Eastridge - Eaton-Constantine

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

132-136

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'Eastridge - Eaton-Constantine', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 132-136. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50937 Date accessed: 30 September 2014.


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Eastridge

EASTRIDGE, a tything, in the parish and hundred of Ramsbury, union of Hungerford, N. division of Wilts, 6 miles (N. W. by N.) from Hungerford; containing 173 inhabitants.

Eastrington (St. Michael)

EASTRINGTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Howden, in Howdenshire, E. riding of York, containing, with the townships of Bellasize, Gilberdike, Newport-Wallingfen, and Portingten with Cairl, 2076 inhabitants, of whom 405 are in the township of Eastrington, 3½ miles (E. N. E.) from Howden. The parish comprises by computation 8000 acres, of which about 7200 are arable, and the remainder meadow and pasture; the soil is for the most part a strong clay, the surface flat: corn is grown in great abundance, and numerous orchards produce, among other fruits, vast quantities of apples. At Newport is a large manufactory for bricks, draining-tiles, and chimney-pots. The Hull and Selby railway passes near the village, where is a station. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 9. 7., and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £202, and a vicaragehouse; impropriators, several landowners: the tithes were mostly commuted for land and money payments, under an inclosure act, in 1813. The church is an ancient edifice with a tower, and contains a monument of a Knight Templar. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In 1726, Joseph Hewley gave land now producing £28 a year, for the support of a school; and the poor have about £13 per annum arising from various bequests.

Eastrip

EASTRIP, an extra-parochial liberty, in the hundred of Bruton, E. division of Somerset, 2 miles from Bruton; containing 13 inhabitants, and comprising 594 acres of land.

Eastrop

EASTROP, a parish, in the union and hundred of Basingstoke, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, ½ a mile (N.) from Basingstoke; containing 94 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2, and in the gift of the Trustees of the late George Glover, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £85.

Eastrop

EASTROP, a tything, in the parish of Highworth, union of Highworth and Swindon, hundred of Highworth, Cricklade, and Staple, Swindon and N. divisions of Wilts; containing 544 inhabitants.

Eastry (St. Mary)

EASTRY (St. Mary), a parish, and the head of a union, partly in the hundred of Downhamford, but chiefly in that of Eastry, lathe of St. Augustine, E. division of Kent, 2¾ miles (S. W. by S.) from Sandwich; containing 1629 inhabitants. During the Saxon era this place appears to have been held in royal demesne. It received from Henry VI., in the 28th year of his reign, the grant of a market on Tuesday, and a fair on the festival of St. Matthew, Sept. 21st: the fair is at present held on the 2nd of October, and is principally for the sale of horses, sheep, and pigs. The village is situated on the road from Sandwich to Dovor, by Waldershare. The parish consists of 2715 acres, of which 32 are in wood. The living is a vicarage, with that of Worth annexed, valued in the king's books at £19. 12. 1.; patron, the Archbishop of Canterbury; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The great tithes have been commuted for £910, and the vicarial for £310; the impropriate glebe comprises 52a. 1r., and the vicarial 3 roods, attached to the vicarage-house. The church is a spacious and handsome edifice, consisting of a nave, aisles, and chancel, with a tower, and appears to have been built in the 12th century; it contains a tablet to the memory of Capt. John Harvey, who was mortally wounded in the action on the 1st of June, 1794, when holding the honourable post of second to Earl Howe, commander-in-chief. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. Six almshouses were built (and endowed with £2000 three per cent. consols.) by the late Wm. Fulke Greville, Esq., in 1834, on an eligible plot of land provided by voluntary contributions; and in the year following, Mr. Greville made a donation of £666. 13. in the same stock, directing the dividends to be divided between two aged inhabitants. Near the village is a commodious edifice formerly the house of industry for 16 united parishes; of late, spacious buildings have been added, and it is now the workhouse for the union of Eastry, which comprises 30 parishes, and contains a population of 23,928. Not far from the church is Eastry Court, an old mansion, in which Thomas à Becket, after his flight from Northampton in 1164, concealed himself for eight days before he embarked at Sandwich for France: it has the remains of a chapel. In 1792, on digging a cellar in a garden on the east side of the turnpike-road between Eastry Cross and Butsole, a burial-ground was discovered, probably of Roman origin, in which, on opening several graves, were found skeletons, fibulæ, beads, umbones of shields, and other relics, and in one a glass vessel. Henry de Eastry, first a monk, and then prior, of Christ-Church, Canterbury, and noted for his superior learning, was a native of the parish.

East-Ville

EAST-VILLE, a township, in the union of Spilsby, E. division of the soke of Bolingbroke, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 142 inhabitants. The township, with six others, was made such by act of parliament in 1812, on the occasion of a very extensive drainage of fen lands, and is not dependent on any parish. A church was built in 1840.

Eastwell (St. Mary)

EASTWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of East Ashford, hundred of Wye, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 3¼ miles (N.) from Ashford; containing 106 inhabitants. The parish comprises 894 acres, of which about 70 are arable, 370 meadow and pasture, 95 wood, and the remainder park land; the surface is elevated, and the soil clay, alternated with chalk, which latter prevails in the northern part. Eastwell Park, the seat of the Earl of Winchilsea, is a handsome residence, in the grounds of which is a spring, the source of a stream that flows into the river Stour. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 16. 8., and in the gift of the Earl: the tithes have been commuted for £189. 13., and the glebe comprises 23 acres. The church is an ancient structure, completely restored and beautified by the Earl of Winchilsea, in 1844; it contains a tomb in memory of Richard Plantagenet, natural son to King Richard III., and who, having fled hither after the battle of Bosworth, was protected by Sir Thomas Moyle, lord of the manor, at a small house erected by his permission, and died in 1550, at the age of eighty-one. The rectory-house was lately considerably improved by the incumbent.

Eastwell (St. Michael)

EASTWELL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3 miles (N. W.) from Waltham; containing 131 inhabitants. It is about three miles from the road between Grantham and Melton-Mowbray, and 3½ miles from the Nottingham and Grantham canal, which passes through the neighbouring parish of Harby. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 12. 1., and in the patronage of the Crown, with a net income of £372: the glebe consists of about 250 acres. Here is a Roman Catholic chapel.

Eastwick (St. Botolph)

EASTWICK (St. Botolph), a parish, in the union of Ware, hundred of Braughin, county of Hertford, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Sawbridgeworth; containing 173 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 8.; net income, £210; patrons, the Ward family.

Eastwood (St. Lawrence and All Saints)

EASTWOOD (St. Lawrence and all Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Rochford, S. division of Essex, 2 miles (S. W. by S.) from Rochford; containing 596 inhabitants. This parish, which derives its name from its relative situation to the neighbouring woods, is intersected by the road from London to Southend, and comprises 3202 acres, of which 175 are waste or common. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £219; impropriator, Robert Bristow, Esq., who has considerable property in the neighbourhood. The church is an ancient structure with a tower and spire, and consists of two aisles and a chancel, separated by massive pillars.

Eastwood (St. Mary)

EASTWOOD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Basford, S. division of the wapentake of Broxtow, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 9 miles (N. W. by W.) from Nottingham; containing 1621 inhabitants. It is on the road from Mansfield to Derby, and comprises 900a. 2r. 4p. The population is partly employed in the weaving of stockings, and in some mines of coal, for which facilities of conveyance are afforded by the Nottingham, Erewash, and Cromford canals, which pass through the parish. The village is pleasantly situated on an eminence, and about half a mile to the west of it is Langley Bridge over the river Erewash, erected in 1830, and which gives name to a large village partly in the county of Derby. A cattle-fair is held annually. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 1½.; net income, £360; patron, J. P. Plumptre, Esq.; incumbent, the Rev. H. Western Plumptre: the tithes were commuted for 166 acres of land in 1791. The church, rebuilt in 1760, is a neat edifice. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Eathorpe

EATHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Wappenbury, union of Warwick, Southam division of the hundred of Knightlow, S. division of Warwickshire, 5½ miles (N. N. W.) from Southam; containing 175 inhabitants, and comprising 516 acres of a fertile soil. The Roman Fosse-way crossed it from south to north, and the river Leam, after being joined here by the Watergall stream, encircles it on the north and west.

Eatington (St. Thomas à Becket)

EATINGTON (St. Thomas à Becket), a parish, in the union of Stratford-upon-Avon, Kington division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 6 miles (N.) from Shipston-on-Stour, containing 704 inhabitants. The parish is divided into Upper and Lower Eatington, the former of which contains the greater portion of the population. Sir William Dugdale observes of Lower Eatington, that it is "the only place in the county which glories in an uninterrupted succession of its owners for so long a tract of time, Henry de Ferrers (progenitor of the earls Ferrers), having possessed it from the Conquest, and his descendants in the male line ever since." Until the reign of Henry III. it was the principal seat of the family, but they afterwards fixed it at Shirley, in Derbyshire, and assumed their surname from that place. Eatington is situated on the roads from Stratford-on-Avon to Banbury and from Warwick to Stow, and comprises, exclusively of roads, 3441 acres, whereof 1088 are pasture, 2243 arable, and 110 woodland; the soil is clay of the blue lias formation, and the surface beautifully undulated and diversified, with the rounded swell peculiar to blue lias. There are quarries of blue limestone, which, though used, is of an inferior description, whether for roads or buildings; a bed of white limestone, lying underneath, and found near the surface in some places, is much better for both purposes, and is consequently more generally wrought.

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 0. 7½., and in the patronage of Evelyn John Shirley, Esq.; net income, about £150: impropriator, the Rev. C. Grave. 121½ acres of land were allotted in lieu of the vicarial tithes on the inclosure, in 1798; and 10 acres were more recently added, conveyed by the patron, and towards the purchase of which the Commissioners of Queen Anne's Bounty contributed: on this ground a glebe house and offices were erected by the patron. The church is a plain substantial edifice, built by the late Evelyn Shirley, Esq., at Upper Eatington, about the period of the inclosure: the ancient church, at Lower Eatington, now in ruins, was erected by an ancestor of the family; a part of it has been fitted up as a private chapel. The Baptists, Wesleyans, and Society of Friends have places of worship; and a national school is supported by Mr. and Mrs. Shirley. The Roman Fosse road passes for more than a mile and a half through the parish; and near it some Roman remains have been discovered.

Eaton

EATON, a township, in the parish of Appleton, union of Abingdon, hundred of Ock, county of Berks, 5¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from the town of Abingdon; containing 127 inhabitants.

Eaton

EATON, a township, in the parish of Eccleston, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 3¾ miles (S.) from Chester; containing 64 inhabitants. The manor was given by Leofric, Earl of Mercia, in the time of Edward the Confessor, to the monks of Coventry. In the reign of Henry III., Hamon de Pulford, being lord, settled half of it on his son, Richard, who assumed the name of Eaton, and his descendants appear to have been possessed of the whole manor, which, in the reign of Henry V., passed in marriage with the heiress of John Eaton to Ralph, second son of Sir Thomas Grosvenor, who continued the male line of that family, and was the ancestor of the present noble possessor. The township comprises 971 acres, of a clayey soil, and is situated on the river Dee, near which stands Eaton Hall, the princely residence of the Marquess of Westminster. This superb mansion, of which the prevailing style is the Gothic, is of modern erection, with the exception of the vaulted basement and a portion of the original edifice; it is of light-coloured stone, and has two fronts, each of which consists of a spacious centre of three stories, finished with octagonal turrets, buttresses, and pinnacles placed between large wings with similar ornaments. The entrance to the western front is under a lofty vaulted portico, leading by a magnificent flight of steps to the great hall; and on the eastern side is another noble flight of steps, terminating in three rich arches that form the middle of a beautiful vaulted cloister, which spreads along the whole centre and connects the wings with each other. The vast interior of the building is in correspondence with the architectural grandeur of its exterior: the dining, drawing, and other state rooms are of noble dimensions, and decorated and furnished in the most costly manner; the library is fitted up with elaborately carved oak, and abounds in ancient and valuable manuscripts. The entrance to the grand saloon is through the arches already mentioned; this sumptuous apartment looks down upon a terrace upwards of 350 feet in length, whence is seen one of the richest landscapes that the Dee presents in its course through the county. The plantations are extensive; and the grounds, laid out with exquisite taste, are enlivened by an artificial inlet of the Dee: the stables form a great quadrangle, and there are two lodges, in the Gothic style, with avenues of venerable trees, leading to the mansion.

Eaton

EATON, a township, in the parish of Tarporley, union of Nantwich, First division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 1½ mile (E. N. E.) from Tarporley, containing 525 inhabitants. This manor, which was granted by John Scott, Earl of Chester, to Hugh Fitton, was afterwards successively in the Greys, earls of Kent, and the Hintons, and appears to have been subsequently in the family of Done. The township lies east of the road from Tarporley to Warrington, and comprises 1251 acres, of a strong soil. The tithes of Eaton, with those of Utkinton and Rushton, have been commuted for £509. 5. Schools are partly supported by endowment.

Eaton

EATON, a township, in the parish of Astbury, union and hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 2 miles (N. N. E.) from Congleton; containing 535 inhabitants. This place is said to have had no manor, and no mention of one occurs in ancient records. It comprises 1167 acres, of a sandy and clayey soil; and lies on the west side of the river Dane, and on the road from Congleton to Macclesfield. A short distance from the village is Eaton Hall, long a seat of the Antrobus family.

Eaton

EATON, a township, in the parish of Davenham, union and hundred of Northwich, S. division of the county of Chester, 3 miles (S. by W.) from Northwich; containing 11 inhabitants. The manor, anciently Ayton, was at an early period in moieties between the family of Praers (succeeded by the Mainwarings) and that of Bulkeley. In the reign of Henry VIII. the latter sold their estate to the Breretons, who seem eventually to have possessed the whole manor, which afterwards passed by successive sales to the Lindseys and Cholmondeleys. The township lies east of the river Weaver, and comprises 401 acres, of a loamy and clayey soil. The tithes have been commuted for £5. 6. 8.

Eaton, Derbyshire.—See Alsop-le-Dale.

EATON, Derbyshire.—See Alsop-le-Dale.

Eaton

EATON, a township, in the parish and union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford; containing 59 inhabitants.

Eaton (St. Denis)

EATON (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 8 miles (N. N. E.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 404 inhabitants. It comprises 1719a. 3r. 29p., of which about 300 acres are pasture, and the rest arable, with the exception of 22 acres of woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 3., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £83; impropriators, C. M. Morley and J. Rogers, Esqrs. The tithes were commuted for land in 1769. The Wesleyans have a place of worship; and there are some small bequests for distribution among the poor.

Eaton, or Idletown (All Saints)

EATON, or Idletown (All Saints), a parish, in the union of East Retford, South-Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 2¼ miles (S.) from East Retford; containing 189 inhabitants. This place was of some importance prior to the Norman Conquest. The parish immediately adjoins the great north road, and comprises by admeasurement 1485 acres, whereof about 100 acres are woodland, chiefly of oak, and the remainder arable and pasture in nearly equal portions; the soil is generally a strong clay, and the surface undulated. The village is divided by the river Idle into two parts, connected by a bridge. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Archbishop of York, with a net income of £80: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1809. The church is a small, plain, ancient edifice, with a campanile turret.

Eaton

EATON, a township, in the parish of Stoke-upon-Tern, union of Market-Drayton, Drayton division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of the county of Salop, 6 miles (N. W.) from Newport; containing 127 inhabitants. It comprises 6201 acres, of which 73 are waste or common.

Eaton (St. Edith)

EATON (St. Edith), a parish, in the union of Church-Stretton, and within the liberty of the borough of Wenlock, S. division of Salop, 4¼ miles (S. E. by E.) from Church-Stretton; containing 579 inhabitants. This parish, which was anciently appendant to the abbey of Wenlock, comprises by measurement 6004 acres; the surface is hilly, and the soil heathy, affording chiefly rough pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Richard Sandford; impropriators, the family of Eaton, and others. The tithes have been commuted for £178. 10., and the glebe comprises 148 acres. The church is an ancient structure, in the decorated English style; the roof of the chancel is of oak, richly embellished.

Eaton, Bishop (St. Michael)

EATON, BISHOP (St. Michael), a parish, in the hundred of Webtree, union and county of Hereford, 6 miles (W.) from Hereford; containing 434 inhabitants. It comprises 2081a. 10p., of which 1192 acres are arable, 786 pasture, 62 woodland, and 40 common. The surface is undulated, and the scenery in many parts picturesque, embracing beautiful views of the river Wye, which runs through the parish; the soil is a red marl. Sugwas, an ancient palace of the bishops of Hereford, is situated here. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13; net income, £444; patron, the Bishop: the glebe contains nearly 35 acres, with a house. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans; and a school is supported by property bequeathed by the late Mr. Edward Goff, of London. The remains of a Roman encampment are still visible, on the right bank of the river.

Eaton, Bray (St. Mary)

EATON, BRAY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Luton, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford, 3½ miles (W. by S.) from Dunstable; containing 1097 inhabitants. The manor was given by King John to Ardulphus de Braci, and not long afterwards belonged to the Cantilupes, who built a castle in 1221, which the Chronicle of Dunstable represents as very injurious to that town. In 1273 it passed by a female heir to the family of Zouche; and it is supposed to have been forfeited by attainder, and to have been granted to Sir Reginald Bray. The parish lies on the south-west border of the county. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 16. 3.; net income, £189; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Eaton, Church (St. Edith)

EATON, CHURCH (St. Edith), a parish, in the union of Penkridge, hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 7 miles (S. W. by W.) from Stafford; containing 743 inhabitants. It comprises about 4000 acres, principally arable land; the soil is generally fertile, being a strong loam both in the meadows and uplands. The Liverpool and Birmingham canal passes through. The village, which is long, consists chiefly of one street of detached and well-built houses. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £14. 19. 9½., and in the patronage of the Earl Talbot: the tithes have been commuted for £750, and there are 90 acres of glebe. The church is an ancient structure, with a low tower supporting a spire of modern erection; the south side of the edifice, also, appears to have been rebuilt in later times, from the square form of its windows. A grammar school of unknown origin has from an early period possessed several houses and other buildings, with about 92 acres of land in Church and Wood Eaton, now producing £170 per annum; it is free to all the boys of the parish. The Gnosall and Church-Eaton charity estate consists of about 33 acres of land, let for £42. 11. 10. per annum, which is divided among the poor of those places. Mr. Henry Crocket, in 1780, gave £200, since invested in land producing about £20 per annum, also distributed in small sums to the necessitous.

Eaton-Constantine (St. Mary)

EATON-CONSTANTINE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Atcham, Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 5¼ miles (N. N. W.) from Wenlock; containing 294 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south-west by the Severn, and comprises 835a. 3r. 39p.; the surface rises gradually from the river towards the north, and the soil in the lower part is rich and fertile, but in the higher grounds of inferior quality. Coal is wrought to a small extent; and rough stone quarried for buildings and fences. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Duke of Cleveland: the rectorial tithes have been commuted for £128; the glebe comprises 35 acres. There is also a rent-charge of £48. 6. belonging to the vicar of Layton. The church is a neat structure in good repair.