Knaresdale - Knock

Sponsor

Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

706-708

Citation Show another format:

'Knaresdale - Knock', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 706-708. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51085 Date accessed: 30 July 2014.


Highlight

(Min 3 characters)

Knaresdale

KNARESDALE, a parish, in the union of Haltwhistle, W. division of Tindale ward, S. division of Northumberland, 6 miles (N. W. by N.) from Alston-Moor; containing 491 inhabitants. The parish derives its name from the Knar, a rough mountain torrent which intersects the western portion of it from west to east; it is bounded on the west by the county of Cumberland, and comprises by computation 7144 acres, of which 2144 are good arable, pasture, and meadow land, and the remainder open common. The common is in general a bleak and sterile moorland, but is supposed to abound in mineral wealth; and it has been said that the Romans had formerly a lead-mine in Knaresdale. The village is situated on the South Tyne, and on the road from Brampton to Alston; but until the road was made to the colliery at Hartley-Burn, the place was difficult of access, and the manners and mode of living of the people were exceedingly rude. Slaggyford, also on the South Tyne, according to tradition, was once a markettown, and had a fair; it is still the largest village in the parish. Williamston, which occupies a situation equally beautiful, is on the opposite side of the river; and the hamlet of Eals, seated in a sheltered spot on its right bank, is remarkable for its old plum-trees and some fine ash-trees, and has a bridge of two arches. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 18. 9., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £117, and the glebe comprises 22 acres, with a rectory-house surrounded by tasteful gardens. The church is on a dry knoll; the old edifice having become greatly out of repair, the present building was erected in 1833, at a cost of £300: the churchyard embraces a wide view. There are two places of worship for Wesleyans. On the side of a fell is a mineral spring, called Snope's Well, formerly in high repute. The Rt. Hon. Thomas Wallace was raised to the peerage by the title of Baron Wallace of Knaresdale, in 1828: his lordship died in 1844.

Knayton, with Brawith

KNAYTON, with Brawith, a township, in the parish of Leake, union of Thirsk, wapentake of Allertonshire, N. riding of York, 4 miles (N.) from Thirsk; containing 404 inhabitants. These places comprise about 1390 acres of land. The village is pleasantly situated on an eminence on the road from Thirsk to Yarm: Brawith lies on the east bank of the small river Codbeck. Brawith Hall is a neat mansion, the property of the late Mr. Consett, who, in 1839, bequeathed his extensive estates to his nephew, named Preston, then eleven years of age, but to accumulate in the hands of trustees until 1860. The Wesleyans have a place of worship.

Knebworth (St. Mary)

KNEBWORTH (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Hitchin, hundred of Broadwater, county of Hertford, 4 miles (N.) from Welwyn; containing 253 inhabitants, and comprising by computation more than 3000 acres. The manor-house of the Lytton family, who have been settled here since the time of Henry VII., contains some exquisitely carved oak. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 1. 10½., and in the patronage of Mrs. B. Lytton: the tithes have been commuted for £525, and the glebe consists of 70 acres. The church is a good structure in the early English style, and contains the sepulchral chapel of the Lyttons, in which are some handsome monuments.

Knedlington

KNEDLINGTON, a township, in the parish and union of Howden, wapentake of Howdenshire, E. riding of York, 1 mile (W. by S.) from Howden; containing 142 inhabitants. It comprises 940 acres, and includes the hamlet of Booth, where is a ferry across the Ouse. The old Hall, a fine specimen of the Elizabethan style, was possessed by Sir John Gate, a distinguished knight in the reign of Henry VIII. The village is well built, and ornamented with some fine trees.

Kneesall (St. Bartholomew)

KNEESALL (St. Bartholomew), a parish, in the union of Southwell, partly in the South-Clay division of the wapentake of Bassetlaw, and partly in the N. division of that of Thurgarton, N. and S. divisions of the county of Nottingham, 4 miles (S. E. by E.) from Ollerton; containing, with the townships of Kersall and Ompton, 596 inhabitants. In Kneesall and Ompton townships are 2878 acres, of which 92 are common or waste. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10, with the perpetual curacy of Boughton annexed, and in the patronage of the Chapter of the Collegiate Church of Southwell; net income, £100. The church is an ancient structure, in the later English style, with a square embattled tower. There is a chapel of ease; also a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Kneesworth

KNEESWORTH, a hamlet, in the parish of Bassingbourne, union of Royston, hundred of Armingford, county of Cambridge, 2¾ miles (N. W.) from Royston; containing 191 inhabitants. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £24. 15.

Kneeton (St. Peter)

KNEETON (St. Peter), a parish, in the union, and N. division of the wapentake, of Bingham, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 7¾ miles (S. W. by W.) from Newark; containing 109 inhabitants. This parish, which is bounded on the west by the river Trent, and on the east by the Roman Fosse-road, comprises 926 acres by measurement. The Trent affords every facility for the conveyance of commodities; there is a ferry to Hoveringham. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £4. 9. 4½.; net income, £58; patron and impropriator, the Earl of Carnarvon. The church is a neat plain edifice.

Kneeton, York.—See Middleton-Tyas.

KNEETON, York.—See Middleton-Tyas.

Kneighton

KNEIGHTON, a township, in the parish of Muckleston, union of Drayton, N. division of the hundred of Pirehill and of the county of Stafford, 5½ miles (N. E. by N.) from Drayton; containing 164 inhabitants. This is a small township, bounded on three sides by Shropshire, with a village lying on the road from Muckleston to Nantwich. A school-house was built here in the year 1829.

Knettishall (All Saints)

KNETTISHALL (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Thetford, hundred of Blackbourn, W. division of Suffolk, 5½ miles (S. by W.) from East Harling; containing 79 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1080 acres, and is bounded by the smaller river Ouse, which separates it from the county of Norfolk. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 11.; net income, £184; patron, Thomas Thornhill, Esq.: the glebe comprises 28 acres. The church is in the early English style, with a square embattled tower.

Knightley

KNIGHTLEY, a township, in the parish of Gnosall, union of Newport, W. division of the hundred of Cuttlestone, S. division of the county of Stafford, 3½ miles (S. S. W.) from Eccleshall. This place forms the northern quarter of the parish, and has a number of farmhouses and several scattered dwellings. The common was inclosed in 1806; the old inclosures contain many excellent oaks.

Knighton

KNIGHTON, a hamlet, in the parish of ComptonBeauchamp, union of Farringdon, hundred of Shrivenham, county of Berks; with 124 inhabitants.

Knighton

KNIGHTON, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Margaret, Leicester, union of Blaby, hundred of Guthlaxton, S. division of the county of Leicester, 2½ miles (S. S. E.) from Leicester; containing 465 inhabitants. The soil is in general rich. Sir E. C. Hartopp, Bart., who is lord of the manor, has a mansion here. The Midland railway passes through a tunnel of brickwork at this place, 100 yards in length, and 27 feet wide. The chapel is dedicated to St. James. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Knighton

KNIGHTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Stogursey, union of Williton, hundred of Cannington, W. division of Somerset; containing 37 inhabitants.

Knighton-Upon-Teame

KNIGHTON-UPON-TEAME, a chapelry, in the parish of Lindridge, union of Tenbury, Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Tenbury and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 3¾ miles (E. N. E.) from Tenbury, on the road to Ludlow; containing, with the hamlet of Newnham, 552 inhabitants. This chapelry is situated in the western part of the parish, and surrounded by the county of Salop, except on the south, where it is bounded by the river Teame. It comprises 2489 acres of land, of which 1097 acres are the property of Sir William Smith, Bart., whose seat, Eardiston, is a handsome mansion near the Teame. The Leominster canal passes through the chapelry. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Lindridge; net income, £100, paid out of the vicarial tithes. The chapel, dedicated to St. Michael, is an ancient edifice with a wooden spire, and will seat 200 persons.

Knighton, West (St. Peter)

KNIGHTON, WEST (St. Peter), a parish, in the union of Dorchester, hundred of Culliford-Tree, Dorchester division of Dorset, 4 miles (S. E.) from Dorchester; containing 268 inhabitants. It comprises by measurement 2200 acres, of which two-thirds are arable and pasture; the soil, chiefly chalk and gravel, is very poor. The living is a rectory, with that of Broadmayne annexed, valued in the king's books at £8. 15. 5.; net income, £332; patron, the Rev. F. Urquhart. The tithes of West Knighton payable to the rector have been commuted for £149, and the glebe consists of 100 acres: £55 are payable to an impropriator. The church, which is in the Norman style, has been enlarged.

Knightsbridge

KNIGHTSBRIDGE, a chapelry, partly in the parish of St. George, Hanover-square, liberty of the city of Westminster, and partly in the parishes of Kensington and Chelsea, Kensington division of the hundred of Ossulstone, county of Middlesex. This place consists principally of a long street on the line of the great western road from the metropolis, and is partially paved, lighted with gas, and supplied with water from the Chelsea Water-works. There are many good houses, and some handsome mansions overlooking Hyde Park. Towards Pimlico, on the Marquess of Westminster's property, splendid additions have been made, containing some of the most fashionable residences in the western part of the metropolis; and great improvement has also been effected by the removal of a large portion of the wall which separates the park from the road, and the erection of iron palisades. On the north side, adjoining the park, are commodious barracks for cavalry; and at the entrance from Piccadilly, on the south side of the road, is St. George's Hospital. Here are an ale brewery on a very extensive scale, and two large floorcloth manufactories. The living is in the gift of the Dean and Chapter of Westminster. The chapel, dedicated to the Holy Trinity, and now a chapel of ease, belonged originally to an ancient hospital, or lazarhouse; the present building was erected in 1789. A district church dedicated to St. Paul, the site of which was given by the late Marquess of Westminster, has been erected in Wilton-place, Belgrave-square, at an expense, including the endowment, of £15,000, raised by subscription, aided by a grant of £1000 from the Church Commissioners, and £500 from the Metropolis Building Fund; it was consecrated in May, 1843. The edifice is of brick and stone, in the later English style, with a tower carried to the height of 121 feet, in two stories, and terminating in a rich embattled parapet of open work, and eight crocketed pinnacles, four of which rise from the angles. It has 1600 sittings, whereof 600 are free; the interior is 106 feet in length, 59 in breadth, and 47 feet to the ceiling, where the timber-work is exposed to view, and the tie-beams are filled with tracery. The living is in the gift of the Bishop of London; income, £1000. Here is a place of worship for Baptists.

Knight's-Enham.—See Enham, Knight's.

KNIGHT'S-ENHAM.—See Enham, Knight's.

Knight-Thorpe

KNIGHT-THORPE, a township, in the parish and union of Loughborough, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of Leicestershire; with 60 inhabitants.

Knightwick (St. Mary)

KNIGHTWICK (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Martley, Lower division of the hundred of Oswaldslow, Worcester and W. divisions of the county of Worcester, 8½ miles (W.) from Worcester; containing 157 inhabitants. This parish, which is situated on the borders of Herefordshire, and separated from Doddenham by the river Teame, comprises 733a. 3r. 33p., mostly rich pasture: the soil is a rich loam near the river and in the lowlands, and in the uplands a stiffish clay; the surface is pleasingly undulated. At its northern end, the parish is intersected by the road from Worcester to Bromyard. The living is a rectory, with the living of Doddenham consolidated, valued in the king's books at £13. 13. 4.; net income, £266; patrons, the Dean and Chapter of Worcester. The church is an ancient stone edifice, with 72 sittings: in it were interred the two daughters of Colonel Lane, supposed to have been instrumental in secreting Charles II. on his flight from Worcester.

Knill (St. Michael)

KNILL (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Presteign, hundred of Wigmore, county of Hereford, 2¾ miles (N. N. W.) from Kington; containing 75 inhabitants. The parish is situated on the borders of Wales, and comprises by measurement 777 acres, of which 310 are pasture, 130 arable, 177 hill, and 160 woodland. It is intersected by the road from Radnor to Presteign, and bounded on the south by Offa's dyke, and on the east by the Endwell brook, which joins the river Lug. The living is a discharged rectory, valued in the king's books at £4. 10.; net income, £70; patron, Sir J. J. Garbet Walsham, Bart.

Knipton (All Saints)

KNIPTON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Grantham, hundred of Framland, N. division of the county of Leicester, 7 miles (S. W. by W.) from Grantham; containing 363 inhabitants. The parish comprises 1247a. 3r. 33p.; the soil consists of clay, sandy loam, and good red turnip-land. The surface is hilly; the lower grounds are watered by a small river called the Devon, and immediately above the village is a capacious reservoir for the Grantham canal. Stone of inferior quality is quarried for the roads. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16. 12. 3½.; net income, £261; patron, the Duke of Rutland. The tithes were commuted for land and corn-rents in 1797; the glebe altogether comprises 53 acres. The church is an ancient structure, in the decorated English style, with a square embattled tower. There is a place of worship for Baptists. A national school is supported; and £25 per annum are appropriated from the funds of Chester's charity, at Barkestone, for distribution in bibles, and in coal and money, among the poor.

Knitsley, with Conside.—See Conside.

KNITSLEY, with Conside.—See Conside.

Kniveton (St. John the Baptist)

KNIVETON (St. John the Baptist), a parish, in the hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 3 miles (N. E.) from Ashbourn; on the road to Matlock; containing 326 inhabitants. The manor of "Cheniveton," so called in the Domesday survey, was from a very early period the property of the Kniveton family, and was sold by Sir Andrew Kniveton, Bart., in the reign of Charles I., to the family of Lowe; it afterwards passed to the Pegges, and others. The parish comprises 1947 acres of fertile land, principally on limestone, and occupied as dairy-farms; the surface is undulated, and the scenery picturesque: there are two limestone-quarries. The village, which is considerable, is well built. The living is a perpetual curacy, net income, £64; patron, J. Harrison, Esq., of Snelston Hall. The church is at the highest point and the south extremity of the village: it was erected about the close of the 13th century, and was lately restored, with open seats; it has a low tower and small spire. Two places of worship have been built by the dissenters, but one only is now used, by the Primitive Methodists. In 1715, John Hurd endowed a school with £8 per annum; but the premises for it not having been built agreeably to the will of the founder, or suitably to the wants of the parish, a new house has recently been erected, with assistance from the National Society and the Committee of Council on Education.

Knock

KNOCK, a township, in the parish of Long Marton, East ward and union, county of Westmorland, 2 miles (N. N. E.) from the village of Long Marton; containing 197 inhabitants. The manor was anciently called Knock-Shalcock. The Close House estate here belongs to Francis Pearson, Esq., of Kirkby-Lonsdale, in whose family it has been for nearly two centuries: the House has been lately rebuilt, and Mr. Pearson has made some very scientific improvements on the estate.