Horton - Horton, Monks

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

557-559

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'Horton - Horton, Monks', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 557-559. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51047 Date accessed: 23 November 2014.


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Horton

HORTON, a hamlet, in the parishes of Eddlesborough, Ivinghoe, and Slapton, union of Leighton-Buzzard, hundred of Cottesloe, county of Buckingham, 2½ miles (N. N. W.) from the town of Ivinghoe; containing 179 inhabitants.

Horton (St. Michael)

HORTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Eton, hundred of Stoke, county of Buckingham, 1¼ mile (S. S. W.) from Colnbrook; containing, with part of the town of Colnbrook, 873 inhabitants. A papermill on the banks of the Coln affords employment to about 50 persons. The Colnbrook cattle-fairs are held in the parish. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £22. 9. 4½.; net income, £385; patron, T. P. Williams, Esq.: the tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1799. The church contains a Norman doorway with a circular arch enriched with mouldings, and is surrounded by a Roman wall. The parents of Milton resided here, and his mother, who died in 1637, is interred in the church; a few of the juvenile years of the poet were passed at the place.

Horton

HORTON, a township, in the parish of Tilston, union of Great Boughton, Higher division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 2½ miles (N. W. by W.) from Malpas; containing 142 inhabitants. It comprises 745 acres, of a clayey soil. The tithes have been commuted for £71.

Horton, with Peele

HORTON, with Peele, a township, in the parish of Tarvin, union of Great Boughton, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 7½ miles (E. N. E.) from the city of Chester; containing 45 inhabitants. It comprises 329 acres, of a clayey and a sandy soil.

Horton (St. Wolfrida)

HORTON (St. Wolfrida), a parish, in the union of Wimborne and Cranborne, hundred of Badbury, Wimborne division of Dorset, 5 miles (S. S. W.) from Cranborne; containing 448 inhabitants. The parish is situated in a well-wooded country, on the road between Shaftesbury and Ringwood; and comprises, with the tything of Woodlands, 3978 acres, of which 281 are common or waste: the soil is in general clayey. On a hill near the village stands a lofty tower of brick, built by Mr. Sturt about fifty or sixty years ago, and commanding fine views of the county, the Needles' point of the Isle of Wight, &c. A fair, formerly held at Knowlton, a hamlet now depopulated, was removed about the year 1730 to Woodlands, where it takes place on the 5th of July, for horses, cheese, and toys. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 13. 10.; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Shaftesbury. The great tithes have been commuted for £400, and the vicarial for £150; the glebe contains 3 acres, with a house. The church is in the later English style; the belfry contains the figure of a Knight Templar. The Wesleyans have a place of worship. An abbey founded here in 970, by Ordgar, Earl of Devonshire, became a cell to Sherborne Abbey in 1122. At Knowlton are the remains of a chapel, which, with the cemetery, are surrounded by a deep circular intrenchment, comprising one acre of ground, and containing several tumuli; in the vicinity are several other works of the kind.

Horton (St. James)

HORTON (St. James), a parish, in the union of Chipping-Sodbury, Upper division of the hundred of Grumbald's-Ash, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 3¼ miles (N. E.) from Chipping-Sodbury; containing 466 inhabitants. It is pleasantly situated; and from the hills are obtained fine views of Bristol, Clifton, and the Severn, with the adjacent country, abounding with picturesque beauty. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16, and in the gift of the Rev. Richard Brook: the tithes have been commuted for £600, and the glebe comprises 39 acres.

Horton (St. Mary)

HORTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hardingstone, hundred of Wymersley, S. division of the county of Northampton, 6½ miles (S. E.) from Northampton; containing 65 inhabitants. This place has been the residence of several noble and distinguished families, including those of Salisbury, Parr, Halifax, and Hinchinbroke; and is now the property of Sir R. H. Gunning, Bart., whose seat of Horton House, an ancient mansion, has been modernised and greatly improved. The parish is situated on the road between Northampton and Newport-Pagnell, and on the borders of Buckinghamshire; and comprises 1641 acres, mostly pasture. The living is a perpetual curacy, with that of Piddington annexed, valued in the king's books at £7. 17. 1.; patron, Sir R. Gunning; net income, £98. The church is in the later English style, with a tower, and contains a beautiful monument to Lord Parr, uncle of Catherine Parr, Queen of Henry VIII. Charles Montague, first earl of Halifax, was born at Horton House in 1661.

Horton

HORTON, a parochial chapelry, in the union of Tynemouth, E. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland; containing, with the townships of Bebside, Cowpen, and East and West Hartford, 2838 inhabitants, of whom 218 are in the township of Horton, 7¼ miles (S. E.) from Morpeth. Possessions were anciently held here by the knightly family of Horton, and by the family of Charron, of whom was Guischard de Charron, sheriff of Northumberland in the 13th century; among later proprietors occurs Sir Bertram Monboucher, Knt., sheriff of the county, and knight of the shire, in the 14th century. The chapelry is bounded on the north by the Blyth river, and comprises 5217 acres, extending five miles from east to west, and in breadth from one to three miles. Its soil, though various, is generally a strong clay, producing excellent crops of wheat and beans; there is some good turnip-land, and oats thrive well. The surface is for the most part level, but relieved by gentle undulations, whose slopes are richly wooded: the timber consists of oak, ash, beech, elm, black poplar, and some of the larger species of willow; and several small plots of ground are covered with young trees. Lord Hastings is owner of 2313 acres, forming the township of Horton, and abounding in coal and stone. The ancient village is seated on a gradual slope, about three miles west of the sea, and once consisted of several houses, but at present is reduced to one farm and a few cottages, with the chapel. At Low Horton stood the ancient manor-house, or castle, belonging to the Delaval family, which was strongly fortified by licence in 1293, and surrounded by a double moat and rampart of earth; the greater part of the foundation was razed, and the intrenchment levelled, in 1809. The chapelry formed part of Woodhorn parish until 1768, when it was abscinded: the living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Woodhorn, with a net income of £150; impropriators, the Mercers' Company, and the rector of Hampstead, near London. The old chapel was taken down in 1827, and a new structure erected on its site, at an expense of £400, defrayed partly by a rate, and partly by subscription; it stands on the road between Newcastle and Blyth.

Horton

HORTON, a township, in the parish of Chatton, union of Glendale, E. division of Glendale ward, N. division of Northumberland, 3½ miles from Wooler. This place was held of the Vesey barony by William Tuberville, and was afterwards, for many years, the seat of a younger branch of the Greys of Chillingham; upon the demise of Sir Henry Grey, it devolved on the late Earl Grey. The township comprises 2200 acres, of which 1500 are arable and 700 moorland, the whole divided into two farms; the river Till bounds it on the south. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £62. Here was a strong castle, of which there are now scarcely any remains.

Horton

HORTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Beckley, union of Headington, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford, 7¼ miles (N. E.) from the city of Oxford; containing 330 inhabitants.

Horton

HORTON, a township, in the parish and union of Wellington, Wellington division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of the county of Salop; containing 117 inhabitants.

Horton

HORTON, a tything, in the parish of Bishop's-Cannings, union of Devizes, hundred of Potterne and Cannings, Devizes and N. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 387 inhabitants.

Horton

HORTON, a township, in the parish and union of Wem, Whitchurch division of the hundred of North Bradford, N. division of Salop, 1¾ mile (W. by N.) from the town of Wem; containing 86 inhabitants.

Horton (St. Michael)

HORTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Leek, N. division of the hundred of Totmonslow and of the county of Stafford, 2¾ miles (W. by N.) from Leek; containing, with the township of Blackwood with Crowborough, 942 inhabitants, of whom 200 are in the township of Horton, and 216 in that of Horton-Hay. This parish, which is situated in a retired part of the county, at a distance from any public road, comprises 4861 acres, the principal part in pasture, and divided into farms of small extent. The scenery is truly picturesque, finely diversified with hills and valleys, and enlivened by numerous streams, frequently interrupted in their course over a rocky bed by detached masses of stone. A large reservoir, which supplies the Caldon branch of the Trent and Mersey canal with water, is inclosed between lofty and precipitous banks, the sides of which, from the water's edge to the summit, are clothed with thriving plantations. There are several quarries of stone of inferior quality, and one of good red sandstone for building. A considerable quantity of cheese is made in the neighbourhood. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £105; patron, G. C. Antrobus, Esq. The church is a very ancient structure, chiefly in the Norman style, with portions apparently of earlier date, and a tower, and contains some handsome monuments to the families of Wedgwood, Fowler, and Gaunt. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Ranters, and a school with a small endowment.

Horton

HORTON, a chapelry, in the parish and union of Bradford, wapentake of Morley, W. riding of York, 2 miles (S. W. by W.) from Bradford; containing 17,615 inhabitants. This place, noticed in the Domesday survey as a berewick, or hamlet, in the manor of Bradford, subsequenty formed part of the ample possessions of the Lacys, earls of Lincoln, who were lords of nearly all the lands from Pontefract to Clitheroe, in the county of Lancaster. In the reign of Henry II., the manor was granted by Robert de Lacy to the ancestor of the Hortons. The chapelry is within the borough, and forms a suburb, of Bradford; it comprises by computation 1824 acres, whereof 1505 are chiefly high moorland pasture, and 310 arable. The surface is boldly varied, and the scenery of considerable interest; the soil of the lands under cultivation is fertile, and the substratum abounds with coal and flagstone, which have been worked for several centuries for the supply of the adjacent district. Horton Hall, the residence of Samuel Hailstone, Esq., was for many generations the seat of the family of Sharp, of whom John Sharp, for his zealous attachment to the parliamentary cause in the reign of Charles I., received from the house of commons, during the Protectorate, a gold medal with the figure of Fairfax on the obverse: his son, Abraham, was one of the most eminent mathematicians of his time, and assisted Flamsteed at the Royal Observatory at Greenwich. The Hall is a very ancient structure, consisting of a square massive tower in the centre, and two wings, one of which was taken down, and rebuilt in a handsome modern style, by the late proprietor. At a short distance from the Hall, is the seat of Francis Sharp Bridges, Esq., a descendant from a younger branch of the same family, who were zealous adherents of the royal cause in the civil war, and of whom John Sharp was severely wounded in an engagement with the parliamentarian forces. The township is pleasantly situated on an acclivity rising gradually from the town of Bradford to the Clayton Heights; and includes the villages of Great and Little Horton, with those of Lidget-Green and Scholis-Moor. The inhabitants are chiefly employed in the coal-mines, and in the worsted manufacture, for which there are not less than 22 mills, 13 in Little and 9 in Great Horton, the machinery of which is propelled by 23 steam-engines of an aggregate power of 674 horses. A large fair for cattle is held on the 5th of September.

The chapel (at Great Horton) was built by subscription, in 1807, at an expense of £1200; it has since been improved, and contains 750 sittings. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the gift of the Vicar of Bradford; net income, £150. The church dedicated to St. James, in the lower part of Little Horton, was erected in 1840, at the cost of John Wood, Esq., a native of this place, at an expense of £10,000; it is a handsome structure in the early English style, with a square embattled tower surmounted by a well-proportioned spire, and contains 1500 sittings, of which 600 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, endowed with £250 per annum by the founder, in whom the patronage is vested: the residence of the minister is of appropriate character. A church dedicated to St. John was erected in 1840, at a cost of £5000, defrayed by Edward Lyon Berthon and Thomas Frankland Preston, Esqrs.; it is a cruciform edifice in the early English style, with a tower surmounted by a spire, and contains 1100 sittings: the living is a perpetual curacy in the patronage of the Founders. There are places of worship for Moravians, Wesleyans, Independents, Unitarians, and Primitive Methodists. In 1712, John Ashton bequeathed several cottages, a barn, and 16 acres of land, now producing £57. 10. per annum, for distribution among the poor. The Baptist College at Horton, or "Northern Baptist Education Society," for young men intended for the ministry of that denomination, was first founded in 1804; and the premises, which have undergone successive alterations and additions, are now adapted to the accommodation of 30 students. The institution is supported by subscription, and the proceeds of a bequest of £5000 by Samuel Broadley, Esq., formerly treasurer to the college.

Horton

HORTON, a township, in the parish of Gisburn, union of Clitheroe, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 9½ miles (W. by S.) from Skipton; containing 156 inhabitants. It is situated on the east side of the river Ribble, and comprises about 1780 acres: the village is north of the road between East Marton and Grindleton.

Horton-Grange

HORTON-GRANGE, a township, in the parish of Dinnington, union and W. division of Castle ward, S. division of Northumberland, 9 miles (N. N. W.) fron Newcastle-upon-Tyne; containing 64 inhabitants. It stands about three miles north-by-east from Ponteland, and comprises 1112 acres. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £179. 7. 2., payable to Merton College, Oxford, and the vicarial for £16. 5. 6.

Horton-in-Ribblesdale (St. Oswald)

HORTON-IN-RIBBLESDALE (St. Oswald), a parish, in the union of Settle, W. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 5½ miles (N.) from Settle; containing 520 inhabitants. This parish is situated on the banks of the river Ribble, and includes the mountain of Pennigant, and several small hamlets and scattered houses, extending to the very source of the river. It comprises 15,269a. 2r. 33p., tithe-free, and chiefly a hilly moorland, affording tolerable pasture for sheep and cattle; the surface is strikingly varied, and the scenery abounds with interesting features. Slate of good quality is quarried to a considerable extent. The village is pleasant, and contains some well-built houses. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £108; patron, the Rev. G. Holden. The church is a neat structure, referred to the time of Stephen. A free grammar school was endowed in 1725, by John Armitstead; the income is £160 per annum. A bequest of 11 acres of land, now let for £30 per annum, is appropriated for distribution among the poor.

Horton, Kirby (St. Mary)

HORTON, KIRBY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Dartford, hundred of Axton, Dartford, and Wilmington, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, W. division of Kent, 4 miles (S. S. E.) from Dartford; containing 714 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2584 acres, of which 2044 are arable land and hopgrounds, 120 pasture, and 420 woodland; the surface is pleasingly varied: about 100 acres are planted with hops. Franks, the seat of the Bathurst family since the commencement of the reign of Elizabeth, is situated on the bank of the Darent, which flows through the village. A paper-manufactory has been established at South Darent, in the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 6.; patron and incumbent, the Rev. George Rashleigh; impropriators, the landowners. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for £265. The church is a cruciform structure, with a tower rising from the intersection, and replacing the original tower, which was surmounted by a spire. Some extensive remains of a castle founded by the family of Ros, about the time of the Conquest, have been partially converted into the manorial farmhouse.

Horton, Monks (St. Peter)

HORTON, MONKS (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Elham, hundred of Stouting, lathe of Shepway, E. division of Kent, 5 miles (N. N. W.) from Hythe; containing 171 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1079 acres, of which 90 are in wood: the railroad from London to Dovor passes very near it. The living is a discharged rectory, consolidated with the vicarage of Brabourne, and valued in the king's books at £7. 10. 8.: the tithes have been commuted for £137, and the glebe comprises 16 acres. The church is principally in the early English style, and contains some handsome ancient monuments. Here was a cell of Cluniac monks, founded in the reign of Henry II., subordinate to the priory of Lewes, and dedicated to St. Mary, St. John the Evangelist, and St. Pancras; its revenue at the Dissolution was valued at £111. 16. 11. The remains are in the Norman style, with later insertions, and have been converted into a dwelling-house; contiguous was a large circular arch, a very small portion of which now remains, curiously ornamented, and supposed to have been the entrance into the conventual church.