Catterlin - Caversfield

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

534-538

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'Catterlin - Caversfield', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 534-538. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50862 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


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Catterlin

CATTERLIN, a township, in the parish of NewtonRigney, union of Penrith, Leath ward, E. division of Cumberland, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Penrith; containing 147 inhabitants.

Catterton

CATTERTON, a township, in the parish of Tadcaster, W. division of Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Tadcaster; containing 58 inhabitants.

Catteshill

CATTESHILL, anciently Gates-Hill, a tything, in the parish, and First division of the hundred, of Godalming, W. division of Surrey, 1 mile (N. E.) from Godalming. At this place, which is situated on the navigable river Wey, is an extensive and long-established paper-mill, employing about 100 persons in manufacturing the finest writing and printing paper. Near the hamlet is the old manor-house; but the adjacent stone walls, barns, and out-houses have far more the aspect of remote age than the dwelling, which is brick and tile, though substantially constructed. The old walls are strongly built, and are apparently coeval with the remains of the Lady Chapel at the back; the general arrangement having the character of an ancient grange. A pleasure-fair is held on Holy-Thursday.

Cattistocke (St. Peter and St. Paul)

CATTISTOCKE (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Cerne, hundred of Cerne, Totcombe, and Modbury, Cerne division of Dorset, 9 miles (N. W.) from Dorchester; containing 549 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Dorchester to Yeovil, and comprises 2938a. 1r. 6p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 9., and in the patronage of Mrs. Still: the tithes have been commuted for £510, and there is a glebe-house, with about 28 acres of land. On a hill in the eastern part of the parish is an ancient circular fortification of about four acres, called the Castle, surrounded by a double rampart, with entrances at the north-east and west: towards the middle of the area the ground rises into a long barrow; and near the north entrance is a round tumulus, the top of which consists of flint stones.

Catto, with Landmoth.—See Landmoth.

CATTO, with Landmoth.—See Landmoth.

Catton

CATTON, a township, in the parish of Croxall, union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 7½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Burton; containing 47 inhabitants. It comprises 1064a. 2r. 14p., of strong good wheat land. The village, which is scattered, is situated on the Trent, about a mile and a half north-west from the village of Croxall. The Hall is a noble brick mansion, pleasantly seated in a fine park on the east bank of the Trent. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for a rent-charge of £91. 15.

Catton (St. Margaret)

CATTON (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of St. Faith's, hundred of Taverham, E. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (N.) from Norwich; containing 650 inhabitants. It comprises 904a. 2r. 35p., a considerable part of which consists of woodlands, and garden and pleasure grounds, interspersed with numerous mansions and villas, forming together a beautiful suburban village. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 3. 9.; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Norwich. The landowners have purchased the impropriate tithes of the Dean and Chapter; the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £170, and the glebe contains 13 acres. The church, of which the most ancient part is in the later English style, consists of a nave, chancel, and north aisle, with a circular tower, the upper part octagonal; in the interior are several neat memorials. The Wesleyan Methodists have a place of worship.

Catton

CATTON, a grieveship, in the parish of Allendale, union of Hexham, S. division of Tindale ward and of Northumberland; containing 535 inhabitants.

Catton (All Saints)

CATTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, partly in the wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, and partly in the Wilton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing, with the townships of East and West Stamford-Bridge, and Kexby, 1078 inhabitants, of whom 185 are in the township of High Catton, and 186 in that of Low Catton, 7½ miles (E. N. E.) from York. The parish comprises 7664 acres, whereof 1640 are in High, and 1264 in Low, Catton. The surface is generally level, and there is some fine land, the soil varying from a very good to a very inferior quality; the scenery, though not particularly striking, is yet pleasing, and some parts present a beautiful view of the Wolds, by which the parish is bounded on the east. The village of Low Catton is situated in the vale of the Derwent; and that of High Catton on a gentle acclivity, at the distance of a mile from the former. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 12. 8½.; net income, £410; patron, Col. Wyndham: the tithes were commuted for land in 1760. The church is an ancient edifice with a large tower. There are places of worship for Wesleyans at High Catton and East Stamford-Bridge.

Catton

CATTON, a township, in the parish of Topcliffe, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 5 miles (S. W.) from Thirsk; containing 136 inhabitants. It is on the east bank of the river Swale, and comprises by computation 770 acres of land: the Leeming-Lane road passes at the distance of about a mile and a half to the west of the village. The tithes have been commuted for £160 payable to the Dean and Chapter of York, and £26. 15. to the vicar.

Catwick (St. Michael)

CATWICK (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Skirlaugh, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 8 miles (N. E. by E.) from Beverley; containing 191 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1493 acres: the soil is various, but chiefly clay and gravel; the surface is undulated, and the scenery diversified, and in some situations of pleasing character. Tiles, chimney-pots, and bricks are manufactured to some extent. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 5., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £149: the tithes were commuted for a money payment on the inclosure of the parish. The church is an ancient edifice in the later style of English architecture, repaired in 1842. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Catworth, Great (St. Leonard)

CATWORTH, GREAT (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of St. Neot's, hundred of Leightonstone, county of Huntingdon, 4 miles (N. by W.) from Kimbolton; containing 637 inhabitants. It is situated on the London and Oundle road, and comprises about 2000 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 16. 10½.; net income, £337; patrons, the Principal and Fellows of Brasenose College, Oxford. The tithes were commuted for corn rents, under an inclosure act, in 1795; the glebe contains 60 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is in the early English style, and ornamented with a spire. The Baptists and Wesleyans have places of worship. Sir Wolstan Dixie, lord mayor of London in 1585, was born here.

Catworth, Little

CATWORTH, LITTLE, a chapelry, in the parish of Longstow, union of St. Neot's, hundred of Leightonstone, county of Huntingdon, 3¾ miles (N. by E.) from Kimbolton; containing 75 inhabitants.

Caughall

CAUGHALL, a township, in the parish of Backford, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 3½ miles (N. by E.) from Chester; containing 16 inhabitants, and comprising 310 acres. The manor belonged for several generations to a family of the same name, of whom Roger de Caughall, who died in the early part of the 15th century, left two daughters, through whom it passed into the families of Massey and Osbaldeston. One moiety afterwards came to Sir Thomas Stanley Massey Stanley, and the other became vested in the feoffees of the grammar school at Whitchurch. The Ellesmere canal flows on the west of the township.

Cauldon (St. Mary)

CAULDON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Cheadle, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 7 miles (N.) from Cheadle; containing 326 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1500 acres of land, in a barren and dreary part of the moorlands; and is separated from the parish of Waterfall by the river Hamp, which in its course enters the ground at Waterhouses, continuing a subterraneous progress for upwards of five miles. At Cauldon Lowe, a lofty hill, are lime-works from which the greater part of the surrounding country is supplied; the lime is conveyed by railway to Froghall, and thence by canal, and much of it is used in the iron districts for the smelting of ore, being peculiarly adapted for that purpose: about 150 hands are employed on the works at Cauldon Lowe. The village is formed of straggling houses on a declivity. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £85; patron, A. Henniker, Esq.: the church is a small building, with a tower. A school is supported by subscription. Curious fossils are found here in abundance.

Cauldwell

CAULDWELL, a chapelry, in the parish of Stapenhill, union of Burton-upon-Trent, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 5¼ miles (S. by E.) from Burton; containing 153 inhabitants. The manor was sold by William, Lord Paget, in 1565, to Peter Collingwood, Esq., from whose family it passed by successive marriages to the families of Sanders and Mortimer; it afterwards came by purchase to Henry Evans, Esq., of Burton. The township comprises 1040 acres of land, east of the Trent. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £257, and the vicarial for £146. 10. The chapel is dedicated to St. Giles, and is a small structure with a tower. The Baptists have a place of worship.

Caulk, or Calke (St. Giles)

CAULK, or Calke (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hundred of Repton and Gresley, S. division of the county of Derby, 4¼ miles (N. by E.) from Ashby; containing 55 inhabitants. A convent of Augustine friars, in honour of St. Mary and St. Giles, was founded here before 1161; of which the Countess of Chester was a principal benefactor, on the condition that it should be subject to the priory of Repindon, or Repton. The site was granted by Edward VI., in 1547, to John, Earl of Warwick; and the Caulk estate subsequently came to the Wensleys, Bainbrigges, and Harpurs. Of the last-named family, Henry Harpur was created a baronet in 1626; and Sir Henry Harpur, the seventh baronet, took in 1808 the name of Crewe, in right of his great-grandmother, Catharine, daughter and coheiress of Thomas, Lord Crewe.

The parish comprises by measurement 900 acres. Quarries of limestone, in which, occasionally, much lead is found, are extensively wrought; and large quantities of the stone are burnt into lime, for the conveyance of which facility is afforded by the Swannington railway, to Ashby and Leicester, and by canal to other places. A handsome and substantial stone mansion, of the Grecian order, called The Abbey, has been erected amidst the remains of the conventual buildings, the walls of which are still found in the pleasure-grounds and garden; the house stands in an extensive park, well wooded, varied in its surface, and amply stocked with deer. The living is a peculiar; Sir John Harpur Crewe is patron and impropriator, and allows the minister £100 per annum. The church is a neat edifice in the early English style, built, on a former site, by the late Sir George Crewe in 1830. The poor are eligible to the hospital at Tickenhall, founded by Charles Harpur, Esq., in 1770.

Caundle, Bishop

CAUNDLE, BISHOP, a parish, in the union of Sherborne, partly in the hundred of Brownshall, Sturminster division, and partly in that of Sherborne, Sherborne division of Dorset, 5 miles (S. E. by E.) from Sherborne; containing 365 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1304 acres, of which 200 are arable, 961 meadow and pasture, and about 22 wood. The hamlet of Brownshall, in the parish, is of great antiquity, and was formerly of importance, having given name to a hundred. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 10.; net income, £226; patron, Earl Digby. The glebe contains 21 acres, with a glebehouse.

Caundle-Marsh (St. Peter and St. Paul)

CAUNDLE-MARSH (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union and hundred of Sherborne, Sherborne division of Dorset, 3¾ miles (S. E.) from Sherborne, containing 77 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Sherborne to Sturminster, comprises 781 acres, of which 40 are common or waste: stone of inferior quality is quarried. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 16. 3., and in the gift of Sir H. R. Hoare, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for a rentcharge of £96, and the glebe comprises 35 acres. The church is a neat edifice.

Caundle-Purse (St. Peter)

CAUNDLE-PURSE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Sherborne, Sherborne division of Dorset, 1½ mile (E. S. E.) from Milborne-Port; containing 183 inhabitants. It is intersected in the eastern portion by the road from London to Sherborne, and comprises 1470a. 2r. 16p., of which, with the exception of about 100 acres of woodland and copse, the whole is arable, meadow, and pasture. The surface is generally level, but rises towards the south, and terminates in a long ridge; the soil is a strong clay, alternated in some parts with a stone brash. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 8. 8., and in the gift of Sir H. R. Hoare: the tithes have been commuted for £162, and the glebe comprises 23 acres. In the chancel of the church, under a plain marble tombstone, are interred the remains of Dr. Highmore, a distinguished writer on medical and anatomical subjects. Dr. Mew, Bishop of Winchester, was born here in 1618: he was commanded by the king to proceed against Monmouth, in the rebellion, and had the management of the artillery at the battle of Sedgmoor, where he rendered considerable service.

Caundle-Stourton

CAUNDLE-STOURTON, a parish, in the union of Sturminster, hundred of Brownshall, Sturminster division of Dorset, 2 miles (S. W.) from Stalbridge; containing 394 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1962 acres: stone of good quality for building is quarried. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £50; patron and impropriator, Sir H. R. Hoare, whose tithes have been commuted for £21.

Caundle-Wake

CAUNDLE-WAKE, a tything, in the parish of Bishop-Caundle, union of Sherborne, hundred of Brownshall, Sturminster division of Dorset; containing 36 inhabitants. It takes its adjunct Wake from a noble family which anciently possessed the manor of the place.

Caunton (St. Andrew)

CAUNTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 5½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Newark; containing 539 inhabitants. It is situated on the Worksop road, and comprises by measurement 2900 acres, of which 1600 are in the manor of Caunton, 800 in that of Beesthorpe, and 500 in the manor of Knapthorpe; the scenery is pleasing, the soil chiefly clay, and the land well cultivated. Coal is supposed to exist, and various attempts have been made to discover it, but without success. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Prebendary of North Muskham in the Collegiate Church of Southwell, valued in the king's books at £4. 2. 1.; net income, £142; impropriator, Lord Middleton. The tithes were commuted for land under an inclosure act, in 1795. The church is a neat structure of stone. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists; and a school built by subscription.

Causey-Park

CAUSEY-PARK, a township, in the parochial chapelry of Hebburn, union of Morpeth, W. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of Northumberland, 6½ miles (N. by W.) from Morpeth; containing 116 inhabitants. This place, which has its name from an ancient paved way that led along its eastern boundary, and on the line of the present great north road, was formerly in the parish of Felton; and comprises 1030 acres of land, exempt from tithes, paying only a modus of £3 per annum. The House here was built in 1589 by James Ogle, and has some gardens which are very productive, and well stocked with fruit-trees. A little to the west of the house is a fine broad dyke, of compact whinstone, which has been much quarried for the roads; it has the millstone grit on its north cheek, and beds of slaty sandstone, bituminous shale, &c., on the south. There was once a chapel dedicated to St. Cuthbert, with which the place was probably honoured on account of the monks of Durham having rested here in their flight from that city, with the body of St. Cuthbert, to Holy Island, in 1069. Henry Ogle, in 1760, bequeathed a rent-charge of £15 for a school.

Cautley and Dowbiggin

CAUTLEY and Dowbiggin, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Sedbergh, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 3 miles (N. E.) from Sedbergh, on the road to Kirkby-Stephen; containing about 500 inhabitants. This district was formed out of Sedbergh township; it is mostly grass land, the soil various, and the scenery mountainous: the river Rawther, which passes through, rises about four miles eastward. Flagstone and buildingstone are obtained, and at Hebblethwaite Hall is a bobbin-mill. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £40; patron, the Vicar of Sedbergh: the church was built in 1846, at an expense of £750, and is in the decorated style, with a campanile tower. There is a place of worship for a congregation of Wesleyan Methodists. In the vale of the Rawther is a picturesque cascade called Cautley Spout, the water of which falls from a great height.

Cave, North (All Saints)

CAVE, NORTH (All Saints), a parish, partly in the union of Howden, and partly in that of Pocklington, Hunsley-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 10 miles (E. N. E.) from Howden; containing 1217 inhabitants, and comprising the chapelry of South Cliffe, and townships of North Cave, and Drewton with Everthorpe. This parish is situated on the main road from Hull and Beverley to Wakefield and the West riding, about 4 miles from the Hull and Selby railway, and 2 from the Market-Weighton canal. It comprises 6913a. 1r. 8p., of which 2025 acres are in the chapelry of South Cliffe: about 4702 are arable, 1006 pasture and meadow, 230 wood, 935 warren, and 13 common; the soil is various, being chalky in the high, blue lias in the lower, and oolite in the intervening, lands. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 7. 6.; net income, £247; patrons and impropriators, Henry Burton, Esq., and Mrs. Sarah Burton. The great tithes for part of the township of North Cave were commuted for land in 1764; a tithe rent-charge of £155 is paid to the impropriators, and one of £57 to the vicar, who has a glebe, of an acre and a half. The church is a commodious edifice with a handsome tower, and contains a full-length figure of a knight in armour, supposed to represent Sir Thomas Matham, whose family were formerly seated here, but of whose mansion there are no remains. At South Cliffe is a chapel of ease; and there are places of worship in the parish for the Society of Friends, Primitive Methodists, and Wesleyans.

Cave, South (All Saints)

CAVE, SOUTH (All Saints), a parish, in the unions of Howden and Beverley, Hunsley-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York; containing 1852 inhabitants, of whom 1288 are in the market-town of South Cave, 27 miles (S. E.) from York, and 183 (N. by W.) from London. This parish comprises 7103a. 2r. 30p., and includes the townships of Broomfleet and Faxfleet; it is situated at the western extremity of the Wolds, and on the river Humber, which forms its boundary for three miles. The township of South Cave comprises 4323a. 1r. 20p. The surrounding country is very pleasing; the eminences affording many delightful views of Lincolnshire, and of the river, with the scenery on its banks. At the market, which is held on Monday, considerable quantities of corn are sold for the supply of the manufacturing towns in the West riding; it is shipped on the Humber, and the return cargoes consist of coal, freestone, lime, flags, and a variety of other necessary commodities. There is a fair on Trinity-Monday. The petty-sessions for the wapentake of Howdenshire take place here; and a manorial court is held in October, at which a constable is appointed. The town consists principally of three long streets, of which the longest is on the northern acclivity of a valley: having been anciently washed by the tides of the Humber, it obtained the name of Cove, afterwards corrupted to Cave. In the vicinity is Cave Castle, the seat of H. G. Barnard, Esq., a splendid embattled structure, with numerous turrets; the interior exhibits a corresponding style of magnificence, and is enriched with a noble collection of paintings by the first artists, including a fine portrait of Washington, whose ancestors possessed a portion of the estate, and resided here prior to their emigration to Virginia, in the middle of the seventeenth century. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £168; patron and impropriator, Mr. Barnard: the great tithes have been commuted for £465, and the vicarial for £95. The church is a neat edifice, erected in 1601, and consists of a nave, north aisle, south transept, and chancel, with a fine tower. There are three places of worship belonging to Methodists, and a Roman Catholic chapel at Cave Castle.

Cavendish (St. Mary)

CAVENDISH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Babergh, W. division of Suffolk, 2½ miles (E. N. E.) from Clare; containing 1353 inhabitants. This parish, at a very early period, was the property of the Cavendish family, of whom John Cavendish, being in attendance on Richard II., despatched the rebel Wat Tyler, whom William Walworth, lord mayor of London, had stunned with a blow of his mace. The populace of this neighbourhood, in retaliation, seized Sir John Cavendish, uncle of the former, and lord chief justice of the king's bench, whom, together with the prior of Bury, they beheaded at the market-cross in that town. The parish comprises 3351a. 1r. 24p.: the village is situated on the river Stour. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26; net income, £547; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Jesus College, Cambridge. Thomas Grey, in 1696, gave 78 acres of land for teaching poor children. The noble family of Cavendish, of which the Duke of Devonshire is the representative, derives its name from this place.

Cavenham (St. Andrew)

CAVENHAM (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Mildenhall, hundred of Lackford, W. division of Suffolk, 4½ miles (S. E.) from Mildenhall; containing 277 inhabitants. The river Lark is navigable on the north of this parish, where it is crossed by Temple bridge. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 5. 10., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £113; impropriator, H. S. Waddington, Esq. The vicarial tithes were commuted for land in 1801. The sum of about £22 per annum, the rental of 80 acres of land under an inclosure act, is applied to the purchase of coal for the poor.

Caversfield (St. Lawrence)

CAVERSFIELD (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 2 miles (N.) from Bicester; containing 178 inhabitants. It comprises 1438a. 2r. 3p., the soil of which is light and stony. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £69; patrons and impropriators, the Trustees of the late Joseph Bullock, Esq. The glebe contains about 60 acres. Some suppose this to have been the place where Carausius, the Roman commander, assumed the purple in 287, and where he was afterwards slain by Caius Alectus: on Bayard's Green, about a mile from the church, are faint traces of a camp.