Cotton - Coupland

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

700-702

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'Cotton - Coupland ', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 700-702. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50899 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Cotton

COTTON, a township, in the parish of Sandbach, union of Congleton, hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 2¾ miles (E. by N.) from Middlewich; containing 101 inhabitants. It lies about a mile west of the road from Brereton to Knutsford, and comprises 323 acres, of a sandy soil. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £25. 5.

Cotton

COTTON, a township, in the parish and union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of the county of Salop; containing 439 inhabitants.

Cotton

COTTON, a township, in the parish of Alveton, union of Cheadle, S. division of the hundred of Totmonslow, N. division of the county of Stafford, 5¼ miles (N. E.) from Cheadle; containing 519 inhabitants. It includes the hamlets of Upper and Lower Cotton, and comprises 2272 acres of land. Here is abundance of excellent limestone, of which extensive quarries are worked by the Trent and Mersey Canal Company. At Lower Cotton is a chapel dedicated to St. John the Baptist, built in 1795, at the expense of the late Thomas Gilbert, Esq., who partly endowed it, and left the payment of the repairs a charge upon his property. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £44; patron, Thomas Gilbert, Esq.; impropriator, John Bill, Esq.

Cotton (St. Andrew)

COTTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Hartismere, W. division of Suffolk, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Stow-Market; containing 545 inhabitants. It comprises 1921 acres, of which 58 are common or waste; the surface is in general flat, and the soil heavy. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 10. 2½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Peter Eade: the tithes have been commuted for £480, and the glebe consists of 18½ acres, with a glebe-house, much improved by the present incumbent. The church is a handsome structure in the decorated style, with an embattled tower, and a fine south porch; the nave is lighted by clerestory windows. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Cotton, county of York.—See Cottam.

COTTON, county of York.—See Cottam.

Cotton, or Coulton

COTTON, or Coulton, a township, in the parish of Hovingham, union of Helmsley, wapentake of Ryedale, N. riding of York, 8 miles (S. by E.) from Helmsley; containing 158 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 990 acres of land; the village is situated to the east of the high road from Helmsley to Easingwould. There was anciently a chapel, but no traces of it now remain.

Cotton, Abbots

COTTON, ABBOTS, a township, in the parish of Christleton, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 4 miles (E. by N.) from Chester; containing 15 inhabitants. The manor of this place, anciently called Cotes, was given by the baron of Malpas, about 1093, to the convent of St. Werburgh. Some time after the Dissolution it was the property of the Smiths of the Hough, from whom it passed to various families. The township comprises 299 acres, of a clayey soil.

Cotton, Edmunds

COTTON, EDMUNDS, a township, in the parish of Christleton, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¼ miles (E. by S.) from Chester; containing 77 inhabitants. This place derives its name from Edmund de Cotton, whose ancestor held the manor in the reign of Henry III.: it came by a female heir of the family to William Venables, baron of Kinderton; was afterwards possessed by Lord Vernon, and the Brocks; and is now the property of the Marquess of Westminster. The township comprises 576 acres, the soil of which is clay, of a strong quality.

Cotton-End

COTTON-END, a hamlet, in the township of Eastcotts, parish of Cardington, hundred of Wixamtree, union and county of Bedford; containing 508 inhabitants.

Cotton-Far

COTTON-FAR, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Hardingstone, hundred of Wymersley, S. division of the county of Northampton, ½ a mile (S.) from Northampton; containing 279 inhabitants. An hospital here, dedicated to St. Leonard, for a master and leprous brethren and sisters, is stated to have been founded by William the Conqueror, and was under the superintendence of the mayor and burgesses of Northampton. Its revenue, in the 26th of Henry VIII., was estimated at £12. 6. 8.

Coughall, Chester.—See Caughall.

COUGHALL, Chester.—See Caughall.

Coughton (St. Peter)

COUGHTON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Alcester, Alcester division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Alcester; containing, with the hamlet of Sambourn, 955 inhabitants. It lies in the western part of the county, on the border of Worcestershire, which bounds it on the west; and comprises 4079 acres: the river Arrow flows from north to south, and roads from Birmingham and Bromsgrove to Alcester unite here. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 10. 7½.; net income, £161; patron and impropriator, Sir R. Throckmorton, Bart.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1773. The church has been repaired, and 158 additional sittings have been provided. There is a place of worship for Roman Catholics.

Couldsmouth, with Thompson's-Walls

COULDSMOUTH, with Thompson's-Walls, a township, in the parish of Kirk-Newton, union of Glendale, W. division of Glendale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 7½ miles (W. by N.) from Wooler; containing 38 inhabitants. The township comprises 1415 acres, of which 106 are common or waste; it is a mountainous district, extending to the boundary of Scotland, half a mile east of Yetholm. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £56. 17. 6., and the vicarial for £17. 17.

Coulsdon (St. John the Evangelist)

COULSDON (St. John the Evangelist), a parish, in the union of Croydon, First division of the hundred of Wallington, E. division of Surrey, 5 miles (S. by W.) from Croydon; containing 1041 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from London to Brighton, occupies an elevated position, and commands extensive and varied prospects; it comprises 3648 acres, exclusively of 550 of down land, and the Brighton railway passes a little to the west. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21. 16. 5½., and in the gift of the Archbishop of Canterbury: the tithes have been commuted for £858, and the glebe comprises 80¾ acres. The church, consisting of a nave, chancel, and aisles, with a tower and spire, has been thoroughly repaired and stuccoed, and is a very pleasing object. The Roman road out of Sussex passed through the parish: on Farthing Downs are dykes which seem to have been thrown up as a barricade, and on the high part of the downs are several small barrows.

Coulston, East (St. Thomas à Becket)

COULSTON, EAST (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Westbury and Whorwelsdown, hundred of Whorwelsdown, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions of Wilts, 8 miles (S. W.) from Devizes; containing 105 inhabitants. It comprises 864 acres, of which 276 are arable, 362 pasture, 168 down, and 9 woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 14. 2., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £175. 5., and the glebe consists of 31 acres, with a glebe-house.

Coulston, West

COULSTON, WEST, a tything, in the parish of Edington, union of Westbury and Whorwelsdown, hundred of Whorwelsdown, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions of Wilts; containing 144 inhabitants.

Coulton (Holy Trinity)

COULTON (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster; containing, with the chapelries of Haverthwaite and Rusland and the parochial chapelry of Finsthwaite, 1983 inhabitants. East Coulton is 5½ miles (N. N. E.), and West Coulton 5 (N. by E.), from Ulverston. This is one of the most modern parishes in Lancashire. Dr. Whitaker, by whom its origin was investigated, does not carry the parochial claim higher than to the year 1676, when it was probably severed from the parish of Hawkshead, in which it was previously a parochial chapelry. The parish is bounded on the east and south by the lake Windermere, and the river Leven, which issues from it; and on the west by the lake Coniston, and the river Crake, which, with the Leven, falls into Morecambe bay. The scenery is diversified by cheerful valleys, and rocky but moderate acclivities with hanging woods every where clothing their sides almost to their summits. The road from Ulverston to Kendal runs through the southern part of the parish, within the limits of which, at Backbarrow, extensive cotton-works are carried on; there are also iron-works, and works for the preparation of acid, and of gunpowder. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £84; patrons and appropriators, the Landowners, who pay their quotas for the minister's stipend. The church is a small plain building on the summit of a bleak hill; it consists of an embattled tower, a body with aisles, and a chancel. The chapels of Haverthwaite, Rusland, and Finsthwaite, form separate incumbencies. There is a meeting-house for the Society of Friends; and a parochial school is endowed with 50 acres of land given by Adam Sandys, Esq., besides a small bequest from Bartholomew Pennington.

Cound (St. Peter)

COUND (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Atcham, hundred of Condover, S. division of Salop, 6½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Shrewsbury; containing, with the chapelry of Cressage, 808 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Shrewsbury to Worcester, and washed on the north-east by the navigable river Severn. It abounds with richly diversified and wildly romantic scenery, and comprises by computation 5071 acres, of which 1543 belong to Cressage; the surface is slightly undulated. There are two quarries, from which is obtained a species of white freestone, lately used in rebuilding the chapel at Cressage. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £33, and in the patronage of Mrs. Frances Thursby: the tithes have been commuted for £619, and the glebe consists of 93 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is in the later English style, and contains monuments to the memory of the Cresset, Fowler, Dod, Wilde, and Langley families; the pulpit is a handsome specimen of ancient carved oak. Dr. Edward Cresset, Bishop of Llandaff, who had been rector of this parish, and possessed the principal property in it, lies buried here.

Coundon

COUNDON, a township, in the parish of St. Andrew Auckland, union of Auckland, N. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 2 miles (E. by S.) from Bishop-Auckland; containing 475 inhabitants, when the census was taken in 1831, but now increased to 990, in consequence of the extended working of its coal-mines. A church and parsonage-house have been erected, and the living has been endowed by the Bishop of Durham, and a district assigned comprising the townships of Coundon, Windleston, and Westerton: the Bishop presents.

Coundon

COUNDON, a hamlet, in the parish of the Holy Trinity, Coventry, union of Meriden, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick; containing 181 inhabitants, and comprising 1000 acres. An act for inclosing waste lands was passed in 1841. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £245.

Coundon-Grange

COUNDON-GRANGE, a township, in the parish of St. Andrew Auckland, union of Auckland, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 1½ mile (E. S. E.) from Bishop-Auckland; containing 313 inhabitants. This place is situated on an eminence, and commands an extensive view of Weardale: the river Gaunless passes on the west. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £93. 12.

Countess-Thorp

COUNTESS-THORP, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Blaby, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester; containing 815 inhabitants. It comprises 1200 acres of land, the soil of which is chiefly a strong clay. The manufacture of stockings is carried on. Here is a station of the railway between Rugby and Derby, situated 5½ miles south from the Leicester station. The chapel, dedicated to St. Andrew, was rebuilt in 1841, when 212 sittings were gained.

Counthorpe

COUNTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of BythamCastle, union of Bourne, wapentake of Beltisloe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 3½ miles (S.) from Corby; containing 85 inhabitants.

Countisbury (St. John the Baptist)

COUNTISBURY (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Barnstaple, hundred of Sherwell, Braunton and N. divisions of Devon, 15½ miles (E. by N.) from Ilfracombe; containing 185 inhabitants, and comprising 3227 acres, whereof about 2000 are common or waste. This parish, which is situated on the shore of the Bristol Channel, and near the junction of the counties of Devon and Somerset, is bounded for some miles on the south and west by the small, rapid, river Lyn. The spring tides here rise to the height of 30 feet. The scenery is of bold and rugged character, softened occasionally by woodland and pastures. Stone of good quality is abundant, and is quarried for the use of the immediate neighbourhood. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to that of Linton: the tithes have been commuted for £105, and the glebe comprises 14 acres.

Coupe and Lenches, with Newhall-hey, and Hall-Carr

COUPE and LENCHES, with Newhall-hey, and Hall-Carr, a township, in the parish of Bury, union of Haslingden, Higher division of the hundred of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 4¼ miles (S. S. E.) from Haslingden; containing 1716 inhabitants. These places comprise 1545 acres, of which 230 are common or waste; they lie on the banks of the Irwell, and on the confines of the hundred of Salford. The inhabitants are actively engaged in the cotton and woollen manufactures. Coupe Law is a bold eminence commanding an extensive view. Part of the township is in the ecclesiastical district of Rawtenstall. The tithes have been commuted for two rent-charges of £2. 12. 6. each, payable to the rectors of Bury and Prestwich-cum-Oldham.

Coupland

COUPLAND, a township, in the parish of KirkNewton, union of Glendale, W. division of Glendale ward, county of Northumberland, 4½ miles (N. W.) from Wooler; containing 109 inhabitants. The township is bounded on the east by the river Till, and on the south-west by the Glen, and comprises about 800 acres, mostly arable land, with 70 acres of plantation; the surface is level, and the soil of a light gravelly quality. Coupland Castle was enlarged in 1820, from a peelhouse, of which the walls have been preserved. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £106. 10., and the vicarial for £40. 10.



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