Fenton - Fersfield

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

230-232

Citation Show another format:

'Fenton - Fersfield', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 230-232. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50961 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Fenton, with Faugh.—See Faugh.

FENTON, with Faugh.—See Faugh.

Fenton

FENTON, a parish, in the union of Newark, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 7¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Newark; containing 120 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Witham, and comprises by measurement 1207 acres; the soil is various. The living is a perpetual curacy, annexed to the living of Beckingham. The tithes were commuted for land at the inclosure; the glebe altogether comprises 145a. 36p. The church, dedicated to All Saints, which has been enlarged at different periods, contains details of the Norman, early English, and decorated English styles.

Fenton

FENTON, a township, in the parish of Kettlethorpe, union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 9¾ miles (N. W. by W.) from Lincoln; containing 253 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land in 1765.

Fenton

FENTON, a township, in the parish of Wooler, union of Glendale, E. division of Glendale ward, county of Northumberland, 4¾ miles (N. by W.) from Wooler; containing 205 inhabitants. This township, which once constituted a separate parish, but was united to Wooler in 1313, is supposed to have been the place where St. Ninian commenced his labours, about 420, in converting the natives of Northumberland and the south of Scotland to Christianity, having proceeded from his own country, North Wales, for the purpose. In confirmation of this conjecture, is the fact, that a fair annually held here, on September 27th, for cattle, sheep, and horses, has long been called St. Ninian's fair; and an old well continues to be termed St. Ninian's well.

Fenton

FENTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Sturton, union of East Retford, North-Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham; containing 74 inhabitants.

Fenton-Culvert, or Great Fenton

FENTON-CULVERT, or Great Fenton, an ecclesiastical district, in the borough and parish of Stokeupon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Newcastle-under-Lyme. The township of Fenton-Culvert contains 3744 inhabitants; and the greater portion of it, and the adjoining township of Fenton-Vivian, form the ecclesiastical district. The soil generally is a stiff clay, producing good wheat; coal and ironstone are wrought, and the manufacture of pottery and china is extensively carried on. The Trent and Mersey canal passes through. Fenton Manor-house is an elegant mansion on the summit of a spacious lawn, with beautiful gardens and pleasure-grounds, and commanding a fine prospect to the south and west. The church was built in 1838, principally by the bounty of the late Ralph Bourne, Esq., who gave £2500 towards its erection, and £1000 for its endowment. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Lichfield. There are places of worship for Wesleyans, and Methodists of the New Connexion; and attached to the church is a national school.

Fenton, Kirk

FENTON, KIRK, a parish, in the union of Barwick (under Gilbert's act), Upper division of the wapentake of Barkstone-Ash, W. riding of York; containing, with the township of Biggin, 608 inhabitants, of whom 378 are in the township of Kirk-Fenton, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Tadcaster, and 104 in that of Little Fenton. The former township comprises by computation 1800 acres; the village is pleasantly situated, and neatly built. The York and North-Midland railway passes to the west of the township, and is here joined by a line from Harrogate, opened in 1847. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the patronage of the Prebendary of Kirk-Fenton in the Cathedral of York, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £125: the tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1770; the land comprises 260 acres. The church is a neat ancient structure, repaired at different periods; the roof is of peculiar construction. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Fenton-Vivian, or Little Fenton

FENTON-VIVIAN, or Little Fenton, a township, in the borough and parish of Stoke-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 2¼ miles (E.) from Newcastle; containing 1179 inhabitants.—See Fenton-Culvert.

Fenwick

FENWICK, a township, in the parish of Kyloe, union of Berwick, in Islandshire, N. division of Northumberland; containing 227 inhabitants.

Fenwick

FENWICK, a township, in the parish of Stamfordham, union of Castle ward, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 13½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Newcastle-upon-Tyne; containing 66 inhabitants. Fenwick Tower was the seat of the ancient family of the same name, so numerous in Northumberland; and so continued till 1688, when Sir John Fenwick alienated his estates for the sum of £20,000, obtained for him by Sir William Blackett, from Mr. Guy, the founder of Guy's Hospital. The township comprises 1634a. 2r. 31p. Certain tithes were commuted for land and money payments, under an act of inclosure, in 1779; and under the recent act a rent-charge of £97. 3. 7. has been awarded, of which £91. 8. are payable to the Bishop of Durham, and £5. 15. 7. to the vicar of the parish. In 1775, in pulling down part of the Tower, which has long been in ruins, gold nobles of the reigns of Edward III., Richard II., and David, King of Scotland, were found.

Fenwick

FENWICK, a township, in the parish of Campsall, union of Doncaster, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 5½ miles (S. W.) from Snaith; containing 262 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 2200 acres, of which the soil is mostly a strong clay; the village is situated on the south side of the vale of the river Went. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Feock, St. (St. Feock)

FEOCK, ST. (St. Feock), a parish, in the union of Truro, W. division of the hundred of Powder and of the county of Cornwall, 5 miles (S.) from Truro; containing 1476 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the east by the Truro river, on the west by a creek of Falmouth harbour, and on the south by Carrick roads; and comprises 2550 acres, of which about 1530 are arable, 600 pasture, and 400 woodland. The surface is uneven, in some parts hilly, and the higher grounds command beautiful views. There is a large smeltinghouse for lead and silver ore, and the Carrick Tin-stream is partly within the parish, which is intersected by the railway from Redruth to Point Quay, a small shipping-port at the head of Carrick roads. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11; net income, £175; patron, the Bishop of Exeter; impropriator, the Earl of Falmouth. The church is an ancient edifice, in the later English style, with a detached tower at the distance of 20 feet: in the churchyard is a cross with a figure rudely sculptured. There are places of worship for Baptists, Calvinists, and Wesleyans. At Roundwood are some remains of an earthwork.

Ferensby

FERENSBY, a township, in the parish of Farnham, union of Great Ouseburn (under Gilbert's act), Lower division of the wapentake of Claro, W. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Knaresborough; containing 112 inhabitants. The township comprises about 400 acres; the village is small, but pleasantly situated. Rent-charges amounting to £25. 18. have been awarded in lieu of tithes.

Ferne-Islands.—See Farn-Islands.

FERNE-ISLANDS.—See Farn-Islands.

Fernham

FERNHAM, a hamlet, in the parish and hundred of Shrivenham, union of Farringdon, county of Berks, 2½ miles (S. by E.) from Farringdon; containing 222 inhabitants, and comprising 999 acres. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £300.

Fernilee

FERNILEE, a township, in the parish of Hope, union of Chapel-en-le-Frith, hundred of High-Peak, N. division of the county of Derby; containing 560 inhabitants. Thomas Ouff in 1786 bequeathed an estate, from the proceeds of which £18 a year are paid for teaching children.

Ferriby, North (All Saints)

FERRIBY, NORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the county of the town of Hull, union of Sculcoates, E. riding of York; containing 935 inhabitants, of whom 479 are in the township of North Ferriby, 5¼ miles (S. E.) from South Cave. A priory of Knights Templars founded here by Lord Eustace de Vesci, of Bromfleet, was, at the suppression of that order, converted into a priory of Augustine canons, whose revenue at the Dissolution was valued at £95. 11. 7. The parish includes the township of North Ferriby, and part of that of Swanland; and comprises about 3760 acres, of which 1610 are in North Ferriby. Several of the proprietors of land possess handsome mansions in the village. The Hull and Selby railway has a station here. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 13. 4.; net income, £135; patron and impropriator, W. W. Wilkinson, Esq. The church, which appears to be part of a more spacious structure, has a low massive tower at the west end, and contains some ancient monuments; it was thoroughly repaired in 1829. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship; and there is a free school.

Ferriby, South (St. Nicholas)

FERRIBY, SOUTH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, N. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3¼ miles (W. by S.) from Barton-uponHumber; containing 542 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Humber, which here receives the waters of the Ancholme; it comprises about 1500 acres, and contains some pits of chalk, used partly for manure. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 6.; net income, £192; patron, the Bishop of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for 130 acres of land, under an act of inclosure, in 1802, when an allotment of 15 acres was given for the repair of the church, now producing about £30 per annum. The church is an ancient structure, standing north and south, with the tower on the north-east side: during a late repair a beautiful arch in the west wall, and the bases of a range of pillars, were discovered, which had been long concealed, and, no doubt, belonged to an older edifice. There are places of worship for Primitive and Wesleyan Methodists.

Ferring (St. Andrew)

FERRING (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of East Preston (under Gilbert's act), hundred of Poling, rape of Arundel, W. division of Sussex, 3¾ miles (W.) from Worthing; containing 285 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 935 acres, of which 633 are arable, 212 meadow and pasture, and 43 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of East Preston and that of Kingston united, valued in the king's books at £6. 8. 4., and in the gift of the Bishop of Chichester. The tithes in the parish belonging to the Ecclesiastical Commissioners have been commuted for £237, and the vicarial tithes for £90; there is a glebe of 21 acres. The vicar's total net income is £244. The church, which is in the early English style, is dedicated to St. Andrew, in honour of whom a church or monastery was built here so early as the time of Offa, King of Mercia, of which there were some remains in the reign of Edward III. On Highdown Hill, an isolated eminence, is a small earthwork, from which is an extensive panoramic view.

Ferry-Bridge

FERRY-BRIDGE, a post-town, in the parish of Ferry-Frystone, union of Barwick (under Gilbert's act), Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 21½ miles (S. S. W.) from York. This place takes its name from the erection of a handsome stone bridge over the river Aire, in lieu of an ancient ferry, the possession of which was strongly contested by the rival armies of York and Lancaster, and near which numerous skeletons, fragments of armour, and military relics have been found at various times. The town derived its chief importance from its situation on the great thoroughfare from the north to the south of England, but since the opening of the railway, that traffic has been diverted into another channel; the houses are well built, and near the bridge are some extensive wharfs, whence goods are forwarded by the Aire and Calder navigation. Here are also large glassworks. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ferry-Corner

FERRY-CORNER, an extra-parochial liberty, adjoining the parish of Bicker, in the union of Boston, wapentake of Kirton, parts of Holland, county of Lincoln; containing 66 inhabitants.

Ferry, East

FERRY, EAST, a chapelry, partly in the parish of Scotton, wapentake of Corringham, and partly in the parish of Owston, W. division of the wapentake of Manley, union of Gainsborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 7¼ miles (N. by E.) from Gainsborough; containing 156 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to St. Mary. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ferry-Hill

FERRY-HILL, a township, in the parish of Merrington, union of Sedgefield, S. E. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 5¾ miles (E. N. E.) from Bishop-Auckland; containing 850 inhabitants. There are collieries in the neighbourhood, to which a branch of the Clarence railway extends, and in this township the Byers-Green branch diverges from the Durham branch of that line. Here is also a station of the York and Newcastle railway. A church, dedicated to St. Luke, was erected in 1828, and made a district church in 1843 for Ferry-Hill and Chilton townships. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Durham: the tithes of the township of Ferry-Hill have been commuted for £276 payable to the perpetual curate, and £68 to the vicar of Merrington. At an early period the convent of Durham had a chapel here, dedicated to St. Ebbe and St. Nicholas, and also a court-house, swannery, and fish-pool; there are still some remains of the swan-house, and a rent called swan-oats is yet paid.

Ferry, West

FERRY, WEST, a hamlet, in the parish of Owston, union of Gainsborough, W. division of the wapentake of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln; containing 1025 inhabitants. That part of the parish which extends along the margin of the river Trent, is commonly called by this name, in contradistinction to East Ferry, on the opposite side of the river.—See Owston.

Fersfield (St. Andrew)

FERSFIELD (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Guiltcross, hundred of Diss, E. division of Norfolk, 4¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Diss; containing 295 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1140 acres, chiefly the property of the Duke of Norfolk, who is lord of the manor, which belonged anciently to the family of Du Bois, the supposed founders of the church: the village is situated near the sources of the rivers Waveney and Little Ouse. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 6. 8., and in the gift of Frederick Nassau, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £360, and the glebe comprises 59 acres. The church is in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower; in two arched recesses are the recumbent figures of a knight and a priest, the former to the memory of Sir Robert, and the latter to William, Du Bois. The church-lands comprise 20 acres, producing £32 per annum. The Rev. Francis Blomefield, the Norfolk historian, was born and buried here.



<--Previous:
Felsham - Fenstanton