Chilmark - Chingford

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

597-599

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'Chilmark - Chingford', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 597-599. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50874 Date accessed: 24 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Chilmark (St. Margaret)

CHILMARK (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Dunworth, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 12 miles (W. by N.) from Salisbury; containing, with the tything of Rudge, 593 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the ancient Ikeneldstreet, belonged to the abbey of Wilton; it was granted by Henry VIII. to William Herbert and his wife, sister to Catharine Parr, and is still the property of their descendants, the earls of Pembroke. The parish comprises 3032a. 3r. 14p., and contains clay of excellent quality for bricks and for pottery. The celebrated quarries of freestone, from which was raised the stone for the erection of Salisbury cathedral, have almost fallen into disuse, being superseded by the Bath stone, which is more easily wrought. The river Nadder, and several of its tributaries, flow through the parish, which is also intersected by the Wilts and Berks canal. A fair, chiefly for cheese and horses, is held on the 31st of July. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Earl of Pembroke: the tithes have been commuted for £411, and the glebe comprises 24 acres. The church is cruciform, with a tower rising from the intersection, surmounted by a handsome spire; some parts of the building are in the early English style, others of later date. This is the birthplace of John de Chilmarke, a celebrated mathematician and philosophical writer who lived in the thirteenth century.

Chilson

CHILSON, a tything, in the parish of Charlbury, union of Chipping-Norton, hundred of Chadlington, county of Oxford, 5¼ miles (S. by W.) from ChippingNorton; containing, with the adjacent tything of Pudlicott, 287 inhabitants.

Chilswell

CHILSWELL, a liberty, in the parish of Cumner, union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks, 5 miles (N. by W.) from Abingdon; containing 12 inhabitants. Here was formerly a chapel.

Chiltern, county of Wilts.—See Chittern.

CHILTERN, county of Wilts.—See Chittern.

Chilthorne-Domer (St. Mary)

CHILTHORNE-DOMER (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Stone, W. division of Somerset, 3 miles (N. W.) from Yeovil; containing 291 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 1395 acres. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 1.; net income, £235; patron, the Rev. John Bayly. The glebe contains 16 acres of land, with a glebe-house.

Chiltington, East

CHILTINGTON, EAST, a village, in the parish of Westmeston, union of Chailey, hundred of Street, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 5 miles (N. W. by N.) from Lewes; containing 271 inhabitants. Here is a chapel of ease, a neat edifice in the later English style of architecture.

Chiltington, West

CHILTINGTON, WEST, a parish, in the union of Thakeham, partly in the hundred of East Easwrith, rape of Bramber, but chiefly in that of West Easwrith, rape of Arundel, county of Sussex, 9 miles (E. S. E.) from Petworth; containing 747 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 3444 acres, of which 2817 are arable; a portion towards the South Downs is uninclosed common. The surface is generally flat, but is intersected by a ridge of considerable elevation, extending for nearly half a mile, and commanding good views. The soil near the downs is sandy, resting on a substratum of ironstone: on the steep banks which overhang the roads, are found circular nodules of blue limestone imbedded in clay; and in the lower parts are some pits of Sussex marble of fine quality. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 10½., and in the patronage of the Earl of Abergavenny: the tithes have been commuted for £770, and the glebe comprises 12 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is a handsome structure, chiefly in the early English style, with later additions; it has a spire rising from between the nave and chancel, and a highly-enriched Norman arch at the north entrance. A school was founded in 1634, by William Smyth, who endowed it with land now producing £47 per annum.

Chilton (All Saints)

CHILTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Wantage, hundred of Compton, county of Berks, 3¼ miles (N.) from East Ilsley; containing 309 inhabitants, and comprising 1374a. 2r. 36p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 8. 4., and in the gift of the family of Heneage; net income, £400.

Chilton (St. Mary)

CHILTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Thame, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Thame; containing, with the hamlet of Easington, 364 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £67; patron and impropriator, Charles Spencer Ricketts, Esq. The church contains some fine monuments to the Croke family, of whom Sir George Croke, Knt., the celebrated lawyer, famous for his determined opposition to the tax of ship-money, in the reign of Charles I., was born and lies buried here. Nicholas Almond, in 1628, gave property now producing £26. 16. per annum, for distribution among the poor; and there is a small fund for apprenticing children.

Chilton

CHILTON, a township, in the ecclesiastical district of Ferry-Hill, parish of Merrington, union of Sedgefield, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 9 miles (S. by E.) from Durham; containing 189 inhabitants. The village of Great Chilton is situated about a mile to the northeast of Rushyford, and occupies a hilly region: it formed part of the forfeitures of William de la Pole, Earl of Suffolk, in 1388. There is a branch of the Clarence railway from the Durham branch, about three furlongs in length. The tithes have been commuted for £166. 19. payable to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners, and £68 to the vicar of the parish.

Chilton

CHILTON, a parish, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Babergh, W. division of Suffolk, 1½ mile (N. E. by E.) from Sudbury; containing 98 inhabitants. It comprises 979a. 1r. 8p. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 5½., and in the gift of the family of Windham: the tithes have been commuted for £280, of which £80 belong to the rector of Great Waldingfield; and there are nearly 26 acres of glebe.

Chilton, or Chipley

CHILTON, or Chipley, a hamlet, in the parish of Clare, union and hundred of Risbridge, W. division of Suffolk, 1 mile (W. by N.) from Clare; containing 150 inhabitants. A small priory of Augustine canons, dedicated to the Blessed Virgin Mary, was founded here; but the income not exceeding £10 per annum, and the buildings becoming dilapidated, it was given, in 1468, to the Dean and Chapter of the College of Stoke: the remains have been converted into a dwelling-house. There was also a chapel.

Chilton-Candover, county of Southampton.—See Candover, Chilton.

CHILTON-CANDOVER, county of Southampton. —See Candover, Chilton.

Chilton-Cantilo (St. James)

CHILTON-CANTILO (St. James), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, forming a detached portion of the hundred of Houndsborough, Barwick, and Coker, but locally in that of Horethorne, E. division of Somerset, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Yeovil; containing, with the chapelry of Nether Adbeer, 134 inhabitants. It comprises 616 acres, and is washed on its western boundary by the river Yeo. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 11. 5½.; net income, £260; patrons, the Goodford family.

Chilton-Foliatt (St. Mary)

CHILTON-FOLIATT (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hungerford, partly in the hundred of Kintbury-Eagle, county of Berks, but chiefly in the hundred of Kinwardstone, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of Wilts, 2¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Hungerford; containing, with the hamlet of Leverton, in Berks, 727 inhabitants. The parish derives its name from the river Chilt, a small stream by which it is intersected. Here is the residence of Lieut.-Col. Popham, which is remarkable for its antiquity and the elegance of its style, and has attached a spacious chapel. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 8. 9.; net income, £994; patron, Lieut.-Col. Popham. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In 1770, Roger and Elizabeth Ipanswick founded a school, with an endowment now producing £20 per annum.

Chilton-Trinity (Holy Trinity)

CHILTON-TRINITY (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Bridgwater, hundred of North Petherton, W. division of Somerset, 1½ mile (N. by W.) from Bridgwater; containing 74 inhabitants. This place is of great antiquity, and formerly gave name to a hundred, designated Chilton-Trinitatis. The navigable river Parret flows on the eastern side. The neighbourhood contains a great quantity of coal, lying beneath a stony stratum here called wark, on which, when split, impressions of fern and other plants are visible; much of the coal is tinged with sulphur, and in one mine a considerable quantity of lead-ore has been found adhering to it. The living is a discharged rectory, united to the vicarage of Bridgwater, and valued in the king's books at £7. 0. 2½.; the tithes of the parish, exclusive of the hamlets of Idstock and Beer, have been commuted for £193. 10. 6., and the glebe contains upwards of 5½ acres. The church is a neat structure, covered with lead, with a tower rebuilt in 1728.

Chilton-upon-Poldon

CHILTON-upon-Poldon, a chapelry, in the parish of Moorlinch, union of Bridgwater, hundred of Whitley, W. division of Somerset, 5¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Bridgwater; containing 425 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Edington annexed; net income, £120; patron and impropriator, the Rev. R. J. Luscombe. The great tithes of Chilton have been commuted for £80, and the vicarial for £78.

Chilvers-Coton (All Saints)

CHILVERS-COTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Nuneaton, Atherstone division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, ¾ of a mile (S. W.) from Nuneaton; containing, with the hamlet of Griff, 2508 inhabitants. In the reign of Henry II., Ralph de Sudley founded an Augustine priory at Erdbury, in this parish, in honour of the Blessed Virgin Mary, the revenue of which, at the Dissolution, was £122. 8. 6. The site was granted, in the reign of Elizabeth, to Sir Edmund Anderson, who destroyed the monastic buildings, and with the materials erected a spacious quadrangular mansion, which, in 1586, he exchanged with John Newdegate, of Harefield, in the county of Middlesex, for the manor of Harefield. The ancient house was re-modelled by the late Sir Roger Newdegate, in the later style of English architecture; the apartments are spacious and richly ornamented, and the park is pleasingly varied. The present possessor is Charles Newdegate Newdegate, Esq., who also owns Harefield. The parish comprises by measurement 4180 acres. The manufacture of ribbons is carried on extensively; and there are some coalworks in the parish, which is intersected by the Coventry canal, the rateable annual value of the coal-works being £798, and of the canal property £1022. The river Anker bounds the parish on the east, and it is crossed by the road from Nuneaton to Coventry. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £106. The church has been recently enlarged. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and two national schools are supported by funds given by the late Sir Roger Newdegate. Adjoining the precincts of the park is an ancient residence of the Knights Templars, granted to them by Ralph de Sudley.

Chilwell

CHILWELL, a hamlet, in the parish of Attenborough, union of Shardlow, S. division of the wapentake of Broxtow, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 4¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Nottingham; containing 772 inhabitants. The manor was anciently divided; in Domesday book it is called East and West Chilwell, and the parts do not appear to have been united until the reign of Elizabeth. In the hamlet are 1475 acres, including the portion covered by the Trent (which divides it into two unequal parts) and by its back-water, the Holme-Pit, which is partly in Chilwell and partly in the parish of Clifton. The soil is mostly of a superior quality, consisting of darkish-red marl, clayey loam, and gravelly loam, with a small quantity of black peat; the land is divided into arable, pasture, and nursery-grounds, but of late years the pasture and meadow have considerably increased. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the manufacture of stockings and lace, the latter being of recent introduction. The Midland railway passes through the parish, and has absorbed a great portion of the former traffic through the village, which stands on the old coachroad between Nottingham and Birmingham. There are, a place of worship for Methodists, a Sunday school supported by subscription, and two endowed almshouses.

Chilworth

CHILWORTH, a hamlet, in the parish of Great Milton, union of Thame, hundred of Bullington, county of Oxford, 3½ miles (W. N. W.) from Tetsworth; containing 93 inhabitants.

Chilworth

CHILWORTH, a parish, in the union of South Stoneham, hundred of Mainsbridge, Southampton and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 5 miles (S. E. by E.) from Romsey; containing 177 inhabitants. It is pleasantly situated, and comprises about 1200 acres, of which 200 are wood and meadow, and the rest chiefly arable; the soil is peculiarly favourable to the growth of oak. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £53; patron and impropriator, John Fleming, Esq. The church is a neat and beautiful edifice, built a few years since, by the late patron, P. Serle, Esq.

Chilworth, Surrey.—See Martha (St.).

CHILWORTH, Surrey.—See Martha (St.).

Chimnell

CHIMNELL, a township, in the parish of Whitchurch, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 1¾ mile (N. N. E.) from Whitchurch; containing 16 inhabitants.

Chimney

CHIMNEY, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of Bampton, union of Witney, county of Oxford, 6¼ miles (S. by W.) from Witney; containing 36 inhabitants. The river Isis flows past the village. An ancient chapel here was taken down in 1758.

Chineham

CHINEHAM, a tything, in the parish of MonksSherborne, union and hundred of Basingstoke, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 1½ mile (N. N. E.) from Basingstoke; containing 34 inhabitants.

Chingford (All Saints)

CHINGFORD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Epping, hundred of Waltham, S. division of Essex, 9½ miles (N. N. E.) from London; containing 971 inhabitants. This parish lies on the borders of Epping Forest, in which is a house called Queen Elizabeth's Lodge, where the courts under the Forest laws are held. It is separated on the west from the parish of Edmonton, in the county of Middlesex, by the river Lea; and comprises 2459 acres of land, whereof 1505 are pasture and meadow, 462 arable, and 492 woodland, of which last 142 are inclosed. The surface is diversified, rising in some parts to a considerable elevation, and commanding richly varied views; and from the situation of Chingford on the borders of the Forest, and the number of handsome mansions in its vicinity, it abounds with picturesque scenery. The name appears to have been derived from a ford over the river Lea, called the King's Ford; and the principal manor, which belonged to Edward the Confessor, was given by that sovereign to the Cathedral of St. Paul, London, from which it was separated at the Reformation. In the manor-house, now the residence of the Rev. R. B. Heathcote, is the oak table on which James I. is said to have knighted the sirloin of beef on his return from hunting; also an oak panel, supposed to have belonged to the coach in which Queen Elizabeth rode to return thanks after the defeat of the Spanish Armada. A pleasure-fair is held on Whit-Monday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 5. 5.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Mr. Heathcote, whose tithes have been commuted for £560, and whose glebe comprises 18 acres. The old church, beautifully situated, is a small ancient building of flint and stone, with a low tower, and in the later English style. In a corner are deposited the remains of Mr. and Mrs. Ramsden, who gave the pulpit, a very handsome one, and were buried about 1590: he was an officer in the household of Queen Elizabeth, and left bequests to this and several adjoining parishes. Sir John Sylvester, recorder of the city of London, and the late Col. Cooke, of the Bengal army, with his lady, are interred here; and there are several very old tablets. A new parish church was lately erected.