Appleford - Ardwick

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

66-69

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'Appleford - Ardwick', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 66-69. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50758 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Appleford

APPLEFORD, a chapelry, in the parish of SuttonCourtney, union of Abingdon, hundred of Ock, county of Berks, 3½ miles (S. E.) from Abingdon; containing 187 inhabitants, and comprising 843 acres, of which 77 are common or waste. Here is a station of the Oxford branch of the Great Western railway. The chapel is dedicated to St. Peter and St. Paul. The tithes have been commuted for £344. 10., payable to the Dean and Canons of Windsor. A free school was founded and endowed by Edmund Bradstock, for the education of twenty poor children, seven from the chapelry of Appleford, and the remainder from the rest of the parish of Sutton.

Appleshaw

APPLESHAW, a parish, in the union and hundred of Andover, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (N. W. by W.) from Andover; containing 372 inhabitants. Fairs for the sale of sheep are held on May 23rd, Oct. 9th, and Nov. 4th and 5th. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Amport: the incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £206. The church, erected in 1832 at an expense of £1300, is a neat edifice, containing 270 sittings, of which 86 are free. There is a school with a small endowment.

Applesthorpe, or Apesthorpe (St. Peter)

APPLESTHORPE, or Apesthorpe (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of East Retford, North-Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (N. by E.) from East Retford; containing 109 inhabitants. It comprises 783a. 3r. 27p., and is bounded on the east by the river Trent; the surface is flat, and the soil a stiffish clay; the land near the Trent is rich meadow. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £81; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1795. The church has been more than a century in ruins, and the inhabitants attend that at North Leverton: there is, however, a burial-ground, which was inclosed in 1833.

Applethwaite

APPLETHWAITE, a township, in the parish of Windermere, union and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 5¼ miles (S. E.) from Ambleside; containing 436 inhabitants. In the township are several beautiful villas, among which is Calgarth Park, commenced in 1789 by Dr. Watson, Bishop of Llandaff, who occupied it till his death in 1816: his remains were interred at Bowness. The residence of Elleray, then the property of Professor Wilson, of Edinburgh, was visited in 1825 by Sir Walter Scott and George Canning, Mr. Wordsworth being also present at the meeting; and during the visit, a most splendid regatta took place on Windermere lake under the direction of Professor Wilson. Rayrigg, on the road to Bowness, was a residence of Mr. Wilberforce's. Two bobbin-mills afford employment to a portion of the population. The tithes have been commuted for £27.

Appleton (St. Lawrence)

APPLETON (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Abingdon, hundred of Ock, county of Berks, 5½ miles (N. W.) from Abingdon; comprising 1981a. 2p., and containing, with the township of Eaton, 496 inhabitants. It is bounded on the north-west by the river Thames, which separates it from the county of Oxford, and on the south-east by a small stream called the Ouse. The surface undulates gently from the banks of the Thames, and the scenery is pleasingly diversified; the soil near the river is of a clayey quality, and in the more elevated lands a rich and fertile loam. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 5., and in the gift of Magdalene College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £455, and the glebe comprises 32 acres. The church contains a few monuments to the Fettiplace family. There are some remains of two ancient manor-houses, each surrounded by a moat. Dr. Edmund Dickinson, author of a work entitled Delph Phœnicizantes, tracing to the Bible the origin of the heathen mythology, was born here in 1624.

Appleton, with Hull

APPLETON, with Hull, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Runcorn, E. division of the hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 2 miles (S. S. E.) from Warrington, on the road to Northwich; containing 1753 inhabitants. The manor, with its hamlets of Hull and Stockton, belonged in the reign of Henry III. to Geffrey Dutton, and subsequently passed, with Budworth, to Sir Peter Warburton, Bart. Bradley, another manor, was given by Geffrey, son of Adam de Dutton, to the ancestor of Thomas Daniers or Daniel, whose daughter and heiress, in the reign of Edward III., brought it by marriage to the Savage family; in 1622 it was the seat of the Greggs, and at a later period was held by the Egertons, of Oulton, of whom it was purchased in 1800 by Richard Wilson, Esq. The township was inclosed by an act passed in 1764, and comprises 3048 acres; the soil is clay and sand, with rock, but the first prevails: the Bridgewater canal passes through. A court baron is held by R. E. E. Warburton, Esq. Appleton Hall is the seat of Thomas Lyne, Esq. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £150, and a residence; patrons, Thomas and Gilbert Greenall, Esqrs.: the church is a plain structure, erected at a cost of £1000. At Stockton Heath is a chapel dedicated to St. Thomas, the incumbent of which has an income of £124. There is also a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school for infants, boys and girls, is supported by subscription.

Appleton, Lancashire.—See Widness.

APPLETON, Lancashire.—See Widness.

Appleton (St. Mary)

APPLETON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Freebridge-Lynn, W. division of Norfolk, 8 miles (N. E. by E.) from Lynn; comprising 876a. 1r. 7p., of which 508 acres are arable; and containing 25 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of the Hon. C. S. Cowper: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £10, and the vicarial for £8. The church has fallen into ruins.

Appleton

APPLETON, a township, in the parish of Catterick, union of Richmond, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, 2 miles (S. by W.) from Catterick; containing 91 inhabitants. It comprises about 1480 acres of land, and includes the hamlets of East and West Appleton.

Appleton-Le-Moors

APPLETON-LE-MOORS, a township, in the parish of Lastingham, union of Pickering, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 3¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Kirkby-Moorside; containing 322 inhabitants. It comprises about 2570 acres, of which nearly 1300 are open moorland: the river Seven passes on the east, and the road from Kirkby-Moorside to Pickering on the south. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. John Stockton, in 1839, left £10 a year for the instruction of children.

Appleton-Le-Street (All Saints)

APPLETON-LE-STREET (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Malton, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York; comprising the townships of Amotherby, Appleton, Broughton, Hildenley, and Swinton; and containing 944 inhabitants, of whom 185 are in the township of Appleton, 3¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Malton. This parish, which is bounded on the north by the river Rye, is situated on the road to Thirsk; the surface is undulated, and the scenery richly diversified. Limestone of excellent quality is abundant, and extensively quarried. The living is a vicarage, with the chapel of Amotherby, valued in the king's books at £7. 8. 6½.; net income, £515; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. J. Peach; impropriators, the Earl of Carlisle, F. Cresswell, Esq., and others. The church is in the Norman style, with a square tower.

Appleton-Roebuck and Nun-Appleton

APPLETON-ROEBUCK and Nun-Appleton, a township, in the parish of Bolton-Percy, W. division of Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York, 7½ miles (S. S. W.) from York; containing 564 inhabitants. This place comprises by computation 2800 acres, chiefly the property of the Milner family, whose splendid mansion, Nun-Appleton Hall, stands in an extensive and finely wooded park, near the confluence of the rivers Ouse and Wharfe: the house was built by Thomas, Lord Fairfax, on the site of a Cistercian priory for nuns, founded by Alice de St. Quintin at the commencement of the thirteenth century. The village is situated in the vale of a rivulet. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Appleton-upon-Wisk

APPLETON-upon-Wisk, a parish, in the union of Northallerton, W. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 7¼ miles (S. S. W.) from Yarm; containing 600 inhabitants. The manor, at the time of the Domesday survey, was in the hands of the Conqueror, and was then styled Apeltune: it was afterwards granted by the monarch to Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, who gave it to the abbey of St. Mary at York; and with that institution it continued till the Dissolution, when it was bestowed by Henry VIII. upon Sir Charles Brandon, Knt. The parish is bounded on the south by the river Wisk, and is about two miles in length from east to west, and a mile and a half broad. It comprises 1827a. 2r. 25p., of which 1101 acres are arable, 666 grass land, 27 wood, and 32 acres cottages, gardens, roads, and waste: the soil is a strong clay; and the fields, which adjoining the river are low, rise from it by a gradual and easy ascent towards the north. The manufacture of linen affords employment to about 100 of the inhabitants. The village is situated at the southern extremity of the parish, in the most westerly part of Cleveland, and is intersected by the roads between Richmond and Stokesley, and Northallerton and Yarm. The living is annexed to the rectory of Great Smeaton; impropriator, the Rev. J. Hewgill. The church is a small ancient building. There are places of worship for Independents, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Appletree

APPLETREE, a hamlet, in the parish of Astonle-Walls, union of Banbury, hundred of ChippingWarden, S. division of the county of Northampton, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from Banbury; containing 92 inhabitants, and comprising 526a. 30p. It is situated on the borders of Oxfordshire, which bounds it on the southwest.

Appletree-Wick

APPLETREE-WICK, a township, in the parish of Burnsall, union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 9 miles (N. E. by N.) from Skipton; containing 467 inhabitants. This township, which forms the eastern side of Wharfdale, and includes the hamlets of Gateup and Skireholm, comprises by computation 7740 acres, chiefly forming a high moorland district affording tolerable pasture. The village is pleasantly situated; a fair for horses and cattle is held in it annually on the 25th of October, under a charter granted in the reign of Edward III. Christ-church in Skireholm was erected in 1837 by subscription, at a cost of £240, as a chapel of ease to the mother church; it is a neat small edifice. William Craven, lord mayor of London in 1611, and whose son was created Baron Craven in the 2nd, and Earl of Craven in the 16th, of Charles II., was a native of this place.

Arborfield (St. Bartholomew)

ARBORFIELD (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Wokingham, hundred of Sonning, county of Berks, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Reading; comprising 1468a. 2r. 25p., and containing 300 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of Lord Braybrooke: the tithes have been commuted for £398. The village of Arborfield Cross, about a mile from the church, is partly in this parish, and partly in that of Hurst.

Arbury, with Houghton and Middleton.—See Houghton.

ARBURY, with houghton and Middleton.—See Houghton.

Arcleby

ARCLEBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Plumbland, union of Cockermouth, Allerdale ward below Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 7 miles (N. N. E.) from the town of Cockermouth. There are some coalworks in the vicinity.

Arclid

ARCLID, a township, in the parish of Sandbach, union of Congleton, hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 2 miles (E. N. E.) from Sandbach; containing 121 inhabitants. It comprises 530 acres; the prevailing soil is sand. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £29, and the vicarial for £39.

Arden, with Ardenside

ARDEN, with Ardenside, a township, in the parish of Hawnby, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 8 miles (N. W. by W.) from Helmsley; containing 137 inhabitants. A small Benedictine nunnery in connexion with Rivaulx Abbey, about four miles distant, was founded here about 1150, the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, was £12: Arden Hall is built upon its site. In 1757, John Smales and Gregory Elsley bequeathed £120. 5., directing the produce to be applied to the instruction of six boys.

Ardingley, or Erthingley

ARDINGLEY, or Erthingley, a parish, in the union of Cuckfield, hundred of Buttinghill, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 6 miles (N. E. by N.) from Cuckfield; containing 742 inhabitants. It is situated on the road to Brighton through Lindfield, and is intersected by the London and Brighton railway. In the hamlet of Hepsted Green a pleasure-fair is held on the 30th of May. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 5. 10.; net income, £498; patron, J. W. Peyton, Esq. The church is a handsome structure, in the decorated English style, and contains several ancient monuments to the Culpepper family.

Ardington (The Holy Trinity)

ARDINGTON (The Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wantage, county of Berks, 2¾ miles (E.) from Wantage; containing 405 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2190 acres, and is intersected by the Wilts and Berks canal. The surface is flat, except at the northern extremity, which contains a portion of the chalk hills extending through this county and Wiltshire. The northern part has some good meadow lands, and the middle is a rich loam well adapted for corn. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 7. 9., and in the patronage of the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford: the church has a narrow south aisle divided from the nave by pointed arches, and at the east end a small transept. The Roman Ikeneld-street passed through the parish.

Ardleigh (St. Mary)

ARDLEIGH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Tendring, N. division of Essex, 4¾ miles (N. E.) from Colchester; containing 1605 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 4953 acres, is situated on the road from Colchester to Harwich, and has a station of the Colchester and Ipswich railway, midway between the stations of Colchester and Manningtree. A fair is held on September 29th. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 0. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £258. The church is an ancient structure partly rebuilt of brick, with the original square embattled tower of stone. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In 1571 William Littlebury bequeathed a farm called Wrabnass, now let for £250 per annum, for the instruction of boys of Ardleigh, Dedham, and other places adjacent.

Ardley (St. Mary)

ARDLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Bicester; containing 168 inhabitants. It contains by measurement 1469 acres, and is situated on the road from Oxford to Northampton. Lace is manufactured here. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 12. 8½., and in the gift of the Duke of Marlborough: the tithes have been commuted for £283, and the glebe comprises 60 acres. The main body of the church was rebuilt in a plain style about 50 years since. In Ardley wood are the foundations of an ancient castle built by the Normans, in the reign of Stephen, on the site of a fortification which had been raised by Offa, King of Mercia: they are nearly circular, and comprise an area about sixty yards in diameter, surrounded by a moat.

Ardsley

ARDSLEY, a township and chapelry, in the parish of Darfield, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Barnsley; containing 1226 inhabitants. Hand-loom weaving of linen, and the manufacture of fancy drills, are carried on here: a coal-pit is in operation, and there is a valuable stonequarry from which grindstones of a very superior quality are supplied to the Sheffield and Birmingham manufacturers. The Dearne and Dove canal runs through the township. The chapel, dedicated to Christ, a cruciform structure in the Norman style, was erected in 1841, on a site given by Sir George Wombwell, Bart., at an expense of £1200, of which £400 were contributed by the lord of the manor, £200 by the Incorporated Society, £120 by the vicar of Darfield, and the rest by private individuals: it contains 500 sittings, one-third of which are free. The living is a perpetual curacy in the gift of the Vicar of Darfield, with a net income of £120, and a parsonage-house. The tithes have been commuted for £203, half payable to Trinity College, Cambridge, and half to the rector. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ardsley, East

ARDSLEY, EAST, a parish, in the union of Wakefield, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Wakefield; containing 900 inhabitants. This parish, which is in the honour of Pontefract, comprises about 1600 acres of fertile land: the village is situated on the road to Bradford, and the surrounding scenery is pleasing. There are extensive coal-mines. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £369; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Cardigan. The tithes of East and West Ardsley were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1826. The church has a square tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ardsley, West (St. Mary)

ARDSLEY, WEST (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Wakefield, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 5¼ miles (S. S. W.) from Leeds; containing 1420 inhabitants. This place, in some documents called Woodkirk, from its ancient church of wood, formerly belonged to Nostall Priory, subordinate to which a cell of Black canons was founded here, and endowed with land by one of the family of Soothill, in expiation of the murder of a child: its revenue at the Dissolution amounted to £17, and the foundations of the building may still be traced. The parish comprises by measurement 2300 acres of fertile land: the substratum abounds with coal of excellent quality, of which there are some extensive mines in operation. Fairs for horses, &c., are held on August 24th and September 17th. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £265, derived from land; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Cardigan, who is lord of the manor. The church, an ancient structure in the early English style, having fallen into dilapidation, was partly rebuilt in 1832, and the chancel in 1834; the ancient stalls and monuments have been preserved in the present structure, and among the latter is a monument to Sir John Topcliffe, chief justice and master of the mint in the reigns of Henry VII. and VIII., who resided at Topcliffe Hall, now a farmhouse. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Ardwick

ARDWICK, a township, forming two ecclesiastical districts, in the parish and borough of Manchester, union of Chorlton, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 1 mile (S. E. by E.) from Manchester; containing 9906 inhabitants. This is a wealthy suburb of Manchester, comprising 496 acres, and chiefly inhabited by merchants of that town. For ecclesiastical purposes the township is divided into two districts, the Manchester and Birmingham railway being the line of separation: this railway is here joined by the Manchester and Sheffield line. The railway called the Ardwick Junction is a third line connected with the township, measuring 1¾ mile in length, and reaching from Ardwick to the Ashton branch of the Manchester and Leeds railway. The living of St. Thomas' is a perpetual curacy; net income, £294; patrons, the Dean and Canons of Manchester. The church has been twice enlarged during the present incumbency, viz. in 1831 and 1836, at a cost in both instances of £2000, the building being lengthened at each end, and a tower erected in a campanile form: the interior is neat, and the altar ornamented by an original picture, by Bassano, of the Presentation in the Temple, the gift of William Townend, Esq., late of Ardwick. The living of St. Silas' is also a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of Five Trustees. The church was built in 1841, at a cost of £4564; it is in the Norman style, with a tower and spire. The Wesleyans and Independents have places of worship; and there is a public cemetery of eight acres, opened in 1838, at a cost of £18,000. In both districts are excellent schools.