Burton, Bishop - Burton-upon-Stather

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

448-452

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'Burton, Bishop - Burton-upon-Stather', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 448-452. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50847 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Burton, Bishop (All Saints)

BURTON, BISHOP (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Beverley, Hunsley-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 3 miles (W.) from Beverley; containing 532 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the road from York to Hull, and comprises 4208a. 20p., of which about 170 acres are woods and plantations; of the rest two-thirds are arable, and one-third pasture. The soil is various, the greater part a strong clay, with some very rich grazingland near the village; and the surface is undulated. There is a good limestone-quarry. On the village green is a fine pool of water, near which stood a long-noted gigantic elm, that was blown down in 1837. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of York: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1767. The church, which stands on an eminence, has an ancient chapel and a tower; the nave was rebuilt some years since, at a cost of £1700. There is a place of worship for Particular Baptists. Ten children are instructed for £20 a year, the rental of land purchased with a legacy of £100 from Mrs. Elizabeth Gee, in 1714; and almshouses for four persons are endowed with about £70 per annum, arising from property given by Ralph Hansby, by deed dated July 24th, 1614. Here are several tumuli, in which human bones and urns have been found; and near Killingwold-graves is a pillar called Stump Cross, supposed to have been one of the crosses which marked the limits of the sanctuary of Beverley.

Burton, Black, or Burton-in-Lonsdale

BURTON, BLACK, or Burton-in-Lonsdale, a chapelry, in the parish of Thornton, union of Settle, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 12 miles (N. W.) from Settle; containing 629 inhabitants. This place was anciently the baronial residence of the Mowbray family, and on the attainder of John de Mowbray, in the reign of Edward II., was forfeited to the crown; but from an inquisition taken in the reign of Edward III., it appears that the same John de Mowbray died possessed of the manor, which is now the property of Hornby Roughsedge, Esq., of Bentham House, who has enfranchised the lands, reserving only his right of holding a manorial court. The township comprises by computation 1552 acres, and is situated on the road between Lancaster and Richmond, the former of which places is the posttown: the surface is varied, and the lower grounds are watered by the river Greta. The substratum abounds with coal of very good quality, and a mine has been opened, but the operation of it is impeded by the water of the river, which, finding an entrance, prevents its being worked with any considerable profit: clay of good quality for earthenware is also found, and a manufacture of the coarser kinds of pottery is carried on. A pleasure-fair is held on Whit-Monday. The chapel is a neat structure, and the living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £94; patron, the Vicar of Thornton.

Burton-Bradstock (St. Mary)

BURTON-BRADSTOCK (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Bridport, liberty of Frampton, though locally in the hundred of Godderthorne, Bridport division of Dorset, 2¾ miles (S. E. by S.) from Bridport; containing 1201 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the south by the English Channel, and on the west by Bridport harbour, comprises by measurement 2700 acres: the scenery is bold, and in some parts strikingly romantic; the cliffs on the beach rise perpendicularly to a great height, and abound with fossil remains. In the village is an establishment for spinning flax, and the linen and woollen manufactures afford employment to about 200 persons: stone of good quality for building is extensively quarried. The living is a rectory, with the curacy of Shipton-George, valued in the king's books at £25, and in the gift of Lord Rivers: the tithes have been commuted for £416. 10. payable to the incumbent, and for £18. 3. belonging to impropriators; the glebe comprises 40 acres. The church is an ancient cruciform structure, in the Norman style. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Burton-By-Lincoln (St. Vincent)

BURTON-BY-LINCOLN (St. Vincent), a parish, in the wapentake of Lawress, parts of Lindsey, union and county of Lincoln, 2¼ miles (N. N. W.) from the city of Lincoln; containing 206 inhabitants. The ancient family of Monson has long flourished in the neighbourhood; and many of its members have represented the city in parliament since the reign of Elizabeth. Of this family were, Sir William Monson, a distinguished naval captain, afterwards admiral; and Sir John Monson, Bart., who rose to great eminence in the law. The fifth baronet was created Baron Monson, of Burton, in 1728. The parish comprises 2260 acres of land, including Hathow, a farm three miles west of the village, where is a tract of low land, now well drained, but formerly swampy. Lord Monson is lord of the manor and owner of the parish, and has a large mansion standing in a finely-wooded park, called Burton Hall, long a seat of the family, and lately repaired for his lordship's residence. The village, which is pleasant and well built, is scattered over a bold acclivity. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 15. 2½., and in the patronage of Lord Monson; net income, £419. The church is a small neat structure, built in 1795. Some almshouses with gardens attached, for ten widows, were founded before 1651 by Sir John Monson, who endowed them out of his Burton estate with £20 per annum; the widows have also £5, arising from £100 left by Edward Monson, Esq., in 1712. Burton is entitled to send free scholars to the school at South Carlton.

Burton, Cherry (St. Michael)

BURTON, CHERRY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Beverley, Hunsley-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 3 miles (W. N. W.) from Beverley; containing 455 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Beverley to Malton, and comprises 3438a. 3r. 7p., of which 2683 acres are arable, 653 meadow, and 50 wood. The soil is clayey, and in most situations suitable for the growth of wheat; and the surface generally level, but in some parts undulated: about a third comes under the denomination of wold land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 6. 8.; patron, Robert Ramsden, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £1050, and the glebe comprises 25a. 3r. 27p. The church, a small ancient edifice with a square tower, has traces of Norman and early English architecture; it was repaired in 1842. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Burton-Coggles (St. Thomas à Becket)

BURTON-COGGLES (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Grantham, wapentake of Beltisloe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 1¾ mile (W. N. W.) from Corby; containing 260 inhabitants. It comprises 2476 acres, and has a pleasant village seated on an eminence beneath which a small rivulet flows. Limestone of a soft quality is quarried. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 12. 3½.; and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £530, and there is a good glebe-house, with a glebe of 104 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, and contains the figures of two crusaders in good preservation. A school has an endowment of £21 per annum, arising from a bequest of land at Quadring by John Speight, in 1734, and by Catherine Chomeley, in 1773.

Burton-Constable

BURTON-CONSTABLE, a hamlet, in the parish of Swine, union of Skirlaugh, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 8 miles (N. E.) from Hull; containing 71 inhabitants. In the time of the Conqueror, this place was part of the possessions of the Archbishop of York; it shortly afterwards came to the family of Constable, who are the present owners. The hamlet comprises 1247a. 3r. 2p. of land, lying in West Newton township, in the parish of Aldbrough, but usually returned with Ellerby township, in Swine parish. Burton-Constable House, the seat of Sir Thomas Aston Clifford Constable, Bart., is a splendid mansion, said to have been partly erected so early as the reign of Stephen, but the two principal fronts of which, east and west, each about 130 feet long, have been built upon, and added to, an ancient edifice probably of the time of Henry VIII. The apartments are of exceedingly handsome design, and appropriately embellished, and the whole buildings are of a character suitable to a residence of distinction: the parks, also, and the gardens, are excellently kept.

Burton-Constable

BURTON-CONSTABLE, a township, in the parish of Fingall, union of Leyburn, wapentake of HangWest, N. riding of York, 4¼ miles (N. E.) from Middleham; containing 252 inhabitants. It comprises 2572 acres of land, chiefly the property of Marmaduke Wyvill, Esq., lord of the manor, who has a handsome seat, standing in a picturesque valley, with fine park land attached.

Burton-Dassett, or Dassett Magna (All Saints)

BURTON-DASSETT, or Dassett Magna (All Saints), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Southam, Burton-Dassett division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 4 miles (E.) from Kington; containing 614 inhabitants. This place, now reduced to a very small hamlet, is supposed to have been destroyed about the time of the battle of Edge-Hill, which place is distant 2 miles. The parish is situated on the Warwick and Banbury road, and comprises by measurement 4500 acres. Large stone-quarries are wrought, the material of which is used for buildings. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14; net income, £167; patrons, Lord Willoughby de Broke, and W. R. Blencow, Esq., of whom the former is impropriator: the glebe consists of 90 acres, with a good glebe-house. The church is a very spacious and handsome structure.

Burton-Extra

BURTON-EXTRA, a township, in the parish and union of Burton-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford; contiguous to the southern part of the town of Burton, and containing 1193 inhabitants. This place, called also Bond-End, comprises the district of Shobnal, distant one mile to the west, and forming in monastic times an abbey grange. Here is a chalybeate spring.

Burton-Fleming, or North Burton (St. Cuthbert)

BURTON-FLEMING, or North Burton (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Bridlington, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 7 miles (N. W. by W.) from Bridlington; containing 460 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 3590 acres: the soil, opening to the south-west, is chalky, producing all kinds of grain of an excellent quality, and turnips in great abundance. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books as a discharged vicarage at £6. 4. 2.; net income, £95; patron, Capt. Robert Mitford, R.N. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1768. The church is a neat edifice, consisting of a nave and chancel, with a low tower; it contains a beam perfectly sound, marked "June, 1574." There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists.

Burton-Gate (St. Helen)

BURTON-GATE (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Gainsborough; containing 126 inhabitants. It is situated on the banks of the Trent, and intersected by the Lincoln and Gainsborough road. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 10. 10.; net income, £88; patron, W. Hutton, Esq. The glebe consists of about 16 acres, with a good glebe-house. A small petrifying spring has been discovered.

Burton-Hastings (St. Botolph)

BURTON-HASTINGS (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of Hinckley, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3 miles (S. S. W.) from Hinckley; containing 276 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the line of the Roman Watling-street, and intersected by the Ashby-de-laZouch canal. It comprises by admeasurement 1335 acres, about one-third of which is arable, and the rest pasture; the surface is rather flat, the soil of medium quality, and the scenery (the parish being well wooded), is picturesque. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £105; patron and incumbent, the Rev. William Samuel Bucknill. The church is ancient, with a square tower. Connected with it is a Sunday school.

Burton-Hill

BURTON-HILL, a tything, in the parish, union, and hundred of Malmesbury, Malmesbury and Kingswood, and N. divisions of the county of Wilts, ¾ of a mile (S.) from Malmesbury; containing 257 inhabitants.

Burton-in-Kendal (St. James)

BURTON-IN-KENDAL (St. James), a parish, partly in Lonsdale ward, and partly in Kendal ward, union of Kendal, county of Westmorland; and partly in the hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster; comprising the township of Dalton, in Lancashire, and the townships of Burton, Holme, Holmscale, and Preston-Patrick, in Westmorland; and containing 2387 inhabitants, of whom 796 are in the market-town of Burton, 34½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Appleby, and 251 (N. W. by N.) from London. The ancient name of this place, Borton, a contraction of Borough town, is still retained by the inhabitants: it takes its adjunct from its situation in the dale, or valley, of the river Ken, to distinguish it from Burtonin-Lonsdale, Yorkshire. The place was given at the Conquest, with many other estates in the neighbourhood, to Ivo de Talebois, who afterwards granted the church, and certain lands, to the abbey of St. Mary at York, with which the property remained till the dissolution of monasteries, when it was granted to the Middletons, of Leighton Hall, in the adjoining parish of Warton. Burton is a neat town, on the great north-western road: the houses, many of which are ancient, are well built, and the general appearance is prepossessing; the inhabitants are amply supplied with excellent water, and the air is particularly salubrious. A communication with the Mersey, the Dee, the Humber, and the Trent, is afforded by the Kendal and Lancaster canal; and the Lancaster and Carlisle railway enters Westmorland near the town, and has a station called the Holme and Burton station, where an embankment commences, which in its course crosses the romantic little river Bela by a viaduct. But notwithstanding its favourable situation, the town has little trade, the only branch being that of linen, of which there is a manufactory at Holme. The market, established in 1661, and once noted for corn, is on Tuesday: the market-place is a spacious area, adjoining which are some good houses and several shops, and in the centre is a neat stone cross. A fair is held on Easter-Monday for cattle, which is also a statute-fair; and one on the first Tuesday in October. An agricultural society was founded in 1831. The county magistrates hold a petty-session every alternate Tuesday; and a manorial court is held on Whit-Monday and Martinmasday, for the renewal of fines, and the recovery of debts under 40s.

The parish comprises 8740a. 36p., of which 1437 acres are in the township of Burton; of the latter, 318 are common or waste. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £15. 17.; net income, £199; patrons, the trustees of the late Rev. C. Simeon; impropriators, the trustees of the late W. Atkinson, Esq. The vicarial tithes were partly commuted for land and a money payment, in 1815, under an act of inclosure: there is a good glebe-house, erected in 1844, beautifully situated, and having in front a remarkably fine avenue of 37 lime-trees. The church is an ancient structure with a large square tower, and is now in excellent condition, the walls of the nave having been raised about ten feet, and the whole building re-arranged and restored, in 1844, at a cost of £400: the pulpit, and the canopy over it, are of oak richly carved; and there are two sepulchral chapels, belonging to Dalton and Preston Halls. In the churchyard is a monument to the memory of William Cockin, author of the Rural Sabbath and other literary productions. There is a church at PrestonPatrick, and another at Holme. The grammar school has an income of £50 per annum, the produce of various benefactions since the year 1657.

Burton-Joyce (St. Helen)

BURTON-JOYCE (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Basford, S. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton and of the county of Nottingham, 5 miles (N. E. by E.) from Nottingham; containing, with the chapelry of Bulcote, 764 inhabitants. This place, in Domesday book called Bertune, belonged in the reign of Henry II. to the family of Jorz, from whom it derives the adjunct to its name, and from whom it descended to the ancestors of the Earl of Chesterfield. The village is pleasantly situated on the north bank of the river Trent, the vale of which is bounded by a range of lofty hills that shelter it on the north. The Nottingham and Lincoln railway has a station here, 5½ miles from the Nottingham station. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 19. 2.; net income, £145; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Chesterfield: the tithes were commuted for land in 1768. The church is an ancient spacious structure, with a spire: in a niche of the north aisle is an upright effigy of an armed knight, standing on a lion, and bearing a shield on the left arm, said to represent Robert de Jorz, who lived in the reign of Edward I.; and in the chancel are two altar-tombs of members of the family of Stapleton, with inscriptions in Saxon characters. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Burton, Kirk (St. John the Baptist)

BURTON, KIRK (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg. W. riding of York; containing 18,452 inhabitants, of whom 3474 are in the township of Kirk-Burton, 5 miles (S. E.) from Huddersfield. This parish comprises the townships of Cartworth, Foulston, Hepworth, Kirk-Burton, Shelley, Shepley, Thurstonland, Wooldale, and part of Cumberworth-Half; the whole forming an area of 15,990 acres, whereof 1260 are in Kirk-Burton, which includes the hamlets of DogbyLane, Green-Grove, Linfit-Lane, Spring-Grove, and Paddock, and the village of High Burton. The village of Kirk-Burton is of considerable size, and pleasantly seated on a declivity at the junction of two narrow ravines, or valleys. The woollen and fancy-waiscoating manufactures are carried on to a great extent, affording employment to about 2600 persons: edge-tools, and spades and shovels, are manufactured in High Burton; and there are coal-pits and good stone-quarries. Fairs for cattle are held on the last Mondays in April and October. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Lord Chancellor; net income, £276; impropriators, the governors of Sheffield Hospital. The tithes were commuted for land in 1799. A sum of £4 is annually paid by Kirk-Burton to the vicar of Dewsbury, as a mark of its dependence upon that ancient church. The parochial church, built in the reign of Edward III., is a large and commanding edifice, with a square tower; an organ was erected in 1836, at a cost of £300. At Holmfirth and New-Mill are district churches, the former an ancient structure; and at Thurstonland is an episcopal chapel. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and Primitive Methodists. A school, established in 1714, was endowed in 1721 by the Rev. Henry Robinson, with a bequest of £100; and in the following year with a bequest of £360, by J. Horsfall, Esq.; which sums, having been invested in land and houses, produce about £80 per annum: the school was rebuilt in 1840.

Burton-Latimer (St. Mary)

BURTON-LATIMER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Kettering, hundred of Huxloe, N. division of the county of Northampton, 6 miles (N. W.) from Higham-Ferrers; containing 965 inhabitants. This place derives its distinguishing appellation from the barons Latimer, who had a residence here. The parish is intersected by the road from Higham-Ferrers to Kettering, and comprises by computation 2300 acres. The soil is a free loam, and very good except in the wold, where it is cold stiff land. The immediate locality is not picturesque, owing to the land having been but lately inclosed; but the surrounding country is very pretty, well wooded, and undulated. Limestone of the oolite formation, with fossils, is abundant. A mill for spinning worsted-yarn affords employment to about 100 persons; and there is a large manufactory for Brussels and Kidderminster carpets, in connexion with it. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £29. 10.; patron, David Bevan, Esq.; incumbent, the Rev. D. Barclay Bevan. The tithes were commuted for land, under an inclosure act, in 1800: the glebe now comprises 700 acres; and the parsonage is a good house, much enlarged and improved by the present rector. The church is a handsome structure, partly in the Norman and partly in the early English style, and contains a richly carved oak screen: a new east window has been put up in the chancel by the Rev. Mr. Bevan, by whom, also, stalls have been erected. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. The free school was founded in the reign of Elizabeth, by Margaret Burbank, and William Vaux, Lord Harrowden, the former of whom endowed it with 10 acres of land, and the latter with a house. The Rev. S. Barwick, in 1792, left an endowment of 7 acres, producing £20 per annum, for preparing children for the free school; and an infants' school has been lately established by the incumbent. The rent of 40 acres of land is distributed among the industrious poor, and 70 acres are set apart in lieu of the right of cutting furze.

Burton-Lazars

BURTON-LAZARS, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 1¾ mile (S. E. by S.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 262 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. James. In the reign of Stephen, an hospital dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary and St. Lazarus, was founded here by a general collection throughout England, the principal contributor being Roger de Mowbray: it was dependent on the great house at Jerusalem, and was the chief of all the lazar houses in England; and the revenue, in the 26th of Henry VIII., was estimated at £265. 10. 2. The buildings stood near a spring, the water of which was in high repute for curing the leprosy; a bath and a drinkingroom were built about 1760. The land in this lordship is peculiarly fine.

Burton-Leonard (St. Helen)

BURTON-LEONARD (St. Helen), a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Knaresborough; containing 455 inhabitants. It comprises 1739a. 2r. 39p., of which 1100 acres are arable, and the remainder grassland; the soil is of an inferior kind, and the surface generally undulated: stone of excellent quality is burnt for lime. Many of the inhabitants were formerly employed in the flax and linen trade, but it has entirely ceased. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 1. 0½.; net income, £140; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of York: a glebe-house was erected in 1839, and there are 45 acres of glebe. The church is a small plain structure, built in 1782. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists.

Burton, Long (St. James)

BURTON, LONG (St. James), a parish, in the union and hundred of Sherborne, Sherborne division of Dorset, 3 miles (S. by E.) from Sherborne; containing 386 inhabitants. It is situated on the great road between Bath and Weymouth, and comprises by measurement 1026 acres. The females are chiefly employed in making gloves for the Yeovil and other manufacturers. There are extensive stone-quarries, from which are obtained limestone, and excellent stone for building. The living is a discharged vicarage, with the perpetual curacy of Holnest annexed, valued in the king's books at £10. 15.; net income, £275; patron, C. Cosens, Esq.; impropriator, R. Gordon, Esq.: there is a good glebe-house, with 20 acres of land. The church was built more than 200 years ago. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists.

Burton-on-the-Wolds

BURTON-ON-THE-WOLDS, a township, in the parish of Prestwold, union of Loughborough, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3½ miles (E. N. E.) from Loughborough: containing 448 inhabitants. The Wesleyans have a meeting-house.

Burton-Overy (St. Andrew)

BURTON-OVERY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 7½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Leicester; containing 449 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1800 acres, and has an undulated surface, with a strong clay soil. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £18. 5. 10.; net income, £497; patron and incumbent, the Rev. R. Thorp. The tithes were commuted in 1765 for land, and the glebe now consists of 272 acres, to which there is a good glebehouse.

Burton-Pedwardine (St. Andrew)

BURTON-PEDWARDINE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Sleaford, wapentake of Ashwardhurn, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 4½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Sleaford; containing 125 inhabitants, and comprising by computation 1800 acres. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 12. 8½.; patron and impropriator, H. Handley, Esq.: the glebe comprises 263 acres, valued at £332 per annum. The church is a plain edifice, built in 1802, to replace the former structure, which had been erected in 1340, on the site of a still more ancient foundation; one of the chapels of the old church is still existing. There are some remains of the seat of Thomas Horseman, taster to Queen Elizabeth; and several tumuli.

Burton-Pidsea (St. Peter, or St. Mary)

BURTON-PIDSEA (St. Peter, or St. Mary), a parish, in the Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 5 miles (E. by N.) from Hedon; containing 400 inhabitants. The name of this place is a corruption of Burton per Sea, or by the Sea: it is one of the manors that have remained, as part of the original fee of Drogo the Norman, in possession of the succeeding lords of the seigniory of Holderness to the present day. The parish contains about 1980 acres by measurement: the soil is rich and fertile; and the village is picturesque, situated on ground commanding an extensive prospect, and surrounded by some fine trees. Chatt House, in the parish, the residence of a family of that name in the 17th century, has been rebuilt, with much taste, by the Clapham family. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £42; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of York. The tithes were commuted for a money payment, under an act passed in 1761. The church is a handsome edifice, principally in the later English style, with a lofty tower. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Burton-Pynsent

BURTON-PYNSENT, a tything, in the parishes of Curry-Rivell, Drayton, and Fivehead, union of Langport, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset; containing 43 inhabitants. The mansion here, which was the residence of the celebrated Earl of Chatham, who had the title of Viscount Pitt of Burton-Pynsent, has been taken down.

Burton-Salmon

BURTON-SALMON, a township, in the parish of Monk-Fryston, Lower division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Ferry-Bridge; containing 166 inhabitants. Here is a station of the York and North-Midland railway, which takes a curvilinear course through the township.

Burton-Upon-Stather (St. Andrew)

BURTON-UPON-STATHER (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, N. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 35½ miles (N. by W.) from Lincoln, and 164½ (N. by W.) from London; containing, with the hamlets of Normanby and Thealby, and part of that of Coleby, 799 inhabitants, of whom 429 are in the township of Burton. The parish comprises by measurement 3510 acres, the soil varying, through several gradations, from light sand to strong clay; a considerable portion is of a yellow colour, resembling ochre, and leaves a dark and indelible stain on the clothes of the ploughman. Along the side of the river Trent is a hill of considerable elevation, forming a kind of terrace six or seven miles in length, and commanding an uninterrupted view, as far as the eye can reach, of the county of York, and part of Nottingham. The village is situated on the brow of a hill, at the foot of which flows the river, where there is a wharf, called Stather. It was formerly of much greater extent than it is at present, having been reduced by a tempest that destroyed several houses, and injured the church. A market was once held on Tuesday, and there are still fairs on the first Monday in May, and the first Monday after Martinmas. The living is a vicarage, consolidated in 1729 with the rectory of Flixborough, and valued in the king's books at £12: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1803. On the summit of Alkborough Hill is a kind of labyrinth called the Julian Tower, supposed to be the remains of a Roman fortification.