Ellenhall - Ellough

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

158-161

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'Ellenhall - Ellough', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 158-161. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50944 Date accessed: 18 April 2014. Add to my bookshelf


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Ellenhall (St. Mary)

ELLENHALL (St. Mary), a parish, in the S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, union, and N. division of the county, of Stafford, 2¼ miles (S. by E.) from Eccleshall; containing 280 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 1765 acres. The village lies east of the high road from Eccleshall to Newport. The Hall belonged to the ancient family of the Noels, from whom descended the Noels of Hilcote, in this county, and the Noels of Ridlington, in Rutlandshire; it afterwards passed, with the manor, by marriage, to the Harcourts, and about forty years ago both became the property, by purchase, of the family of the Earl of Lichfield. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £91; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Lichfield.

Ellerbeck

ELLERBECK, a township, in the parish of Osmotherley, union of Northallerton, wapentake of Allertonshire, N. riding of York, 5½ miles (E. N. E.) from Northallerton; containing 81 inhabitants.

Ellerburn (St. Hilda)

ELLERBURN (St. Hilda), a parish, in Pickering lythe and union, N. riding of York, 3¼ miles (E. by N.) from Pickering; containing, with the township of Farmanby and chapelry of Wilton, 686 inhabitants. The soil is a red earth of various qualities, and the surface hills and valley, some of the former being of considerable size, and in a measure planted; the scenery is romantic and beautiful, up the dale. A corn-mill is propelled by a mountain stream. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 4. 9½.; net income, £146; patron, the Dean of York; impropriators, T. Mitchelson, Esq., and others. The church is an ancient edifice, the interior of which underwent a thorough renovation in 1800. At Wilton is a chapel of ease; and at Farmanby a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ellerby

ELLERBY, a township, in the parish of Swine, union of Skirlaugh, Middle division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 7¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Hull; containing 275 inhabitants. This place is called in Domesday book Alverdebi, and at a later period Heludby; the chief proprietors have been the families of St. Quintin and Dacre, and at present the lands are in various hands. The township includes the hamlets of Dowthorpe, Owbrough, Woodhall, and part of Longthorpe; and comprises by computation 2500 acres of land: the village, which is small, is on a gentle acclivity near Burton-Constable. In a pond at Horse Hill are often found quantities of small marine shells.

Ellerby

ELLERBY, a township, in the parish of Lythe, union of Whitby, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 7½ miles (W. N. W.) from Whitby; containing 78 inhabitants. This place was anciently written Elverdby, and in Domesday book Elwordebie. It was part of the great possessions of the barons Mauley, of Mulgrave; but the lands have been long parcelled out among various owners, and most of them now belong to the Marquess of Normanby. The township comprises 596 acres, of which 51 are waste land or common: the village is situated a little to the north of the road between Whitby and Guisborough. The tithes have been commuted for £105. 10., payable to the Archbishop of York.

Ellerington

ELLERINGTON, a quarter, in the parochial chapelry of Haydon, N. W. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 4¼ miles (W.) from Hexham; containing 337 inhabitants. This place is situated in the north-western extremity of Hexhamshire; and the Hexham and Haydon-Bridge road, and South Tyne river, run at a little distance to the north.

Ellerker

ELLERKER, a township and chapelry, in the parish of Brantingham, union of Beverley, wapentake of Howdenshire, E. riding of York, 1¼ mile (S. by W.) from South Cave; containing 373 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1920 acres of land, of a fertile soil, stretching southward to the river Humber. The chapel is chiefly of brick, and covered with tiles. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ellerton-Abbey

ELLERTON-ABBEY, a township, in the parish of Downholme, union of Richmond, wapentake of HangWest, N. riding of York, 7 miles (W. S. W.) from Richmond; containing 56 inhabitants. It is situated on the south side of Swaledale, and comprises 1490 acres, rising in bold scarrs and fells from the river. Here was a small priory of Cistercian nuns, thought to have been founded by Warnerius, dapifer to the Earl of Richmond, in the time of Henry II., and which at the Dissolution was valued at £15. 10. 6.

Ellerton-Priory (St. Mary)

ELLERTON-PRIORY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Howden, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 9 miles (N. N. W.) from Howden; containing 320 inhabitants. The scattered village of Ellerton lies on the east side of the vale of Derwent. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £110; late patron and impropriator, Sir C. B. Codrington. The church, which is in a dilapidated state, is part of the nave of the ancient structure, which joined a priory built by William Fitz-Piers, before 1212, for canons of the Semperingham order: this institution maintained 13 poor persons, and at the Dissolution its revenue was valued at £78. 0. 10. There are almshouses for 6 persons, founded by Sir Hugh Bethell, in 1610; also a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ellerton-upon-Swale

ELLERTON-UPON-SWALE, a township, in the parish of Catterick, union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-East, N. riding of York, 1¼ mile (E. by S.) from Catterick; containing 152 inhabitants. It is situated to the east of the river Swale, and comprises about 1300 acres of land, the property of the Earl of Tyrconnel, who is lord of the manor. Henry Jenkins, who lived to the extraordinary age of 169 years, was born here; he died on the 8th of December, 1670, at this place, and a monument with a suitable epitaph was erected to his memory in 1743, in the church of Boltonupon-Swale, where he was interred.

Ellesborough (St. Peter and St. Paul)

ELLESBOROUGH (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Aylesbury, county of Buckingham, 2½ miles (W. by S.) from Wendover; containing 708 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 9. 7.; net income, £285; patron, Sir R. G. Russell, Bart. Near the church, on a circular eminence, is an ancient fortification called Belinus' Castle, where tradition relates that Belin resided; above it is a high hill, still retaining the name of Belinesbury. There are almshouses for eight poor widowers and widows, endowed by Lady Isabella Dodd with land now let for a yearly rent of £63, and property in the funds producing a dividend of £34 per annum.

Ellesmere (St. Mary)

ELLESMERE (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, chiefly in the hundred of Pimhill, N. division of Salop, 16½ miles (N. N. W.) from Shrewsbury, and 178½ (N. W.) from London; containing, with a portion of the parish in Flintshire, 7080 inhabitants. This place derives its name from an adjoining lake or mere, which, being the largest of several in the neighbourhood, was distinguished by the appellation of Aelsmere, or the principal lake. It had at a very early period a strong castle, which in the reign of John was, with the manor, given in marriage with the natural daughter of that monarch to Llewelyn, Prince of North Wales; but from the importance of the place as a frontier town, the government of the castle was reserved in the crown, as a necessary defence to the marches, and, after the death of Llewelyn, it was wholly given up by his son to Henry III. The castle was alternately in the possession of the English and the Welsh, during the period of mutual hostilities which preceded the final subjugation of Wales. In the reign of Edward II., the custody of it was entrusted to Oliver Ingleham, who had been the firm adherent of that king during the insurrection of the Earl of Lancaster; and in the reign of Edward III. the castle and manor were given to Lord Eubule le Strange, from whose descendant they passed by marriage into the family of the Kynastons, of whom Sir Edward Kynaston, Knt., obtained from Queen Elizabeth the grant of a market and a fair.

The town, which is pleasantly situated, consists of several streets tolerably well paved; the houses are in general well built and of handsome appearance, and the inhabitants are amply supplied with water. On the elevated site of the castle, of which there are no remains, is a fine bowling-green commanding a pleasing view; where a festival called the meeting of the Ellesmere Club, is celebrated at Midsummer. The trade is chiefly in malt, which is sold to a very considerable extent, and in leather, for which there are several tanneries; and many of the labouring poor are employed in spinning flax and in the manufacture of stockings. The Ellesmere canal passes to the south of the town, and, with its several branches, affords a communication with the Severn, the Dee, and the Mersey, forming a line of navigation from Liverpool to Bristol, and opening a communication with North Wales. The market is on Tuesday, and is abundantly supplied with corn, for which it is in high repute; the fairs are on the Tuesday after February 2nd, the third Tuesday in April, Whit-Tuesday, August 26th, and November 14th, for horses, cattle, and sheep. This place formerly gave name to a hundred, which, with its dependencies, was annexed to the hundred of Pimhill in the 27th of Henry VIII.

The parish is bounded on one side by the river Dee, and comprises by measurement 24,745 acres, exclusively of the chapelry of Penley, in the county of Flint. The surface is richly varied; and within the parish are six lakes, varying in extent from 50 to 120 acres, the principal of which, bordered on one side by the town, and on the other by the beautiful grounds of Oakley Park, in which are some of the finest elm-trees in the country, is a fine expanse of limpid water. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £17. 18. 1½., and in the patronage of the Trustees of the Earl of Bridgewater, to whom, with others, the impropriation belongs: the great tithes have been commuted for £2591. 10., and the vicarial for £430. The church is an ancient cruciform structure, in the decorated English style, with a handsome embattled tower crowned by pinnacles; the east window, in the later style, is enriched with delicate tracery of elegant design: on the south side of the chancel is the sepulchral chapel of the Kynastons, the ceiling of which is elaborately groined. There are chapels at Penley, Duddleston, and Cockshut, in the patronage of the Vicar. The Independents and Primitive Methodists have places of worship. The union comprises 9 parishes or places in Salop, and a like number in the county of Flint; and contains, in the English portion, a population of 10,993. The town gives the title of Earl to the Egerton family.

Ellesmere-Port

ELLESMERE-PORT, a small town or port, in the township of Whitby, parish of Eastham, union, and Higher division of the hundred, of Wirrall, S. division of Cheshire, about 6 miles (N.) from Chester. This place owes its origin to the formation of a canal from Chester to the river Mersey here; though for some years after the opening of the navigation, the progress of the port was slow. At present, there are about 200 houses, many of them of neat aspect; a fine range of warehouses, erected on arches, with branches of the canal passing below; and a splendid floating-dock, containing upwards of 60,000 yards of water-space. A large dock, also, for coasters, was opened in September 1843; and other works have been formed, connected with boats and shipping. The canal itself was commenced towards the close of the last century; it was lately much improved from designs by Mr. William Cubitt, who also planned the recent dock improvements, and in 1843 the whole line, with the docks, quays, and warehouses, was leased by the proprietors to the Earl of Ellesmere. A neat church of stone has been just erected, by the contributions of the Grosvenor family, the Rev. Henry Raikes, and others; and schools, with a dwellinghouse for the teachers, have been also opened.

Ellingham (St. Mary)

ELLINGHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Clavering, E. division of Norfolk, 2¾ miles (N. E. by E.) from Bungay; containing 398 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Waveney, which is navigable from Yarmouth to Bungay. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the gift of Trustees: the tithes have been commuted for £339. 13., and the glebe comprises 91 acres. The church is in the early English style, with a square embattled tower.

Ellingham (St. Maurice)

ELLINGHAM (St. Maurice), a parish, partly in the union of Alnwick, and partly in that of Belford, S. division of Bambrough ward, N. division of Northumberland; containing 861 inhabitants, of whom 270 are in the township of Ellingham, 8½ miles (N.) from Alnwick. The manor, in Henry III.'s reign, was held of the king in capite by Ranulph de Guagy; it passed in 1286 to Roger de Clifford, and in 1378 was possessed by Sir Allan de Heton, who acquired in that year great honour at the siege of Berwick. When the Earl of Northumberland's estates were confiscated in 1461, this estate formed part of his forfeitures, and was given to the then governor of Ireland, the brother of Edward IV. The parish, which is near the coast of the North Sea, includes the townships of North and South Charlton, Chathill, Doxford, and Preston, and comprises about 13,970 acres; it abounds with coal and limestone. The seat of Sir Edward Haggerston, Bart., forms an interesting feature in the landscape: the village stands a little to the east of the great north road. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 5. 5.; net income, £538; patrons and impropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Durham. The church, which stands at a short distance from the village, was founded by Ranulph de Guagy, in the 12th century, and rebuilt a few years since. Attached to the mansion of Sir Edward, is a Roman Catholic chapel.

Ellingham (St. Mary)

ELLINGHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Ringwood, hundred of Fordingbridge, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2 miles (N. by W.) from Ringwood; containing 350 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Avon, and comprises by computation nearly 1400 acres: the soil is a gravelly sand, alternated with a brownish mould; the surface is generally flat. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 4. 9½.; net income, £159; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of Eton College. In the churchyard is a plain stone commemorating the execution of Alicia Lisle, in her old age, pursuant to a sentence passed by Judge Jeffreys, on a charge of harbouring known rebels in her mansion of Moyle's Court; which attaint was reversed at the Revolution.

Ellingham, Great (St. James)

ELLINGHAM, GREAT (St. James), a parish, in the union of Wayland, hundred of Shropham, W. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Attleburgh; containing 838 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2670a. 1r. 35p., of which 2135 acres are arable, and 477 pasture, meadow, and woodland. Ellingham Hall, an ancient mansion surrounded with a moat, is now a farmhouse. The village is irregularly built, and consists chiefly of scattered houses. The living is a discharged vicarage, annexed to the rectory of Little Ellingham, and valued in the king's books at £6. 5. 10.: the rector of Little Ellingham, the vicar of Carbrook, and others, are the impropriators; there is a glebe of about four acres. The church is a spacious structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire; the nave is lighted by clerestory windows, and in the chancel is a neat monument to the Colman family. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans. At the inclosure, in 1799, an allotment of 53 acres was awarded to the poor.

Ellingham, Little (St. Peter)

ELLINGHAM, LITTLE (St. Peter), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wayland, W. division of Norfolk, 4½ miles (N. W.) from Attleburgh; containing 250 inhabitants. At the time of the Conquest, this place, though now an inconsiderable village, is said to have been three miles long. The parish comprises 1540 acres, of which 1196 are arable, 287 pasture and meadow, and 20 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, with the vicarage of Great Ellingham annexed, valued in the king's books at £7. 1. 10½.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. Samuel Colby. The tithes have been commuted for £416, and the glebe comprises 46a. 1r. 13p., with a handsome parsonage-house, enlarged by the present rector. The church, chiefly in the early English style, consists of a nave and chancel, with a square embattled tower on the south side; the east window is embellished with stained and painted glass, presented by the incumbent. At the inclosure, in 1769, 40 acres were awarded for fuel to the poor, who have also 22 acres of old land.

Ellingstring

ELLINGSTRING, a township, in the parish of Masham, union of Leyburn, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, 4½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Masham; containing 196 inhabitants. The township is on the south of the river Ure, and comprises, according to the tithe survey, 401 acres of land: the road from Masham to East Witton passes north of the village. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £10. 10., and the impropriate for £62, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ellington (All Saints)

ELLINGTON (All Saints), a parish, in the hundred of Leightonstone, union and county of Huntingdon, 5½ miles (W. by N.) from Huntingdon; containing 448 inhabitants. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £20; net income, £84; patrons and impropriators, the Master and Fellows of PeterHouse, Cambridge. A school is partly supported by an endowment of £12 per annum.

Ellington

ELLINGTON, a township, in the parish of Woodhorn, union of Morpeth, E. division of Morpeth ward, N. division of the county of Northumberland, 7 miles (N. E. by E.) from Morpeth; containing 286 inhabitants. The township comprises 2060 acres, and is situated on the north side of the river Line, over which is a stone bridge: the village is neat and well built, seated on a rock on the brow of a hill, fronting the west, and having land of a good quality about it. The tithes have been commuted for £243 payable to the impropriators, and £46 to the vicar.

Ellington, Nether and Over

ELLINGTON, NETHER and OVER, a township, in the parish of Masham, union of Leyburn, wapen take of Hang-East, N. riding of York. Nether Ellington, including 63 persons, is 2¼ miles (N. W.), and Over, including 67 persons, 2½ (N. W. by W.) from Masham. The township is on the south of the river Ure, and comprises 1710a. 2r. 39p.: the two villages are contiguous to each other. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £35. 10., and the impropriate for £183, payable to Trinity College, Cambridge.

Ellinthorpe

ELLINTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of Aldborough, wapentake of Hallikeld, N. riding of York; containing 49 inhabitants. This place, which is situated on the north side of the river Ure, near its junction with the Swale, is the constablewick of Mytton-on-Swale, and comprises 576a. 2r. 11p., divided in nearly equal portions between the estates of Ellinthorpe Hall and Ellinthorpe Lodge, and of which about two-thirds are arable land, and one-third pasture.

Ellisfield (St. Martin)

ELLISFIELD (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Basingstoke, hundred of Bermondspit, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4 miles (S.) from Basingstoke; containing 246 inhabitants. This place is supposed to have derived its name, a corruption of Ella's Field, from its having been the seat of war during the heptarchy; and various intrenchments remain, one of which, occupying an area of three acres, and deeply moated, is thought to have been the site of a castle belonging to the Saxon king, Ella. The parish comprises 2254 acres, of which 1447 are arable, 83 meadow, 583 woodland, and 140 common; the soil is generally clayey, and the surface varied with hills of moderate elevation. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 3. 6½., and in the gift of W. Pigott, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £402, and the glebe consists of 18 acres, with a house, built in 1839. There were two churches, one dedicated to St. Martin, and the other to All Saints, till the reign of Edward III., when the latter was taken down.

Ellough, or Willingham (All Saints)

ELLOUGH, or Willingham (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wangford, E. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (S. E. by S.) from Beccles; containing 155 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 1088 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £12; patron, the Earl of Gosford. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. A parsonage has been erected by the Rev. Mr. Arnold.