Glatton - Gloster-Hill

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

298-301

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'Glatton - Gloster-Hill', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 298-301. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=50982 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Glatton (St. Nicholas)

GLATTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Peterborough, hundred of Norman-Cross, county of Huntingdon, 2¼ miles (S. S. W.) from Stilton; containing, with the chapelry of Holme, 715 inhabitants. It is situated on the great north road, and comprises by admeasurement 2070 acres, of which two-thirds are arable, and the remainder pasture; the soil is a stiff clay. The surface is rather flat; the prevailing timber is elm, with an intermixture of oak and ash in some parts, and the scenery is generally of pleasing character. The living is a rectory, with the perpetual curacy of Holme annexed, valued in the king's books at £21. 8. 11½.; net income, £546; patron, T. M. Wingfield, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1800; the land comprises 473 acres. There is an endowment of £15 per annum, arising from land for teaching children.

Glazebrook, Lancaster.—See Rixton.

GLAZEBROOK, Lancaster.—See Rixton.

Glazeley

GLAZELEY, a parish, in the union of Bridgnorth, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 3½ miles (S. by W.) from Bridgnorth; containing 38 inhabitants. It comprises 636 acres, the soil of which is a strong clay, lying on marl and coarse limestone with an admixture of sandstone; a bed of coal, of sulphureous quality, extends throughout the whole district. The living is a discharged rectory, united, together with that of Deuxhill, in 1760, to the rectory of Chetton: the tithes have been commuted for £86, and the glebe comprises four acres. The church is a small neat edifice; its style bespeaks a date little anterior to the Reformation, and not improbably subsequent to that period. Near it is an ancient farmhouse, part of which appears to have been a religious building, as it contains windows and doorways in the ecclesiastical style of the 15th contury: a stone coffin, also, was found there, which now lies in the churchyard.

Gleaston

GLEASTON, a township, in the parish of Aldingham, union of Ulverston, hundred of Lonsdale north of the Sands, county of Lancaster, 3 miles (S. E.) from Dalton. This place contains several neat houses at the foot of a rising ground; and also the mouldering ruins of Gleaston Castle, which, according to tradition, was erected by the lords of Aldingham immediately after the sea had swept away the lower part of the parish, where their original residence was fixed. The date of its erection is uncertain, but the style of the architecture, as yet to be discerned, points to the Harringtons as the founders. The area of the castle is a square, and the ruins consist chiefly of two towers, nearly perfect, on the west side, with the falling stones of a wall which connects them; there are also traces of towers on the east, on which side the greater part of the ruins are at the north-east angle: the north and south walls are almost razed to their foundations. The interior of this structure, once a place of great strength and importance, is now a browzy pasture, of uneven surface, covered in many parts with masses of stones.

Glemham, Great (All Saints)

GLEMHAM, GREAT (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Saxmundham; containing 370 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 1800 acres of arable and pasture land: Glemham House is a handsome mansion, pleasantly situated. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with the small tithes, and annexed to the rectory of Little Glemham: the impropriate tithes have been commuted for £352. 14. 8., with a glebe of 3 acres, and the small tithes for £95. The church is in the later English style, with a square embattled tower; the ancient font, of Caen stone, is richly sculptured.

Glemham, Little (St. Andrew)

GLEMHAM, LITTLE (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 3 miles (N. E. by E.) from Wickham-Market; containing 333 inhabitants. This place was for many years the property of the Glemham family, whose seat, Glemham Hall, has for more than a century and a half been the residence of the North family, the present proprietors, of whom Sir Dudley North, Knt., the first owner of the lordship, was sheriff of London in 1682. The parish comprises 1269a. 3r. 12p. The living is a rectory, with the perpetual curacy of Great Glemham annexed, valued in the king's books at £6, and in the patronage of the Hon. Mrs. North: the tithes of the parish have been commuted for £305, and the glebe comprises 7 acres. The church is a handsome structure, beautifully situated, and contains monuments to Sir Dudley North and others of his family, who are interred in the chancel.

Glemsford (St. Mary)

GLEMSFORD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Sudbury, hundred of Babergh, W. division of Suffolk, 7 miles (N. N. W.) from Sudbury; containing 1366 inhabitants. This is a place of considerable antiquity, and in the reign of Edward the Confessor a collegiate society was established here, under the government of a dean, and invested with several privileges, which were confirmed by Henry III. It was also of importance as a manufacturing town, but only for a short period. An attempt has recently been made to revive its manufactures by establishing the silk-trade; and worsted goods, silks, and velvets are made by handloom: the platting of straw also employs some of the population. The parish comprises by measurement 2295 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £30, and in the gift of the Bishop of Ely: the tithes have been commuted for £800, and the glebe comprises 75 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient and handsome structure, situated on an eminence. There are places of worship for Baptists and Independents.

Glen Magna (St. Cuthbert)

GLEN MAGNA (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 6 miles (S. E.) from Leicester; containing, with the chapelry of Stretton Magna, 833 inhabitants, a few of whom are employed in the manufacture of stockings. The Leicester Union canal passes through the parish. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 14. 2.; net income, £217; patron and impropriator, Sir G. Robinson, Bart. The sum of £30 per annum, arising from lands originally bequeathed by William Hobson, and exchanged for others under an inclosure act in 1760, is applied to the relief of the poor and to parochial uses.

Glen Parva

GLEN PARVA, a chapelry, in the parish of Aylestone, union of Blaby, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4¼ miles (S. by W.) from Leicester; containing 148 inhabitants. The tithes have been commuted for £190.

Glendon (St. Helen)

GLENDON (St. Helen), a parish, in the union of Kettering, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (N. W. by N.) from Kettering; containing 44 inhabitants. It lies about half way between Kettering and Rothwell, and to the right of the road between those places; and consists of 772a. 2r. 3p. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8, and in the gift of the Booth family.

Glenfield (St. Peter)

GLENFIELD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Blaby, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 3½ miles (W. N. W.) from Leicester; containing, with the chapelries of Braunstone and Kirby-Muxloe, 1032 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 4000 acres. The soil is partly a strong heavy clay, and partly gravelly; the surface is diversified with hills, and the lower grounds are watered by the Glenfield brook. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 9. 9½.; net income, £818; patron, C. Winstanley, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land, under an act of inclosure, in the 49th of George III. The church is an ancient structure. There are chapels of ease at Braunstone and Kirby-Muxloe, and a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Glenfield-Frith

GLENFIELD-FRITH, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Blaby, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4 miles (W. by N.) from Leicester; containing 10 inhabitants. This place formed part of the ancient Chase or Frith of Leicester.

Glentham (St. Peter)

GLENTHAM (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Caistor, E. division of the wapentake of Aslacoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 8 miles (W. by N.) from Market-Rasen; containing, with the hamlet of Bishop-Bridge, 477 inhabitants. This place is bounded on the east by the river Ancholme, which falls into the Humber at Ferriby Sluice. The parish comprises 2642a. 3r.: there are quarries of stone of moderate quality, for the roads. Vessels sail from Bishop-Bridge, down the Ancholme, to Hull and other parts of Yorkshire. Fairs for horned-cattle, sheep, and pigs, are held on the 25th of November. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £90; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Lincoln: the tithes were commuted for land in 1763, when 312 acres were allotted to the appropriators, and 70 to the vicar. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with a tower and chancel of more recent date. Here is a place of worship for Wesleyans; also an endowed almshouse.

Glentworth (St. Michael)

GLENTWORTH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Gainsborough, W. division of the wapentake of Aslacoe, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2 miles (S. W.) from Spittal; containing 324 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Lincoln to Barton, called the Old-street, and comprises by measurement 3040 acres: there are quarries of good limestone, which is raised for building, burning into lime, and for the roads. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 6., and in the patronage of the Earl of Scarborough, who is impropriator: the vicarial tithes have been commuted for £340, and the impropriate for £500; there are 7 acres of glebe. The church contains a sumptuous monument to the memory of Sir Christopher Wray, Knt., lord chief justice in the reign of Elizabeth.

Glevering

GLEVERING, a hamlet, in the parish of Hacheston, union of Plomesgate, hundred of Loes, E. division of Suffolk; containing 11 inhabitants.

Glewston

GLEWSTON, a township, in the parish of Goodrich or Goderich, poor-law union of Ross, Lower division of the hundred of Wormelow, county of Hereford; containing 121 inhabitants.

Glidden, with Chidden.—See Chidden.

GLIDDEN, with Chidden.—See Chidden.

Glinton (St. Benedict)

GLINTON (St. Benedict), a parish, in the union and soke of Peterborough, N. division of the county of Northampton, 3 miles (S. S. E.) from Market-Deeping; containing 404 inhabitants. It comprises 1480a. 2r. 24p.; the soil is generally light and gravelly, and there are some pits of good gravel. The living is annexed to the rectory of Peakirk: the church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with an embattled tower surmounted by a lofty spire of graceful elevation. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, and Calvinistic Methodists; and a school endowed with 14 acres of land.

Globe-Lane

GLOBE-LANE, an extra-parochial liberty, adjoining the parish of St. Margaret, Ipswich, in the union and liberty of Ipswich, E. division of the county of Suffolk; containing 17 inhabitants.

Glodwick

GLODWICK, a district parish, in the parochial chapelry and poor-law union of Oldham, parish of Prestwich, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, ¾ of a mile (S. E.) from Oldham; containing about 5500 inhabitants. This place, which lies east of the high road from Oldham to Ashton, was formed into a parish under the provisions of the 6th and 7th of Victoria, cap. 37. The living is a perpetual curacy, with an endowment of £150 per annum, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Chester and the Crown, alternately. The church, dedicated to Christ, was built in 1843, on a site given by Earl Howe, and is a cruciform edifice in the early English style.

Glooston (St. John)

GLOOSTON (St. John), a parish, in the union of Harborough, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 5¾ miles (N. by E.) from Harborough; containing 157 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £180; patron, the Earl of Cardigan: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1825.

Glororum

GLORORUM, a township, in the parish of Bambrough, union of Belford, N. division of Bambrough ward and of Northumberland, 4¾ miles (E.) from Belford; containing 53 inhabitants. It is situated east of the Waren burn, and about a mile south-west of Bambrough, on the road to Bradford; to the north-west is Waren bay.

Glossop (All Saints)

GLOSSOP (All Saints), a market-town, a parish, and the head of a union (though a portion of the parish is in the union of Hayfield), in the hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby. This parish comprises the chapelries of Chinley with Bugsworth and Brownside, Hayfield, and Mellor; the townships of Chisworth, Chunall, Dinting, Glossop, Hadfield, Ludworth, Newmills, Padfield, Simmondley, and Whitfield; and the hamlets of Beard, Charlesworth, Ollersett, Thornsett, and Whittle; the whole containing 22,898 inhabitants, of whom 3548 are in the township of Glossop, 10 miles (N.) from Chapel-en-le-Frith, 50 (N. N. W.) from Derby, and 176 (N. N. W.) from London. It forms the north-west extremity of Derbyshire, the river Etherow having its rise in the Alpine ridges here, and separating it from Cheshire. The Derwent, also, has its source at the north extremity, where for some distance it is called the Wrongsley river, and separates the parish and county from Yorkshire, after which, entering the chapelry of Derwent, it takes that name. The Goyt, which rises from Axe Edge, near Buxton, washes the south-west side of the parish; the Etherow has its confluence with the Goyt near Marple bridge, and flows to Stockport. Glossop is one of the most romantic parishes in the county, particularly the wild mountainous district on its eastern side, of which a considerable portion is moorland; its western side is a highly flourishing district, and by far the most important seat of the cotton manufacture in the county, owing chiefly to which the population within the last fifty years has increased more than twofold. There are about fifty cotton-mills, several extensive establishments for calico-printing, two clothingmills, a manufactory for cloth, and three considerable paper-mills. Before the introduction of the cotton-trade the manufacture of woollens had made great progress, but it has since declined. The parish is very extensive, comprising 49,960 acres of land, mostly pasture; it abounds in clay, stone, slate, and coal, with valuable falls of water: in the township of Glossop, which is situated in a beautifully romantic dale surrounded by lofty hills, are 4816 acres.

The Old Town of Glossop is irregularly built, but many improvements have taken place within the last few years, including some new roads, a street, &c. Mill Town connects itself with Howard Town on the Sheffield road leading to the Old Town, so called in contradistinction to New Town or Howard Town, which forms the great focus of improvements, and is three-quarters of a mile west from Glossop. In 1837 an act was passed for obtaining a more regular supply of water, by constructing reservoirs upon the tributary streams of the river Etherow, in the parish; and an act for lighting the place with gas was passed in 1845. A branch of the Manchester and Sheffield railway was opened to the town in the last mentioned year: the line is a little more than a mile long. The market was established under an act of the 7th of Victoria; it was commenced in July 1845, and is held on Saturday: a handsome town-hall and market-house, with a prison, and an office for the agent of the Duke of Norfolk, lord of the manor, form a noble range of building, in the Italian style. The market is a covered one, behind the town-hall, with shops for butchers, greengrocers, and other traders; and the New Town being for the most part neatly built of stone, and the shops in general respectable, the whole presents a thriving and handsome appearance. Petty-sessions are held in the town-hall every fourth Thursday. The powers of the county debt-court of Glossop, established in 1847, extend over the greater part of the registration-district of Hayfield and Glossop.

The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 18. 9.; net income, £300; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Norfolk. The church, situated in Old Glossop, is a neat structure, consisting of a nave, chancel, aisles, and tower and spire; it was partly rebuilt in 1831, and enlarged by the erection of two galleries, by which 800 sittings were obtained. The cost, £2000, was raised by subscription, aided by a grant of £200 from the Incorporated Society; the chancel was repaired at the expense of the Duke of Norfolk. In the churchyard is a very ancient yew-tree; also two sun-dials. At Mellor, Newmills, Hayfield, Charlesworth, and Whitfield, are other incumbencies. There are places of worship for Independents, Wesleyans, Roman Catholics, and other congregations of dissenters: the Roman Catholic chapel, a handsome structure of the Tuscan order, standing on an eminence overlooking the Old Town, was built by the late Duke of Norfolk, at a cost of £3000. One of the schools is endowed with £37. 10. per annum; and among other useful institutions is a savings' bank, commenced in April 1844. Joseph Haigh, Esq., who died in March, 1786, left the interest of £1000 to be annually laid out in clothing poor men and women; and there are several minor charities. The poor law union of Glossop comprises a portion of the parish, and contains a population of 10,322. On the south side of the Etherow, near Woolley Bridge, are vestiges of a Roman station, measuring 122 yards by 112, and called Melandra Castle; the moat towards the south-east, the four entrances, the ramparts, about nine feet in thickness, and the site of the prætorium, 25 yards square, are still discernible, as are also the Roman road from Brough to this place, and that to Buxton.

Gloster-Hill

GLOSTER-HILL, a township, in the parish of Warkworth, union of Alnwick, E. division of Coquetdale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 8½ miles (S. E.) from Alnwick; containing 18 inhabitants. The township is situated on the southern bank of the Coquet, near its confluence with the North Sea; and comprises 260 acres of excellent land, tithe-free, in equal portions of arable and pasture. The surface is undulated, and the view of the sea extensive. The Hall, which stood on an eminence near the Coquet, was burnt down in 1760.