Bartherton - Barton, St Mary

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

161-164

Citation Show another format:

'Bartherton - Barton, St Mary', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 161-164. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50782 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Bartherton

BARTHERTON, a township, in the parish of Wybunbury, union and hundred of Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 2¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Nantwich; containing 32 inhabitants. It comprises 406a. 3r. 12p., of a clayey soil. The Grand Trunk canal passes in the vicinity. The tithes have been commuted for £32 payable to the Bishop of Lichfield, and £5. 19. 6. to the vicar.

Bartholomew Hospital (St.)

BARTHOLOMEW HOSPITAL (ST.), an extraparochial liberty, in the hundred of Eastry, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, ¾ of a mile (S.) from Sandwich; containing 54 inhabitants, and comprising about 20 acres.—See Sandwich.

Bartholomew (St.), Hyde-Street, county of Southampton.—See Winchester.

BARTHOLOMEW (ST.), HYDE-STREET, county of Southampton.—See Winchester.

Barthomley (St. Bertoline)

BARTHOMLEY (St. Bertoline), a parish, partly in the union of Newcastle, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, but chiefly in the hundred of Nantwich, unions of Congleton and Nantwich, S. division of the county of Chester; containing 2725 inhabitants, of whom 422 are in the township of Barthomley, 6½ miles (S. by E.) from Sandbach. In the civil war, a troop of Lord Byron's passing through this place, on the 22nd of December, 1643, made an attack upon the church, into which some of the inhabitants had gone for safety. The troop soon gained possession of it, and having set fire to the forms and matting, made such a smoke as caused fifteen men to retreat to the steeple, where they called for quarter; their assailants, however, having gotten them into their power, are said to have stripped them all naked, and murdered twelve in cold blood, three only being suffered to escape. The parish includes the townships of Alsager, Balterley, Crewe, and Haslington, and comprises by computation 11,000 acres, whereof 1981 are in Barthomley township: the surface is flat, and the soil light and sandy; there are several excellent beds of marl. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 7. 1., and in the gift of the Trustees of Lord Crewe: the tithes have been commuted for £429 payable to impropriators, and £729 belonging to the incumbent, who has also a glebe of 90 acres. The church exhibits various styles, and has a Norman porch on the northern side ot the chancel. There are separate incumbencies at Alsager and Haslington; and a school endowed with about £10 per annum.

Barthorpe

BARTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Acklam, union of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York, 9½ miles (S. by W.) from Malton; containing 51 inhabitants. This place, also called Barthorpe-Bottoms, is picturesquely situated on the west side of the Wolds: the river Derwent passes on the west at a distance of about three miles.

Bartington

BARTINGTON, a township, in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Runcorn, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 3¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Northwich; containing 89 inhabitants. It comprises 300 acres, of a sandy soil. The tithes have been commuted for £30. 14., of which £29 are payable to the Dean and Chapter of Christ-Church, Oxford.

Bartley Regis

BARTLEY REGIS, a tything, in the parish of Eling, union of New Forest, hundred of Redbridge, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 288 inhabitants.

Bartlow (St. Mary)

BARTLOW (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Linton, hundred of Chilford, county of Cambridge, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from Linton; containing 89 inhabitants. This place was supposed to have been the scene of the conflict between Canute the Great and Edmund Ironside, which took place in 1016, and in commemoration of which four artificial mounds on the lands near Bartlow farm were thought to have been erected; but on the exploration of these mounds between 1832 and 1840, all the remains discovered were evidently of Roman origin. The parish comprises by computation 360 acres: a fair is held on the 12th of June. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 16. 8.; net income, £259; patron, the Rev. John Bullen. The church has a circular tower, of Norman architecture, said to have been built in the eleventh century; the body of the building is of the fifteenth century. On the south wall of the nave is a curious painting of St. Christopher, discovered in 1817, on the erection of a monument to Sir William Blackett. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans in the hamlet of Bartlow.

Bartlow, Little, or Steventon-End

BARTLOW, LITTLE, or Steventon-End, a hamlet, in the parish of Ashdon, union of Linton, hundred of Freshwell, N. division of Essex, 2¾ miles (S. E.) from Linton; containing 216 inhabitants. This place, supposed to have been formerly a distinct parish, is civilly included in Ashdon, but ecclesiastically, and as connected with the militia, is considered to be in Bartlow, county of Cambridge.

Barton (St. Peter)

BARTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Wetherley, county of Cambridge, 3½ miles (W. S. W.) from Cambridge; containing 319 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1772 acres, of which about 1622 are arable, and 150 pasture. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 11. 3., and in the gift of the Bishop of Ely: the great tithes, belonging to King's College, Cambridge, have been commuted for £400, and those of the incumbent for £135, with a glebe of 36½ acres. In 1839, an act was obtained for inclosing lands.

Barton

BARTON, a township, in the parish of Farndon, union of Great Boughton, Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 9½ miles (S. S. E.) from Chester; containing 169 inhabitants. The manor was anciently held under the barony of Malpas by the family of Barton, some monuments of whom, with their effigies, were formerly to be seen in Farndon church; it was afterwards long held by the noble family of Cholmondeley. The township comprises 470 acres; the soil is clay and sand. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £105.

Barton

BARTON, with Bradnor and Rushock, a township in the parish and union of Kington, hundred of Huntington, county of Hereford, ¾ of a mile (N. E.) from Kington; containing 426 inhabitants.

Barton

BARTON, a township, in the parish and union of Preston, hundred of Amounderness, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 4½ miles (N. N. W.) from Preston; containing 413 inhabitants. It lies on the road, railway, and canal from Preston to Lancaster, and comprises 2400 acres; about 600 are arable, 500 meadow, 90 wood, and the remainder pasture. The surface is undulated, being at the foot of the Bleasdale fells, the peculiar swell of which is continued in a lower degree throughout the township; and the distant fells, and the winding, rural, and wooded lanes, render the scenery varied and pleasing. From the upper grounds are obtained extensive views over the level Fylde, with the sea beyond, embracing the Cumberland and Welsh hills when the atmosphere is clear. The soil is deep and productive, but retentive of moisture, as is the subsoil, which for the most part is a reddish clay, with occasionally marl, sand, peat, and limestone. There are indications of coal in the higher parts; and a quarry of limestone is wrought, more valuable for building purposes than for burning. The township constitutes part of the chapelry of Broughton, and there is a private chapel on the Barton estate for the convenience of the tenantry, the surplus seats being let to the inhabitants of the adjoining township of Myerscough. This chapel, which was in existence before the Reformation, is in the Italian-Gothic style, with a handsome doorway, and has a stained window enriched with the arms of the families now and formerly connected with the estate: the building was enlarged in 1845, by the late George Jacson, Esq., at a considerable expense. Barton Cross, a conspicuous and venerable ruin, which stood where three lanes meet, was mischievously pulled down by some idle persons in 1845.

Barton (St. George)

BARTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Basford, N. division of the wapentake of Rushcliffe, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 6¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Nottingham; containing 382 inhabitants. It is bounded by the river Trent, which is here navigable. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 3. 9.; net income, £360; patron, the Archbishop of York. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, in 1759. The church has several monuments of the Sacheverel family. On the lofty eminence of Brent's hill, south of the village, are the remains of a Roman camp; and in the vicarage farmyard is a Roman pavement.

Barton (St. David)

BARTON (St. David), a parish, in the union of Langport, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 5 miles (N. E. by N.) from Somerton; containing 455 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises 945a. 31p., is intersected by the roads from KeintonMansfield to Butleigh and Baltonsborough respectively, and the river Brue divides the parish from the last named place. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £61; patron, the Bishop of Bath and Wells. The tithes have been commuted for £170, and there are 54 acres of glebe, with a house. The church is an ancient edifice, in the churchyard of which is a stone pedestal of St. David, preserved when the church was dedicated. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Barton

BARTON, a tything, in the parish and union of South Stoneham, hundred of Mainsbridge, Southampton and S. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 57 inhabitants.

Barton

BARTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Bidford, union of Alcester, Stratford division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick; containing 147 inhabitants.

Barton (St. Michael)

BARTON (St. Michael), a parish, in West ward and union, county of Westmorland, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Penrith; comprising the chapelries of Martindale and Patterdale-with-Hartsop, and the townships of High Barton, Sockbridge-with-Tirrel, Low Winder, and Yanwith-with-Eamont-Bridge; and containing 1668 inhabitants, of whom 323 are in High Barton. The parish comprises by measurement 15,000 acres, of which 4355 are in High Barton; and among its many villages is Pooley, a distinguished place of resort, distant from Penrith five miles. The soil partakes of both clay and gravel, and produces excellent corn and hay; the land lies upon a slope, and is encompassed with lofty mountains, among which, at its western extremity, is Helvellyn, and at its eastern King Arthur's Round Table. In the parish is part of the lake of Ullswater, from which flows the river Eamont, separating Westmorland from Cumberland. Barton Fell contains a great variety of valuable minerals, including jasper, agate, onyx, cornelian, chalcedony, &c., besides spars and petrifactions of fish, shells, leaves, &c. At Hartsop and Patterdale are extensive quarries of fine blue slate, and at the latter place is a lead-mine. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 1. 0½.; net income, £130; patron, the Earl of Lonsdale; impropriators, the Earl of Lonsdale, and E. W. Hasell, T. Gibson, and J. De Whelpdale, Esqrs. The impropriate tithes of High Barton have been commuted for £76. 13., and the vicarial for £49. 11.; the glebe consists of 75¼ acres. The church is a large low structure, beautifully situated in the vale of Eamont. Martindale and Patterdale have each a separate incumbency. A free grammar school was founded in 1649, by Dr. Launcelot Dawes and Dr. Gerard Langbaine, natives of the parish, and the latter an industrious antiquary; whose endowment of it has been augmented by subsequent benefactors to about £90 per annum.

Barton (St. Mary and St. Cuthbert)

BARTON (St. Mary and St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Darlington, wapentake of GillingEast, N. riding of York, 5 miles (S. W.) from Darlington; containing, with the township of Newton-Morrell and part of Stapleton, 631 inhabitants, of whom 567 are in the township of Barton. This parish formerly comprised the chapelries of St. Mary and St. Cuthbert, together forming the township of Barton, and both perpetual curacies, the latter in the patronage of the Vicar of St. John's, Stanwick, and the former in that of the Vicar of Gilling. In 1840, the churches being in a dilapidated condition, the two curacies were consolidated into one benefice, and a new church was erected by subscription. The parish is on the road from Richmond to Darlington, and comprises about 2900 acres, of which 2335 are in the township of Barton; about two-thirds of the land are arable and in profitable cultivation, and the remainder meadow and pasture, with a small portion of woodland. The village is pleasantly situated on the banks of a small rivulet, and has an ancient cross in the centre. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the alternate patronage of the Vicars of Stanwick and Gilling, with a net income of £120; impropriators, John Allan, Esq., of Blackwell, and others. The great tithes have been commuted for £125, and those of the incumbent of Gilling for about £75; 23½ acres of glebe here are attached to the benefice of Easby, and 37½ belong to that of Gilling. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Barton-Bendish

BARTON-BENDISH, a parish, in the union of Downham, hundred of Clackclose, W. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Stoke-Ferry; containing 455 inhabitants. This place derives the affix to its name from a dyke called Bendish, constructed here by the Saxons as a boundary line to the hundred; it formerly consisted of the three parishes of St. Andrew, St. Mary, and All Saints, the two latter of which have been consolidated. The whole comprises 4126a. 24p., whereof 3316 acres are arable, 450 meadow and pasture, and the remainder fen and waste. The living of St. Andrew's is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14, with a net income of £260, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes were commuted in 1777 for 308 acres of land, and the glebe comprises 26 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower, and a south porch in the Norman style. The livings of St. Mary's and All Saints' form a rectory, valued at £11, with a net income of £300, and in the gift of Sir H. Berney, Bart.: the tithes were commuted for 320 acres of land, and the glebe comprises 10 acres, with a house. The church of St. Mary is chiefly in the early English style, with a small belfry, the tower having fallen in the reign of Anne: of the church of All Saints there are no remains. In the hamlet of Eastmore was anciently a chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Barton-Blount

BARTON-BLOUNT, a parish, in the union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 11 miles (W.) from Derby; containing 68 inhabitants. The manor was held in 1296 by the de Bakepuze family, from whom the place acquired the name of Barton-Bakepuze; and after it had passed into the possession of their successors, the Blounts, it obtained its present affix. The families of Merry, Simpson, Curzon, and Bradshaw subsequently possessed the manor. The manor-house was garrisoned in October 1644, by Col. Gell, on behalf of the parliamentarians. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 19. 1.; net income, £69; patron, F. Bradshaw, Esq.

Barton, Earl's (All Saints)

BARTON, EARL'S (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wellingborough, hundred of Hamfordshoe, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3¾ miles (S. W.) from Wellingborough; containing 1079 inhabitants. This place is situated a mile northward from the navigable river Nene, and about the same distance from the Northampton and Peterborough railway, which has a station here; it comprises 2330 acres of a fertile soil. The greater part of the inhabitants are employed in shoe and mat making. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £183, chiefly arising from 88 acres of land allotted on the inclosure in lieu of tithes; impropriator, T. R. Thornton, Esq., holding 280 acres. The church is a curious edifice, presenting specimens of various styles of architecture, and having a massive tower of rude Saxon construction. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; also a national school erected in 1844, a neat building in the Elizabethan style. Almshouses for three poor people were founded by Mrs. Mary Whitworth in 1823. To the north of the church is a large tumulus or barrow, of Roman origin.

Barton-End

BARTON-END, a hamlet, in the parish of Horsley, union of Stroud, hundred of Longtree, E. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 268 inhabitants.

Barton, Great, or Bramble (Holy Innocents)

BARTON, GREAT, or Bramble (Holy Innocents), a parish, in the union of Thingoe, hundred of Thedwastry, W. division of Suffolk, 2½ miles (N. E. by E.) from Bury; containing 774 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 15. 7½., and in the patronage of Sir H. E. Bunbury, Bart., whose seat is here: the tithes, with certain exceptions, were commuted for land and a money payment in 1802. The produce of about 100 acres of land is applied to the purchase of fuel for the poor, and to parochial purposes.

Barton-Hartshorn (St. James)

BARTON-HARTSHORN (St. James), a parish, in the union, hundred, and county of Buckingham, 4¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Buckingham; containing 165 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Chetwood annexed; net income, £80; patrons and impropriators, the families of Bracebridge and Viger.

Barton-In-Fabis, Notts.—See Barton.

BARTON-IN-FABIS, Notts.—See Barton.

Barton-In-The-Beans

BARTON-IN-THE-BEANS, a township, partly in the parishes of Shackerstone and Nailstone, but chiefly in that of Market-Bosworth, union of Market-Bosworth, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 2¼ miles (N. by W.) from Market-Bosworth; containing 161 inhabitants. Here was formerly a chapel.

Barton-In-The-Clay (St. Nicholas)

BARTON-IN-THE-CLAY (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Luton, hundred of Flitt, county of Bedford, 3¼ miles (S.) from Silsoe; containing 855 inhabitants. This place, which derives its distinguishing affix from its position at the commencement of the clayey soil under Barton Hill, is situated on the road from Luton to Bedford, and on the border of Hertfordshire: the manor formerly belonged to the monks of Ramsey, since whose possession it has been in the hands of many different families. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 9. 7.; net income, £317; patron, the Crown. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1809. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists; and a school is endowed with property producing about £50 per annum, the bequest of Edward Willes in 1807.

Barton-Le-Street (St. Michael)

BARTON-LE-STREET (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Malton, partly in the wapentake of Bulmer, but chiefly in that of Ryedale, N. riding of York; containing 419 inhabitants, of whom 185 are in the township of Barton, 6 miles (N.) from Whitwell. This parish is bounded on the north by the river Ryle; and, including the townships of Coneysthorpe and Butterwick, comprises by computation 3200 acres, of which about 1500 are in the township of Barton. The surface is undulated, and the scenery beautifully varied; the soil is of moderate quality, and limestone for building and for burning into lime is extensively quarried. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 8. 6½.; net income, £450; patron, Hugh M. Ingram, Esq. The church, an ancient structure with a campanile turret, is said to have been erected with materials from the ruins of St. Mary's Abbey, York; it contains some curious specimens of sculpture. A chapel was erected at Coneysthorpe in 1837, at the expense of the Earl of Carlisle, sole proprietor of that township.

Barton-Le-Willows

BARTON-LE-WILLOWS, a township, in the parish of Crambe, union of Malton, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 10½ miles (N. E.) from York; containing 207 inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Barton, St. Mary

BARTON, ST. MARY, a hamlet, in the parish of St. Mary-de-Lode, Gloucester, union of Gloucester, Middle division of the hundred of Dudstone and King's Barton, E. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 1674 inhabitants.