Cumberworth - Cwmyoy

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

751-755

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'Cumberworth - Cwmyoy', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 751-755. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50911 Date accessed: 17 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Cumberworth (St. Helen)

CUMBERWORTH (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Spilsby, Marsh division of the hundred of Calceworth, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4¼ miles (S. E. by E.) from Alford; containing 183 inhabitants, and comprising 1228a. 31p. The living is a discharged rectory, united in 1733 to the rectory of Anderby, and valued in the king's books at £10. 10. 2½. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, in 1819; the glebe comprises 215 acres. The church was rebuilt at the expense of the incumbent, the Rev. John Lodge, and opened for divine service in 1839; it is a handsome structure in the decorated English style. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Cumberworth

CUMBERWORTH, a chapelry, partly in the parish of High Hoyland, and partly in that of Silkstone, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 8 miles (W.) from Barnsley; containing 1867 inhabitants. This chapelry, which is divided into Upper and Lower, comprises 2360 acres, principally the property of T. Wentworth Beaumont, Esq.: the population is chiefly agricultural, but partly employed in the woollen and fancy manufactures. The villages of Upper and Lower Cumberworth are both of considerable antiquity, and in the former is the chapel of St. Nicholas, an ancient building situated on a high hill. The living is a donative, in the patronage of Mr. Beaumont. The tithes, which were commuted for 40 acres of land in 1800, at the inclosure of the commons, originally belonged to the ancestors of the patron, the Wentworths of Bretton Park, who were lords of the manor, and obtained a grant of the donative in consideration of their endowing the living with the tithes of the township. They afterwards augmented the benefice by inclosing 34 acres of land from the waste.

Cumberworth-Half

CUMBERWORTH-HALF, a township, partly in the parish of Emley, Lower division of Agbrigg wapentake, and partly in the parish of Kirk-Burton, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of Agbrigg wapentake, W. riding of York; containing 1480 inhabitants. The township includes part of the hamlets of Skelmanthorpe and Scissett, and comprises 800 acres.

Cumdevock

CUMDEVOCK, a township, in the parish of Dalston, union of Carlisle, Cumberland ward, and E. division of the county of Cumberland, 6 miles (S. S. W.) from Carlisle; containing 361 inhabitants.

Cummersdale

CUMMERSDALE, a township, in the parish of St. Mary, liberty and union of Carlisle, E. division of Cumberland, 2¼ miles (S. by W.) from Carlisle; containing 620 inhabitants.

Cumner (St. Michael)

CUMNER (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks; comprising the tythings of Bradley, Chawley, Henwood, Hillend, Stroud, Swinford, and Whitley, the liberty of Chilswell, and the township of Cumner; and containing 1058 inhabitants, of whom 608 are in the township, 5¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Abingdon. This was one of the appendages to the abbey of Abingdon, whose abbots had a residence here called Cumner Hall, now in ruins, which is noted as the place of the murder of the Countess of Leicester by the direction of her husband, the favourite of Queen Elizabeth: many of the scenes of Sir Walter Scott's Kenilworth are connected with the locality. The parish comprises 6637a. 2r. 38p.; the surface is very elevated, and the greater portion consists of the hills of Cumner and Wytham, rising nearly 300 feet above the level of the river Thames, which bounds the parish for nearly three miles. The soil is various; in some parts clayey, in others sandy, alternated with stone brash. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £24. 17., and in the gift of the Earl of Abingdon: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments, in 1795 and 1814. The church is an ancient structure, containing some interesting monuments, among which are those of two abbots of Abingdon, and a monument to Anthony Foster, a retainer of the Earl of Leicester's, by whom the countess was murdered. A mineral spring here was formerly much frequented for its reputed virtues, but is now disused.

Cumrew

CUMREW, a parish, in the union of Brampton, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland, 7 miles (S. by E.) from Brampton; comprising the townships of Cumrew Inside and Outside, the former containing 112, and the latter 71, inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the river Gelt, and comprises 2694a. 2r. 10p., of which about 950 acres are arable, and the rest, with the exception of 30 acres of wood, high moorland pasture inclosed about 35 years ago. The soil on the level grounds is a good loamy earth; and in the western district, which is mountainous, there is good limestone. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £81; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The tithes have been commuted for £89. 13. 4., and the glebe comprises 17½ acres. There are several cairns, one of which, Carduneth, on the summit of a hill, is of immense size; and near the river are the ruins of a large castle formerly belonging to the Dacres.

Cumwhinton

CUMWHINTON, a township, in the parish of Wetheral, union of Carlisle, Cumberland ward, E. division of the county of Cumberland, 4 miles (S. E. by E.) from Carlisle; containing 339 inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Cumwhitton (St. Mary)

CUMWHITTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Brampton, Eskdale ward, E. division of Cumberland; comprising the townships of Cumwhitton, Moorthwaite, and Northsceugh; and containing 533 inhabitants, of whom 242 are in the township of Cumwhitton, 9 miles (E. S. E.) from Carlisle. The parish comprises 5400a. 2r. 29p., the whole of which is arable, with the exception of about 140 acres of meadow, the ground occupied by a few Scottish firs and larches, and the plantations on the banks of the Eden. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £102; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Carlisle. The church is in the Norman style, and consists of a nave, chancel, and north aisle; a tower was built in 1810, and the ancient lancet windows have been displaced for others of larger dimensions. On an eminence called "King Harry" is a Druidical temple, the stones of which, 90 in number, are placed in a circular position; and the lines of intrenchments may be traced on the common.

Cundall (St. Mary and All Saints)

CUNDALL (St. Mary and All Saints), a parish, comprising the townships of Cundall with Leckby, and Norton-le-Clay, in the wapentake of Hallikeld, and the township of Fawdington in that of Birdforth, N. riding of York; and containing 387 inhabitants, of whom 188 are in Cundall with Leckby, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Boroughbridge. The parish is on the banks of the river Swale, and comprises by computation 3480 acres, of which about 2120 are in Cundall with Leckby: the soil is gravelly; the scenery is pleasingly diversified with wood and water. The hamlet of Cundall is on the western side of the river, and about 5 miles distant from the Sessay station of the York and Newcastle railway. The hamlet of Leckby is about a mile north from Cundall. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Bishop of Ripon, with a net income recently augmented to £96: the church is an old and dilapidated building, fast falling into ruins. A small chapel of ease was erected in 1839, at Norton-le-Clay.

Cunsall

CUNSALL, a township, in the parish of Cheddleton, union of Cheadle, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 3¾ miles (N. N. W.) from Cheadle; containing 190 inhabitants. It contains 2122 acres, and has a small village. At Cunsall Wood the Caldon canal passes through a deep glen, in which are extensive limekilns.

Cunscough.—See Melling.

CUNSCOUGH.—See Melling.

Curbar

CURBAR, a township, in the parish and union of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby, 1½ mile (E. by S.) from Stoney-Middleton; containing 412 inhabitants. It is situated on the eastern bank of the river Derwent.

Curborough, with Elmhurst

CURBOROUGH, with Elmhurst, a township, in the parish of St. Chad, Lichfield, union of Lichfield, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford; containing 227 inhabitants. The two hamlets extend from one to two miles from Lichfield, and form a township of scattered houses, comprising about 2000 acres, of which 860 are in Elmhurst. Near Stitchbrook, in the township, is Christian Field, where tradition says 1000 British Christians were massacred.

Curbridge

CURBRIDGE, a hamlet, in the parish and union of Witney, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 2¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Witney; containing 387 inhabitants. It comprises 2907 acres, of which 1941 are arable and 955 pasture. The tithes have been commuted for £685, and there is a glebe of 124½ acres. Six almshouses situated here are endowed with £110 per annum.

Curdridge

CURDRIDGE, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Bishop's-Waltham, union of Droxford, Droxford and N. divisions of the county of Southampton; containing 397 inhabitants. A separate incumbency has been founded here, in the gift of the Rector.

Curdworth (St. Nicholas)

CURDWORTH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Aston, Birmingham division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 8 miles (N. E. by E.) from Birmingham; containing 693 inhabitants. This parish, which includes the hamlet of Minworth, is bounded on the south by the river Tame, and intersected by the road from Birmingham to Tamworth, and the old road from Coventry to Lichfield. It comprises by computation 3170 acres, of which 1620 are in the township of Curdworth, and 1550 in Minworth, into which districts the parish is divided by a portion of Sutton-Coldfield intervening between them. The surface is generally level, and the soil chiefly suited to the growth of turnips and barley; around the village and towards the river are rich meadow and pasture grounds. The Birmingham and Fazeley canal passes through the parish, and the Birmingham and Derby railway proceeds for about half a mile through Minworth. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the patronage of the Rev. W. Wakefield, the present incumbent, and others; net income, £289; impropriators, the Rev. W. Wakefield, and C. B. Adderley, Esq. The tithes (with the exception of those for the manor of Dunton, about 500 acres, which still pays great and small tithes to the vicar of Curdworth) were commuted for land under an inclosure act passed in the year 1791. The church is an ancient structure, in the later English style, with a tower; a noble Saxon arch separates the chancel from the body of the edifice: Dr. Sacheverel was married in this church. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans, and at Minworth is one for Independents. A battle was fought here between the parliamentarians and Charles I.

Curland (All Saints)

CURLAND (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset, 5¾ miles (S. E. by E.) from Taunton; containing 228 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the rectory of Curry-Mallet: the tithes have been commuted for £84, and the glebe contains 12 acres. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Curry, East, and Curry-Load

CURRY, EAST, and CURRY-LOAD, tythings, in the parish of Stoke St. Gregory, union of Taunton, hundred of North Curry, W. division of Somerset; containing respectively 686 and 184 inhabitants.

Curry-Mallet (All Saints)

CURRY-MALLET (All Saints), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Langport, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset, 6 miles (N. N. W.) from Ilminster; containing 630 inhabitants. The manor, in the time of Edward II., belonged to Hugh Poyntz, to whom that monarch granted a weekly market, and a fair on the eve, day, and morrow of the festival of All Saints; and who, in the 18th of that reign, was summoned to parliament by the title of Lord Poyntz, of Curry-Mallet. In the second year of Edward III. this place was annexed to the duchy of Cornwall, by the same act of parliament which vested the duchy in the eldest son of the king, and it has ever since continued to form a part of it. The parish abounds with lias stone, which is extensively quarried for lime, and for building; and the Chard canal passes through. The living is a rectory, with that of Curland annexed, valued in the king's books at £24. 1. 3., and in the patronage of the Crown, in right of the duchy of Cornwall; net income, £392. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style.

Curry, North (St. Peter and St. Paul)

CURRY, NORTH (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of North Curry, W. division of Somerset, 7 miles (E. by N.) from Taunton; comprising the tythings of North Curry, Knapp, Lillesdon, and Wrantage; and containing 2028 inhabitants, of whom 950 are in the tything of North Curry. This place appears to have been known to the Romans, an urn containing a quantity of silver coins of that people having been discovered in 1748: it was subsequently held by the Saxon kings, and retained in demesne by the Conqueror. King John granted it a market, which was held on Wednesday, but has been long discontinued. The parish comprises by admeasurement 5500 acres, of which about 1600 are arable, 90 woodland, and the rest pasture; the navigable river Tone passes in the vicinity. Newport, in the parish, anciently possessed the privileges and officers of a corporate town, and is still called a borough; it had also a chapel. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of West Hatch annexed, in the patronage of the Dean and Chapter of Wells, valued in the king's books at £21; impropriator, C. Holcombe Dare, Esq. The great tithes have been commuted for £650, and the vicarial for £220; the glebe consists of 2½ acres, with a glebe-house. There are places of worship for Particular Baptists and Wesleyans.

Curry-Rivell (St. Andrew)

CURRY-RIVELL (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Langport, hundred of Abdick and Bulstone, W. division of Somerset, 2 miles (W. S. W.) from Langport; comprising the tythings of Hambridge and Portfield, part of those of Burton-Pynsent and Week, the entire hamlet of Langport-Westover, and Westmoor, an extra-parochial place; the whole containing 1660 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the river Parret, and intersected by the road from Barnstaple to London; it comprises 4001 acres by measurement, and contains several quarries of blue limestone and white lias, in which bivalve shells of different sorts are frequently found. Fairs for cattle and sheep are held on the last Wednesday in February, the Monday next after Lammas, and the 5th of August. The living is a vicarage, with the chapelry of Weston, endowed with the rectorial tithes of the latter, and valued in the king's books at £13. 16. 0½.; patron and impropriator, W. Speke, Esq. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £310, and the impropriate for £200; the glebe comprises only the site and gardens of the ancient vicarage-house. The church is an old edifice in the early English style. At Westport is a separate incumbency, in the gift of R. T. Combe, Esq.

Cury (St. Ninian)

CURY (St. Ninian), a parish, in the union of Helston, W. division of Kerrier hundred and of Cornwall, 4¾ miles (S. S. E.) from Helston; containing 541 inhabitants. It is situated on the shore of Mount's bay. The old living is a vicarage, annexed, with the livings of Germoe and Gunwalloe, to the vicarage of Breage: the great tithes have been commuted for £279, and the vicarial for £190. A perpetual curacy has been lately instituted, which is in the gift of the Rev. Canon Rogers, and includes the parishes of Cury and Gunwalloe. The church has a fine Norman arch over the south door. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In a field on the estate of Trevessec was discovered, a few years since, an earthen vessel containing several hundred copper coins of various Roman emperors.

Cusop (St. Mary)

CUSOP (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hay, hundred of Ewyaslacy, county of Hereford, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from Hay; containing 223 inhabitants. On the west and south the parish is bounded by a portion of Wales, the river Wye separating it in the former, and the river Dulas in the latter, direction. It comprises 2294 acres, of which 900 are common or waste; and is intersected by the road from Hereford to Hay. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 19. 7., and in the gift of the Earl of Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £210.

Custhorpe

CUSTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of WestAcre, union and hundred of Freebridge-Lynn, S. division of the hundred of Grenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 4¼ miles (N. W.) from Swaffham. Here are the ruins of a chapel, dedicated to St. Thomas à Becket, and supposed to have been founded by the monks of West-Acre priory, who received permission to hold a fair on the 7th of July: connected with it was a house, the residence of a custos and one or two monks.

Cutcombe (St. John)

CUTCOMBE (St. John), a parish, in the union of Williton, hundred of Carhampton, W. division of Somerset, 5¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Dunster, and on the road from Minehead to Exeter; containing 843 inhabitants. The parish comprises 7231 acres, of which 1852 are common or waste. The surface is strikingly diversified, rising in some parts into hills of mountainous elevation; and on the summit of Dunkery, one of the highest mountains in the western counties, and 1696 feet above the level of the sea, are the remains of several large hearths belonging to the beacons formerly erected to alarm the country in times of civil discord or foreign invasion. Limestone is extensively quarried for building and for burning into lime; and iron-ore, which is wrought in the adjoining parish, is supposed also to exist here. Fairs are held at Wheddon Cross on the 22nd, and at Luckwall Bridge on the 29th, of September. The living is a vicarage, endowed with part of the rectorial tithes, with the living of Luxborough annexed, and valued in the king's books at £14. 0. 7½.; it is in the patronage of the Crown. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £114. 14. 6., and the vicarial for £295; the glebe comprises about 1¼ acre. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A parochial school has an endowment of £35 per annum, arising from a bequest by Richard Elsworth, in 1729; and commodious schoolrooms, with a residence for the master and mistress, have been erected.

Cutsdean

CUTSDEAN, a chapelry, in the parish of Bredon, union of Winchcomb, Upper division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Blockley and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 7 miles (W. by S.) from Moreton-inthe-Marsh; containing 172 inhabitants. It comprises 1505a. 2r. 20p., and forms a detached portion of the parish, entirely surrounded by the county of Gloucester. The chapel is a small edifice containing 72 sittings, and stands about 14 miles east-south-east of the parish church. There is a place of worship for Baptists. A schoolmistress receives £7. 16. per annum, left by a member of the Tracey family.

Cutthorpe

CUTTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Brampton, union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 1½ mile (N. by E.) from Brampton village; containing 333 inhabitants. The hamlet is pleasantly situated on an eminence commanding fine views, and forms the north side of the parish. The road from Chesterfield to Chapel-en-leFrith passes through. The Hall, now a farmhouse, is a very ancient building.

Cuxham (Holy Rood)

CUXHAM (Holy Rood), a parish, in the union of Henley, hundred of Ewelme, county of Oxford, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Tetsworth; containing 222 inhabitants. It comprises 497 acres, of which 29 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 10. 5.; net income, £275; patrons, the Warden and Fellows of Merton College, Oxford. The tithes have been commuted for a rentcharge of £182; there is a good glebe-house, and the glebe contains nearly 24½ acres.

Cuxton (St. Michael)

CUXTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of North Aylesford, hundred of Shamwell, lathe of Aylesford, W. division of Kent, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from Rochester; containing 376 inhabitants. This parish comprises 1685 acres, of which 24 are common or waste, and 382 in wood: the river Medway, which has a wharf, passes within a quarter of a mile. The chalk-pits in the neighbourhood supply material for lime, and bricks are made to a limited extent. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 15. 5., and in the gift of the Bishop of Rochester: the tithes payable to the incumbent have been commuted for £380. 16., with a glebe of 28½ acres; a rentcharge of £32. 1. is paid to an impropriator, and one of £43. 5. to the Dean and Chapter of the Cathedral of Rochester.

Cuxwold (St. Nicholas)

CUXWOLD (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Caistor, wapentake of Bradley-Haverstoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 4 miles (E.) from Caistor; containing 62 inhabitants. It lies in the eastern part of the Wolds, and comprises 1670 acres of land. The road from Caistor to Great Grimsby passes on the north of the parish. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 6., and in the gift of H. Thorold, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £314. 17. 8., and the glebe comprises one acre and a quarter.

Cwmcarvan

CWMCARVAN, a parish, in the division of Trellick, hundred of Raglan, union and county of Monmouth, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Monmouth; containing 315 inhabitants. The parish is in the eastern part of the county, and contains 2908 acres, of which 939 are arable, 1498 pasture and meadow, and 394 woodland, the remainder consisting of roads and waste. The surface exhibits considerable varieties of elevation, some parts being boldly undulated, and others tolerably level; and from Cwmcarvan Hill the views are extensive and pleasing. A battle was fought here between Henry V. and Owen Glyndwr, the latter of whom was defeated. The living is annexed to the rectory of Mitchel-Troy: a rent-charge of £193 has been awarded as a commutation for the tithes, of which sum £20 are payable to the Bishop of Llandaff; and there is a glebe of 10 acres of land belonging to the rector. The church is an ancient structure, containing a pulpit which is elaborately carved.

Cwmyoy (St. Michael)

CWMYOY (St. Michael), a parish, in the union, division, and hundred of Abergavenny, county of Monmouth, 8 miles (N. by W.) from Abergavenny; containing, with the hamlets of Bwlch-Trewyn and Toothog, 718 inhabitants. Soon after the year 1108, a priory, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, and afterwards known by the name of Llanthony Abbey, was founded here by Hugh Lacy, for canons regular of the order of St. Augustine, many of whom, on account of the privations and hardships which they sustained in this place, removed, first to the episcopal palace at Hereford, and afterwards, in 1136, to Hyde, near Gloucester; leaving a few of their brethren at the original settlement at Llanthony, whose revenue, in the 26th of Henry VIII., was estimated at £100. The parish is about eight miles in length, and one mile in breadth, forming a rich and fertile valley, inclosed on both sides by lofty hills, which extend from one extremity of the parish to the other, and watered by a rivulet called the Honddu, along the bank of which is the road to Abergavenny. Nearly in the centre of this picturesque vale are the ruins of the abbey, consisting of the gateway, and part of the conventual building. The chapel of Llanthony, a plain edifice, is situated close to the ruins. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £68; patron, R. Powell, Esq. There are places of worship for Welsh Methodists and Baptists; and a school supported by subscription. At the extreme part of the Black mountain is a fine specimen of a Roman encampment.



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