Hinton-Blewitt - Hitchenden

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

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Pages

518-521

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'Hinton-Blewitt - Hitchenden', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 518-521. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51034 Date accessed: 31 July 2014.


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Hinton-Blewitt (All Saints)

HINTON-BLEWITT (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Clutton, hundred of Chewton, E. division of Somerset, 8 miles (N. N. E.) from Wells; containing 336 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 8. 1., and in the gift of the Representatives of the late Rev. James Johnson: the tithes have been commuted for £155, and the glebe comprises 73 acres.

Hinton, Broad

HINTON, BROAD, a liberty, in the parish of Hurst, union of Wokingham, hundred of Charlton, county of Berks, 3¾ miles (N. by W.) from Wokingham; containing 524 inhabitants.

Hinton, Broad (St. Peter)

HINTON, BROAD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Marlborough, hundred of Selkley, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of Wilts, 8 miles (N. W.) from Marlborough; containing 670 inhabitants. The manor belonged in the reign of Elizabeth to Sir John Glanville, speaker of the house of commons, who resided for many years in the ancient manor-house, and whose remains are interred in the chancel of the church, with those of several members of his family. The parish is situated on the road from Devizes to Oxford, and comprises by admeasurement 4388 acres. The village, which is neatly built, is on the road from Wootton-Bassett to Marlborough, and on the new road from Salisbury to Kennet. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 18. 11½.; net income, £302; patron and impropriator, the Master of St. Nicholas' Hospital, Salisbury: the glebe comprises 21 acres. The church, a venerable edifice, has been thoroughly repaired and beautified, at the expense of the parishioners, aided by grants from the Diocesan and Incorporated Societies; it contains a monument to Sir John Glanville, who was killed at Bridgwater, and two monuments to the Wroughton family, on one of which is the effigy of an armed knight, with helmet and gauntlets. The communion-plate was presented by the family of Glanville. At Broad-Town is a church dedicated to Christ, having a consolidated chapelry attached. A school was endowed with £20 per annum, and a house and garden for the master, by Thomas Bennet, of Salthrop, who also bequeathed £13. 8. per annum for apprenticing children. There are evident traces of a camp; and a deed conveying some lands in the parish 200 years since, notices a chapel here.

Hinton-Charterhouse (St. John the Baptist)

HINTON-CHARTERHOUSE (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Bath, hundred of Wellow, E. division of Somerset, 5 miles (S. S. E.) from Bath; containing 797 inhabitants. This place is supposed to have been the site of a Roman station, and considerable vestiges of ancient buildings may yet be seen, with some remains of a small amphitheatre: in turning up the soil in various places Roman pottery has been found, from the coarsest kind to the finest Samian ware, with iron, glass, and scoriæ of iron; and the line of a Roman road may still be distinctly traced. A Carthusian monastery was founded here in 1227, and dedicated to the Blessed Virgin, St. John the Baptist, and All Saints, by Ela, Countess of Salisbury, widow of William Long Espee, who removed to it the monks of Heythorp, in the county of Gloucester, in 1232; it continued to flourish till the Dissolution, when its revenue was £262. 12. The remains consist chiefly of the chapel, charnel-house, and granary, surrounded by a grove of aged oaks. The parish, which derives the affix to its name from the monastery, comprises about 3000 acres, rather more than one-half being arable; the surface is finely varied, and the substratum abounds with freestone of good quality for building, and with sandstone for repairing the roads. Many of the inhabitants are employed in the manufacture of woollencloth. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Vicar of Norton St. Philip's. The church has been enlarged. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hinton, Cherry (St. Andrew)

HINTON, CHERRY (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Flendish, county of Cambridge, 3 miles (E. by S.) from Cambridge; containing 654 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 2043 acres, about 100 of which are pasture. The church stands near the Gogmagog hills: the valley beneath was formerly noted for an abundance of cherry-trees growing in it, but it is now the principal spot in the county where saffron is cultivated. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 14. 7.; net income, £164; patrons and appropriators, the Master and Fellows of Peter-House, Cambridge: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1806. A national school was founded by the late Rev. Bewick Bridge, who built the school premises, and endowed it with £1000. Various fossil teeth, and vertebræ of fish, are found in the chalkpits here.

Hinton, Great

HINTON, GREAT, a tything, in the parish of Steeple-Ashton, union of Westbury and Whorwelsdown, hundred of Whorwelsdown, Whorwelsdown and N. divisions of Wilts, 3¼ miles (E. by N.) from the town of Trowbridge; containing 216 inhabitants. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £75, and there is a glebe of 120 acres. The tything is sometimes called simply Hinton; it is situated in the northern extremity of the parish, and very near the road from Trowbridge to Devizes.

Hinton-in-the-Hedges (Holy Trinity)

HINTON-IN-THE-HEDGES (Holy Trinity), a parish, in the union of Brackley, hundred of King'sSutton, S. division of the county of Northampton, 1½ mile (W.) from Brackley; containing 171 inhabitants. It comprises about 1404 acres, of which 873 are arable, 500 pasture and meadow, and 30 woodland; the surface is finely undulated, and the prevailing timber ash, oak, and beech. The living is a rectory, with that of Stean united, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £343; patron, Earl Spencer. The tithes were commuted for land in 1766; the glebe altogether comprises 300 acres. The church is an ancient structure, in the Norman style, and contains a monument with the recumbent effigies of a knight and his lady, supposed to represent Lord and Lady Lovell, of whose family mansion or castle some remains may still be traced in a meadow near the village.

Hinton, Little (St. Swithin)

HINTON, LITTLE (St. Swithin), a parish, in the union of Highworth and Swindon, forming a distinct portion of the hundred of Elstub and Everley, Swindon and S. divisions of Wilts, 5¼ miles (E.) from Swindon; containing 324 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Bishop of Winchester: the tithes have been commuted for £520, and the glebe comprises two acres. A school is supported by endowment.

Hinton-Martell (St. John)

HINTON-MARTELL (St. John), a parish, in the union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Badbury, Wimborne division of Dorset, 4¼ miles (N. by E.) from Wimborne; containing 290 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1534 acres, of which the chief part is arable, and the remainder pasture and meadow, with a portion of woodland, and 77 acres of common or waste. The surface is hilly, and richly embellished with wood, principally oak and ash; the soil is a strong clay alternated with chalk, and there are numerous pits from which great quantities of chalk are dug for various purposes. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 8. 6½., and in the gift of the Earl of Shaftesbury: the tithes have been commuted for £360, and the glebe comprises 25 acres.

Hinton, St. Mary (St. Peter)

HINTON, ST. MARY (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Sturminster, hundred of SturminsterNewton-Castle, Sturminster division of Dorset, 8 miles (S. W. by W.) from the town of Shaftesbury; containing 361 inhabitants. The living is annexed to the vicarage of Iwerne-Minster.

Hinton-on-the-Green (St. Peter)

HINTON-ON-THE-GREEN (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Evesham, hundred of Tibaldstone, though locally in the Lower division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester, 2¾ miles (S. S. W.) from Evesham; containing 178 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 13. 11½.; net income, £200; patron, A. J. Baker Cresswell, Esq. Two-thirds of the great tithes belong to the Bishop of Gloucester and Bristol, and onethird to the rector.

Hinton Parva, or Stanbridge (St. Kenelm)

HINTON PARVA, or Stanbridge (St. Kenelm), a parish, in the union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Badbury, Wimborne division of Dorset, 2½ miles (N. by W.) from Wimborne; containing 47 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Cranborne to Wimborne, and bounded on the west by the river Allen, comprises 439 acres, whereof 240 are arable, 125 pasture and meadow, 55 woodland, and the remainder waste. The surface is pleasing; the soil is a rich loam, alternated with sand, and the substratum generally chalk. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 12. 1., and in the gift of Sir R. P. Glyn, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for £77, and the glebe comprises 31 acres. The church, an ancient building with a Norman arch separating the chancel from the nave, was formerly a chapel to the church of Wimborne, where the inhabitants bury; it has been almost entirely rebuilt, at the expense of Sir R. Glyn, and has a very beautiful spire, and a fine doorway.

Hinton, Tarrant

HINTON, TARRANT, a parish, in the union of Blandford, hundred of Pimperne, Blandford division of Dorset, 4 miles (N. E.) from Blandford; containing 278 inhabitants. The parish takes the affix to its name from the river Tarrant, which flows within its limits. It is situated on the great road from Salisbury to Exeter, through Blandford and Dorchester, and consists chiefly of arable and down land, with some extensive water meadows; the soil is chalky. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 17. 1.; net income, £370; patrons, the family of Saunders. The church is a handsome ancient structure, in the later English style, with a square embattled tower.

Hinton-Waldrist (St. Margaret)

HINTON-WALDRIST (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Farringdon, hundred of Ganfield, county of Berks, 8 miles (W. by N.) from Abingdon; containing, with the hamlet of Duxford, 353 inhabitants. Henry III., in 1217, granted a charter to Henry de St. Valery, for a market to be held here on Wednesday; but it has long been disused. The parish is bounded on the north by the river Isis, and comprises, according to survey in 1837, an area of 1847 acres, of which by far the greater portion is arable land: the higher grounds command extensive views, embracing Blenheim and Witney, with much picturesque scenery. There are some quarries of good freestone, which is used for building and other purposes. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 7. 6., and in the gift of J. Loder Symonds, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1761. In the neighbourhood are traces of an intrenchment, now an orchard, near which is an eminence called Windmill Hill, supposed to have been a signal station.

Hints (St. Bartholomew)

HINTS (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Tamworth, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 4 miles (W. by S.) from Tamworth; containing 213 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1831a. 3r. 12p., of which three-fourths are arable, and the remainder, with the exception of about 58 acres of woodland, meadow and pasture. Its surface is beautifully diversified with hills, some of which are finely wooded, and the lower grounds are watered by a clear rivulet, which flows through the centre of the parish; the soil is generally a rich loam, and the prevailing timber is oak and ash of luxuriant growth. The estate is the property of W. H. Cawley Floyer, Esq.: the mansion of the family has been enlarged by the present proprietor. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £80; patron, the Bishop of Lichfield; appropriators, the Dean and Chapter. The church is a modern structure in the Grecian style, and, from its situation, is a picturesque object in the scenery. A small school was founded, and is supported, by the Floyer family. Canwell was formerly distinguished for a priory, founded by Gever Riddle in 1142, for Benedictine monks, and which was one of those establishments assigned to Cardinal Wolsey, towards the erection and endowment of his intended colleges. On Hints Common, in 1792, a pig of lead was discovered, weighing 150lbs., on which was inscribed, in bas-relief, "imp. vesp. vii. t. imp. v. cos."

Hinwick

HINWICK, a hamlet, in the parish of Poddington, union of Wellingborough, hundred of Willey, county of Bedford, 4¼ miles (N.) from Harrold; containing 204 inhabitants.

Hinxhill (St. Mary)

HINXHILL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of East Ashford, hundred of Chart and Longbridge, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 2½ miles (E. by S.) from Ashford; containing 171 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 671 acres, of which 211 are arable, 387 pasture, and 73 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £7. 16. 8., and in the gift of the family of Honywood: the tithes have been commuted for £195. 10., and the glebe contains 12 acres. The church is principally in the early English style. A parsonage-house has been recently erected.

Hinxton (St. Mary)

HINXTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Linton, hundred of Whitlesford, county of Cambridge, 9 miles (S. by E.) from Cambridge; containing 382 inhabitants, of whom the females are chiefly employed in working muslin. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 5. 2½.; net income, £150; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Jesus' College, Cambridge; appropriator, the Bishop of Ely. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1820.

Hinxworth (St. Nicholas)

HINXWORTH (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Royston, hundred of Odsey, county of Hertford, 4½ miles (N.) from Baldock; containing 328 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1300 acres of pasture and arable land, the latter of which predominates; the soil is a strong clay, producing good crops. Two ancient manor-houses, called respectively Hinxworth Place and Hinxworth House, are now occupied as farmhouses. A pleasure-fair is held on the festival of St. John the Baptist. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16; net income, £300; patron, the Rev. John Lafont: the tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1802. The church is an ancient structure, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a low spire, and contains about 230 sittings; in the chancel is a tablet to the memory of John Lafont, Esq., descended from a Protestant branch of an old French family, and who was interred here in 1834. In the neighbourhood, urns inclosing ashes and burnt bones were discovered in 1724, also several human skeletons, with a glass tribulus, lachrymatories of glass, pateræ of red earth, &c.; and in 1810, two beautiful and very scarce Greek coins, or medals, were found in a state of entire preservation, one being of Mithridates, King of Pontus, the other of Perseus, King of Macedonia.

Hippenscombe

HIPPENSCOMBE, an extra-parochial liberty, in the hundred of Kinwardstone, Everley and Pewsey, and S. divisions of Wilts; containing 59 inhabitants, and comprising 900 acres of land.

Hipperholme

HIPPERHOLME, with Brighouse, a township, in the parish and union of Halifax, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 2½ miles (E. N. E.) from Halifax; containing 5421 inhabitants. This township, which takes its name from its elevated situation, overlooking the picturesque valley of the Calder, comprises by computation 2550 acres, including its several hamlets. The soil is generally fertile, and the scenery richly diversified; the substratum abounds with coal and freestone, for the conveyance of which facilities are afforded by the Calder and Hebble navigation, and by the Leeds and Manchester railway, which passes along the south side of the river Calder. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans. The free grammar school at Hipperholme was founded in 1647, by Matthew Broadley, who bequeathed £40 for the erection of the building, and £500, and a rent-charge of £5, to be vested in land for the endowment, now producing an income of more than £60 per annum; which bequest was augmented by Samuel Sunderland, who in 1671 left property now yielding £100 per annum. Mr. Sunderland likewise bequeathed property at Norwood Green, producing £28 per annum, for distribution among indigent persons, who have also some smaller bequests.—See Brighouse, Coley, and Lightcliffe.

Hipswell

HIPSWELL, a chapelry, in the parish of Catterick, union of Richmond, wapentake of Hang-East, N. riding of York, 3 miles (W. by N.) from Catterick; consisting of the townships of Hipswell, Colburn, and Scotton; and containing 313 inhabitants, of whom 33 are in the township of Hipswell. The township comprises 2535a. 1r. 13p. The chapel, dedicated to St. Martin, was rebuilt in the later English style, in 1811. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Vicar of Catterick. Christopher Plowes, in 1665, bequeathed £100 to be vested in land, the rent of which, now £22 per annum, was to be distributed among the poor of the chapelry. Robert Cockin, in 1757, gave £100 towards the endowment of a free school, for which a more commodious building was erected by subscription, in 1815. —See Martin, St.

Histon

HISTON, a parish, in the union and hundred of Chesterton, county of Cambridge, 3½ miles (N. by W.) from Cambridge; containing 859 inhabitants. The parish comprises, exclusively of roads, 2225 acres. The living consists of the vicarages of St. Andrew and St. Etheldreda, the former valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 3., and the latter at £7. 16. 3.; patron, the Rev. T. P. Michell; impropriators, W. A. Taylor, Esq., and others. On the inclosure of the parish in 1806, an allotment of 218a. 1r. 7p. was made in lieu of tithes, now producing £400 per annum. The church of St. Andrew is a handsome cruciform structure, with a square embattled tower rising from the centre, and is partly in the early and partly in the later English style; that of St. Etheldreda has been entirely demolished. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. A school is partly supported by an endowment of about £20 per annum.

Hitcham (St. Mary)

HITCHAM (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Eton, hundred of Burnham, county of Buckingham, 2¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Maidenhead; containing 267 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 5. 7½.; net income, £364; patrons, the Provost and Fellows of Eton College. The windows in the chancel of the church exhibit a considerable quantity of stained glass, of remarkable brilliancy.

Hitcham (All Saints)

HITCHAM (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Cosford, W. division of Suffolk, 1¾ mile (N. N. W.) from Bildeston; containing 1065 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 4056 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £26. 13. 4., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £1150, and the glebe contains 22 acres. A national school is supported; and there are almshouses appropriated by Sir George Waldegrave, in 1663, for two poor persons. William Burkitt, a biblical writer, was born here in 1650.

Hitchenden, or Hughenden (St. Michael)

HITCHENDEN, or Hughenden (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Wycombe, hundred of Desborough, county of Buckingham, 1¾ mile (N.) from Wycombe; containing 1481 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4977 acres, of which 400 are common or waste. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 17. 6.; patron, J. Norris, Esq.; impropriators, the landowners: the great tithes have been commuted for £319, and the small for £350. The church, which is partly of Norman architecture, has a curious font, and some remarkable monuments supposed to commemorate the descendants of Simon Montfort, Earl of Leicester, who was killed at the battle of Evesham, and whose family retired hither after that event, and occupied the ancient mansion of Rockhall, recently rebuilt. Catherine Pye, in 1713, conveyed property towards the endowment of a school; and Ellen, Countess of Conyngham, bequeathed £500 four per cent. Bank annuities, for the foundation and endowment of four almshouses, on the south-west of the churchyard.