Ketteringham - Keynsham

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

663-667

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'Ketteringham - Keynsham', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 663-667. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51073 Date accessed: 17 September 2014.


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Ketteringham (St. Peter)

KETTERINGHAM (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Henstead, hundred of Humbleyard, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (E. by N.) from Wymondham; containing 246 inhabitants. The parish comprises about 1915 acres, of which 988 are arable, 596 pasture and heath, and 330 woodland. Ketteringham Park is the beautiful seat of Sir John Peter Boileau, lord of the manor; the mansion is a noble structure in the Elizabethan style, and contains some fine paintings and valuable antiquities, brought from the continent by the proprietor. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6; net income, £196; patron and impropriator, Sir J. P. Boileau: the glebe contains 35 acres. The church is pleasantly situated in the park, and is chiefly in the earlier and later English styles, with a square embattled tower; in 1837 it was thoroughly repaired, and the windows ornamented with ancient and modern stained glass, at a cost of £300, of which £50 were given by the Incorporated Society, and the remainder by Miss Atkins and the Rev. W. W. Andrews. The chancel, on the south side of which a piscina has been lately discovered, contains monuments to the ancient family of Heveningham, of whom William was judge in the reign of Charles I., and one of the regicides who surrendered in 1660; also monuments to the Atkins and Peech families, three of the former of whom were barons of the exchequer in the reigns of Charles II. and William III. A school was lately erected at the cost of Sir J. P. Boileau.

Kettlebaston (St. Mary)

KETTLEBASTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Cosford, W. division of Suffolk, 2¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from Bildeston; containing 203 inhabitants. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8., and in the gift of the family of Fiske: the tithes have been commuted for £300 payable to the rector, and £3. 5. payable to the rector of Preston St. Mary; there are 17 acres of glebe.

Kettleburgh (St. Andrew)

KETTLEBURGH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Plomesgate, hundred of Loes, E. division of Suffolk, 2¼ miles (S. W. by S.) from Framlingham; containing 355 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the river Deben, comprises 1435a. 3r. 12p.; the soil of the greater portion is clay, and that of the remainder of a mixed quality. The surface, though generally flat, has some gentle undulations, and the village is neatly built. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16, and in the gift of the Earl of Gosford: the tithes have been commuted for £405, and the glebe comprises 16 acres. The church is a handsome structure, in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. Several Roman relics have been found.

Kettleby

KETTLEBY, a hamlet, in the parish of Bigby, union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 2¾ miles (E. by N.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing 45 inhabitants. This place is situated in the vale of the Ancholme; where Kettel, a Danish captain under Canute, is said to have dwelt, on a site afterwards occupied by a mansion of the Tyrwhitts, the foundations of which, covered by a modern farmhouse, and surrounded by a moat, still remain.

Kettleby-Thorp

KETTLEBY-THORP, a hamlet, in the parish of Bigby, union of Caistor, S. division of the wapentake of Yarborough, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 3 miles (W. by N.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing 27 inhabitants. This is a farm, on the south of which is the road from Glandford-Brigg to Caistor. Here is a desecrated burial-ground, where fragments of Roman pavement have been found.

Kettleshulme

KETTLESHULME, a township, in the parish of Prestbury, union and hundred of Macclesfield, N. division of the county of Chester, 6¾ miles (N. E.) from Macclesfield; containing 336 inhabitants. It comprises 1023 acres of land, the soil of which is clay, with stone. The Wesleyan Methodists have a place of worship; and there is a school with a small endowment.

Kettlestone (All Saints)

KETTLESTONE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Walsingham, hundred of Gallow, W. division of Norfolk, 3¼ miles (E. N. E.) from Fakenham; containing 219 inhabitants. It comprises 1168a. 3r. 4p., of which 813a. 1r. 25p. are arable, 259a. 3r. 7p. pasture, and 95a. 2r. 36p. woodland. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £290, and the glebe comprises 43 acres. The church is chiefly in the later style, with an octagonal tower. W. Newman, in 1777, left £500 to the poor, who have several other bequests.

Kettlethorpe (St. Peter and St. Paul)

KETTLETHORPE (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 9½ miles (W. N. W.) from Lincoln; containing, with the hamlet of Laughterton and the township of Fenton, 501 inhabitants. It is situated on the river Trent, and comprises by measurement 3005 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £28; net income, £569; patron, Sir W. A. Ingilby, Bart.: the tithes were commuted for land in 1766; the glebe altogether comprises 300 acres. The church was rebuilt in 1810. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. John Becke, rector in 1597, bequeathed lands subsequently exchanged at the inclosure for others, now producing £20 per annum, to be divided among the poor.

Kettlewell (St. Mary)

KETTLEWELL (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Skipton, E. division of the wapentake of Staincliffe and Ewcross, W. riding of York, 15 miles (N.) from Skipton; containing, with Starbotton township, 685 inhabitants. This place suffered great devastation in 1686 from a flood, during which one of the neighbouring hills opened, and poured forth a deluge of water and gravel, which nearly destroyed the village of Starbotton. The parish comprises by computation 7320 acres, of which 2520 are in Starbotton: the surface is mountainous, and the scenery romantic; the soil is in general rich, the parish consisting, with the exception of some moors, of fine pasture and meadow land. Coal of moderate quality is abundant on the mountains, and lead-ore is found, for which smeltingworks are in operation. The town is situated on the banks of the river Wharfe, in a deep and luxuriant valley, between the mountains of Great Whernside and Middlesmoor; and is irregularly built. The market, which is well supplied with corn, is on Thursday; a statutefair is held on July 6th, and there are fairs, chiefly for cattle, on the 2nd of Sept. and 23rd of October. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5, and in the gift of the Misses Bolland; net income, £120. The church is a neat structure with a tower, built in 1820, at a cost of about £1400, raised by a rate, aided by £100 from the Church Building Society; it contains 600 sittings. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Ketton (St. Mary)

KETTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Stamford, hundred of East, county of Rutland, 4 miles (S. W. by W.) from Stamford; containing 951 inhabitants. This parish, which is intersected by the road from Stamford, through Uppingham, to Leicester, comprises 3122a. 19p.; the surface is undulated, the soil clay and loam, and the substratum limestone. There are extensive quarries of freestone of a very superior quality, much used for building in the vicinity, and of which considerable quantities are sent to distant counties. The living is a discharged vicarage, with that of Tixover annexed, valued in the king's books at £8; net income, £107; patron, the Bishop of Peterborough. The church is principally in the early English style, but in the west end has an intermixture of Norman; the date of the south porch is 1232. It had formerly north and south transepts, which have been destroyed; the tower and spire are very handsome, and in good preservation. Here is a place of worship for Independents. In 1791, Sophia Elizabeth Edwards gave £1000 three per cents, for the support of a school.

Keverne, St.

KEVERNE, ST., a parish, in the union of Helston, W. division of the hundred of Kerrier and of the county of Cornwall, 11 miles (S. by E.) from Helston; containing 2469 inhabitants. This parish, forming part of the wide district of Meneage, and comprising by measurement 10,158 acres, whereof 2002 are common or waste, is situated on the shore of the English Channel, by which it is bounded on the east and south. It contains three fishing coves, called respectively Coverack, Porthalloe, and Porthonstock, at the first of which is a good pier, affording shelter to small vessels from the rough winds and stormy seas frequent on this part of the coast. In these coves the pilchard-fishery is carried on to a considerable extent, and several boats are also otherwise employed. A yellow clay found here, is much esteemed for fine castings in silver, brass, and lead. Fairs for cattle are held on March 5th, June 19th, October 2nd, and the first Tuesday after Twelfth-day. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £18. 11. 5½., and in the patronage of Mrs. Griffith; impropriators, the landowners: the tithes have been commuted for £512. The church has a handsome tower surmounted by a spire, and contains many monuments, among which is one to the memory of Major George Cavendish, Capt. Dunkenfield, and sixty-one men of a regiment, who, returning with dispatches in a transport from Spain, were shipwrecked, and perished off Coverack Cove, on the 22nd December, 1809. There are places of worship for Baptists, Bryanites, and Wesleyans. Charles Incledon, the celebrated singer, was born in the parish.

Keverstone, with Raby.—See Raby.

KEVERSTONE, with Raby.—See Raby.

Kew (St. Anne)

KEW (St. Anne), a parish, in the union of Richmond, Second division of the hundred of Kingston, E. division of Surrey, 6½ miles (W. by S.) from London; containing 923 inhabitants; It is pleasantly situated on the southern bank of the Thames, over which a handsome stone bridge of seven arches, replacing a former structure of wood, was erected in the year 1789, connecting it with Brentford. The village is lighted with gas. George III., who resided for a considerable time at Kew Palace, greatly improved and extended the gardens, which he united to those of Richmond; and began to erect a new royal palace in the ancient English style, which, after remaining for several years in an unfinished state, was taken down in 1828. The royal gardens are tastefully laid out, and embellished with temples of the various orders of Grecian architecture, and with a Chinese pagoda, from the summit of which a most extensive prospect is obtained of the scenery on the banks of the Thames, and of the surrounding country. The Botanic Gardens here contain the most complete collection of exotic plants in Europe, and comprise fifteen conservatories, one of which was erected in 1837, by His Majesty William IV., at an expense of about £5000, and is in the Grecian style, with Doric columns. Up to 1841 these gardens belonged to the crown as private gardens; but in that year Her Majesty assigned them to the Commissioners of Woods, at the same time giving 45 acres in addition, from the royal pleasure-grounds; and in 1846 a further grant of land was made, making a total of about 70 acres. The gardens are entered by beautiful gates of wrought iron, 13 feet high, with piers of Portland stone. The royal grounds are open to the public on Thursday and Sunday; and the Botanic portion everyday, Sunday excepted. The King of Hanover and Duke of Cambridge have residences on Kew green, and in the environs are several handsome villas.

Kew was a chapelry to Kingston, but was constituted a separate parish by act of parliament, in 1770: it comprises by measurement 231 acres of land, chiefly laid out in pasture; about 25 or 30 acres are woodland and ozier-beds. The living is a vicarage, with that of Petersham annexed; net income, £401; patrons, the Provost and Fellows of King's College, Cambridge; impropriator, Edward Kent, Esq. The church was built by subscription in 1714, on a site given by Queen Anne, as a chapel of ease to the vicarage of Kingston, and was enlarged by George III., whose successor on the throne erected the organ gallery, and presented to the parish the organ on which his father had been accustomed to play. The edifice was enlarged in 1837, under the directions of Sir Jeffrey Wyatville, at an expense of £4500, defrayed by William IV., and by a grant of £200 from the Incorporated Society. It contains neat monuments to the memory of Lady Capel, who endowed a free school, and Elizabeth, Countess of Derby, who left £1000 to the poor of the parishes of Kew and Old Brentford. The free school was founded in 1721, and is endowed with land producing £31. 10. per annum. George IV. contributed £300 towards its erection; and the first stone was laid by William IV., when Duke of Clarence, on the 12th of August, 1824: it is designated the "Queen's Free School," by permission of Her Majesty, who subscribes 20 guineas per annum towards its support.

Kew, St.

KEW, ST., a parish, in the union of Bodmin, hundred of Trigg, E. division of Cornwall, 4¼ miles (N. E. by N.) from Wadebridge; containing 1429 inhabitants. The parish is bounded on the south by a branch of the river Camel, navigable to Amble Bridge; and comprises by measurement 6087 acres, of which 21 are common or waste. There are quarries of stone for the roads; and sand for manure is brought to the lower part of the parish by a branch of the river Wade, at spring tides. A fair is held on the first Tuesday in April. The living, a vicarage endowed with a small portion of the rectorial tithes, is valued in the king's books at £19. 11. 0½., and in the patronage of Mrs. Every; impropriators of the remainder of the rectorial tithes, the family of Molesworth. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £734, and the incumbent's for £521. 9.; the glebe comprises 21 acres. The church is an ancient edifice, consisting of a nave, with north and south aisles, and containing in the windows some interesting remains of painted glass; under a window in the north aisle is an altar-tomb with the recumbent effigy of Honor Webber, who died in 1601. Here are places of worship for Wesleyans. In the churchyard was formerly a chapel, dedicated to St. Wenn; and there are several barrows or beacons in the parish.

Kewstoke (St. Paul)

KEWSTOKE (St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 9½ miles (N. W.) from Axbridge; containing 545 inhabitants. This place is distinguished by the beautiful remains of Wordspring Priory, founded in 1210 by William de Courtenay, for Augustine canons, and which continued to flourish till the Dissolution, when its revenue was returned at £110. 18. 4¾. The remains, romantically seated in a secluded spot, consist of the chapel, which is nearly entire, with a handsome tower at the eastern end; the refectory, which is in a dilapidated state; and the prior's apartments, now occupied as a farmhouse. The parish is indented on the west by Sand bay, and bounded by the Cleveland Flats on the north; it comprises by measurement 2428 acres, of which 240 are common or waste. There are several quarries of good limestone and freestone, which are extensively worked; and lead and iron ore are found in abundance. The Bristol and Exeter railway passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at£9. 12. 6., and in the patronage of the Crown; impropriators, the Corporation of Bristol. The great tithes have been commuted for £60, the vicarial for £315, and the glebe comprises 24 acres. The church is in the early and later English styles, with a square embattled tower: the south doorway has a highly enriched Norman arch in good preservation; the pulpit is of stone, richly sculptured. A national school is supported by subscription.

Kexborough

KEXBOROUGH, a township, in the parish of Darton, wapentake of Staincross, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (W. N. W.) from Barnsley; containing 625 inhabitants. This place was formerly owned by the Burdett family, whose ancient seat of Birthwaite Hall, a stately mansion in the early English style, with towers and turrets, is still remaining. The estate is now the property of T. Wentworth Beaumont, Esq., to whom Haigh Hall, an ancient mansion beautifully situated on an eminence in a fine park, and once the residence of the Cottons, also belongs. Kexborough comprises 1650 acres, of which about 790 are arable, 500 pasture, and 200 wood; the land is of the finest quality, and in many parts planted. A portion of the population is employed in collieries and in weaving, and at Swithen is an establishment for bleaching webs and damasks. The village stands pleasantly on a gentle acclivity rising from the margin of the river Dearne. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Kexby

KEXBY, a township, in the parish of Upton, union of Gainsborough, wapentake of Well, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5½ miles (S. E.) from Gainsborough; containing 269 inhabitants. On the inclosure of the parish, 55 acres of land, producing £35 per annum, were awarded to the poor in lieu of their right of common; but they are now carried to the account of the poor's rates.

Kexby

KEXBY, a township, in the parish of Catton, wapentake of Ouse and Derwent, union and E. riding of York, 6 miles (E.) from York; containing 159 inhabitants. This township comprises by computation 1750 acres, and is situated on the road from York to Pocklington, and on the west bank of the Derwent, which is here crossed by a handsome stone bridge of three arches. Kexby Hall was formerly surrounded by a moat.

Keyham

KEYHAM, a chapelry, in the parish of Rothley, union of Billesdon, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 5¾ miles (E. by N.) from Leicester; containing 184 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to All Saints. Of £35 per annum arising from land given on the inclosure in exchange for land bequeathed to the poor, £15 are paid to a schoolmaster, and £20 distributed to poor families.

Keyhaven

KEYHAVEN, a tything, in the parish of Milford, union of Lymington, hundred of Christchurch, Lymington and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 2¾ miles (S. S. W.) from the town of Lymington; containing 292 inhabitants.

Keyingham (St. Nicholas)

KEYINGHAM (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Patrington, S. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 5 miles (S. E. by E.) from Hedon; containing 728 inhabitants. The parish is on the road between Hedon and Patrington; it includes Salthaugh-Grange, and comprises 3300 acres, a large portion of which is marshy land, much improved and fertilized by drainage. The soil on the more elevated grounds is a marly clay, interspersed at intervals with sand and gravel; in the low marshes it is a deep warp clay, formed by a deposit from the river Humber. The village is pleasantly situated on an eminence commanding extensive views of the Humber, the Lincolnshire coast, and the Yorkshire wolds; there are some remains of an ancient cross, consisting of the lower part of the shaft, elevated on three steps. The living is a discharged curacy, valued in the king's books at £12; net income, £92; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York. The tithes of the titheable property have been commuted for a rent-charge of £409. 13. 8., and the appropriator has a tithe farm, assigned at the inclosure of certain lands. The church is one of the few in this district with a spire; the font is very ancient. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Ranters.

Keymer, North and South

KEYMER, NORTH and SOUTH, a parish, in the union of Cuckfield, hundred of Buttinghill, rape of Lewes, E. division of Sussex, 2¼ miles (E. S. E.) from Hurst-Pierrepoint; containing 1364 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the road from Hurst-Pierrepoint, viâ Ditchelling, to Lewes, consists chiefly of down land in the southern portions of it, and in the northern of good arable, pasture, and wood. Clay for pottery is found in abundance; and at St. John's common is an extensive establishment for making bricks for building, a peculiar red brick for paving, also tiles, and brown pottery. The London and Brighton railway passes near the place: a branch line was completed from near Keymer to Lewes, in 1847. The living is a rectory, annexed to the living of Clayton. The church is in the early English style; the chancel, which is circular, is separated from the nave by a round arch; the interior was repaired and beautified in 1838.

Keyne, St.

KEYNE, ST., a parish, in the union of Liskeard, hundred of West, E. division of Cornwall, 2½ miles (S.) from Liskeard; containing 194 inhabitants. The parish derives its name from St. Kayne, or Keyna, said to have been the daughter of Braganus, Prince of Brecknockshire, who lived in the fifth century. It comprises by computation 800 acres: the soil is generally a stiff yellow clay; the surface is diversified with hills, and the low grounds are watered by the river Looe. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £5. 18. 6½., and in the gift of Lieut. Cory, R. N.: the tithes have been commuted for £140, and there are 25 acres of glebe. The church is a small plain edifice, and near it is St. Kayne's well, long celebrated in legendary tales for its peculiar virtues; the roof of the inclosure supports, in a singular manner, five trees, two of oak, two of ash, and one of elm, planted more than half a century ago.

Keynsham (St. John the Baptist)

KEYNSHAM (St. John the Baptist), a parish, the head of a union, and formerly a market-town, in the hundred of Keynsham, E. division of Somerset, 7¼ miles (W. N. W.) from Bath; containing, with the tything of Chewton-Keynsham, 2307 inhabitants. The parish comprises 3500 acres; the surface is undulated, and the scenery abounds with variety and beauty. The town is situated upon the Avon, which is navigable hence to Bath, and across which is a bridge leading into Gloucestershire. On the river are some mills belonging to a brass and copper company at Bristol; and several of the inhabitants are employed in the preparation of flax. The Great Western railway passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £11. 19. 7.; patron, the Duke of Buckingham. The tithes belonging to his grace have been commuted for £135, the vicarial tithes for £170, and those belonging to the trustees of the Bristol charities for £116. 7.; the vicarial glebe comprises 5½ acres. The church is a spacious edifice in the later English style. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans; also a school endowed in 1705 with £20 per annum by Sir Thomas Bridges, who likewise built an almshouse for six widows. The poor-law union of Keynsham comprises 19 parishes or places, of which 14 are in the county of Somerset, and 5 in that of Gloucester; and contains a population of 21,710. An abbey of Black canons was established by William, Earl of Gloucester, about 1170, and dedicated to the Virgin Mary, St. Peter, and St. Paul; its revenue, at the Dissolution, was valued at £450. 3. 6. There is a mineral spring.



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