Barrow - Bartestree

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

158-161

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'Barrow - Bartestree', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 158-161. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50781 Date accessed: 23 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Barrow (St. Bartholomew)

BARROW (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Great Boughton, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 4½ miles (E. N. E.) from Chester; containing 668 inhabitants. This place consists of Great and Little Barrow. It was given by Ranulph, Earl of Chester, to his nephew William de Albini, Earl of Arundel. The two manors were at a later period possessed by the Despencers, and, after their attainder, were granted by Edward III. to Sir Roger de Swinerton, an heiress of whose family brought them, in marriage, to Sir John Savage, who was knighted by Henry V. at the battle of Agincourt. They afterwards came to the noble family of Cholmondeley. The parish comprises 2774 acres, the soil of which is sand and clay, the ground is elevated, and there is a fine view of the city of Chester, with the Welsh hills in the distance. The road from Chester to Northwich passes on the south. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 16. 2½., and in the gift of Lord H. Cholmondeley: the tithes have been commuted for £460, with a house. A school is endowed with about £6 per annum. Here was a commandery of the Knights Hospitallers, founded in the reign of Henry II., and valued at the Dissolution at £107. 3. 8.

Barrow (St. Wilfrid)

BARROW (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, partly in the hundred of Appletree, and partly in that of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 5¾ miles (S.) from Derby; containing 641 inhabitants. The manor, at the time of the Domesday survey, was held by Godwin under Henry de Ferrars. An estate here, which had been parcel of the manor of Melbourne, was annexed to the see of Carlisle before 1273, and was held on lease, under the bishops, by the family of Coke. This estate was enfranchised by act of parliament in 1704, and became the property of Daniel Dalrymple, Esq., by purchase from Lord Melbourne, about the year 1800. The parish includes the chapelry of Twyford with Stenson, and the liberty of Sinfin with Arleston; and comprises about 1140 acres, whereof two-thirds are arable, and the rest pasture, with small plantations: the soil is chiefly a light loam, and the scenery picturesque. The river Trent bounds the parish on the south, and the Trent and Mersey canal passes through. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 5½.; net income, £105; patron, the Rev. John Latham. The tithes have been commuted for £245; and the glebe consists of about 40 acres. In addition to the parochial church, there is a chapel of ease at Twyford. The Wesleyans and Independents have places of worship; and a school is endowed with £8 per annum, the gift of Elizabeth Sale in 1702. A preceptory of Knights Templars formerly existed here.

Barrow

BARROW, a village and sea-port, in the township of Hawcoat, parish of Dalton, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 5 miles (S. W. by S.) from Dalton, and 9 (S. W.) from Ulverston, the post-town. This place is situated at the south-western extremity of the district of Furness, opposite to the isle of Walney and Old Barrow island. The trade consists chiefly in the export of malt, slate, and iron-ore, of which two last articles vast quantities are brought from the mines and quarries in the vicinity by the Furness railway: an excellent pier of wood was built by the railway company in 1846. The land near the village is mostly arable, the surface rather uneven, and the soil a stiff clay. About a mile on the road to Dalton is a chapel in connexion with the Establishment, built by subscription in 1845.

Barrow

BARROW, a township, in the parish of Hallystone, union of Rothbury, W. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 9½ miles (W. N. W.) from Rothbury; containing 22 inhabitants. It is situated on the south side of the Coquet river, near the confluence of the Barrow burn.

Barrow

BARROW, a chapelry, in the parish of Cottesmore, union of Oakham, hundred of Alstoe, county of Rutland, 5 miles (N. by E.) from Oakham; containing 142 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an inclosure act of the 39th and 40th of George III.

Barrow (St. Giles)

BARROW (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Madeley, liberties of the borough of Wenlock, S. division of Salop, 3½ miles (E. by S.) from Much Wenlock; containing 383 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the rectory of Willey: the tithes payable to the impropriator have been commuted for £283. 2., and those to the perpetual curate for £3. 15. Here is a small free school, to which £10 per annum were bequeathed in 1631 by John Slaney, who also founded an almshouse for six persons.

Barrow

BARROW, a tything, in the parish of KingsburyEpiscopi, union of Langport, E. division of the hundred of Kingsbury, W. division of Somerset, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Ilminster; containing 242 inhabitants. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £245. A conical hill, in a great degree the work of art, was raised here to Ina, King of the West Saxons, who is said to have been buried at this place; near it is a mansion of considerable antiquity.

Barrow (All Saints)

BARROW (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 6¾ miles (W.) from Bury; containing 995 inhabitants, and comprising 2665a. 2r. 33p., of which 156 acres are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 9. 9½., and in the patronage of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for £810, and there are 62 acres of glebe. The church is a spacious building of the time of Henry III. or Edward I. There is an endowment of about £21 per annum for the education of children. A rental of £36 (subject to a deduction of £3. 12. 4.) arising from land and tenements assigned by deed of the Rev. John Crosier, in the 12th of Elizabeth, is applied to the purposes of a church-rate; and about £20 are distributed among the poor. The Rev. Philip Francis, the translator of Horace, was rector of this parish.

Barrow-Gurney (Holy Trinity)

BARROW-GURNEY (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Bedminster, hundred of Hartcliffe with Bedminster, E. division of Somerset, 5 miles (S. W.) from Bristol; containing 303 inhabitants. It comprises 2026 acres, of which 339 are arable, 1448 pasture, 97 wood, and 16 common. The living is a donative; net income, £71; patron, Montague Gore, Esq. A Benedictine nunnery was founded here about 1200, the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, was valued at £29. 6. 8.: the site is occupied by a fine old mansion in the Elizabethan style.

Barrow, North (St. Nicholas)

BARROW, NORTH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 2¾ miles (S. W.) from Castle-Cary; containing 140 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 8½., and in the patronage of Lord Portman: the tithes have been commuted for £115, and there are about 41 acres of glebe.

Barrow, South (St. Peter)

BARROW, SOUTH (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 3¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Castle-Cary; containing 140 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £80, and in the patronage of Mrs. Toogood, to whom also belong the tithes, which have been commuted for £245.

Barrow-Upon-Humber (Holy Trinity)

BARROW-UPON-HUMBER (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, N. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (E.) from Barton-uponHumber; containing 1662 inhabitants. Henry VIII. landed at this place on his route to Thornton Abbey. The parish is situated on the river Humber, and on the road from London through Peterborough and Lincoln to Hull; it comprises 4720 acres, of which 3000 are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with one or two small plantations. The soil of the arable land is a strong rich loam, and there is also some fine turnip land; in that part of the parish near the Humber, the soil is a kind of clay warp, apparently embanked from the river at some early period. The village, which is large and well built, comprises a spacious street, at the south end of which is an area called the market-place, with an ancient cross; the view of Hull and neighbouring parts of Yorkshire is very fine. A manufactory of glue is carried on, affording employment to about 20 persons. A market for cattle, held once a fortnight, was commenced in 1832, but afterwards discontinued; and in the same year was established a ferry for passengers and cattle, from a place called New Holland, in this parish, to Hull, a distance of 2¾ miles. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 16.; net income, £348: the patronage and impropriation belong to the Crown. The tithes were commuted for corn-rents and a money payment in 1797. The church is an ancient Norman structure, with a handsome tower of later English architecture, and exhibits appearances of having been repaired at different times and in various styles. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and Independents. About a mile north-westward from the village is an intrenchment called the Castle, supposed to have been a British camp; and near it are several barrows. A monastery was founded about the middle of the seventh century, by Wulphere, King of Mercia; and in digging on the site, a little north of the village, some years since, a coffin, a valuable gold ring, and other remains were found. Harrison, the inventor of the chronometer for discovering the longitude at sea, and who, in 1763, received a premium of £20,000 from the Board of Longitude, was a native of the place.

Barrow-Upon-Soar (Holy Trinity)

BARROW-UPON-SOAR (Holy Trinity), a parish, and the head of a union, partly in the hundred of East, but chiefly in that of West, Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester; containing 5913 inhabitants, of whom 1837 are in Barrow proper, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Loughborough. The parish consists of Barrow proper; a part of the market-town of Mountsorrel; the chapelries of Quorndon and Woodhouse, and the consolidated chapelry or district of St. Paul's, WoodhouseEaves; the manor of Beaumanor; and the hamlets of Mapplewell, Charley, and Alderman-Haw. It comprises 9100 acres of land, the soil of which is of various kinds, from the finest meadow and richest loam to cold clayey and sterile mountain. The district has for many centuries been noted for its excellent lime, which is made from a hard blue-lias stone, and is extensively used in works where great hardness is necessary: the pier at Ramsgate was built with it, after all other kinds of lime had failed; and from its property of hardening under water, it has been used in Holland. Near Mountsorrel and Quorndon are very extensive and valuable quarries of granite; the midland counties are hence supplied with material for the repair of roads, and the stone is also used for architectural purposes. In Charnwood forest are quarries of primitive slate, which for centuries has been used for covering buildings, and is in much request for tombstones, and many domestic purposes. Barrow proper, and Mountsorrel and Quorndon, are situated on the river Soar, which is navigable through the parish; and here is an intermediate station of the Midland railway, whose course is continued over the Soar by a viaduct of five arches, each spanning 30 feet.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 2. 8½., and in the patronage of St. John's College, Cambridge: the tithes have been commuted for 180 acres of land. There are three other incumbencies, in the three chapelries; and places of worship for Wesleyans, Baptists, Primitive Methodists, and Roman Catholics. The free grammar school is endowed with land producing £110 per annum, bequeathed by the Rev. Humphrey Perkins in 1717. An almshouse for six widowers or "ancient bachelors" was founded in 1686 by the Rev. Humphrey Babington, who endowed it with an estate now producing about £500 per annum: the number of inmates has been increased to eleven aged men and a nurse, and six aged widows. The whole of the property belonging to the parish, applied to charitable purposes, amounts to about £1400 per annum. The poor law union of which Barrow is the head, comprises 30 parishes and places, and contains a population of 19,695. William Beveridge, the learned Bishop of St. Asaph, was born here in 1638, in a house which is still standing.

Barrowby (All Saints)

BARROWBY (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 2 miles (W.) from Grantham; containing, with the hamlets of Breather-Hills, Casthorpe, and Stenwith, 799 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4330a. 1r. 21p. of fertile land, intersected by the Grantham canal. The Duke of Devonshire, who is proprietor of about one-half of the soil, is lord of the manor: the ancient Hall is now a farmhouse. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £31. 1. 5½.; net income, £1084; patron, the Duke. The church is a neat edifice in the pointed style, with a tower and spire. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. At Neubo, in the parish, Richard de Malebisse in 1198 founded an abbey of Præmonstratensian canons in honour of the Blessed Virgin, which at the Dissolution had a revenue of £115. 11. 8.

Barrowden (St. Peter)

BARROWDEN (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, hundred of Wrandike, county of Rutland, 7 miles (S. W.) from Stamford; containing 658 inhabitants. It comprises 1997 acres, whereof 388 are common or waste; and is bounded on the south by the river Welland, which separates the counties of Rutland and Northampton. Excellent rugs are manufactured from sheep-skins; also parchment, glue, leather for the binding of books, hat-linings, &c. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 1½., and in the gift of the Marquess of Exeter: the glebe consists of 26 acres, and a glebe-house has recently been erected; the rector's tithes have been commuted for £588. 13., and £30. 3. are also paid to the incumbent of South Luffenham. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Barrowford

BARROWFORD, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Colne, parish of Whalley, union of Burnley, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2½ miles (W.) from Colne; containing 2630 inhabitants. This place in the reign of Henry VII. constituted two vaccaries, called Over and Nether Barrowford. It is a large township at the junction of several streams flowing into the Colne water; and comprises 1342 acres. The spinning and manufacture of cotton prevail extensively. Carr Hall was the property of Richard Towneley in 1760, and afterwards of Col. Clayton; Park Hill was long the seat of the Banisters. A district church has been erected, dedicated to St. Thomas; the living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of Hulme's Trustees, and the incumbent has a net income of £150. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Barsby

BARSBY, a chapelry, in the parish of Ashby-Folville, union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 291 inhabitants. It comprises 914 acres, of which 774 are pasture, and 140 arable.

Barsham (Holy Trinity)

BARSHAM (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (W. by S.) from Beccles; containing 250 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1777 acres, of which 1000 are arable; and is situated on the road from Beccles to Bungay, and bounded on the north by the navigable river Waveney, which separates it from the county of Norfolk. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 6. 8.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. A. I. Suckling, whose tithes have been commuted for £445, and who has 72 acres of glebe. The church and parsonage are picturesquely situated; the former is chiefly in the early English style, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a circular tower. Lawrence Echard, author of the General Ecclesiastical History; Capt. Morris Suckling, uncle to Lord Nelson, and with whom Nelson went his first voyages; and the mother of Nelson, were born here.

Barsham, East (All Saints)

BARSHAM, EAST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (N.) from Fakenham; containing 240 inhabitants. It comprises 1167a. 2r. 32p., of which 990 acres are arable, 134 pasture and meadow, and 34 woodland; the village is picturesquely situated on the banks of the river Stiffkey, and on the road from Fakenham to Walsingham. Of the once splendid Hall there only remain the south front and lofty entrance gateway, which form a fine specimen of ornamental brickwork in the Tudor style, with towers and turrets. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the great tithes, and with the rectory of Little Snoring annexed, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; patron, Lord Hastings. The tithes of East Barsham have been commuted for £313, and there are nearly nine acres of glebe. The church consists of a nave only, with a square tower on the north side; the entrance is through a Norman doorway.

Barsham, North (All Saints)

BARSHAM, NORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (S. W. by W.) from Little Walsingham; containing 89 inhabitants. It is intersected by the river Stiffkey, and comprises 1015a. 2r. 35p., of which 960 acres are arable, and 43 meadow and pasture. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6, and in the gift of the Earl of Orford: the tithes have been commuted for £330. 15., and there is a glebe of 18 acres, with a house. The church is chiefly in the early English style.

Barsham, West

BARSHAM, WEST, a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (N. N. W.) from Fakenham; containing 86 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 12. 1.; net income, £155; patron and impropriator, C. M. Balders, Esq. The church is partly in the early English, and partly in the decorated style; the entrance on the south is through a Norman doorway.

Barston (St. Swithin)

BARSTON (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union of Solihull, Solihull division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (E. by S.) from Knowle; containing 392 inhabitants. In Domesday book it is written Bercestone, the name, it is supposed, of a possessor in the time of the Saxons. It was anciently given to the Knights Templars and the Hospitallers, and was granted after the Dissolution (4th of Elizabeth) to John Fisher and others. The parish is almost surrounded by the small river Blythe, and comprises by computation 1844 acres; the adjacent country abounds with good scenery, and with objects of interest, and the village is pleasantly situated on an eminence commanding a fine prospect. The Birmingham and Warwick canal approaches within a mile, and the London and Birmingham railway within a mile and a half, of the village. Edward Barber, Esq., who is a large proprietor, has a mansion here. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Berkeswell: the tithes have been commuted for £180. The church is a plain edifice of brick, erected about the commencement of the last century, upon the site of the ancient structure. A school, in connexion with the church, has just been built.

Bartestree

BARTESTREE, a chapelry, in the parish of Dormington, hundred of Greytree, union and county of Hereford, 4½ miles (E.) from Hereford; containing 44 inhabitants. The chapelry is situated near the right bank of the river Froome, and is crossed by the road from Hereford to Ledbury; it comprises 410 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, united to the vicarage of Dormington. A rent-charge of £90 has been awarded as a commutation for the vicarial tithes. The chapel is dedicated to St. James.