Kelham - Kelton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

643-646

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'Kelham - Kelton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 643-646. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51069 Date accessed: 21 August 2014.


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Kelham (St. Wilfrid)

KELHAM (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 2 miles (N. W. by W.) from Newark; containing 169 inhabitants. Charles I. slept here the evening before he gave himself up to the Scottish army, who encamped on the spot in May, 1646. The parish is on the road from Newark to Ollerton, and comprises by measurement 2013 acres: the village is delightfully situated on the river Trent, over which is a neat bridge. The farm of Grange or Park Lathes, comprising 250 acres, belonged to Rufford Abbey, and, though locally in this parish, is extra-parochial. The living is a rectory, annexed to that of Averham, and valued in the king's books at £19. 8. 4.: the tithes have been commuted for £510, and the glebe comprises 45 acres. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with a lofty square embattled tower, and contains some interesting monuments, among which is one to the last lord Lexington, who resided here, and died in 1723.

Kelk, Great

KELK, GREAT, a township, in the parish of Foston-upon-Wolds, union of Driffield, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 6½ miles (E.) from Driffield; containing 187 inhabitants. It comprises about 1020 acres of land: the village is long and straggling, and about two miles to the north of Foston. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £205.

Kelk, Little

KELK, LITTLE, an extra-parochial liberty, in the union of Driffield, wapentake of Dickering, E. riding of York, 5¾ miles (E. by N.) from Driffield; containing 55 inhabitants. It is situated to the north of Great Kelk, and comprises about 784 acres of land.

Kellamergh.—See Bryning.

KELLAMERGH.—See Bryning.

Kellaways, or Calloes (St. Giles)

KELLAWAYS, or Calloes (St. Giles), a parish, in the hundred of Chippenham, Chippenham and Calne, and N. divisions of Wilts, 3 miles (N. E.) from Chippenham; containing 35 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the west by the river Avon, comprises 130 acres; the soil is a light mould, with a substratum of gravel. The surface is flat, and subject to frequent inundations, which have rendered it necessary to construct a causeway more than 100 yards in length, supported on arches of brick, and extending from one side of the river nearly to the church. A causeway from Chippenham to Wickhill, on the other side of this parish, a distance of nearly 3 miles, was formed from the proceeds of a bequest in the 15th century, by Maud Heath, then producing £8 per annum, but subsequently much increased in value. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £2. 13. 4., and in the patronage of Joseph Neeld, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £46, and the glebe comprises 22 acres. The church, a very neat edifice, was built about the year 1820, chiefly at the expense of the Rev. Henry Brindly, then rector.

Kellet, Nether

KELLET, NETHER, a township, in the parish of Bolton-le-Sands, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of the county of Lancaster, 4¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Lancaster; containing 279 inhabitants, and comprising 2018a. 3r. 16p. of land. The Lancaster canal and Lancaster and Carlisle railway pass in the vicinity, on the west. One mile from the village is the remarkable natural curiosity called Dunald-Mill Hole, a cave at the foot of a mountain, into which the water of a large brook, after having turned a mill, enters, and disappears; it continues a subterraneous course for two miles, again emerges at Carnforth, and falls into the river Keer. The cavern extends about 200 yards, and, like other caves in limestone hills, consists of several chambers of various dimensions, with intermediate chasms; the roof is adorned with stalactites and incrustations that reflect the light of tapers in a variety of colours. The entrance to this cavern is fringed with trees, and presents a highly picturesque and striking appearance. Limestone of good quality is abundant in the township. The tithes have been commuted for £340 payable to the Bishop of Chester, and £34 to the vicar.

Kellet, Over

KELLET, OVER, a chapelry, in the parish of Bolton-le-Sands, hundred of Lonsdale south of the Sands, N. division of Lancashire, 6¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Lancaster, to the right of the road to Kendal; containing 508 inhabitants. This is the Chellet of the Domesday survey, and was early a possession of a family named Kellet, whose heiress married Sir Thurstan de Holland. At the erection of the duchy of Lancaster, the manor was held in moieties by Roger de Crofte and Ranulph de Dacres; the Otways, and subsequently the Martons, became proprietors, the latter by purchase in the beginning of the last century. The chapelry comprises about 850 acres, whereof two-thirds are arable, and the remainder meadow, with some small plantations; the surface is mountainous, and commands extensive views, including Morecombe bay and the Furness and Lake districts. Limestone of excellent quality abounds, and there are also good freestone and gritstone. Fairs for cattle are held on May-day and Michaelmas-day. The Lancaster canal runs through, and the Carnforth station on the Lancaster and Carlisle railway is not more than two miles distant. Swarthdale House, here, is the seat of James Clarke, Esq., son of the late venerable recorder of Liverpool. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of John Walmsley, Esq., of Richmond House, Lancaster; net income, £170, with a house. The chapel, dedicated to St. Cuthbert, stands in a quiet spot above the village: in the chapelyard are two small crosses, partly sunk beneath the soil, which are considered to prove the existence of the chapel anterior to the Reformation. A school was endowed in 1802, with an annuity of £11, by Thomas Wilson, and this endowment having been subsequently augmented, the income is now about £40 per annum.

Kelleythorpe.—See Emswell.

KELLEYTHORPE.—See Emswell.

Kelling (St. Mary)

KELLING (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Erpingham, hundred of Holt, W. division of Norfolk, 2 miles (N. by E.) from Holt; containing 223 inhabitants. It comprises 2216a. 21p., of which 1004 acres are arable, 1133 pasture and heath, and 41 plantation; the soil is chiefly a light mould, resting on a bed of gravel, under which is clay. The surface is hilly, and the scenery boldly varied. The village is situated in a picturesque valley or ravine, extending northward to the sea, and traversed by a rivulet and road; the Hall, church, and rectory-house, at the head of the ravine, command a fine view of the ocean. The living is a discharged rectory, with that of Salthouse annexed, valued in the king's books at £12, and in the patronage of Mrs. Girdlestone, the lady of the manor, who resides at the Hall. The tithes of the parish have been commuted for £295. 16., and the glebe comprises 14 acres. The church is chiefly in the later English style, and consists of a nave and chancel, with a square embattled tower; it was reseated in 1841: the font is handsome, and there are several neat memorials to the Girdlestone family; on the south side is a chapel in ruins. When part of the heath was inclosed, about 70 years ago, 200 acres were awarded for the use of the cottagers, to cut fuel and graze their cattle. There is a mineral spring.

Kellington, Cornwall.—See Callington.

KELLINGTON, Cornwall.—See Callington.

Kellington (St. Edmund)

KELLINGTON (St. Edmund), a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of Osgoldcross, W. riding of York; comprising the townships of Beaghall, Egbrough, Kellington, and Whitley; and containing 1493 inhabitants, of whom 324 are in the township of Kellington, 4½ miles (E.) from Ferry-Bridge. This place appears to have had a church at a very early period, which, in the reign of John, was granted by the De Lacys to the Knights of St. John of Jerusalem. The parish comprises about 7000 acres; the lands are well cultivated, and the district is noted for its superior breed of sheep, and of short-horned cattle. The village is pleasantly situated on rising ground, and facility of conveyance is afforded by a canal, which passes through the parish to Goole; there are also turnpike-roads to Pontefract, Selby, Snaith, and Doncaster. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £9. 8. 11½.; net income, £370 per annum; patrons, the Master and Fellows of Trinity College, Cambridge. The great tithes of Kellington township have been commuted for £390, and the small for £122; the impropriate glebe consists of 111 acres, and the vicarial of 12 acres. The church is in the Norman and early English styles, with some portions in the decorated style, and a low square tower. The nave is longitudinally divided into two aisles of unequal breadth, by a range of columns and pointed arches that support a timber-framed roof finely arched, and enriched in the intersections with grotesque ornaments; a similar arrangement prevails in the chancel, which is separated from the nave by a large circular arch. Above the gable at the end of the chancel, is a small turret for one bell. In the churchyard is an ancient stone with a cross rudely sculptured, probably the lid of a coffin. There are three places of worship for Wesleyans.

Kelloe (St. Helen)

KELLOE (St. Helen), a parish, partly in the union of Durham, and partly in that of Easington, S. division of Easington ward, N. division of the county of Durham, 7½ miles (S. E. by E.) from Durham; comprising the townships of Cassop, Coxhoe, Kelloe, Quarrington, Thornley, and Wingate; and containing 11,223 inhabitants, of whom 156 are in Kelloe township. The manor of Kelloe, which is situated near the road from Stockton to Durham, and comprises about 1500 acres, appears to have given name to the family of Kelloe or Kellaw, of whom Richard de Kellaw, a native of the parish, was Bishop of Durham in 1311. It passed from the Kellaw family to that of Forcer, who eventually sold it to John Tempest, Esq., by whom it was devised to his nephew, Sir Henry Vane Tempest, Bart.; the manor is now in the possession of the baronet's only daughter, and heiress, Lady Frances Vane, Marchioness of Londonderry. The parish is about 7 miles in length, nearly of equal breadth, and includes an area of 24,000 acres. The soil, generally thin and sterile, rests on a stratum of magnesian limestone, which, in the lands of Raceby, near the southern boundary of the parish, is in a state of purity, entirely free from those qualities which, in many parts, render it unfit for agricultural use; very extensive quarries are in operation. Coal of excellent quality is found in every part, and since the successful establishment of the Thornley colliery, not less than twelve mines have been opened in the various townships, all of which are in active operation; about 500,000 tons of coal being annually raised, and conveyed by railway to Hartlepool and Stockton, whence they are shipped for the London market. The village of Kelloe, about half a mile to the east of the church, contains a few neatly-built houses, and is well inhabited; the small hamlet of ChurchKelloe contains only the church, the vicarage-house, and one or two other houses. Since the opening of the coalmines, the population has increased from 663 to more than 11,000 persons; and in the several townships, numerous villages, inhabited by the miners, have arisen, in the immediate vicinities of the works.

The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the patronage of the Bishop of Durham; the impropriation belongs to Sherburn Hospital, to the master and brethren of which the church was given by Bishop Pudsey, in the 12th century. The vicarial tithes have been commuted for about £120, and the glebe comprises 220 acres: several parcels of land intermixed with it, are claimed by the hospital. The church, situated in a valley, is an ancient structure chiefly in the early English style of architecture, with a square tower; portions of the edifice are in the decorated English style: on the north side is a projection called the Thornley porch, or Pity porch. The vicarage-house, to the north of the churchyard, is a handsome substantial residence. Churches, to which districts are assigned, have been erected at Thornley and Wingate-Grange. There are places of worship for Wesleyans.

Kelly (St. Mary)

KELLY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Tavistock, hundred of Lifton, Lifton and S. divisions of Devon, 6 miles (E. S. E.) from Launceston; containing 258 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £9. 8. 9., and in the gift of Arthur Kelly, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and the glebe comprises 73 acres.

Kelmarsh (St. Denis)

KELMARSH (St. Denis), a parish, in the union of Market-Harborough, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 11 miles (N.) from Northampton; containing 163 inhabitants. It is intersected by the road from Northampton to Harborough, and comprises by measurement 2857 acres, of which 2480 are pasture, and the remainder arable and woodland; the surface is partly undulated, with gentle slopes shelving to a narrow line of flat country. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £23. 1. 5½., and in the gift of Lord Bateman: the tithes have been commuted for £671. 10., and the glebe comprises 36 acres.

Kelmscott

KELMSCOTT, a chapelry, in the parish of Broadwell, union of Farringdon, hundred of Bampton, county of Oxford, 2 miles (E.) from Lechlade; containing 179 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 1020 acres, of which 867 are arable, and 153 meadow and pasture; the soil is rich. The chapel is a very ancient structure, dedicated to St. George.

Kelsale (St. Mary)

KELSALE (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Blything, hundred of Hoxne, E. division of Suffolk, 1 mile (N.) from Saxmundham; containing 1126 inhabitants, and comprising 3000 acres. The living is a rectory, with that of Carlton consolidated in 1679, valued in the king's books at £20. 0. 5.; patron, H. B. Bence, Esq. The tithes of Kelsale have been commuted for £700, and the glebe consists of 59 acres.

Kelsall

KELSALL, a township, in the parish of Tarvin, union of Great Boughton, Second division of the hundred of Eddisbury, S. division of the county of Chester, 4¼ miles (N. W. by N.) from Tarporley; containing 686 inhabitants, and comprising 1189 acres of land, of a sandy soil. This was formerly a military post of great importance, commanding the principal approach to Chester. Here is a quarry of excellent freestone; also a chalybeate spring. The tithes have been commuted for £99. 10. payable to the vicar, and £150. 10. to the Dean and Chapter of Lichfield. A church, dedicated to St. Philip, was completed in 1847. The Wesleyans have a place of worship; and there is a national school.

Kelsey, North

KELSEY, NORTH, a parish, in the union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (W.) from Caistor; containing 767 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £220; patron, the Prebendary of North Kelsey in the Cathedral of Lincoln. The tithes were commuted for land and a money payment, under an act in 1813, amended by a subsequent act of the 53rd of George III. There is a place of worship for Wesleyan Methodists.

Kelsey, South

KELSEY, SOUTH, in the union of Caistor, N. division of the wapentake of Walshcroft, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5¾ miles (W. by S.) from Caistor; consisting of the united parishes of St. Mary and St. Nicholas, and containing 622 inhabitants. This district, which is situated on the river Ancholme, comprises by computation 5000 acres; the soil is generally a dark clay, with some portions of a light black mould near the river. The surface is level, and was subject to frequent inundations prior to the improvement of the Ancholme by widening and deepening its channel, under an act of parliament; the draining of the lands has also been promoted by the construction of a canal, which passes for nearly four miles through the parish, and communicates with the river. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £19. 15., in the alternate patronage of the Crown, and G. Skipwith, Esq., with a net income of £687: the glebe comprises 100 acres. The church of St. Nicholas is a modern edifice, attached to the ancient tower; that of St. Mary has gone to ruin. Here was a priory, a cell to the abbey of Seize, in Normandy; but there are no remains.

Kelshall (St. Faith)

KELSHALL (St. Faith), a parish, in the union of Royston, hundred of Odsey, county of Hertford, 3½ miles (S. W. by S.) from Royston; containing 276 inhabitants. It comprises 2200 acres, principally arable land, with a few acres of pasture to each farm. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £21; net income, £548; patron, the Bishop of Ely. The church is an ancient and elegant structure.

Kelstern (St. Faith)

KELSTERN (St. Faith), a parish, in the union of Louth, Wold division of the wapentake of LouthEske, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5½ miles (W. N. W.) from Louth; containing, with the hamlet of Lambcroft, 211 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 11. 10.; net income, £150; patron and impropriator, John E. Denison, Esq. In the chancel of the church is a monument erected by Sir Francis South, Knt., to the memory of his wife Elizabeth, who died in 1604; it is curiously ornamented with emblematical figures and inscriptions. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Kelston (St. Nicholas)

KELSTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Keynsham, hundred of Bath-Forum, E. division of Somerset, 3¾ miles (W. N. W.) from Bath; containing 255 inhabitants. It is bounded on the south and west by the river Avon, and comprises about 1045 acres: the soil is chiefly clay; the surface is diversified with hills. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £15. 9. 4½., and in the gift of the Neeld family: the tithes have been commuted for £240, and the glebe comprises 50 acres. Sir John Harrington, a distinguished writer in the reign of Elizabeth, whose family seat was in the parish, was interred in the church, in 1612.

Kelton

KELTON, a township, in the parish of Lamplugh, union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 8 miles (E.) from Whitehaven; containing 192 inhabitants. The tithes were commuted for land in 1819.



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