Kinnerley - Kirby-Horton

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

687-689

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'Kinnerley - Kirby-Horton', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 687-689. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51080 Date accessed: 28 November 2014.


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Kinnerley (St. Mary)

KINNERLEY (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Oswestry, N. division of Salop, 6 miles (S. E. by S.) from the town of Oswestry; containing 1286 inhabitants. This parish, which is intersected by the great Holyhead road, comprises about 5000 acres. A castle here was demolished during the minority of Henry III., by Llewelyn, Prince of Wales, who agreed to make reparation for the act; but the building was never habitable afterwards. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 6. 8., and in the patronage of the Crown; net income, £114. The church is a plain edifice.

Kinnersley (St. James)

KINNERSLEY (St. James), a parish, in the union of Weobley, partly in the hundred of Wolphy, but chiefly in that of Stretford, county of Hereford, 4½ miles (W. by S.) from Weobley; containing 281 inhabitants. This place had a castle of some importance before the Conquest, the remains of which have been converted into a residence. The parish comprises by measurement 2400 acres. Facilities of conveyance are afforded by the river Wye, and by the road between Weobley and Hay, which passes through the village. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 8. 4., and in the patronage of Mrs. Clarke: the tithes have been commuted for £415, and the glebe comprises 24 acres. The church is in the early English style.

Kinnersley (St. Chad)

KINNERSLEY (St. Chad), a parish, in the union of Wellington, Newport division of the hundred of South Bradford, N. division of Salop, 4¾ miles (N. N. E.) from Wellington; containing 295 inhabitants, and comprising 1789 acres by measurement. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 1. 8., and in the gift of the Duke of Sutherland: the tithes have been commuted for £340, and the glebe comprises 82 acres. The church is an ancient structure in the early English style. About half a mile from it are the remains of a large encampment, called the Wall, supposed to be of British origin.

Kinnerton, Lower

KINNERTON, LOWER, a township, in the parish of Doddleston, union of Great Boughton, Lower division of the hundred of Broxton, S. division of the county of Chester, 5¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Chester; containing 73 inhabitants, and comprising 519 acres, of which the soil is clay.

Kinneyside

KINNEYSIDE, a township, in the parish of St. Bees, union of Whitehaven, Allerdale ward above Derwent, W. division of Cumberland, 3¾ miles (N. E. by N.) from Egremont; containing 223 inhabitants, of whom many are employed in some extensive lead-mines here, and others at a smelting-mill belonging to the London Lead Company.

Kinoulton (St. Wilfrid)

KINOULTON (St. Wilfrid), a parish, in the union of Bingham, S. division of the wapentake of Bingham and of the county of Nottingham, 9 miles (S. E.) from Nottingham; containing 388 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the west by the ancient Fosseroad, comprises by computation 4000 acres. The soil is partly a strong clay, and partly of lighter quality; the surface is in general flat, though in some parts hilly, and there are some fine tracts of rich grazing-land. The Grantham canal passes through the parish. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £7. 18. 11.; net income, £160; patron and appropriator, the Archbishop of York. There was anciently a chapel at Newbold, in the parish; and the archbishops of York had a palace here, of which no remains exist. In the neighbourhood is an excellent chalybeate spring.

Kinsham

KINSHAM, a hamlet, in the parish of Bredon, union of Tewkesbury, Middle division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Pershore and E. divisions of the county of Worcester, 1 mile (S. E.) from Bredon; containing 128 inhabitants, and comprising 315a. 2r. 39p.

Kinsham, Lower

KINSHAM, LOWER, a township, in the parish and poor-law union of Presteign, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford; containing 55 inhabitants.

Kinsham, Upper

KINSHAM, UPPER, a parish, in the union of Presteign, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 3½ miles (E.) from Presteign; containing 97 inhabitants. It comprises 1149 acres, and is intersected by the road from Presteign to Ludlow, and by the river Lug. The living is a donative curacy; net income, £15; patron and impropriator, Lyndon Evelyn, Esq.

Kintbury (St. Mary)

KINTBURY (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hungerford, hundred of Kintbury-Eagle, county of Berks, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Hungerford; containing, with the tything of Holt, 1881 inhabitants. The Kennet and Avon canal passes through the parish; and on the banks of the river Kennet, here, is a silk-throwing mill. Kintbury had formerly a market on Friday, and fairs on the festival of the Nativity of the Virgin Mary, and on that of St. Simon and St. Jude, granted in 1268 to the nuns of Amesbury. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £20, and in the gift of Admiral Dundas, who, with others, is impropriator: the great tithes have been commuted for £402, and the vicarial for £803; the glebe comprises 3 acres. The church is partly in the Norman style. At Dentford Park, in the parish, a district church was consecrated on the 23rd of August, 1834; it was built and endowed at the expense of George Henry Cherry, Esq., and is in the early English style, with a beautiful embattled tower and four spires. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. In digging a grave, in 1762, a considerable number of Saxon coins, of Edred, Edwy, and Edmund, was discovered under a skull.

Kinvaston

KINVASTON, a township, in the parish of Wolverhampton, union of Penkridge, E. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 8½ miles (N.) from Wolverhampton; containing 21 inhabitants. This is a small detached member of the parish, and consists of a single farm. Dr. James, a distinguished physician, was born here in 1703.

Kinver, county of Stafford.—See Kinfare.

KINVER, county of Stafford.—See Kinfare.

Kinwalsey

KINWALSEY, a hamlet, in the parish of Hamptonin-Arden, union of Meriden, Solihull division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick; containing 25 inhabitants, and comprising 114 acres. This is a small hamlet, which derived its name, as Dugdale conjectures, from a Saxon possessor.

Kinwarton (St. Mary)

KINWARTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Alcester, Alcester division of the hundred of Barlichway, S. division of the county of Warwick, 1 mile (N. E.) from Alcester; containing 67 inhabitants. This parish, which comprises about 450 acres, is situated on the road from Alcester to Henley, and bounded on the south-east by the river Arrow. The name is supposed to be that of a Saxon possessor. The manor was granted to Evesham Abbey on its foundation in the year 714; and the monks held a court leet here, and had divers other privileges from the time of Edward I. In the 32nd of Henry VIII., Kinwarton was granted to Anthony Skinner, of London, from whose grandson it was purchased by Sir Fulke Greville and Lord Brooke. The living is a rectory, with the livings of Great Alne and Weethley annexed, valued in the king's books at £7. 11. 0½., and in the gift of the Bishop of Worcester. The tithes were commuted for land on the inclosure of the parish; the glebe comprises altogether 120 acres, and, with the glebes of Alne and Weethley, is valued at about £440 per annum, net. The church is an ancient structure, in the early English style.

Kiplin

KIPLIN, a township, in the parish of Catterick, union of Northallerton, wapentake of GillingEast, N. riding of York, 2¾ miles (E. S. E.) from Catterick; containing 114 inhabitants. It comprises about 1250 acres, the property and manor of the Earl of Tyrconnell, whose seat of Kiplin Hall is a handsome mansion, in an extensive park. The village, which is small, is seated in the picturesque and well-wooded vale of a rivulet. This was the birthplace of Sir G. Calvert, created Lord Baltimore in Ireland by James I., in the year 1624, and who established colonies in Newfoundland and Virginia.

Kippax (St. Mary)

KIPPAX (St. Mary), a parish, in the Lower division of the wapentake of Skyrack, W. riding of York, 8 miles (E. by S.) from Leeds; containing, with the townships of Allerton-Bywater, Great and Little Preston, and part of Ledstone, 2232 inhabitants, of whom 1214 are in the township of Kippax. This parish, in the Domesday survey Chepesch, is situated near the river Aire, and comprises by computation 4000 acres: the soil is a light mould, resting on limestone, and the scenery is picturesque. The village is on an eminence, and the surface generally rises gradually from the river towards the north. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 7. 1.; net income, £329; patron, the Crown; impropriator, W. Hastings Medhurst, Esq., who is lord of the manor. The tithes were commuted for land, under acts of inclosure, in 1791 and 1805; the glebe comprises 50 acres, with a house. The church is an ancient structure. Here are places of worship for Primitive Methodists and Wesleyans. A school was founded about the year 1544, by George Goldsmith, who endowed it with land now producing £22 per annum; and there are four almshouses for widows, built by Sir John Bland, Bart.

Kirby-Bedon (St. Andrew)

KIRBY-BEDON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (S. E.) from Norwich; containing, with Kirby-Bedon St. Mary, 265 inhabitants. The parish comprises 625 acres, of which 424 are arable, 160 pasture, 38 in woods, and the remainder glebe. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 4. 9½., and in the gift of H. Muskett, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and there are 7 acres of glebe, with a commodious and handsome house. The church, which is chiefly in the later English style, consists of a nave and chancel, with a low tower; the entrance on the south is by a Norman doorway.

Kirby-Bedon (St. Mary),

KIRBY-BEDON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Henstead, E. division of Norfolk, 3 miles (S. E.) from the city of Norwich. It is bounded on the north-east by the navigable river Yare, and comprises 743a. 1r. 35p., chiefly arable land. The church forms a picturesque ruin.

Kirby-Bellars (St. Peter)

KIRBY-BELLARS (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Melton-Mowbray, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 3½ miles (W. by S.) from Melton-Mowbray; containing 236 inhabitants. It takes the adjunct to its name from the foundation of a college here in the reign of Edward II. by Roger Beller, for a warden and twelve priests; this college, in 1359, was made conventual, for a prior and Canons regular of the order of St. Augustine, and at the Dissolution the revenue was estimated at £178. 7. 10. The parish comprises 2600 acres; it is situated on the road from Melton to Leicester, and on the navigable river Wreak. Here, also, is a station of the Syston and Peterborough railway. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £84; patron and impropriator, Sir Robert Burdett, Bart.: the tithes have been commuted for land. The church is a neat plain edifice of stone, with a tower surmounted by a lofty spire. In 1821, many teeth and bones of the elephant and other animals, together with the horns of the antelope, and also an urn containing black beads, were dug up.

Kirby-Cane (All Saints)

KIRBY-CANE (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Loddon and Clavering, hundred of Clavering, E. division of Norfolk, 4 miles (N. W.) from Beccles; containing 458 inhabitants. This parish derives its name, originally Kirkby-Camp, of which its modern appellation is a corruption, from an ancient camp at Pewters' Hill, where, about the year 1815, several skeletons, celts, and various warlike instruments, were turned up by the plough. Near the church is the Hall, a handsome mansion. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £10, and in the gift of Lord Berners: the tithes have been commuted for £425, and the glebe comprises 41 acres. The church is in the early English style, with a circular tower and other Norman details; the east window has been embellished with ancient stained glass by Lord Berners. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Kirby, Cold

KIRBY, COLD, a parish, in the union of Helmsley, wapentake of Birdforth, N. riding of York, 7 miles (E. N. E.) from Thirsk; containing 182 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 2100 acres, of which about two-thirds are arable, and one-third pasture and meadow. The village is situated close to Hamilton Plain, and south of the Hamilton hills. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £63; patron, Thomas Duncombe, Esq., of Copgrove. The church was rebuilt in 1842, at the sole expense of the patron, who also presented a communion-service of plate.

Kirby-Grindalyth (St. Andrew)

KIRBY-GRINDALYTH (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Malton, wapentake of Buckrose, E. riding of York, 2½ miles (N. W.) from Sledmere; containing, with the townships of Duggleby and Thirkleby, 474 inhabitants, of whom 195 are in the township of Kirby-Grindalyth. The land is mostly arable, with some meadow, and large sheep-walks; the soil is thin, and rests on chalk and flint. The village is situated in a picturesque vale, where are some fine plantations. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 9. 7.; patron, Sir Tatton Sykes, Bart., who is lord of the manor. The church, rebuilt in 1826 at the cost of £400, is a neat edifice, with a square tower surmounted by a spire.

Kirby-Horton, Kent.—See Horton, Kirby.

KIRBY-HORTON, Kent.—See Horton, Kirby