Horndon, East - Horsell

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

550-553

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'Horndon, East - Horsell', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 550-553. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51045 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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Horndon, East (All Saints)

HORNDON, EAST (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Billericay, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 3 miles (S. E.) from Brentwood; containing 529 inhabitants. It comprises 1477a. 24p., of which 68a. 2r. 28p. are woodland, and of the remainder about two-thirds arable and one-third pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £262; patron, the Rev. J. Pearson. The church is a small irregular structure, with several chapels, which contain portions in different styles; the font is Norman, and in the chancel is an octangular ceiling of wood, richly carved with armorial bearings and other devices.

Horndon-on-the-Hill (St. Peter)

HORNDON-ON-THE-HILL (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Orsett, hundred of Barstable, S. division of Essex, 12 miles (E. S. E.) from Romford; containing 576 inhabitants. The parish takes its affix from its situation on a hill, commanding an extensive and richly-diversified prospect; it comprises, partly by admeasurement and partly by computation, 2634a. 3r. 1p., of which about 2005 acres are arable, 506 meadow and pasture, and 36 woodland. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 6. 8.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, London. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £390, and the vicarial for £180; a rentcharge also of £248 is paid to certain impropriators. The church, pleasantly situated near the centre of the village, is an ancient edifice, with a tower of stone surmounted by a spire of wood.

Horndon, West (St. Nicholas)

HORNDON, WEST (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Billericay, hundred of Barstaple, S. division of Essex, 3½ miles (S. S. E.) from Brentwood; containing 60 inhabitants. This parish, in ancient documents called Thorndon, and Little Horndon, is remarkable for the splendid mansion of Lord Petre, named Thorndon Hall, which is beautifully situated on an eminence, surrounded by an extensive and richly wooded park. The living is a rectory, with that of Ingrave united, valued in the king's books at £14. 13. 4.; net income, £350; patron, the Rev. R. Johnstone: the tithes were commuted for land and a corn-rent in 1776. The church, a plain edifice of brick, was erected in 1734, on the union of the two livings, at the expense of the then Lord Petre. At the Hall is a private Roman Catholic chapel.

Horne (All Saints)

HORNE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Alstoe, county of Rutland, 6 miles (N. W. by W.) from Stamford; containing 38 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 856 acres, of which 492 are in Exton Park; of the remainder the far greater part is arable, with a small portion of pasture: the soil is rather of a clayey nature. The living is a rectory, united to the vicarage of Exton, and valued in the king's books at £1. 6. 8.: the tithes have been commuted for £77. The church, of which the site only can be traced, is supposed to have been destroyed in the time of the Commonwealth; the inhabitants attend Exton church.

Horne (St. Mary)

HORNE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Godstone, First division of the hundred of Tandridge, E. division of Surrey, 5½ miles (S. S. W.) from Godstone; containing 649 inhabitants. The parish comprises 4531 acres, principally arable land; 94 acres are waste. Harwardesley, supposed to have been at one time in the possession of King Harold, and to have been known as Harold's-legh, is a tract of about 500 acres, detached from the rest of the parish, and surrounded by the parishes of Burstow and Horley. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 17. 11., and in the patronage of Thomas Poynder, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £600. It was a chapelry to Bletchingley till 1705, when an act was passed for making it a distinct rectory. The church is in the early and later English styles.

Hornet

HORNET, a hamlet, in the parish of Rumbold's-Wyke, union of West Hampnett, hundred of Box and Stockbridge, rape of Chichester, W. division of the county of Sussex; containing 108 inhabitants.

Horning

HORNING, a parish, in the Tunstead and Happing incorporation, hundred of Tunstead, E. division of Norfolk, 10 miles (N. E. by E.) from Norwich; containing 467 inhabitants. The mitred abbey of St. Benedict at this place, which was only a hermitage in the year 800, was raised into a monastery for Black monks before 1020, by Canute, who strongly fortified the buildings; it held out for a considerable time against William the Conqueror, but was at last betrayed by one of the monks. The barony and reversion were given in exchange to the Bishop of Norwich, in 1535, when the abbey revenue was valued at £697. 9. 8. The walls originally inclosed an area of 36 acres; part of the foundations may still be traced, and there are also remains of the once magnificent gateway. The parish comprises 2524a. 1r. 38p.; nearly 1000 acres are arable, and the rest rich marshes and meadows, situated between the navigable rivers Bure and Ant, over the former of which is a ferry to Woodbastwich: on the Bure are commodious wharfs. The village consists of two parts, called the Upper and Lower streets; and a fair is held in it on the third Thursday in July. The living is a discharged vicarage; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Norwich. The appropriate tithes have been commuted for £175, and the vicarial for £160; the appropriate glebe contains 116 acres, and the vicarial 7. The church is chiefly in the decorated and later English styles, and had formerly a north aisle. At the inclosure, in 1807, about 30 acres were allotted to the poor for fuel.

Horninghold (St. Peter)

HORNINGHOLD (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Uppingham, hundred of Gartree, S. division of the county of Leicester, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Uppingham; containing 98 inhabitants. It comprises 1182 acres, having a strong loamy soil and a hilly surface. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 16. 8.; net income, £80: patron and impropriator, W. Chamberlayne, Esq. The church is a curious structure, exhibiting specimens of pure Saxon architecture; it was thoroughly repaired in 1844.

Horninglow

HORNINGLOW, a township, in the parish and union of Burton-upon-Trent, N. division of the hundred of Offlow and of the county of Stafford, 1¾ mile (N. W. by N.) from Burton; containing 852 inhabitants. This is a pleasant village, situated upon an abrupt eminence overlooking the vale of the Trent. The township includes the hamlets of Outwood and Whetmore: the hilly parts abound with gravel, and contain much rich marl. A large portion of the township was granted, at the dissolution of the monasteries, to the Paget family, of which the Marquess of Anglesey is now the head. The Grand Trunk canal, on which are several wharfs and warehouses, passes through the township; and here is the union workhouse.

Horningsea (St. Peter)

HORNINGSEA (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Chesterton, hundred of Stow, county of Cambridge, 4¼ miles (N. E.) from Cambridge; containing 298 inhabitants, and comprising about 1600 acres. This place, which is situated on the river Cam, belonged to the see of Ely, and was annexed by the bishop, in 1220, to the hospital of St. John, on the dissolution of which, in the reign of Henry VIII., it was granted to St. John's College, Cambridge. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the College. On the inclosure of the parish, in 1802, an allotment of land was given in lieu of tithes. The church contains details of Norman character. There are some slight remains of Biggin Abbey, a considerable house of royal foundation, destroyed by the Danes about 870.

Horningsham (St. John the Baptist)

HORNINGSHAM (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Warminster, hundred of Heytesbury, Warminster and S. divisions of Wilts, 4¼ miles (S. W.) from Warminster; containing 1290 inhabitants. The surface is beautifully varied, rising into eminences of considerable elevation, from the summit of one of which is a fine view, embracing the counties of Wilts, Dorset, and Somerset. Longleat, the residence of the Marquess of Bath, is a splendid mansion here, seated in an extensive park, and embosomed in rich plantations. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £165; patron, the Prebendary of Horningsham in the Collegiate Church of Heytesbury. The church has been taken down, and an elegant edifice erected at the sole expense of the Marchioness of Bath; it is in the style of the 15th century, and was consecrated in October, 1844. There is a place of worship for Independents. Some schools are supported by an endowment of about £30 per annum, arising from a bequest by Mr. Cray.

Horningsheath, Great and Little (St. Leonard)

HORNINGSHEATH, GREAT and LITTLE (St. Leonard), ancient parishes, in the union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of Suffolk, 2 miles (S. W. by W.) from Bury St. Edmund's; containing 597 inhabitants. These parishes were united about the year 1528, and together comprise 2197 acres, principally good arable land; 30 acres are waste or common. Fairs for the sale of lambs are held at Horringer. The living is a rectory, valued jointly in the king's books at £13. 13. 9., and in the gift of the Marquess of Bristol: the tithes have been commuted for £575, and the glebe comprises 15 acres. The church, although much modernised, retains portions in the decorated and later English styles; that of Little Horningsheath has entirely disappeared. A school is supported chiefly by a rent-charge bequeathed by Samuel Battely in 1714. William Bedell, Bishop of Kilmore and Ardagh, in Ireland; and Lawrence Womach, Bishop of St. David's, were rectors of the parish.

Horningtoft (St. Edmund)

HORNINGTOFT (St. Edmund), a parish, in the union of Mitford and Launditch, hundred of Launditch, W. division of Norfolk, 5 miles (S. by E.) from Fakenham; containing 290 inhabitants. It comprises 1386 acres, of which 1000 are arable, 187 pasture and meadow, and 197 woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, united to that of Whissonsett, and valued in the king's books at £16. 17. 8½.: the tithes have been commuted for £335, and the glebe contains 27½ acres. The church is partly in the early and partly in the later English style.

Hornsea (St. Nicholas)

HORNSEA (St. Nicholas), a parish, and formerly a market-town, in the union of Skirlaugh, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 17 miles (N. N. E.) from Hull, and 190 (N.) from London; containing, with Burton, 1005 inhabitants. This place, which was formerly more than six miles from the coast, is now not more than half a mile distant from it; and the village of Hornsea Beck, not many years since, was totally destroyed by the encroachments of the sea, which is still progressively advancing. The town consists of four well-built streets, and contains some inns and respectable lodging-houses for the accommodation of visiters, who frequent the place for sea-bathing during the season. The environs are exceedingly pleasant, abounding with picturesque scenery, and commanding some fine views; on the western side is a lake covering 467 acres, containing fresh-water fish of every description, and beautifully interspersed with wooded islands, the resort of numerous aquatic birds; the banks are in many places planted with firs and elders, and form a delightful promenade. An act was passed in 1846, enabling the York and North-Midland Railway Company to make a branch to this place, 10½ miles long. The market, on Monday, has been for some time discontinued; the fairs are on August 13th and December 18th, for horses and cattle. The parish comprises about 3000 acres of land. The living is a vicarage, with the rectory of Long Riston united, valued in the king's books at £13. 3. 4.. and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £382; impropriator of Hornsea, the Rev. C. J. Constable. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment in 1801. The church is a spacious structure, in the decorated English style, with insertions of a later date; the spire, which was a conspicuous landmark, was blown down more than a century since. The rent of land, now £120 per annum, is appropriated to the repairs of the edifice. There are places of worship for Independents and Wesleyans; also an infants' school; and a national school is about to be established. In the parish is a saline chalybeate spring, formerly in much repute, but the waters are not now used.

Hornsey (St. Mary)

HORNSEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Edmonton, Finsbury division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex, 6 miles (N. by W.) from London; containing 5937 inhabitants. The manor of Hornsey, anciently called Haringay, has from a remote period belonged to the see of London. The parish comprises 2362 acres; comprehending, besides its own village, the hamlets of Muswell Hill, Crouch-End, and part of Highgate. The village is agreeably situated in a vale, through which the New River passes, and is enriched by hills commanding varied and beautiful views of London and the adjoining country; it contains many detached villas with gardens and pleasure-grounds, and is one of the most agreeable places of residence, or occasional resort, in the vicinity of the metropolis. Lands held under the lord of the manor descend according to the custom of gavelkind, in common to all the sons or daughters of a customary tenant. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £22; net income, £493; patron, the Bishop of London. The church, consisting of a nave, aisles, and western tower, was rebuilt of brick coloured to imitate stone, in the early English style, in 1833, with the exception of the lower part of the tower: the former edifice is said to have been built about the year 1500. An additional church was some years ago erected at Highgate (which see): there is a small neat chapel at Crouch-End; and a district church has lately been built at Muswell-Hill, which is dedicated to St. James, and is in the gift of the Bishop. At Crouch-End is also a place of worship for Baptists. Several bequests have been made for charitable purposes. At Muswell-Hill was a chapel dedicated to Our Lady of Muswell, much resorted to by pilgrims before the Reformation, on account of a mineral spring called Mousewell, or Muswell, famed for the supposed miraculous cure of a king of Scotland, and still in repute for its medicinal properties. The chapel was an appendage to the priory of Clerkenwell; and the manor of Muswell, though locally in the parish of Hornsey, is subordinate to that of Clerkenwell.

Hornton (St. John the Baptist)

HORNTON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the union of Banbury, hundred of Bloxham, county of Oxford, 6 miles (N. W. by W.) from Banbury; containing 592 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 1400 acres, nearly equally divided between arable and pasture land. The living is a vicarage not in charge, united to that of Horley. The church is principally of the 13th century, but retains extensive remains of a former building of the beginning of the 12th century; there are also some relics of early painting and gilding. A national school is endowed with £14 per annum.

Horrington, East and West

HORRINGTON, EAST and WEST, two tythings, in the out parish of St. Cuthbert, city and union of Wells, hundred of Wells-Forum, E. division of the county of Somerset; the former containing 121 inhabitants, and the latter 129.

Horsecroft

HORSECROFT, a hamlet, partly in the parish of Horningsheath, and partly in that of Nowton, union and hundred of Thingoe, W. division of the county of Suffolk; containing 34 inhabitants.

Horseheath (All Saints)

HORSEHEATH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Linton, hundred of Chilford, county of Cambridge, 3½ miles (E. by N.) from Linton; containing 523 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Haverhill to Cambridge, comprises by computation 1775 acres. A fair, chiefly for pleasure, is held on the 5th of June. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the gift of the Governors of the Charter-House, London: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe comprises 17 acres. The church is a neat edifice in the later English style, and consists chiefly of a nave of great breadth, the roof of which, very slightly arched, is supported entirely by the side walls; it contains a mural tablet to the memory of Lord Montfort, who is described as "Baron of Horseheath." Here is a meeting-house for Independents.

Horsehouse

HORSEHOUSE, a chapelry, in the parish of Coverham, union of Leyburn, wapentake of Hang-West, N. riding of York, 8 miles (S. W.) from Middleham; containing 385 inhabitants. This chapelry derives its name from the place having originally been the site of stabling or sheds for horses used in hunting. It is co-extensive with the district of Carlton-Highdale, and is situated on the river Cover, and upon the road between Middleham and Kettlewell: the hamlet of Horsehouse comprises 425a. 3r. 9p., and forms only a small part of the chapelry. The living is a perpetual curacy, with a net income of £75, in the patronage of the Tomlinson family. The chapel, dedicated to St. Botolph, and bearing the date 1607 over the door, is a plain edifice with a tower, and has undergone considerable repairs within the last half century; when it was erected, is uncertain. The chapelyard was consecrated in 1763. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Horseley

HORSELEY, a township, in the parish of Eccleshall, union of Stone, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 2½ miles (S. W.) from Eccleshall; containing 491 inhabitants. It gives name to the southern quarter of the parish, and comprises 2200 acres of land, of which 500 are common or waste. Pershall, Walton, and Wootton are other townships within the quarter, which includes also an extensive tract of uninclosed land called Offley-Hey. The tithes of Horseley have been commuted for £1. 17. 9. payable to the vicar, and £201. 8. 3. to the Bishop of Lichfield, who has also a glebe of 150 acres.

Horsell (St. Mary)

HORSELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Chertsey, First division of the hundred of Godley, W. division of Surrey, 4½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Ripley; containing 766 inhabitants. It comprises by admeasurement 2523 acres, which, with the exception of about 500 acres, are inclosed, and under good cultivation: here are some extensive nursery-grounds. There is a station on the London and South-Western railway at Woking, within 2 miles; and the Basingstoke canal passes through the parish. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £83; patrons, four Landowners. The church is in the early English style, and contains several ancient brasses and two handsome monuments, one to the memory of James Fenn, Esq., the other to Sir John William Rose, Knt. The parish receives benefit from Henry Smith's charity.