Bulbridge - Bundley

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

428-431

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'Bulbridge - Bundley', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 428-431. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50842 Date accessed: 19 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Bulbridge (St. Peter)

BULBRIDGE (St. Peter), a parish, in the hundred of Cawden and Cadworth, union of Wilton, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, ¾ of a mile (S.) from Wilton; containing 58 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, united to that of Wilton, and valued in the king's books at £11. 2. 1.: the church has been demolished.

Bulby

BULBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Irnham, union of Bourne, wapentake of Beltisloe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 4¼ miles (E. by N.) from Corby; containing, with the hamlet of Hawthorp, 211 inhabitants. These places form the eastern side of the parish, and comprise about 1700 acres: Hawthorp is in two farms. Bulby House is a handsome mansion, lately erected. An old thatched building at Bulby was formerly a chapel, and near it is a moated area in which the foundations of a large building may be traced.

Bulcamp

BULCAMP, a hamlet, in the parish of Blythburgh, union and hundred of Blything, E. division of Suffolk, 3½ miles (E. by S.) from Halesworth; containing 109 inhabitants.—See Blythburgh.

Bulcote

BULCOTE, a chapelry, in the parish of BurtonJoyce, union of Southwell, S. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton and of the county of Nottingham, 6 miles (N. E. by E.) from Nottingham; containing 154 inhabitants. This place comprises 970 acres, mostly arable; the soil is clay. Bulcote Lodge is a neat mansion. The tithes were commuted for land in 1768. The chapel is a small and plain edifice.

Bulford (St. John)

BULFORD (St. John), a parish, in the union and hundred of Amesbury, Salisbury and Amesbury, and S. divisions of Wilts, 2 miles (N. E. by N.) from Amesbury; containing 367 inhabitants. This place, called in the Domesday survey Boltinstone, and in other ancient documents Bolteford, was the property of the nunnery of Amesbury. The parish is situated to the east of the river Avon, which is here crossed by a handsome iron bridge; and a branch of the road connects the village with Amesbury; the number of acres is estimated at 3638. The Avon affords excellent trout-fishing, and the downs fine coursing. There is a mill for the manufacture of the coarser kinds of paper. The living is a donative, with a net income of £75, and in the patronage of Anthony Southby, Esq., M.D., who is impropriator: the tithes have been commuted for £97. The church is a plain edifice of stone and flints. Near the village are two upright stones, similar to those of Stonehenge, of which one is in the middle of the Avon, and the other on the open downs to the south-east; and about a mile higher up the valley is a third of similar description. There are also numerous barrows.

Bulk

BULK, a township, in the parish of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire; adjoining the town of Lancaster, comprising 1086 acres of land, and containing 113 inhabitants. This place belonged to the priory of Lancaster: Neuton, a hamlet in the township, was given to the priory by Roger de Poictou. Bulk has long been the property of the Daltons, of Thurnham Hall.

Bulkington (St. James)

BULKINGTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Nuneaton, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 4½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Nuneaton; containing, with the hamlets of Marston-Jabbet, Ryton, Weston, and Wolvershill, and parts of those of Barnacle and Bramcott, 1831 inhabitants. The parish is traversed on the north by the road from Nuneaton to Lutterworth, and on the south by that from Coventry to Hinckley. The Ashbyde-la-Zouch canal crosses the north-western angle, the Coventry canal forming a junction with it a little to the west of the parish, and the Oxford canal uniting with the latter on the south. Bulkington comprises by computation 4315 acres: the soil is chiefly clay, alternated with sand, and is generally productive; the surface is flat, and the river Aroker, which has its source in the vicinity, flows through part of the parish. There is abundance of excellent freestone. Most of the inhabitants are employed in the ribbon-manufacture. A pleasure-fair is held, beginning on St. James' day, and continuing for a week; and there is a statute-fair for the hiring of servants, on the first Wednesday after the 19th of September. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 10. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £253. The great tithes belong to Oakham and Uppingham grammar schools, and have been commuted for £315; the small tithes have been commuted for £26: there is a glebehouse, with a glebe of 120 acres. The church was enlarged about 20 years since, by the addition of 350 sittings, of which 300 are free; it contains a marble font, resting on a shaft of Numidian marble brought from Rome, and the table in the chancel is covered with a sculptured slab: the late Mr. Hayward, the eminent sculptor, lies buried in the north aisle. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Independents.

Bulkington

BULKINGTON, a tything, in the parish of Keevil, union of Westbury and Whorwelsdown, hundred of Melksham, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions of Wilts, 5¾ miles (S. E.) from Melksham; containing 268 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £145 payable to the Dean and Chapter of Winchester, and £101 to the vicar of the parish. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Bulkworthy

BULKWORTHY, a chapelry, in the parish of Buckland-Brewer, union of Bideford, hundred of Shebbear, Great Torrington and N. divisions of Devon, 7½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Great Torrington; containing 196 inhabitants, and comprising 817 acres, of which 271 are common or waste land.

Buller's-Green

BULLER'S-GREEN, a township, in the parish, parliamentary borough, and union of Morpeth, W. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland; containing 169 inhabitants. It comprises about 100 acres of land, tithe-free, adjoining the north and north-west boundaries of the town of Morpeth, and consists principally of one row of houses, in a curved line. The abbot of Newminster anciently had possessions in the place; and there was probably, some three centuries since, a bowling-green here, on "Bowles Green," a name now corrupted into Buller's-Green.

Bulley (St. Michael)

BULLEY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Westbury, hundred of the Duchy of Lancaster, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 5¼ miles (S. E. by S.) from Newent; containing 229 inhabitants. This parish is of great antiquity, and is noticed in the Domesday survey under the name of Buttelege: it comprises about 500 acres, of which the greater portion is good arable land, and the remainder indifferent pasture. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the vicarage of Churcham. The church is a small structure in the Norman style, with a low spire, and consists only of a nave, at the east end of which is a beautiful Norman arch, that led into the chancel, now destroyed; there is a similar arch at the south entrance.

Bullingham

BULLINGHAM, a parish, in the hundred of Webtree, union and county of Hereford, 2 miles (S.) from Hereford; containing 412 inhabitants, of whom 129 are in Upper, and 283 in Lower, Bullingham. This parish comprises 1679 acres, of which 705 are in Upper Bullingham; it is bounded on the north by the river Wye, and is intersected by the road from Hereford to Ross. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £109; patron, the Bishop of Hereford; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The church was enlarged some years since.

Bullington

BULLINGTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Goltho, W. division of the wapentake of Wraggoe, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 2¾ miles (W.) from Wragby; containing 52 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Lincoln to Louth, and comprises by computation 780 acres; it formerly belonged to the knightly family of Metham, which is now extinct. Here are inconsiderable remains of a religious house founded by Simon Fitz-William, or De Kyme, in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, as a priory and convent for both sexes, under the rule of St. Gilbert of Sempringham: the revenue, at the time of the Dissolution, was £187. 7. 9.

Bullington (St. Michael)

BULLINGTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Andover, hundred of Wherwell, Andover and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (S. by W.) from Whitchurch; containing 187 inhabitants. It comprises 1623 acres, of which 23 are common or waste; the soil is of a mixed quality, but generally fertile. The surface is varied, rising in some parts into hills of moderate elevation; and the lower grounds are watered by a branch of the river Test, which flows through the parish. The living is annexed, with that of Tufton, to the vicarage of Wherwell: the tithes of Bullington have been commuted for £361. 13., of which £272. 6. are payable to the impropriator, who has a glebe of 15 acres, and £89. 7. to the incumbent. At a place called Titbury Hill is an intrenched area of about ten acres, in which square stones, Roman coins, and the remains of some wells have been discovered.

Bullock's-Hall

BULLOCK'S-HALL, a township, in the parish of Warkworth, union of Morpeth, E. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 10½ miles (N. N. E.) from Morpeth; containing 19 inhabitants. It formed part of the ancient chapelry of Chivington, and the chapel for the district was situated near its limits. The tithes have been commuted for £24 payable to the Bishop of Carlisle, and £4. 12. to the vicar of the parish.

Bulmer (St. Andrew)

BULMER (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Sudbury; containing 775 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 2759 acres, of which 83 are common or waste: the soil is generally productive, and in some parts exuberantly fertile, producing abundant crops of grain; several acres are planted with hops, which thrive well. The surface is elevated, and the higher grounds command extensive and finely varied prospects. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Belchamp-Walter consolidated, endowed with a portion of the great tithes, and valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £445; patron, Samuel Milbank Raymond, Esq.; impropriator, excepting where the land is tithe-free, Charles Hammersley, Esq. The church is a plain edifice of stone, with a square tower, and contains an ancient font of considerable beauty. Here was a chantry endowed with lands, which, on the suppression, were annexed to the manor of Butlers.

Bulmer (St. Martin)

BULMER (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Malton, wapentake of Bulmer, N. riding of York, 3 miles (N. W.) from Whitwell; containing 983 inhabitants, of whom 324 are in the township of Bulmer. This parish, which gives name to the wapentake, is bounded on the east by the river Derwent, and comprises the townships of Bulmer and Welburn, the latter in the eastern part. In the township of Bulmer are 1622 acres, of which 929 are arable, 511 meadow and pasture, and 177 woodland: the soil is generally a fine bright loam; the surface is diversified with hills, commanding extensive views, and the scenery is picturesque. Limestone is quarried for building and agricultural purposes. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11, and in the patronage of the Earl Fitzwilliam, with a net income of £395: the tithes were commuted for land under an inclosure act, in 1777; the glebe now consists of 210 acres. The church is an ancient edifice with a square tower at the west end, and contains a monument of a Knight Templar. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Bulphan (St. Mary)

BULPHAN (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 10 miles (E. S. E.) from Romford; containing 254 inhabitants. This parish, which anciently belonged to the nunnery of Barking, is bounded on the west by the brook of Dunton, and comprises 1667a. 15p., including 222 acres of common. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23, and in the patronage of the family of Hand: the tithes have been commuted for £405. 12., and the glebe comprises 15 acres. The church is a small edifice, with a belfry of wood surmounted by a spire; on the south side of the chancel are some remains of an ancient chapel.

Bulverhythe (St. Mary)

BULVERHYTHE (St. Mary), an ancient parish, and a member of the town and port of Hastings, in the union and rape of Hastings, hundred of Bexhill, E. division of Sussex, 1½ mile (E.) from Bexhill; containing 37 inhabitants. This place, formerly a haven called Bollifridé, is said to derive its name from the circumstance of William the Conqueror, who is supposed to have landed here, having granted to an ancestor of the Pelham family as much land as he could cover with a bull's hide, which was made extensive by the expedient of cutting it into slips. The parish is bounded on the south by the English Channel, which has considerably encroached on the land; and is intersected by the road from Dovor to Brighton, by way of Hastings: along the coast are several martello towers, and there are some remains of an ancient church or chapel.

Bulwell (St. Mary)

BULWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Basford, N. division of the wapentake of Broxtow and of the county of Nottingham, 3¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Nottingham; containing 1577 inhabitants. This place derives its name from a copious spring called "Bull-well," to which the cattle from the adjoining forest of Sherwood, previously to its inclosure, were accustomed to resort. The parish includes the ancient soc of Hemshill. It is situated on the river Leen, and comprises by measurement 1631 acres, mostly arable and meadow land in nearly equal portions, and lying on both banks of the river; 177 acres are common or waste. The substratum is chiefly limestone, which produces lime of excellent quality, and coal abounds, and is extensively wrought. The population is partly employed in the manufacture of lace and the weaving of stockings: there are three corn-mills, and one for the spinning of cotton, all propelled by water, and several bleaching-grounds and printing-establishments connected with the cotton manufacture, in which about 300 persons are employed. The village is pleasantly situated near the river, and contains many substantial and well-built houses of stone. Courts leet and baron are held by the lord of the manor, who has the power to prove wills and grant administrations, and to hold a court of copyhold for the manor, in which the custom of Borough-English prevails. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 5. 10., and in the patronage of the Rev. Alfred Padley, who is lord of the manor: the tithes have been commuted for £273. 10., and the glebe comprises 60 acres. The church is a small neat edifice, situated to the east of the village, on the highest ground in the parish; it was enlarged about the year 1775. There are places of worship for Baptists, Wesleyans, Primitive Methodists, and another sect; and a free school endowed with four acres of land, producing £20 per annum.

Bulwick (St. Nicholas)

BULWICK (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Oundle, hundred of Corby, N. division of the county of Northampton, 8 miles (W. S. W.) from Wansford; containing, with Bulwick-Short-Leys, extra-parochial, 487 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the road from Stamford to Kettering, is watered by the Willow brook, and comprises by computation 2000 acres, of which about 200 are wood: the soil, near the village, is of sandy quality, and in other parts a fertile clay. Limestone and iron-ore are found, and the latter appears to have been wrought, as vestiges of ancient mines may still be traced. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 7. 1.; net income, £366; patron, Thomas Tryon, Esq. The greater portion of the tithes was commuted, some time since, for 300 acres of land: there is a good glebe-house. The church is partly in the decorated and partly in the later English style, with a finelyproportioned tower and spire; it contains three stone stalls and some screen-work, and has lately been repewed. Charles Tryon, Esq., in 1705 bequeathed £200, which, in 1805, were invested in the purchase of £400 three per cent, consols., with a portion of the interest of which, together with the rental of some lands, a school is supported. Near Bulwick Hall is a chalybeate spring.

Bumpstead-Helion (St. Andrew)

BUMPSTEAD-HELION (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Risbridge, hundred of Freshwell, N. division of Essex, 3¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Haverhill; containing 906 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 3120 acres, of which 2390 are arable, and the remainder, with the exception of a small portion of pasture, chiefly woodland. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13, and in the patronage of Trinity College, Cambridge; impropriators, the trustees of the late Richard Salwey, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £711. 9. 9., and the vicarial for £274. 3. 10.; the glebe consists of 3½ acres. The church is an ancient edifice of stone, with a tower of brick of modern date, and has been enlarged within the last few years. There was formerly a guild here, dedicated to St. Peter.

Bumpstead, Steeple, or Bumpstead-at-the-Tower (St. Mary)

BUMPSTEAD, STEEPLE, or Bumpstead-at-theTower (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Risbridge, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 2¾ miles (S.) from Haverhill; containing 1212 inhabitants. This extensive parish takes the adjunct by which it is distinguished from Bumpstead-Helion, from its having been conspicuous, at an early period, for the tower or steeple of its church. A small river, called the Stour, passes through the parish, which is also intersected by the road from Clare to London. A pleasurefair is held on Whit-Wednesday, and a fair for the sale of earthenware in August. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 2. 1.; net income, £229; patron, the Lord Chancellor. The church is an ancient structure: the door of the chancel appears to have been formerly enriched with precious stones, and ornamented with the figures of four basilisks. Here is a place of worship for Independents. Sir Thomas Bendish, a distinguished adherent to Charles I., to whom he sent a large sum of money in his troubles, and afterwards ambassador to the Ottoman Porte, was born at Bower Hall; and Augustine Lindsell, Bishop of Hereford, was also a native of the parish.

Bunbury (St. Boniface)

BUNBURY (St. Boniface), a parish, in the union of Nantwich, partly in the Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, but chiefly in the First division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester; comprising the chapelry of Burwardsley, and the townships of Alpraham, Beeston, Bunbury, Calveley, Haughton, Peckforton, Ridley, Spurstow, Tilston-Fearnall, Tiverton, and Wardle; and containing 4678 inhabitants, of whom 926 are in the township of Bunbury, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Tarporley. This place, which is of great antiquity, was granted at the Conquest to Fitz-Hugh, Baron of Malpas, from whom it descended through various possessors, till, on the decease of the late Sir William Bunbury, the manor became vested in the representatives of the Earl of Dysart. Courts leet and baron are held annually, and a manorial court occasionally, for the recovery of debts under 40s. The Chester canal passes through the parish, and is crossed close to Bunbury lock by the Chester and Crewe railway: the parish contains by computation 17,000 acres, whereof 1111 are in the township of Bunbury; of the latter the soil is sand and clay.

The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £117; patrons, the Haberdashers' Company, London. The tithes of Bunbury township have been commuted for £100, and the glebe of the impropriators consists of 23 acres. The church is a handsome building of red freestone, in the later English style: at the termination of each of the aisles is an ancient and elegant chapel, called Eggerton and Spurstow chapels, the former built in 1523. Within the church are several fine monuments: among which are, a rich altar-tomb to the memory of Sir Hugh Calveley, the celebrated "Cheshire hero," who eminently distinguished himself during the invasions of France by Edward III.; and one to Admiral Sir George Beeston, who aided in the destruction of the Spanish Armada, in 1588. The church was fired by a detachment from the royal garrison at Cholmondeley House, on the 20th of June, 1643, and sustained considerable injury. The above Sir Hugh, about 1386, founded and endowed in the church a college for a master and six Secular chaplains; and at the Dissolution, the establishment consisted of a dean, five vicars, and two choristers, whose clear revenue was valued at £48. 2. 8.: the buildings stood in a field about 200 yards north-west of the church. Thomas Aldersey, citizen of London, purchased the rectory and advowson from Queen Elizabeth, and afterwards leased the tithes for £130 per annum, of which he directed that £20 should be given to a schoolmaster, £10 to an usher, 100 marks to a minister (each to have a house and a certain portion of land in addition), £20 to a curate, and £10 to the poor. A chapel was built, in 1735, in the township of Burwardsley; and a church at Tilston-Fearnall, in 1836. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. The school was rebuilt in 1812, at the expense of Samuel Aldersey, Esq.; and a second school, now conducted on the national plan, is supported by an endowment assigned by Mr. Thomas Gardener in 1750. Bunbury Heath, by some considered to be the place described in a poem entitled the "Ancient English Wake of Jerningham," is the scene of festivity on the Sunday preceding the festival of St. Boniface.

Buncton

BUNCTON, a chapelry, in the parish of Ashington, hundred of West Grinstead, rape of Bramber, W. division of Sussex, 2½ miles (N. W.) from Steyning; containing 72 inhabitants.

Bundley, or Bondleigh (St. James)

BUNDLEY, or Bondleigh (St. James), a parish, in the union of Oakhampton, hundred of North Tawton, South Molton and N. divisions of Devon, 2 miles (N. N. W.) from North Tawton; containing 342 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Taw, and comprises 1479 acres, of which 167 are common or waste. A small number of persons are employed in weaving and glove-making. Stone is quarried for the roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 17. 8½., and in the patronage of the Wyndham family; net income, £232. The church has some remains of Norman architecture, and an ancient font. There is a place of worship for Bible Christians.



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