Hincaster - Hinton-Ampner

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

514-518

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'Hincaster - Hinton-Ampner', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 514-518. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51033 Date accessed: 25 October 2014.


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Hincaster

HINCASTER, a township, in the parish of Heversham, union and ward of Kendal, county of Westmorland, 2½ miles (N. N. E.) from Milnthorpe; containing 136 inhabitants. The Kendal and Lancaster canal passes through a tunnel north of the township.

Hinchinbrook

HINCHINBROOK, partly in the parish of St. Mary, union and borough of Huntingdon, and partly in the hundred of Hurstingstone (the latter portion being extra-parochial), county of Huntingdon, 1 mile (W.) from the town of Huntingdon; containing 14 inhabitants. A small Benedictine nunnery, dedicated to St. James, was founded here by William the Conqueror, to which the nuns removed from Eltesley, in Cambridgeshire; its revenue at the Dissolution was £19. 9. 2. The site is occupied by Hinchinbrook House, which belonged to Sir Oliver Cromwell, uncle of the Protector; James I. was sumptuously entertained here, with all his court, on that monarch's arrival from Scotland, and Charles II. visited the place at different periods. This mansion, which, a few years since, sustained considerable injury from a fire, now belongs to the Earl of Sandwich, who enjoys the inferior title of Viscount Hinchinbroke.

Hinckley (St. Mary)

HINCKLEY (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, and the head of a union, chiefly in the hundred of Sparkenhoe, county of Leicester, but partly in the S. division of the hundred of Knightlow and of the county of Warwick; comprising the chapelries of Dadlington and Stoke-Golding, and the hamlet of Wykin; and containing 7291 inhabitants, of whom 6356 are in the town, 13 miles (S. W. by W.) from Leicester, and 100 (N. W. by N.) from London. This place was created a barony soon after the Conquest, and was held by Hugh de Grentismenil, seneschal of England in the reigns of William Rufus and Henry I., who erected a stately castle and a church, and founded a small priory of Benedictine monks, which, before 1173, was granted as a cell to the abbey of Lyra, in Normandy, by Robert Blanchmaines, Earl of Leicester. Having fallen into the hands of the crown, Richard II. gave it to the Carthusian priory at Montgrace in Yorkshire, to which it was finally annexed by Henry V.; and on the dissolution of that priory, it was granted to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. Under its ancient lords the town had all the privileges of a borough; but the inhabitants taking part with the house of Lancaster in the civil war of the fifteenth century, their privileges were annulled by Edward IV. Leland mentions the ruins of the castle (which, in his time, was owned by the crown, but had previously belonged to the Earl of Leicester), as being situated two miles from the town of Hinckley, on the borders of the forest, and as being spacious and celebrated. The assizes for the county were formerly held at Hinckley.

The town stands close to the border of Warwickshire, from which county it is separated by the Roman Watling-street; and so elevated is its situation that it commands a view of fifty churches. It comprises the Borough, within the limits of the ancient town, and the Bond, without those limits. The houses are indifferently built, but the town is paved, lighted with gas, and well supplied with water; and the walks are pleasant. A mechanics' institute has been established. The waste lands were inclosed in 1760, and one-seventh of the lordship allotted to the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. The town has derived great benefit from the introduction of the stocking manufacture, which is now so extensive that a greater quantity of cotton and worsted hose, particularly the former, of the coarser kind, is supposed to be made here than in any other place of equal size in the kingdom: the number of frames in the town and villages adjacent is computed at 2500, affording employment to nearly 3000 persons. A steam corn-mill was built in 1845-6, at a cost of about £10,000. Hinckley possesses a communication with all parts of the kingdom, by means of the Ashby canal, which traverses the south-western part of the parish. The market is on Monday; and fairs are held on the 1st, 2nd, and 3rd Mondays after Jan. 6th, on Easter-Monday, the Monday before Whitsuntide, Whit-Monday, Aug. 26th, and the Monday after Oct. 28th, which last is a cheese-fair. The ancient town is under the government of a mayor or bailiff, a constable, and two headboroughs, chosen at the annual court leet of the lord of the manor: the Bond, or Bound, is under that of a constable and three headboroughs. There is also a town-master, chosen at the church on the Tuesday in Easter-week, who is empowered, in conjunction with his predecessor in the office, to audit annually the accounts of the trustees of the Feoffment. The powers of the county debt-court of Hinckley, established in 1847, extend over the registration-district of Hinckley, and the parish of Wolvey. The town-hall was rebuilt in 1803, by means of funds arising from the Feoffment benefaction; a bridewell was erected in 1768, and a house of detention in 1842.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 9. 9½.; net income, £338; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. The church is a spacious edifice, erected chiefly in the thirteenth century, with a tower and a finely-proportioned spire, the latter built in 1788; it has been enlarged with 340 free sittings. Of the several chapels of ease which formerly belonged to the church, only those of StokeGolding and Dadlington remain. Trinity district church, on the south side of the town, was built and endowed in 1837-8, by the late John Frewen Turner, Esq.: the living is in the gift of Thomas Frewen, Esq. There are places of worship for General Baptists, Independents, Wesleyans, and Unitarians. On the invasion of Belgium by the French, in 1794, the English Dominicans of Bornhern, near Antwerp, took refuge in England, and after remaining for some time at Carshalton, in Surrey, settled at Hinckley, where they built a neat chapel. A national school is supported from the funds belonging to the Feoffment benefaction. In addition to these large funds, is a bequest of Ralph Chesser, Esq., in 1826, producing £74 per annum, to be distributed to the poor. The union of Hinckley comprises 11 parishes or places, of which 9 are in the county of Leicester, and 2 in that of Warwick; and contains a population of 15,589. At a short distance from Hinckley, on the road to Lutterworth, is a mineral spring called Holy Well; and in the neighbourhood are other good mineral waters, at Cogg's Well, Christopher's Spa, and the Priest Hills.

Hinderclay (St. Mary)

HINDERCLAY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Stow, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Botesdale; containing 387 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the north by the smaller river Ouse, which separates it from the county of Norfolk; and comprises by computation about 1300 acres. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 19. 4½.; patron, G. St. Vincent Wilson, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £400, and the glebe consists of 26 acres. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with a square embattled tower.

Hinderwell (St. Hilda)

HINDERWELL (St. Hilda), a parish, in the union of Whitby, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 10 miles (N. W. by W.) from Whitby; including the chapelry of Roxby, and containing 1970 inhabitants, of whom 1771 are in the township of Hinderwell. This place derives its name, anciently Hilderwell, from a spring of pure water in the churchyard, dedicated to St. Hilda, who is said to have had a retreat near the spot. The lands were granted by William the Conqueror to the Percys, and afterwards became the property of the powerful family of Thweng, who retained possession of them till the reign of Richard II., since which time the estate has successively belonged to the Lumley, Sheffield, and Mulgrave families. It is at present owned by the Marquess of Normanby, who is lord of the manor. In 1603, the plague was communicated to the village by a Turkish vessel wrecked upon this part of the coast, and raged here for six weeks, carrying off many of the inhabitants. The parish is of considerable extent, and bounded on the north and northeast by the sea; the soil is chiefly clay with a mixture of gravel, and clayey loam, producing favourable crops, and the surface is diversified by craggy hills and precipitous acclivities, and much beautiful woodland scenery. Stone for building is quarried in abundance, and jet of fine quality is found on the coast. There is a woollen manufactory on a small scale. The village stands on gently rising ground, about a mile from the sea; and within the limits of the parish, are also the villages of Runswick and Staithes, both on the sea-shore: the village of Runswick, to the east of Hinderwell, has a strikingly picturesque appearance, and that of Staithes is romantically situated on a narrow creek between two cliffs. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15, net income, £610; patron, Robert Barry, Esq. The tithes of Hinderwell township have been commuted for £306, and the glebe consists of 46 acres. The church rebuilt by the parishioners, in 1817, at a cost of £600, is a plain neat structure with a tower. At Roxby is a small chapel of ease; and there are places of worship in the village of Staithes for Calvinists, Wesleyan Methodists, and Ranters.

Hindley

HINDLEY, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Wigan, hundred of West Derby, S. division of the county of Lancaster, 3 miles (E. S. E.) from Wigan; containing 5459 inhabitants. The family of Hindley, then Hindele, held lands here as early as the reign of Henry II.: in the eighth of Richard II., Robert, of this family, married Emma, one of the heiresses of Pemberton; and the Hindleys were living at the Hall in 1613. The chapelry comprises 2527 acres, whereof 169 are arable land, and 2358 pasture: there is an abundance of excellent coal; and seven cotton-mills, worked by steamengines of 330-horse power in the aggregate, and having 78,370 spindles, afford employment to 1500 hands. The Liverpool and Bury railway has a station here. Hindley Hall, in the township of Aspull, yet near the village of Hindley, and now the residence of the Rt. Hon. Pemberton Leigh, is a massive brick edifice of the last century. Hindley Lodge is the seat of Richard Pennington, Esq.; and there is another seat, called Higher Hall. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Rector of Wigan; net income, £200, with a house. The chapel, dedicated to All Saints, is a large fabric, with a handsome cemetery. The tithes have been commuted for £298. 11. There are places of worship for Independents, Unitarians, and Wesleyans; and a Roman Catholic chapel. In 1632 Mary Abram built a school, which has an endowment of £150; and a few other sums are appropriated to charitable purposes. Here was formerly a rare phenomenon, called the "Burning Well," which attracted many visiters. It was similar to that at Petoa Mela, near Fierenzota, in Italy, except that the flame of the Italian spring is perpetual, in the absence of heavy rain, and consists of sulphuric gas; while the inflammable principle of that at Hindley was, the decomposition of water acting upon ores and sulphate of iron. The working of the coal-mines exhausted this well.

Hindolveston (St. George)

HINDOLVESTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Aylsham, hundred of Eynsford, E. division of Norfolk, 12 miles (N. E.) from the town of East Dereham; containing 839 inhabitants. It comprises 2490a. 2p., of which 1590 acres are arable, 511 meadow and pasture, and about 5 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 1.; net income, £76; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Norwich: the great tithes have been commuted for £434, and the vicarial for £50; the glebe contains 10 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans.

Hindon

HINDON, a market-town and parochial chapelry, and formerly a representative borough, in the union of Tisbury, hundred of Downton, Hindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 15 miles (W. by N.) from Salisbury, and 96 (W. S. W.) from London; containing 772 inhabitants. This small town is situated on the slope of one of the Wiltshire downs, about two miles from the ruins of Fonthill Abbey, and consists principally of one street, extending along the great western road from London to Exeter: a considerable part was consumed by fire in 1754. The manufacture of silk twist, for which Hindon was formerly noted, is extinct, but that of linen, dowlas, and bed-ticking, is carried on in the vicinity; and at the head of the Fonthill river, about a mile and a half distant, is a large establishment for the manufacture of broad-cloth and kerseymere. The market, on Thursday, was considerable for corn; but it has declined since the great fire, and the establishment of a corn-market at Warminster. There are fairs on the 9th of May, for cattle and sheep, and on Oct. 29th, for horses, cattle, poultry, &c.; a fair is also held at Berwick Hill, about a mile from the town, on November 6th, for horses and sheep. In the 7th of Richard II., a precept was directed to this borough to send burgesses to parliament, but no return was made: it first sent representatives in the 27th of Henry VI., from which period the members were regularly chosen until the 2nd of William IV., when it was disfranchised. The petty-sessions for the Hindon division are held here on the first Wednesday in every month. The chapelry comprises by computation 196 acres: the soil is chalky, and that portion under cultivation is fertile and productive. The living is a donative, in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £75; appropriator, the Rector of Knoyle. The chapel, dedicated to St. John the Baptist, is a plain oblong building, having a small south transept; it was originally erected in 1556, and much improved in 1836, at which time it was enlarged with 126 sittings. It is under the temporal jurisdiction of eight governors, incorporated by letters-patent of George III. There is a place of worship for Primitive Methodists. In the vicinity of the town, towards the north-west, and near the Roman road which leads to Old Sarum, are Stockton Works, occupying an area of 62 acres, and supposed to be the remains of an ancient British settlement.

Hindringham (St. Martin)

HINDRINGHAM (St. Martin), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of North Greenhoe, W. division of Norfolk, 3¾ miles (E. by S.) from Little Walsingham; containing 721 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 3313 acres of rich land, chiefly arable, with a small portion of wood and pasture. Hindringham Hall and Godfrey's Hall are ancient mansions, the former of which is surrounded by a moat. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9; net income, £136; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Norwich. The great tithes have been commuted for £800, and the vicarial for £322; the glebe comprises 2 acres. The church is a handsome structure in the decorated English style, with a lofty embattled tower; at the east end of the north aisle is a small chapel, and some of the windows have remains of stained glass. There are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans.

Hingham (St. Andrew)

HINGHAM (St. Andrew), a market-town and parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Forehoe, E. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Attleborough, 14 miles (W. by S.) from Norwich, and 96 (N. E. by N.) from London; containing 1691 inhabitants. This place is situated north of the South Mere, or Semere, a lake about twenty acres in extent, from which one of the tributary streams of the Yare flows. Though not so considerable as at the period when it gave name to the deanery, the town is yet respectable. About a century ago, a fire consumed the greater part, but it was rebuilt in an improved style, and is now distinguished for neatness, and many good houses; the inhabitants are well supplied with water from wells. The market, formerly on Saturday, is now on Tuesday, and chiefly for corn, but cattle, sheep, and swine are sometimes brought for sale: fairs are held on March 7th, Whit-Tuesday, and October 2nd; the first chiefly for horses, and the last for different kinds of live-stock. General courts baron and customary courts, for the manors of Hingham, Hingham-Gurney, and Hingham rectory, are held annually; and petty-sessions on the first Tuesday in the month. The town having been part of the domains of the Saxon kings, the inhabitants are exempted from serving on juries at the assizes and sessions. The parish comprises by admeasurement 3783 acres, of which 2900 are arable, 700 pasture and meadow, and 72 woodland.

The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24. 18. 4., and in the gift of Lord Wodehouse: the tithes have been commuted for £1248. 16. 3., and there is a handsome parsonage-house, with a glebe of 33 acres. The church is a fine structure, chiefly in the decorated English style, with a tower of flint and stone, formerly surmounted by a lofty spire: it was rebuilt in the reign of Edward III., by the rector, Remigius de Hethersete, aided by the patron, John le Marshall; and had anciently seven chantry chapels, and as many guilds. Against the north wall of the chancel is a noble monument to the memory of Thomas Parker, Lord Morley, who died in 1435. The window of the chancel, presented by the first lord Wodehouse, in 1813, is of stained glass brought from a nunnery in the Netherlands; it is 36 feet high, and 18 feet wide, and is divided into seven compartments, chiefly emblematical of the Crucifixion, Descent from the Cross, Resurrection, and Ascension of Our Saviour. The church was formerly more richly ornamented, but in 1605 was barbarously mutilated by Robert Peak, then rector, a violent schismatic; for which being prosecuted by the bishop, he fled to New England, accompanied by many seceders from Hingham, and built a new town, which he named after this place. There are meeting-houses for Independents and the Society of Friends. The free school was founded by William Parlett, in 1727; the proceeds of an estate, amounting to £171 per annum, are divided between a master and an usher, in the ratio of two-thirds to the former, and onethird to the latter. At the inclosure in 1781, about 35 acres of land were allotted for fuel to the poor, who have also several small bequests. Sir Ralph de Hingham, chief justice of the common pleas in the 1st of Edward II., was born here.

Hinksey, North (St. Lawrence)

HINKSEY, NORTH (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks, 1½ mile (W.) from the city of Oxford; containing, with part of the tything of Botley, 295 inhabitants. This parish, sometimes called Ferry Hinksey, is situated on the western bank of the Isis, and comprises 750 acres. Both North and South Hinksey were formerly chapelries in the parish of Cumner. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £105; joint patrons, the Archbishop of York and the Earl of Abingdon; appropriator, the Archbishop. The tithes were commuted for land in 1776.

Hinksey, South (St. John)

HINKSEY, SOUTH (St. John), a parish, in the union of Abingdon, hundred of Hormer, county of Berks, 1½ mile (S.) from Oxford; containing 153 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 600 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Wootton annexed; net income, £183; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Abingdon. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1814. In a field north of the church is a conduit, erected in 1620, for supplying the city of Oxford with water.

Hinlip (St. James)

HINLIP (St. James), a parish, in the union of Droitwich, Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Worcester; containing 139 inhabitants. The name of this place, properly Hindlip, is derived from two Saxon words signifying the Hind's Leap. The parish is included in the borough of Droitwich, is situated on the Worcester and Droitwich road, and intersected by the Birmingham and Worcester canal; it comprises 1047a. 21p., of which the surface is undulated, the soil good bean land, and the scenery picturesque. Hinlip House, the property and seat of Viscount Southwell, is a fine modern mansion, erected on the site of Hinlip Hall, an ancient structure, formerly the residence of Thomas Habingdon or Abingdon, writer of the Habingdon papers in the British Museum. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 16. 0½., and in the gift of Viscount Southwell: the tithes have been commuted for £202, and the glebe comprises 17 acres, with a house built in 1842. The church is in the Norman style, with a neat tower; the interior is in good repair, and contains 100 sittings. A Roman copper coin was found on the rectory grounds in 1840.

Hinstock (St. Oswald)

HINSTOCK (St. Oswald), a parish, in the union of Drayton, Drayton division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 5¾ miles (N. W. by N.) from Newport; containing 897 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Birmingham to Chester, comprises by measurement 3036 acres; the soil for the greater part is light and sandy, and the surface is diversified with hills. Stone of good quality for building is quarried; and the Birmingham Junction canal passes within a short distance of the village. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 16., and in the patronage of the Trustees of the late Sir C. Corbet, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £527. 17. 6., and the glebe comprises 14 acres. The church, rebuilt in 1721, is a neat structure of stone. There is a chalybeate sulphureous spring in the parish. Vestiges of an ancient castle may be traced.

Hintlesham (St. Nicholas)

HINTLESHAM (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Samford, E. division of Suffolk, 5½ miles (W.) from Ipswich; containing 583 inhabitants. The parish comprises 2828a. 3r. 24p.; the soil is generally a mixed loam, and the surface is level. Hintlesham Hall is a handsome mansion. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £33. 9. 7.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. William H. Deane: the tithes have been commuted for £582, and the glebe comprises 44½ acres. Some children are instructed for £10 per annum, the proceeds of land; and Miss Lloyd, by will, left another endowment of like amount.

Hinton

HINTON, a tything, in the parish, and Upper division of the hundred, of Berkeley, union of Thornbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 539 inhabitants. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists.

Hinton

HINTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Woodford, union of Daventry, hundred of Chipping-Warden, S. division of the county of Northampton, 7¼ miles (S. S. W.) from the town of Daventry; containing 299 inhabitants. Here is a mineral spring.

Hinton

HINTON, a township, in the parish of Whitchurch, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 1¼ mile (N. N. E.) from Whitchurch; containing 41 inhabitants.

Hinton (St. George)

HINTON (St. George), a parish, in the union of Chard, hundred of Crewkerne, W. division of Somerset, 2¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from the town of Crewkerne; containing 832 inhabitants. Nearly the whole of the parish belongs to Earl Poulett, upon whom it confers the title of Viscount. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4., and in the gift of the Earl: certain impropriate tithes have been commuted for £60, and the rectorial for £165; the glebe comprises 14 acres.

Hinton

HINTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Blythburgh, union and hundred of Blything, E. division of the county of Suffolk; containing 136 inhabitants.

Hinton, a tything, in the parish of Steeple-Ashton, Wilts.—See Hinton, Great.

HINTON, a tything, in the parish of Steeple-Ashton, Wilts.—See Hinton, Great.

Hinton-Admiral

HINTON-ADMIRAL, a chapelry, in the parish, union, and hundred of Christchurch, Ringwood and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3¾ miles (N. E.) from the town of Christchurch; containing 334 inhabitants. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £72; patrons, the family of Gervis.

Hinton-Ampner (All Saints)

HINTON-AMPNER (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Alresford, hundred of Fawley, Winchester and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Alresford; containing 360 inhabitants. It comprises 2349 acres, of which 27 are common or waste land. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 11. 10½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £453, and the glebe comprises 100 acres. A school was founded and endowed in 1738, by William Blake.