one at Forton. The church at Elson is dedicated to St. Thomas, and was consecrated in Aug. 1845: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rector. The dissenters, also, have several places of worship.

Alverthorpe

ALVERTHORPE, a township, comprising the ecclesiastical districts of Alverthorpe and Thornes, in the parish and union of Wakefield, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 1½ mile (W. N. W.) from Wakefield; containing 5930 inhabitants. This township, including Westgate Common, a suburb of the borough of Wakefield, comprises by computation 3000 acres. The land is rich and fertile, and in profitable cultivation; the surface is varied; the substratum abounds with coal of good quality, and several mines are in operation. The village of Alverthorpe is pleasantly situated, and the township includes also the village of Thornes, and the hamlets of Fanshaw, Kirkham Gate, and Silcoates. The population is chiefly employed in the spinning of woollen and worsted yarn, and in the manufacture of woollen cloth and worsted stuffs, for which there are several mills and large factories; the manufacture of rope and twine is also carried on to a considerable extent. Alverthorpe church, dedicated to St. Paul, was erected in 1826, at an expense of £8000, chiefly by grant of the Parliamentary Commissioners: it is a handsome structure in the early English style, with a square embattled tower crowned with pinnacles, and contains 1600 sittings, of which 800 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar of Wakefield; the income, previously £72, was augmented in 1841 with £78 per annum by the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and a neat residence for the minister was built in 1842. The small tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an act of inclosure, in 1793. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The Northern Congregational School at Silcoates House was instituted in 1830, for the board and education of the sons of ministers of the Independent denomination.

Alverton

ALVERTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Kilvington, union of Newark, S. division of the wapentake of Newark and of the county of Nottingham, 7½ miles (S. by W.) from Newark; containing 26 inhabitants.

Alvescott

ALVESCOTT, a parish, in the union of Witney, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 6 miles (S. S. E.) from Burford; comprising 2021a. 29p., and containing 357 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 16. 8.; net income, £371; patrons, the family of Neate. All the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents, under an inclosure act, in 1796. The church is an ancient structure, consisting of a nave with semi-transepts, a massive western tower, and a chancel, which has been rebuilt, and contains some mural monuments. Goddard Carter, Esq., in 1723, left a rent-charge of £10, directing one-half to be applied in educating poor children, and the remainder in apprenticing them.

Alvesdiston (St. Mary)

ALVESDISTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Chalk, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 7¾ miles (E. by N.) from Shaftesbury; containing 263 inhabitants. This parish takes its name from Aileva, who held lands here at the time of the Norman survey: it contains about 2733 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, united to the rectory of BroadChalk and the vicarage of Bower-Chalk; impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge. The church has a font of great antiquity, and in one of the aisles are four handsome mural monuments of marble to the memory of the Wyndham family.

Alveston (St. Helen)

ALVESTON (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Thornbury, partly in the Lower, but chiefly in the Upper, division of the hundred of Langley and Swinehead, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 1 mile (S. by E.) from Thornbury; containing 841 inhabitants. This parish lies on the road from Bristol to Birmingham, and comprises by computation 2600 acres, including some waste lands, for the inclosure of which an act was passed in 1836: the land is almost entirely pasture, and is thickly clothed with elm, beech, and oak. The scenery is grand, and the parish being situated on a high ridge, commands extensive views of the Severn and the surrounding country. The living is a vicarage, annexed to that of Olveston: the tithes have been commuted for £319, and the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church, situated at some distance from the village, is a small edifice in the later English style, with a low square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for a congregation of Wesleyans. Some remains of a Roman encampment are to be seen in a part of the parish called the Abbey.

Alveston (St. James)

ALVESTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Stratford-on-Avon, Snitterfield division of the hundred of Barlichway, W. division of the county of Warwick, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Stratford; containing 793 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Avon, and comprises by measurement 2700 acres, whereof fourfifths are arable land; the remainder is pasture by the river side, with 150 acres of wood. The road from Stratford to Wellesbourn-Hastings passes through the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £220; patron, the Rector of Hampton-Lucy; impropriator, George Lucy, Esq.: the glebe consists of 90 acres. The church, rebuilt in 1839, at an expense of about £2500, chiefly raised by subscription, is in the early English style, with a square tower: the east window, presented by the patron, contains a full length figure of St. James, and the arms of the Lucy family; the interior of the edifice is very neatly and conveniently fitted up. A school is supported by subscription.

Alveton, or Alton (St. Peter)

ALVETON, or Alton (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Cheadle, S. division of the hundred of Totmonslow, N. division of the county of Stafford, 4½ miles (E. by S.) from Cheadle; comprising the townships of Alton, Cotton, Denston, and Farley; and containing 2390 inhabitants, of whom 1168 are in Alton township. The extensive manor of Alton became the property of John Talbot, first earl of Shrewsbury, by his marriage with the heiress of the Furnival family, and has remained with his descendants to the present time. The living, before the Reformation, was connected with the abbey of Croxden, to which the benefice was attached by Bertram de Verdun of Alton Castle, in 1176, after he had founded the abbey. The ruins of the castle still remain, on the summit of a rock 300 feet above the bed of the Churnet: on the opposite bank of the river are the magnificent mansion and park of the Earl of Shrewsbury.

The parish contains between 7000 and 8000 acres, whereof 2251 are in Alton township: there are limestone-quarries in the township of Cotton, and some copper-mines at Ribden; and a paper-mill is in operation. The Uttoxeter branch of the Trent and Mersey canal runs through the parish, its course being for some miles parallel with that of the Churnet, over which it is carried by means of an aqueduct. The village is romantically situated on the banks of the river, which here flows through a fertile vale; on the summit of an adjacent eminence is a lofty tower, commanding extensive and varied prospects. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 16. 5½., and in the gift of the Earl of Shrewsbury: the tithes have been commuted for £433 payable to his lordship and others, and £250 payable to the vicar; the glebe comprises 5 acres, with a house. The church, which displays a mixture of the Norman and English styles, was repaired and enlarged in 1831. There is a chapel at Cotton. The Calvinistic, Wesleyan, and Primitive Methodists have places of worship; and a Roman Catholic chapel has been erected at Alton-Towers by the earl. At Bunbury, in the parish, are the remains of a very extensive fortress, of an irregular form, ascribed to Ceolred, King of Mercia about 715; it is defended on three sides by a double vallum, and on the fourth by a steep declivity.

Alvingham (St. Adelwold)

ALVINGHAM (St. Adelwold), a parish, in the union of Louth, Marsh division of the hundred of Louth-Eske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (N. E.) from Louth; containing 313 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1600 acres, and is intersected by the Louth navigation. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Cockerington St. Mary annexed, in the patronage of the Bishop of Lincoln, who, as appropriator, owns about 400 acres of land, allotted in lieu of tithes at the inclosure in 1819, and from the produce of which the incumbent's stipend is paid. The church was rebuilt in 1826, and is a neat and commodious building, situated in the same churchyard as that of Cockerington. A priory of Gilbertine nuns and canons, dedicated to the Virgin Mary and St. Adelwold, was founded here in the reign of Henry II., which, at the Dissolution, was valued at £141. 15. per annum.

Alvington

ALVINGTON, a parish, in the hundred of Bledisloe, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 5½ miles (N. E.) from Chepstow; containing 340 inhabitants, and comprising by estimation 1550 acres. The abbot of Llantony, previously to the Reformation, exercised capital jurisdiction in this manor, which subsequently passed through various hands to the Highfords, of Dixton, from whose coheir it was purchased by the father-in-law of the present proprietor, who resides at Clanna House, in the parish. The road from Gloucester to Chepstow runs through Alvington, and the river Severn flows on the east. The living is consolidated with the rectory of Wollaston.

Alvington

ALVINGTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Brimpton, union of Yeovil, hundred of Stone, W. division of Somerset; containing 65 inhabitants.

Alvington, West (All Saints)

ALVINGTON, WEST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Kingsbridge, hundred of Stanborough, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 1 mile (W. S. W.) from Kingsbridge; containing 998 inhabitants. It comprises 3676 acres; the surface is very hilly, the soil chiefly arable, and a large quantity of peculiarly fine cider is made. The living is a vicarage, with the perpetual curacies of South Huish, Malborough, and South Milton annexed, valued in the king's books at £62. 16. 10½.; net income, £685; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Salisbury. The glebe comprises 2 acres here, and 1½ in each of the parishes of Malborough and South Milton. The church contains some good screen-work in carved oak, and a beautiful monument to a member of the Bastard family, whose ancient seat has been converted into a farmhouse.

Alwalton (St. Andrew)

ALWALTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Normancross, county of Huntingdon, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Stilton; containing 329 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Nene, which here separates the counties of Huntingdon and Northampton, and on the great north road, near its intersection with the road from Lynn to Northampton; it comprises 910a. 3r. 38p., of which the soil is fertile, and the surface beautifully varied. On the banks of the Nene are found great blocks of grey fossil stone, susceptible of a very high polish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 5. 10., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Peterborough: the tithes were commuted for 197 acres of land and a money payment, under an inclosure act, in 1805. The church exhibits in the body of the building a singular combination of Norman and early English architecture: it has been new roofed in appropriate style, and the chancel restored to its pristine elegance by the rector, who has also built a handsome parsonage-house. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Dr. Timothy Neve, archdeacon of Huntingdon, was buried here in 1757.

Alwington (St. Andrew)

ALWINGTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Bideford, hundred of Shebbear, Great Torrington and N. divisions of Devon, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Bideford; containing, with the hamlets of Fairy Cross, Ford, and Woodtown, 392 inhabitants; and comprising by measurement 2603 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 4. 9½., and in the gift of the Rev. I. T. Pine Coffin: the tithes have been commuted for £241, and there are 60 acres of glebe. In the church, over the door of the chancel, is a curious ancient monument to a member of the Coffin family. In Yeo Vale, so called from the river Yeo, which runs through it, are the remains of a chapel. There is a parochial school; also a place of worship for Wesleyans; and almshouses for three poor persons.

Alwoodley

ALWOODLEY, a township, in the parish of Harewood, Upper division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 5½ miles (N.) from Leeds; containing 281 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1250 acres, chiefly the property of G. L. Fox, Esq.; the ancient Hall, the seat of Sir Gervase Clifton, who died in 1666, is now a farmhouse. The soil is fertile, and the lands are generally in good cultivation; the surface is undulated.

Amberley, county of Gloucester.—See Hampton, Minchin.

AMBERLEY, county of Gloucester.—See Hampton, Minchin.

Amberley

AMBERLEY, a chapelry, in the parish of Marden, hundred of Broxash, union and county of Hereford, 5¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Hereford; containing 32 inhabitants, and comprising 378 acres.

Amberley

AMBERLEY, a parish, in the hundred of West Easwrith, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Arundel; containing, with Rackham hamlet, 722 inhabitants. The bishops of Chichester had a residence here, erected at the close of the fourteenth century by Bishop Rede, and which is said to have been plundered and dismantled in the parliamentary war by the army under Waller: the gateway is perfect, and, with other remains, has a bold and striking appearance in the views of the surrounding district. The parish comprises by measurement 2878 acres, and is bounded on the west by the river Arun: the village occupies an elevated situation on a sandstone rock; and towards the south rises a range of steep downs, above which is a large knoll called Amberley Mount. The living is a vicarage, with that of Houghton united, valued in the king's books at £7. 5. 7½.; net income, £166; patron and appropriator, the Bishop. The tithes were commuted in 1813 for 117 acres of land in this parish, and 16 in that of Angmering. The church has a nave of Norman, and a chancel of early English, architecture, separated by a Norman arch much enriched.

Ambersham, North

AMBERSHAM, NORTH, a tything, in the parish of Steep, union of Midhurst, hundred of Easebourne, rape of Chichester, county of Sussex, 2½ miles (E. N. E.) from Midhurst; containing 133 inhabitants.

Ambersham, South

AMBERSHAM, SOUTH, a tything, in the parish of Steep, union of Midhurst, hundred of Easebourne, rape of Chichester, county of Sussex, 2½ miles (E. by N.) from Midhurst; containing 189 inhabitants.

Amble

AMBLE, a township, in the parish of Warkworth, union of Alnwick, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 9 miles (S. E.) from Alnwick; containing 724 inhabitants. The village is pleasantly situated on an eminence near the mouth of the river Coquet, where a harbour has been formed under an act obtained in 1838, by which the value both of the soil and the minerals here has been greatly enhanced. The place was anciently of much greater importance, as is evident from the discovery of circular foundations of houses, of unhewn and uncemented stones of British origin, and of Roman coins: a paved causeway also was discovered a few years since, extending in a direction towards the old bed of the Coquet. There are valuable and extensive mines of coal in the township, the produce of which is exported to France and other parts. The tithes have been commuted for £170. 19. 6. payable to the Bishop of Carlisle, and £46. 8. 10. to the vicar of the parish.—See Warkworth.