Heath - Heaton-Norris

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

459-462

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'Heath - Heaton-Norris', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 459-462. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51020 Date accessed: 23 October 2014.


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Heath, with Reach

HEATH, with Reach, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Leighton-Buzzard, hundred of Manshead, county of Bedford, 2 miles (N. by E.) from LeightonBuzzard; containing 856 inhabitants, of whom 561 are in Heath. It comprises 2395 acres, of which 306 are waste land or common. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Leighton-Buzzard; net income, £98. The chapel, dedicated to St. Leonard, has been enlarged with 160 sittings. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Heath (All Saints)

HEATH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Chesterfield, hundred of Scarsdale, N. division of the county of Derby, 5¼ miles (S. E. by E.) from Chesterfield; containing 402 inhabitants. It lies on the road from Nottingham to Sheffield, and comprises 1607 acres. Coal-mines are wrought. The living is a vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £4. 18. 9., and in the gift of the Duke of Devonshire: the tithes have been commuted for £230, and the glebe comprises 5 acres, with a good house. The church has portions in the Norman style. There is an endowed school.

Heath, with Jay

HEATH, with Jay, a township, in the parish of Leintwardine, union of Ludlow, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 8 miles (W.) from Ludlow; containing 55 inhabitants.

Heath, or Hethe (St. George and St. Edmund)

HEATH, or Hethe (St. George and St. Edmund), a parish, in the union of Bicester, hundred of Ploughley, county of Oxford, 4 miles (N. by E.) from Bicester; containing 380 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 970 acres, of which 800 are arable, 133 pasture, and 37 woodland. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 9. 4½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £164. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Roman Catholics.

Heath

HEATH, a chapelry, in the parish of Stoke-St. Milborough, union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 9 miles (N. E. by N.) from Ludlow; containing 63 inhabitants.

Heath, Yorkshire.—See Warmfield.

HEATH, Yorkshire.—See Warmfield.

Heath-Charnock.—See Charnock, Heath.

HEATH-CHARNOCK.—See Charnock, Heath.

Heath, Upper, and Nether

HEATH, UPPER, and NETHER, a township, in the parish of Worthen, hundred of Chirbury, S. division of Salop; containing 546 inhabitants.

Heather (St. John)

HEATHER (St. John), a parish, in the union of Ashby-de-la-Zouch, hundred of Sparkenhoe, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4½ miles (S. S. E.) from Ashby; containing 368 inhabitants. Here was a commandery of Knights Hospitallers of St. John of Jerusalem, to which Ralph Gresley, in the reign of Henry II., gave the church and lands of the place; the only vestige at present remaining of the building is some wainscoting in the manor-house, which was erected on the site. The revenue was estimated at £39. 1. 5., and, together with the site, was granted, in the reign of Edward VI., to Oliver St. John and Robert Thornton. The parish comprises by measurement 1012 acres, of which about two-fifth parts are arable, and the remainder pasture and meadow; the soil is a light sandy loam, with a small portion of deep rich loam. Collieries have been worked for more than 200 years. The Ashby canal passes within two, and the Leicester and Swannington railway within three, miles. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 8.; net income, £377; patron and impropriator, the Rev. G. Belcher. The church was reopened in July 1847, after having undergone numerous improvements; the chancel has been rebuilt, a tower erected, and a north aisle added. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Heatherycleugh

HEATHERYCLEUGH, a chapelry, in the parish of Stanhope, union of Weardale, N. W. division of Darlington ward, S. division of the county of Durham, 10 miles (W.) from Stanhope. This place, which is situated on the road to Alston, abounds in mineral wealth; ten lead-mines are at present in operation, and there are extensive quarries of flag and other kinds of stone. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £120; patron, the Rector of Stanhope: the glebe comprises 8 acres. The church, the last of those erected by Bishop Barrington, is a neat plain edifice, consecrated in 1823. Here are two places of worship for Primitive, and one for Wesleyan, Methodists; and some national schools supported by endowment. The chapelry contains two mineral springs, and the mines abound with very beautiful and valuable spar.

Heathfield (St. John the Baptist)

HEATHFIELD (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Taunton, hundred of Taunton and Taunton-Dean, W. division of Somerset, 5¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Taunton; containing 146 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 1. 8., and in the gift of the family of Cornish: the tithes have been commuted for £178, and the glebe comprises 62 acres.

Heathfield (All Saints)

HEATHFIELD (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Hailsham, hundred of Hawkesborough, rape of Hastings, E. division of Sussex, 9 miles (E. S. E.) from Uckfield; containing 1971 inhabitants. This is distinguished as the scene of a severe battle in the year 635, between Cadwallo, and Edwin of Northumbria and his son Osfrid, on a spot since named Slaughter Common, in which both Edwin and his son were slain; and also as the scene of a conflict in 1450, when the noted rebel Jack Cade was killed by Alexander Iden, sheriff of Kent. In that part of the village where the rebel fell, since called Cade-street, a monument recording the event was erected by the late Francis Newbery, Esq.; who, also, in commemoration of the defeat of the combined armaments of France and Spain at Gibraltar by General Elliot, afterwards Lord Heathfield, erected a lofty tower, from the summit of which a view over the surrounding country is obtained to the distance of fifty miles. The parish is situated on the road from Battle to Uckfield, and comprises 6117 acres, of which about 140 are hop-grounds, and 429 common or waste; the surface is beautifully diversified with hill and dale. The river Cuckmere has its source in Heathfield Park. Ironore is found in abundance, and cannon were formerly cast, but no works are carried on at present. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Chichester: the tithes have been commuted for £862. 5., of which £400 are payable to the Ecclesiastical Commission, and £462. 5. to the vicar; the former has 18, and the latter 17, acres of glebe. The church is a spacious structure, partly in the early and partly in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a spire, and contains a handsome monument to General Elliot. There is a place of worship for Independents.

Heathpool

HEATHPOOL, a township, in the parish of KirkNewton, union, and W. division of the ward, of Glendale, N. division of Northumberland; containing 51 inhabitants, and comprising upwards of 1022 acres, in a mountainous district. It was the property of Lord Collingwood, the celebrated naval commander, in right of his wife, a daughter of J. E. Blackett, Esq., of Newcastle. Here are the remains of a border tower.

Heathwaite, Lancashire.—See Woodland.

HEATHWAITE, Lancashire.—See Woodland.

Heathy-Lee

HEATHY-LEE, a township, in the parish of Alstonfield, union of Leek, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 2¾ miles (W. by N.) from Longnor; containing 633 inhabitants. This is a moorland township comprising 5487 acres, and includes the village of Hardings-Booth, two miles west of Longnor; and the scattered districts of Broncott, Morredge-Top, Middle-Hills, Longnor-Mill, Downsdale, and some others on the banks of the Manyfold river.

Heaton, with Oxcliffe

HEATON, with Oxcliffe, a township, in the parish of Lancaster, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 3 miles (W. by S.) from Lancaster; containing 149 inhabitants. In the reign of Edward I., Heaton was held under the earls of Lincoln, and Oxcliffe under the earls of Lancaster. In the 47th of Edward III., the lord of Heaton cum Oxcliffe paid a reasonable aid of 10s. towards the marriage of the eldest daughter of John of Gaunt, Duke of Lancaster; and in the 51st of the same reign, William de Heton, descended from very early benefactors of the abbey of Furness, made grants of land in "Heton." The manor passed at a subsequent period to the Catterels, and from them to the De Brockholes. The principal proprietors now are, Thomas Fitzherbert Brockholes, Esq., of Claughton Hall, and Mrs. John Ford, of Ellel Hall. The township is situated on the banks of the Lune, and comprises 1972 acres, whereof 279 are marsh land. The tithes have been commuted for £245. 10. payable to the impropriator, and £122. 15. to the incumbent of Overton.

Heaton

HEATON, a township, in the parish of Deane, union of Bolton, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 2½ miles (W. by N.) from Bolton; containing 713 inhabitants. In the 32nd of Edward I., Richard de Hulton had a charter of free warren in his demesne lands here. The township comprises 1630 acres; it is bounded on the south by the Croal rivulet, and the road from Bolton to Chorley passes through its northern part. Coal, slate, and stone are abundant. The property belongs exclusively to H. Tempest, Esq.

Heaton

HEATON, a township, in the parish of All Saints, Newcastle-upon-Tyne, union of Newcastle, E. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 2 miles (N. E.) from Newcastle; containing 450 inhabitants. This township, which is within the limits of the borough, is separated from the township of Jesmond by the Ouse burn, and comprises about 924 acres of good arable, meadow, and pasture, interspersed with tracts of sand and peat-moss. The manor, in 1628, belonged to the family of Babington, of Harnham. Heaton Hall, built in 1713, and greatly improved by Sir Matthew White Ridley, is a handsome mansion. Here is a station on the Newcastle and North Shields railway, which passes through the township by a tunnel and an excavation. The tithes have been commuted for £166. 14. 4., of which £33. 9. 1. are payable to the vicar of Newcastle. The township contains the ruins of a chapel, in which Edward I., in 1299, attended the celebration of the vespers of St. Nicholas by a juvenile bishop, to whom, and to the singing boys who assisted on the occasion, he presented the sum of forty shillings.

Heaton

HEATON, a township, in the parish and union of Leek, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 5 miles (N. W. by N.) from Leek; containing 430 inhabitants. Here is a small cotton-mill on the Dane river.

Heaton

HEATON, a township, in the district parish of Shipley, union of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Bradford; containing 1573 inhabitants. The township comprises by computation 743 acres, of which 170 are arable, 523 pasture, and 50 wood; the surface is undulated, and the scenery is beautifully diversified, and embellished with stately wood. The lands were inclosed by act of parliament in the 20th of George III., and are in good cultivation. Heaton Hall, for many years the seat of the family of Field, has descended to the Earl and Countess of Rosse. The village, which is pleasantly seated on an acclivity, is irregularly built; and the township comprises also the small village of Frizingley, sheltered with well-grown timber, and the hamlets of Chellow, Heaton-Royds, and Heaton-Shaw; the whole retaining much of its pristine simplicity and rural beauty. A schoolroom is licensed by the bishop for divine service; and there is a place of worship for Baptists, who made Heaton their first settlement in the West riding.

Heaton, Earls, or Nether Soothill

HEATON, EARLS, or Nether Soothill, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Dewsbury, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 1 mile (N. E.) from Dewsbury; containing 4453 inhabitants. The population is chiefly engaged in the woollen manufactures of the district, and blankets are made to a very great extent; there are also some quarries of excellent building-stone. The village is pleasantly situated on the brow of a hill, and is built of stone procured in the neighbourhood. The church, dedicated to St. Peter, was erected in 1827, at a cost of £5000, by the Parliamentary Commissioners; it is a cruciform structure in the later English style, with a tower and spire, and contains 600 sittings, of which 250 are free, and a gallery for the accommodation of 300 children. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £200 by the Ripon Diocesan Society, and in the patronage of the Vicar of Dewsbury; net income, £164. There are 4 acres of glebe, and a good glebe-house.

Heaton, Great

HEATON, GREAT, a township, in the parish of Prestwich, union of Manchester, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 4½ miles (N. by W.) from Manchester; containing 159 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Manchester to Heywood and Middleton, and comprises 837 acres, a considerable portion of which is meadow and pasture; the surface is undulated and hilly, the soil of a sandy nature but fertile, and the scenery pleasing from many points of view. The river Irk skirts the south-eastern boundary, and supplies water to several manufactories, but none of them are within the township. Heaton House, the seat of the Earl of Wilton, is a handsome structure of stone, erected by Wyatt, with columns of the Ionic order, and a circular projection in the centre, surmounted by a spacious dome; it stands in a verdant and well-wooded park, five miles in circumference, at the entrance to which is an elegant Doric lodge. At some distance from the mansion, on a bold eminence, is a circular temple, commanding extensive views into the four adjoining counties of Cheshire, Derby, Stafford, and York. Races are annually held at Heaton Park, and are attended by numerous distinguished supporters of the turf. The tithes have been commuted for £75.

Heaton, Hanging, or Upper Soothill

HEATON, HANGING, or Upper Soothill, an ecclesiastical district, in the parish of Dewsbury, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 1½ mile (N. E.) from Dewsbury. This district, which derives the affix to its name from the earls of Warren having had a gallows here, is on the road from Dewsbury to Leeds, and comprises 1845 acres of arable and pasture land, and 250a. 3r. 20p. of wood. It participates in the various woollen manufactures carried on in the neighbourhood. The village is beautifully situated on the slope of an eminence, abounding with good freestone, of which the houses and the church are built; and coal is wrought. The church, dedicated to St. Paul, was erected in 1825, at an expense of £5000, by the Parliamentary Commissioners; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, and contains 600 sittings, of which 220 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Dewsbury, with a net income of £150, and a good house.

Heaton, Kirk (St. John the Baptist)

HEATON, KIRK (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York; containing 11,930 inhabitants, of whom 3165 are in the township of Kirk-Heaton, 2½ miles (E. by N.) from Huddersfield. The parish consists of the townships of Kirk-Heaton, Dalton, Lepton, and Whitley; and is bounded on the east by the river Calder, which separates it from Mirfield, and on the north-east by the Colne, over which is a handsome bridge. It comprises by computation 6500 acres, whereof about 1800 are arable, 4200 grass-land, and 450 wood. The surface is mountainous; several coal-mines are in operation, and some quarries of good building and flagstone are wrought. The village is pleasantly situated in a deep valley, watered by one of the tributaries of the Colne; the inhabitants are employed in weaving in their cottages a species of fancy goods, a mixture of cotton, woollen, and silk, for gowns and waistcoats. At Colne bridge is a large cotton-mill. The road from Huddersfield to Wakefield, and the Manchester and Leeds railway, pass through the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £25. 13. 9., and in the patronage of the Rev. J. Alderson, with a net income of £537: the tithes of the townships of Kirk-Heaton and Dalton were commuted for land under acts of inclosure in 1799. The church is an ancient structure, with a tower; its principal benefactors were the Hetons, formerly lords of the manor: in the sepulchral chapel of the Beaumont family are some handsome monuments. There are places of worship for Wesleyans.

Heaton, Little

HEATON, LITTLE, a township, in the parish of Prestwich, union of Manchester, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 5 miles (N.) from Manchester; containing 808 inhabitants. It comprises 242 acres, Cheshire measure, of which three-fourths are meadow and pasture, and the remainder arable; the soil in the lower parts is sandy, in the higher clayey. This and the adjoining township of Great Heaton are divided into detached portions, intermixed one with another. On the river Irk is a bleaching-factory. The tithes have been commuted for £55.

Heaton-Norris

HEATON-NORRIS, a chapelry, in the parish of Manchester, union of Stockport, hundred of Salford, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 2 miles (N. W. by N.) from Stockport; comprising the townships of Heaton-Norris and Reddish, and containing 15,817 inhabitants, of whom 14,629 are in Heaton-Norris. This place is separated from Stockport by the river Mersey, and the Manchester and Birmingham railway passes through it: the Manchester and Stockport canal terminates at Heaton. The cotton manufacture is largely carried on. The petty-sessions for the Manchester division of the hundred of Salford are held here. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £116; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Canons of Manchester. The chapel is dedicated to St. Thomas, and has been enlarged by 320 sittings, 250 of which are free. Christ Church, built by the Manchester and Eccles Church-Building Society, was completed in the autumn of 1846; it is in the decorated style, and consists of a nave and transepts, but without a chancel, and has 1220 sittings: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Bishop of Chester. There are places of worship for dissenters, and numerous schools. Near the chapel is a school, endowed with £10 per annum arising from a bequest by John Hollingpriest, in 1785; and at Heaton-Mersey is a Sunday school endowed with £500 in 1815, by Robert Parker, Esq.