Hope-Bowdler - Horbling

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

545-547

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'Hope-Bowdler - Horbling', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 545-547. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51043 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Hope (St. Peter)

HOPE (St. Peter), a parish, and formerly a market-town, partly in the union of Chapel-en-le-Frith, and partly in that of Bakewell, hundred of High Peak, N. division of the county of Derby; containing 4434 inhabitants, of whom 430 are in the township of Hope, 6 miles (N. by E.) from Tideswell. The parish comprises the hamlets of Abney with Abney- Grange, Great and Little Hucklow, Nether Padley, Offerton, and Woodland-Hope; the townships of Aston, Bradwell, Brough with Shatton, Fairfield, Fernilee, Grindlow, Hope, Stoke, Thornhill, and part of Wardlow; and the lordships of Hazlebadge and Highlow. The market anciently held here, and renewed by a grant in the year 1715, was discontinued some years since. There are fairs, chiefly for cattle, on March 28th, May 13th, the day before the second Wednesday in September, and October 11th. The living is a discharged vicarage, in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield, the appropriators, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4.; income, £132. The church is an embattled edifice, in the later English style, with a tower and spire. At Fairfield is a separate incumbency. A school is endowed with about £10 per annum.

Hope (All Saints)

HOPE (All Saints), a parish, in the union and liberty of Romney-Marsh, though locally in the hundred of Langport, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 1 mile (N. W. by W.) from New Romney; containing 21 inhabitants. It comprises 1464 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 1. 0½., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £173. The church is in ruins.

Hope

HOPE, a township, in the parish of Worthen, hundred of Chirbury, S. division of the county of Salop; containing 340 inhabitants.

Hope

HOPE, a township, in the parish of Barningham, union of Teesdale, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 5½ miles (S. W.) from Greta-Bridge; containing 41 inhabitants. This is a high moorland township, comprising about 2430 acres, of which nearly three fourths are waste; it lies to the south of the Greta river. Lead-ore has been obtained here.

Hope-Baggot (St. John the Baptist)

HOPE-BAGGOT (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Ludlow, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 6¼ miles (E. by S.) from Ludlow; near the road from that town to Cleobury-Mortimer; containing 75 inhabitants. It comprises about 400 acres: stone of good quality is quarried for building, and also for grindstones. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £3. 6. 8.; net income, £90, with a house; patron, the Duke of Cleveland. The church has a low pyramidal spire of wood.

Hope-Bowdler (St. Andrew)

HOPE-BOWDLER (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Church-Stretton, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from Church-Stretton; containing 184 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Church-Stretton to Wenlock, and comprises by admeasurement 1600 acres, of which 500 are arable, 800 pasture, and 300 high land used for pasturing sheep. Excellent road-stone is quarried. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 13. 4.; net income, £228; patrons, the Trustees of Mr. Benson: the glebe contains 45 acres, with a house. The church is a small plain edifice, about 300 years old, and has a low square tower.

Hope-Mansell (St. Michael)

HOPE-MANSELL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Ross, hundred of Greytree, county of Hereford, 5 miles (S. E. by S.) from Ross; containing 187 inhabitants. It lies in the southern part of the county, on the borders of Gloucestershire, which bounds it on the north-east and south-east; and consists of 1168 acres of a productive soil. Limestone abounds. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 5., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes produce £194, and the glebe contains 33½ acres.

Hope, Sollers (St. Michael)

HOPE, SOLLERS (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Ross, hundred of Greytree, county of Hereford, 6½ miles (N. by E.) from Ross; containing 161 inhabitants. It is situated on the road between Ross and Hereford, and comprises 1152a. 2r. 16p., of which about 524 acres are arable, 464 pasture, and 98 woodland: there are many orchards for the growth of apples for cider. The parish is intersected by the road between Gloucester and Newent. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of How-Caple, and valued in the king's books at £4. 3. 4.: the tithes have been commuted for £146, and the glebe comprises 67 acres. The church is an ancient structure.

Hope-Under-Dinmore (St. Mary)

HOPE-UNDER-DINMORE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Leominster, hundred of Wolphy, county of Hereford, 4 miles (S. by E.) from Leominster; containing 586 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Lug, and on the road from Leominster to Hereford, comprises 3657a. 2r. 6p.; the soil in some parts is light, and in others a deep loam resting on gravel, and appropriated chiefly to the growth of hops and of apples. Stone of good quality for paving and building is quarried. Hampton Court, here, the magnificent seat of the family of Arkwright, situated in a park eight miles in circumference, was built by Sir Rowland Lenthall, who distinguished himself at Agincourt, where he had a command, and took so many prisoners, that with their ransom he completed the edifice. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £100; patron, the Bishop of Hereford, who, with the family of Arkwright, is impropriator. The church was rebuilt in 1815; several members of the Coningsby family have been interred in it, one of whom, Sir Thomas, founded Coningsby hospital, Hereford. On the western brow of Dinmore Hill is the site of a commandery of the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem.

Hopesay (St. Mary)

HOPESAY (St. Mary) a parish, in the union of Clun, hundred of Purslow, S. division of Salop, 6 miles (S. E.) from Bishop's-Castle; containing 660 inhabitants. It comprises 4021 acres, of which 198 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 12. 6., and in the gift of the Adams' family: the tithes have been commuted for £502, and the glebe contains 62 acres. A school was erected on the waste in 1790; and John Pugh, in 1808, left £10 per annum, which, with some smaller sums, are distributed among the poor.

Hoppen

HOPPEN, a township, in the parish, and N. division of the ward, of Bambrough, union of Belford, N. division of Northumberland, 4½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Belford; containing 36 inhabitants. It is situated east of the Waren burn, and about a mile from Lucker.

Hopperton.—See Allerton-Mauleverer.

HOPPERTON.—See Allerton-Mauleverer.

Hopsford

HOPSFORD, a hamlet, in the parish of Withybrook, union of Foleshill, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 7¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from the city of Coventry; containing 48 inhabitants.

Hopton

HOPTON, a township, in the parish and hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 1¾ mile (W. by S.) from Wirksworth; containing 83 inhabitants, many of whom are employed in working lead-mines. Hopton was the property and residence of Sir John Gell, who, when Charles I. raised the royal standard at Nottingham, proceeded to Derby, assembled a strong body of troops for the parliament, and performed a conspicuous part throughout the war. Almshouses for four persons were erected in 1719, by Sir Philip Gell, Bart., and endowed by him with a rentcharge of £22. 6. Military weapons and some other relics of antiquity have been discovered.

Hopton, county of Stafford.—See Coton.

HOPTON, county of Stafford.—See Coton.

Hopton (All Saints)

HOPTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Thetford, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 6 miles (S.) from East Harling; containing 623 inhabitants. This parish is bounded on the northeast by the Lesser Ouse, which separates Suffolk from Norfolk; it comprises 1317a. 3r. 9p., and is pleasantly situated on the road from Bury to Norwich. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 5., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £284. The church, a handsome structure in the later English style, with a square embattled tower, was repewed in 1830, and a gallery erected by subscription. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Hopton (St. Mary)

HOPTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the incorporation and hundred of Mutford and Lothingland, E. division of Suffolk, 4¾ miles (N. by W.) from Lowestoft; containing 251 inhabitants. The parish comprises the hamlet of Brotherton, and is situated on the coast of the North Sea, by which it is bounded on the east. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £102; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Norwich, whose tithes have been commuted for £445, and who have 6 acres of glebe.

Hopton

HOPTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Mirfield, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 3 miles (W.) from Dewsbury. This place, though in the heart of a mining and manufacturing district, abounds in picturesque scenery; the surface is undulated. The woollen manufacture is carried on to a considerable extent, affording employment to nearly 300 persons: several mines of excellent coal are in full operation; and there are some quarries of good freestone, from which was raised the stone for many public buildings in the neighbourhood. The Calder and Hebble canal, and the Manchester and Leeds railway, pass through the hamlet. A church in the pointed style, with a tower, was erected in 1844-5, partly by the Church Commissioners. A place of worship for Independents was built in 1839, of stone from the quarries of the place, at an expense of £3500.

Hopton, Castle (St. Mary)

HOPTON, CASTLE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Clun, hundred of Purslow, S. division of Salop, 12 miles (W. by N.) from Ludlow; containing 164 inhabitants. This place was distinguished for its castle, which was given by Henry II. to Walter de Clifford, and which, during the parliamentary war, was garrisoned by the royalists, but after a fortnight's siege was surrendered to the assailants, when most of the garrison were put to the sword, and the governor was conveyed as a prisoner to Ludlow Castle. The parish comprises 2524 acres, of which 861 are arable, 724 meadow and pasture, 303 woodland, and about 636 common; the soil is light, producing chiefly barley and turnips, and the scenery is in general exceedingly beautiful. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the gift of Thomas Beale, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £280, and the glebe contains 80 acres, with a house.

Hopton-in-the-Hole, or Hopton-Cangeford

HOPTON-IN-THE-HOLE, or Hopton-Cangeford, a parish, in the union of Ludlow, hundred of Munslow, S. division of Salop, 5 miles (N. E. by N.) from Ludlow; containing 30 inhabitants, and comprising 500 acres by computation. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £47; patron and impropriator, Sir W. R. Boughton, Bart. The church is modern.

Hopton, Monk (St. Peter)

HOPTON, MONK (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Bridgnorth, liberty of the borough of Wenlock, S. division of Salop, 7 miles (W.) from Bridgnorth: containing 189 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road lately completed between Bridg-north and Ludlow. It consists of arable and pasture, the former of which predominates; the soil is a strong retentive red clay, and the chief produce wheat and barley. The surface is diversified with numerous undulations, hills, and dales, and is interesting and picturesque; yewtrees abound, and grow with unusual luxuriance. There are quarries of limestone. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £56; patron, Sir Francis Lawley, Bart.: the glebe is valued at about £25 per annum. The church has been entirely rebuilt, at the cost of Sir F. Lawley, who, by his benevolent and judicious efforts, has given to the whole parish a new and highly improved appearance.

Hopton-Wafers (St. Michael)

HOPTON-WAFERS (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Cleobury-Mortimer, hundred of Stottesden, S. division of Salop, 2 miles (W. N. W.) from Cleobury-Mortimer, and 11 (W. by N.) from Bewdley; containing 481 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the road from Birmingham to Ludlow, and comprises by measurement 1610 acres, of which 1300 are arable, pasture, and woodland, and 310 common and roads. The surface is hilly, the scenery very pleasing, and the soil a stiff clay, and stony. On the Clee hills are coal works. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 16. 5½., and in the patronage of Mrs. Lucy Botfield: the tithes have been commuted for £180, and the glebe consists of 84 acres, with a house. The church was rebuilt on an enlarged scale in 1828, by the late Thomas Botfield, Esq., of Hopton Court, in the parish, the present residence of Mrs. Botfield. The Ranters have a place of worship; and there is a school with an endowment. Here are a spring of water resembling that of Malvern, and one of chalybeate quality. Old Parr, and the Infant Roscius, were natives of the parish.

Hopwas-Hayes

HOPWAS-HAYES, an extra-parochial liberty, locally in the parish and union of Tamworth, S. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 2 miles (W. by N.) from Tamworth: containing 4 inhabitants, and comprising 317 acres of land. The Birmingham and Fazeley canal passes through. Here is a church dedicated to St. John, in the gift of Capt. A'Court. Thomas Barnes, in 1724, gave a messuage, the annual value of which, £14, is applied to purposes of instruction.

Hopwell

HOPWELL, a hamlet, in the parish of Wilne, union of Shardlow, hundred of Morlaston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 7 miles (E.) from Derby, on the road to Nottingham; containing 25 inhabitants. The manor of "Opewelle" was held by Ralph Fitz-Hubert, under the Bishop of Chester, at the time of the Domesday survey; in 1296 it was held by Ralph de Shirley, under the Earl of Lancaster. It afterwards passed to the Sacheverells, one of whom, in 1661, bequeathed it to his cousin Henry Hayes, who sold the property in 1731: in 1784 it came by purchase to the father of the present owner, Thomas Pares, Esq., late M.P. for Leicester. The hamlet comprises 650 acres, of which two-thirds are pasture, and one-third arable, with some woodland; the soil is a strong clay, the land elevated, and extensive views are obtained into the shires of Nottingham, Leicester, Northampton, and Stafford. Hopwell Hall, a handsome brick edifice built in 1720, and standing in a well wooded park of about 90 acres, is the seat of Mr. Pares.

Hopwood

HOPWOOD, a township, in the parish of Middleton, union of Bury, hundred of Salford, S. division of Lancashire, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Middleton; containing, with part of the chapelry of Birch, 1545 inhabitants. A family of the local name was seated here for many centuries, probably from Saxon times. In 1359, Adam de Hopwood was one of the inquisition at Preston held before Thomas de Seton and others, justices, to determine a dispute between Henry, Duke of Lancaster, and Roger de la Warre. On the death of Dr. Robert Hopwood, in the early part of the eighteenth century, when the family became extinct, the estates passed to the Gregges, who assumed the additional name of Hopwood. The township comprises 984 acres of land. Hopwood Hall is an old-fashioned house, pleasing in aspect and agreeable in situation, with tolerably extensive pleasure-grounds, tastefully laid out. Stanicliffe is a venerable building partly of timber, and Siddall an old homestead that gave name to Siddall moor, a large common inclosed a few years ago. The tithes have been commuted for £60. A school is endowed with the interest of £100.

Horbling (St. Andrew)

HORBLING (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Bourne, wapentake of Aveland, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 3¾ miles (E. by N.) from Falkingham; containing, with the hamlet of Bridge-End, 571 inhabitants. It is situated on the road from Bourne to Boston, and comprises by measurement 2650 acres, in addition to which there are 303 acres by computation. Stone for rough building, and for the roads, is quarried. The fen drains at Dinnington High Bridge, which bound the parish to the east, afford facilities of navigation. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 10.; net income, £290, arising from land given in lieu of tithes in 1764; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Lincoln. The church combines portions in the Norman, and in the early, decorated, and later English styles. Here is a school endowed with £30 per annum in 1691 by Edward Brown, who also bequeathed a fund for apprenticing children. The parish contains a spring of remarkably pure water, never varying either in quantity or temperature. To the east of the village are some remains of the Roman Cardyke.



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