Harwood - Haslemere

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

431-435

Citation Show another format:

'Harwood - Haslemere', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 431-435. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51012 Date accessed: 21 September 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Harwood

HARWOOD, a chapelry, in the parish of Middleton-in-Teesdale, union of Teesdale, S. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 10 miles (S. E. by S.) from Alston-Moor. There are some extensive lead-mines in the chapelry and its vicinity. The chapel was built in 1802: the living is in the gift of the Rector.

Harwood

HARWOOD, a township, in the parish and union of Bolton, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Bolton-Cross; containing 1996 inhabitants. Sir Edmund Trafford, Knt., was a proprietor of "Harewood" (the ancient name) in the reign of Edward VI. During the civil wars, the place is said to have been a military station. Lomax Fold, in the township, has long been the inheritance of the Lomax family; but the principal part of the land here belongs to Brasenose College, Oxford, being a portion of the bequest of William Hulme for exhibitions from certain public schools in Lancashire. The affix of Fold or Gate, to the names of mansions, meaning "the inclosure of the homestead," prevails much in this district. The township lies northward of the new road between Bolton and Bury, and is separated from Tonge by Bradshaw Brook; it comprises about 1100 acres, chiefly pasture land. The situation is high and exposed, and the soil, a cold clay, is not very fertile; the substratum is sandstone and shale, and seams of coal underlie the whole township, the dip being from north-east to south-west. The coal, however, is not of the best quality, and is worked only in the north-west part of the township, at Side-o'-th'-Moor and Top-o'-Raikes; pits at Riding Gate and Top-o'-th'-Greeves are exhausted. The stone is quarried for building and for flagging. The inhabitants are chiefly hand-loom weavers, small farmers, crofters, and colliers. A church was consecrated in Oct. 1841, and an ecclesiastical district, called Christ Church, has been formed of parts of the townships of Harwood and Breightmet: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of three Trustees, and endowed with £1000; total income, about £100. The Primitive Methodists have a place of worship; and the Wesleyans a school at Longsight. Miss Lomax supports an infant school, containing nearly 100 children, in a neat cottage at Lomax Fold; and the Earl of Derby having bestowed a piece of land near the church, an appropriate school to accommodate 150 children is being built by subscription, through the exertions of Mr. Lomax and the clergyman. A portion of an ancient Roman road crosses a considerable eminence in the north-east part of the township, in the direction of Tottington.

Harwood

HARWOOD, a township, in the parish of Hartburn, union of Rothbury, N. E. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 13½ miles (W. by N.) from Morpeth; containing 42 inhabitants. It comprises 3795 acres, of which 3726 are uninclosed land, chiefly in sheep-walks. On a dry hill on the north-west side, commanding very extensive prospects, is a strong camp defended by double ditches, and measuring 533 links from the east to the west angle, and 380 from the north to the south angle.

Harwood-Dale

HARWOOD-DALE, a chapelry, in the parish of Hackness, union of Scarborough, liberty of Whitby-Strand, N. riding of York, 7 miles (N. W.) from Scarborough; containing, with the hamlet of Silpho, 335 inhabitants. The chapelry comprises, exclusively of Silpho, 5557a. 5p., of which 1182 acres are arable, 605 pasture, 190 woodland, and 3580 waste and moor. The living is annexed to the perpetual curacy of Hackness. The chapel was built in the reign of Charles II. at the expense of Sir Thos. P. Hoby, Knt., and endowed by him with the tithes, which have been commuted for £220.

Harwood, Great

HARWOOD, GREAT, a township and chapelry, in the parish, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Blackburn, N. division of Lancashire, 4½ miles (N. E.) from Blackburn; the township containing 2273 inhabitants. Roger de Lacy granted the manor to Richard de Fitton, by a deed without date. Richard Fitton, the fifth in descent from the original grantee, lived in the reign of Edward III., and left three coheiresses, through whom the manor, divided into three portions, came to the families of Hesketh, Nowell, and Leigh. The Heskeths purchased the Leighs' share; that of the Nowells continued in that family until alienated by the late Alexander Nowell, Esq. The chapelry comprises part of the township of Rishton, and contains 4574 acres, of which 2744 are in Great Harwood; of these, about 102 are woodland, and the remainder arable and pasture. The township of Harwood is divided into Over and Nether town: the latter had the grant of a market in 1390. Fairs for cattle are held on the 21st of August and 3rd of March. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £150, and a glebe-house; patron, the Vicar of Blackburn. The chapel, dedicated to St. Bartholomew, is an ancient edifice in the later English style, but much deformed by alterations. There are places of worship for dissenters; and a school endowed with £29 per annum.

Harwood, Little

HARWOOD, LITTLE, a township, in the parish, union, and Lower division of the hundred, of Blackburn, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (N. E. by N.) from Blackburn; containing 322 inhabitants. This place was the property of the Claytons for upwards of 400 years. About the year 1815, Colonel Clayton, of Little Harwood Hall, and of Carr Hall, near Clitheroe, disposed of the estate by sale, in shares to various individuals. The township is of small extent, and is situated on the ridge of a lofty hill, on the road from Blackburn to Whalley. The Hall is a neat brick house, shrouded in trees, and new fronted about a century ago. Bank-Hey is a village on a commanding eminence in the township.

Harworth (All Saints)

HARWORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Worksop, Hatfield division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, N. division of the county of Nottingham, 2¾ miles (W. S. W.) from Bawtry; containing 878 inhabitants. The parish contains upwards of 7000 acres, lying in the western verge of the county, between Blyth and Tickhill. Of this number 1428a. 3r. 2p. are in the manor of Harworth; 617 acres in the hamlet of Hesley and Limpool, in the north-western part, adjoining Yorkshire; 1462 in Martin, forming the north-eastern hamlet, near Bawtry; 340 in the farm of Plumbtree; 502 in Serlby hamlet or manor; and 2019a. 1r. 14p. forming a part of the township of Styrrup and Oldcoates, the rest of which is in the parish of Blyth. The village is in rather a low situation, with a small stream running through it. The living is a vicarage, endowed with some rectorial tithes, and valued in the king's books at £5. 9. 7.; net income, £687; patron, the Rev. C. E. Rodgers. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style, with a chancel of later English erected in 1672; it was repaired in 1828, when a handsome cross, found in the churchyard, was placed above the east window. Robert Brailsford, by will dated October 21st, 1700, devised about 58 acres of land, now let for £59 per annum, for the maintenance of a school, and for distributing clothing among the poor inhabitants. In a part of Harworth adjoining the town of Bawtry is an almshouse for widows, anciently founded by Robert Morton for a master and poor persons, with an endowment in land, and some small payments: the chapel, which is a beautiful specimen of the early English style, was lately completely repaired. In this part of the parish, also, is the site of a Roman station, where, in 1828, were found silver coins, a portion of a Roman vase, and many pieces of pottery.

Hasbury

HASBURY, a township, in the parish of HalesOwen, union of Stourbridge, Upper division of the hundred of Halfshire, Hales-Owen and E. divisions of Worcestershire, 1 mile (S. W.) from Hales-Owen, on the Stourbridge road; containing 919 inhabitants. It is of undulated surface, with picturesque scenery, commanding views of the Clent hills: the population is engaged in agriculture and in making nails. Witley Lodge, with forty acres around it, is the seat and property of David Homfray, Esq.

Hascomb (St. Peter)

HASCOMB (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Hambledon, First division of the hundred of Black-heath, W. division of Surrey, 3½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Godalming; containing 335 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Godalming to Horsham. Hascomb Hill, embellished with wood, forms a delightful pleasure-ground to the seat of Park Hatch, and is much frequented by visiters at all seasons; the view is panoramic, and that part of it from the terrace, embracing the high ridge of chalk hills well known as the Hog's Back, with the town of Guildford towards the north, Hindhead to the west, and Blackdown and the long range of Sussex Downs to the south, is singularly beautiful. The Wey and Arun Junction canal adjoins the eastern part of the parish. There is stone of good quality for building and road-making. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 3. 9., and in the gift of the Storie family: the tithes have been commuted for £256. 10., and the glebe comprises 103 acres. The church contains portions in the early and decorated English styles. Conyers Middleton, author of the Life of Cicero, was rector of the parish.

Haselbeech (St. Michael)

HASELBEECH (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Brixworth, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 7 miles (S. by W.) from Market-Harborough; containing 194 inhabitants. This parish forms some of the highest table-land in the midland counties, and comprises about 1600 acres, of which 300 are arable, and the remainder pasture. The village is about two miles east-by-south from that of Naseby. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 14. 9½., and in the patronage of the Governors of St. George's Hospital, London; net income, £296. The church is an ancient structure with a tower; the chancel was rebuilt in 1842, by the present rector, who has also rebuilt the rectory-house, and by whom a school is principally supported.

Haselbury-Bryan (St. James)

HASELBURY-BRYAN (St. James), a parish, in the union of Sturminster, hundred of Pimperne, Sturminster division of Dorset, 9 miles (W. N. W.) from Blandford-Forum; containing 639 inhabitants. The parish comprises by admeasurement 2359 acres, of which 175 are arable, and 1894 pasture, all inclosed with the exception of 159 acres; 8 are woodland, and about 30 or 40 orchard-ground. The soil is generally a strong tenacious clay, but productive, and in some parts a rich and fertile loam: the surface is pleasingly undulated, and the scenery enriched with stately trees; the lower grounds are watered by a brook. Limestone is quarried, of good quality for building and for burning into lime. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 13. 9., and in the gift of the Duke of Northumberland: the tithes have been commuted for £440, and the glebe comprises 69 acres. The church is in the decorated style. 21 acres of land, worth £57 per annum, have been left by some person unknown, the rental to be divided amongst the most deserving poor. The Duke of Northumberland takes the title of Baron Bryan from this parish.

Haseley (St. Mary)

HASELEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Warwick, Snitterfield division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 3½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Warwick; containing 188 inhabitants. In the time of the Conqueror this place had a church; also a mill; and the woods belonging to it extended a mile in length, and two furlongs in breadth. Queen Mary granted the manor to Michael Throckmorton, by a descendant of whom it was conveyed in marriage to the Bromley family, of Bagington. The parish is situated on the road from Birmingham to Warwick, and intersected by a small brook that falls into the river Avon. It comprises 1144 acres, mostly arable land, with about 40 acres of excellent wood; the surface is slightly undulated, the soil good for barley and turnips, and the scenery picturesque. The ancient manor-house is now the property of John Salisbury Richards, Esq., by purchase in 1843, of Sir Edmund Antrobus, Bart. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 9. 4½.; patron, Sir Edmund: the tithes have been commuted for £219, and the glebe consists of 68 acres, with a glebe-house. The church is an ancient edifice with a tower, and has some painted glass and a curious font; also a brass monument of the date 1573, to Clement Throckmorton. A school is chiefly supported by subscription.

Haseley, Great (St. Peter)

HASELEY, GREAT (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Thame, hundred of Ewelme, county of Oxford, 3¼ miles (W.) from Tetsworth; containing, with the township of Little Haseley, the hamlets of Latchford and Lobb, and the liberty of Rycote, 786 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £30, and in the gift of the Dean and Canons of Windsor: the tithes have been commuted for £800, and there are about 98 acres of glebe. The church is in the decorated English style, with a west entrance of elegant design: on the right hand, under the tower, is the figure of a crusader in a suit of chain armour, and at the east end of the south aisle is the trunk of another figure; in the chancel are some handsome stone stalls, and a window of fine proportions, enriched with tracery. Leland, the antiquary, was for some time rector of the parish, to which he was presented by Henry VIII., in 1542. Near the church stands a spacious manor-house, built by a younger branch of the ancient family of Pipard, two members of which performed deeds so valiant in the Scotch wars that Edward I. summoned one to parliament as a baron, and conferred the honour of knighthood on the other. A school is partly supported by an allowance of £31 from the trustees of charity lands.

Haseley, Little

HASELEY, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Great Haseley, union of Thame, hundred of Ewelme, county of Oxford, 3½ miles (W. by S.) from Tetsworth; containing 127 inhabitants.

Haselor

HASELOR, an extra-parochial liberty, locally in the parish of St. Michael, Lichfield, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 4½ miles (N.) from Tamworth; containing 29 inhabitants. The manor passed from the Staffords to the Stanleys, and by marriage to John Brook, Esq. It was subsequently the property of Joseph Girdler, sergeant-at-law, from whom it passed to two coheiresses, and became the property in moieties of the Dowager Lady Chetwynd, and Thomas Nevill, Esq., the latter of whom afterwards possessed the whole manor. The Hall is a fine specimen of the old half-timbered houses, having several florid gables and transom windows. Until 1832, Haselor was claimed as a member of St. Michael's parish, Lichfield; but in that year, after a long and expensive litigation, between the owners of the manor and the churchwardens of St. Michael's, the latter suffered judgment to be filed against them in the court of king's bench. The liberty comprises 520 acres of land. Here is a deserted chapel, which is a prebend in Lichfield cathedral.

Haselor (St. Mary and All Saints)

HASELOR (St. Mary and All Saints), a parish, in the union of Alcester, Stratford division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 2½ miles (E.) from Alcester; containing 360 inhabitants. The name was anciently written Haselover, from the ground being woody and full of hazels, and the situation over, or upon, a hill. In the reign of Edward III., Robert de Stratford, parson of Stratford church, purchased this property with the advowson, neither of which continued long in his possession. The manor subsequently passed to Thomas Beauchamp, Earl of Warwick, who bestowed it in the reign of Richard II. on the canons of his collegiate church at Warwick: after the dissolution of that college, it passed out of the crown to Sir Ralph Sadler, Knt., and Lawrence Wenington. The parish consists of 2250 acres, of a moderately fertile soil. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4., and has a net income of £42; the patronage and impropriation belong to the Crown. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1766.

Haselwood, or Haslewood

HASELWOOD, or Haslewood, a hamlet, in the parish of Aldborough, union and hundred of Plomesgate, E. division of Suffolk, 1¾ mile (N. N. W.) from Aldborough; containing 108 inhabitants. This place is bounded on the north by the river Alde, and on the south-east by the river Ore. The chapel of Haselwood, which was dedicated to St. Mary, is in ruins.

Hasfield (St. Mary)

HASFIELD (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Tewkesbury, Lower division of the hundred of Westminster, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 6 miles (N.) from Gloucester; containing 304 inhabitants, and comprising by measurement 1400 acres. Limestone of good quality is quarried for building and for the roads: facility of conveyance is afforded by the river Severn, which skirts the parish on the south-east, and is navigable for small craft. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £378; patron and incumbent, the Rev. J. F. Sevier. The tithes were commuted for land and money payments in 1795; the land comprises 174 acres, and there is a rectory-house, handsomely rebuilt in the Tudor style, by the present incumbent. The church is in the later English style, with a square embattled tower.

Hasketon (St. Andrew)

HASKETON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Woodbridge, hundred of Carlford, E. division of Suffolk, 1¾ mile (N. W.) from Woodbridge; containing 508 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; patrons, the family of Freeland. The incumbent's tithes have been commuted for £396. 16.; a rent-charge of £187. 18. 3. is paid to an impropriator, and the glebe contains 37 acres. A national school is supported.

Hasland

HASLAND, a township, in the parish and union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 1½ mile (S. S. E.) from the town of Chesterfield; containing 926 inhabitants.

Hasle, or Hesle

HASLE, or Hesle, a township, in the parish of Wragby, Upper division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York, 4 miles (S. W. by S.) from Pontefract; containing 172 inhabitants. It is the northeastern suburb of the village of Wragby, and comprises 641 acres, whereof 50 are waste.

Haslebury (All Saints)

HASLEBURY (All Saints), a parish, in the hundred of Chippenham, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts, 6½ miles (S. W.) from Chippenham. The parish comprises about 200 acres, of which 120 were originally free-warren, under grant from James II. to R. Speke: the old manor-house is the only residence. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £1. 15. 5.; net income, £10; patron, W. Northey, Esq. The church has fallen to decay.

Haslebury-Plucknett (St. Michael)

HASLEBURY-PLUCKNETT (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Yeovil, hundred of Houndsborough, Berwick, and Coker, W. division of Somerset, 1½ mile (N. E. by E.) from Crewkerne; containing 809 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from London to Exeter, and comprises 2069a. 2r. 32p. There are quarries of rough freestone and limestone; and facility of conveyance is afforded by the river Parret. The manufacture of sailcloth, and of webs for girths, is carried on, affording employment to about 200 persons. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7; patron, the Bishop of Bath and Wells. The rectorial tithes have been commuted for £214. 18., and the vicarial for £120; the rectorial glebe comprises 59, and the vicarial 6, acres. The church was enlarged by rebuilding the aisle, and beautified, in 1839, at an expense of £1400; on which occasion, Thomas Hoskins, Esq., presented an ornamented roof, a painted window, and a fine-toned organ. A petrifying spring has been discovered. St. Walfric, a hermit, had a cell here, and, dying in 1154, was interred in the parish church, where his tomb became the resort of pilgrims: a few years prior to his death, a monastery for Canons regular was founded, but it was destroyed during the war between John and the barons.

Haslemere (St. Bartholomew)

HASLEMERE (St. Bartholomew), a market-town and parish, and formerly a representative borough, in the union of Hambledon, Second division of the hundred of Godalming, W. division of Surrey, 12½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Guildford, and 42 (S. W.) from London; containing 873 inhabitants. This place is situated on the road to Chichester, by way of Midhurst, and in the south-west angle of the county, where it borders on Sussex and Hampshire, whence the termination of the name, Mere, signifying a boundary; the prefix alludes to the numerous coppices of hazel growing in the vicinity. There is a tradition that the ancient town, which is said to have been destroyed by the Danes, stood on the side of a hill to the east of the present, where the foundations of buildings have frequently been discovered. It was probably rebuilt before the Conquest, as it is mentioned as a borough in Domesday book. In the reign of Henry II. it appertained to the see of Salisbury; and in 1393, the bishop procured a grant for holding a market and a fair, but these had fallen into disuse previously to the charter by Queen Elizabeth. The town stands on very high ground, and is well supplied with water; a hill called Blackdown, at a short distance from it, affords a view of the sea and the surrounding country to a great extent, and in the vicinity is a telegraph. Near the town is a paper-mill. The market is on Tuesday, and there are fairs for live-stock on May 13th and September 26th. The charter for the re-establishment of the market and fair which had been discontinued, was granted in the 38th of Elizabeth; and in this charter it is stated that "the burgesses had from time immemorial, at their own costs, sent two members to parliament." The borough is by prescription, and has a bailiff and constable, who are chosen at the court leet, in April or May. The privilege of electing representatives was only regularly exercised from the 27th of Elizabeth; the right of election was vested in the resident freeholders, or burgage tenants, and the bailiff was the returning officer. The parish comprises 1290 acres, of which 40 are waste or common; the scenery abounds with interesting features. The living is annexed to the rectory of Chiddingfold: the tithes have been commuted for £240. The church is an ancient edifice, situated on an eminence to the north of the town, and consisting of a nave, north aisle, and tower; the east window contains some stained glass in compartments. Here is a place of worship for Independents; and a national school for boys is held over the market-house. The parish receives about £60 per annum from Henry Smith's charity.



<--Previous:
Hartlip - Harwich