Loan-End - Londesborough

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

126-129

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'Loan-End - Londesborough', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 126-129. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51116 Date accessed: 18 September 2014.


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Loan-End

LOAN-END, a township, in the parish of Norham, otherwise Norhamshire, union of Berwick-uponTweed, N. division of Northumberland, 4½ miles (W. S. W.) from Berwick-upon-Tweed; containing 155 inhabitants. The township comprises 824¾ acres, of which 749 are arable, 64 pasture, and 11¾ woodland; the soil consists generally of a strong loam, capable of producing all kinds of grain and green crops, and the scenery is beautiful. The river Tweed bounds the township on the north and west, and is here crossed by the celebrated Chain bridge, the invention of Captain, now Sir S. Brown, R. N., opened on the 26th of July, 1820, and the first erection of the kind in Great Britain. The extreme length of the suspended chains is 590 feet, and the length from the stone abutments 432 feet; the height above the surface of the river is 27 feet. On the east of LoanEnd, is the road between Berwick and Cornhill. The tithes have been commuted for £189. 15. payable to the Dean and Chapter of Durham, and £37 to the vicar of the parish.

Lobb

LOBB, a hamlet, in the parish of Great Haseley, poor-law union of Thame, hundred of Ewelme, county of Oxford; containing 22 inhabitants.

Lobthorpe

LOBTHORPE, a hamlet, in the parish of North Witham, poor-law union of Grantham, wapentake of Beltisloe, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln; containing 54 inhabitants.

Lockeridge

LOCKERIDGE, a tything, in the parish of Overton, union of Marlborough, hundred of Selkley, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of the county of Wilts, 3 miles (W. S. W.) from the town of Marlborough; containing 334 inhabitants.

Lockerley (St. John)

LOCKERLEY (St. John), a parish, in the union of Romsey, hundred of Thorngate, Romsey and S. divisions of the county of Southampton, 6 miles (N. W.) from Romsey; containing 558 inhabitants. The Salisbury and Southampton canal passes through the parish. The living is annexed, with that of East Dean, to the rectory of Mottisfont: the tithes have been commuted for £370, and the glebe contains 8¼ acres. There is a place of worship for Baptists.

Lockhay, or Locko

LOCKHAY, or Locko, a chapelry, in the parish of Spondon, union of Shardlow, hundred of Appletree, though locally in the hundred of Morleston and Litchurch, S. division of the county of Derby, 4½ miles (E. N. E.) from Derby. Here was an hospital of the order of St. Lazarus of Jerusalem, dedicated to St. Mary Magdalene, and subordinate to a house in France: in the reign of Edward III. it was seized by the crown, and given to the Society of King's College, Cambridge. Locko Hall is a large mansion in a well-wooded park of 240 acres.

Locking (St. Augustine)

LOCKING (St. Augustine), a parish, in the union of Axbridge, hundred of Winterstoke, E. division of Somerset, 6¼ miles (N. W.) from Axbridge; containing 166 inhabitants. The parish comprises by measurement 1016 acres; the Bristol and Exeter railway passes near. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £5. 6. 10½.; patrons and impropriators, the Society of Merchant Adventurers of Bristol. The great tithes have been commuted for £44, and the vicarial for £174. 10.; the glebe comprises 25 acres. The church was built principally at the expense of the abovenamed society, who are trustees of Colston's charity at Bristol; and was enlarged in 1820, at a cost of £700, defrayed chiefly by the society.

Lockinge, East (All Saints)

LOCKINGE, EAST (All Saints), a parish, in the union and hundred of Wantage, county of Berks, 2 miles (E. S. E.) from Wantage; containing 325 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £31. 10., and annexed to the Wardenship of All Souls' College, Oxford, since 1764, by act of parliament; the tithes have been commuted for £520.

Lockinge, West

LOCKINGE, WEST, a hamlet, in the parish, poorlaw union, and hundred of Wantage, county of Berks; containing 63 inhabitants.

Lockington (St. Nicholas)

LOCKINGTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Shardlow, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 10 miles (S. E.) from Derby, on the road to Leicester; containing, with the township of Hemington, 617 inhabitants. The navigable river Trent flows along the northern, and the Soar along the eastern, boundary of the parish, at the north-east angle of which they form a junction. The area of the township of Lockington is 1729a. 3r. 17p.: the soil is a mixture of clay and gravel; the surface is hilly. Lockington Hall, a handsome mansion with tasteful pleasuregrounds and commanding picturesque views, is the property of John Bainbrigge Story, Esq., who is sole proprietor of Lockington. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 7. 3½.; net income, £149; patron and impropriator, Mr. Story. The church is an ancient structure. There are a few small charities.

Lockington (St. Mary)

LOCKINGTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Beverley, Bainton-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 6½ miles (N. N. W.) from Beverley; containing, with part of the township of Aike, 433 inhabitants, of whom 394 are in that part of Lockington township which is in the parish of Lockington. The parish comprises by computation nearly 3000 acres; it is partly arable, and partly old pasture, much of it of inferior quality, and about 100 acres are woodland. The village, which is considerable, is seated in the vale of a small rivulet, about a mile west of the Beverley and Driffield road. The Lockington-Car canal, formed by the Hotham family, is two miles long, and joins the river Hull. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £20; net income, £532; patron, James Walker, Esq.: the tithes for the township of Lockington were commuted for land and a money payment in 1771. The church is a neat edifice, with a small brick tower, and contains monuments to the Constable, Meriton, and other families. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. About three miles east of the village, is a large artificial mound, called Barrow Hill, formerly surrounded by a moat.

Lockton

LOCKTON, a township, in the parish of Middleton, union and lythe of Pickering, N. riding of York, 5 miles (N. E. by N.) from Pickering; containing 347 inhabitants. It comprises 4010 acres, of which 1142 are inclosed, 1058 uninclosed, and 1810 acres are in Saltersgate; the soil is very productive, and some good stone is burned into lime. The Whitby and Pickering railway passes through the township. The village, which is pleasantly situated, borders on two winding dales. There is a small chapel of ease in the village, rebuilt in 1800; also a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Lockwood

LOCKWOOD, a chapelry, in the parish of Almondbury, union of Huddersfield, Upper division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 1½ mile (S. W.) from Huddersfield; containing 4182 inhabitants. It comprises by computation nearly 1700 acres; the soil is fertile, and the substratum abounds with stone of good quality for building and other purposes. The village, which forms a rural suburb to the town of Huddersfield, is beautifully situated in the vale of the river Holme, near its confluence with another tributary of the Colne, and on the road to Sheffield; it is extensive and well built, and contains an hotel for the accommodation of persons visiting the spa in its immediate vicinity. Lockwood Spa, erected in 1827, in a deeplysequestered spot, sheltered by a lofty and well-wooded ridge on the east side of the river, is a handsome range of building, comprising warm, tepid, vapour, cold, and shower baths, with a large swimming-bath, and every requisite arrangement for the internal and external use of the water. The manufacture of woollen-cloths, and the weaving of fancy goods, are carried on extensively in the township; and there is a large brewery, established in 1790. The chapel, now a district church, dedicated to Emmanuel, was erected in 1830, at a cost of £3000, by the Parliamentary Commissioners, on a site given by Sir John Ramsden; it is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a campanile turret, and contains 920 sittings, of which 400 are free. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Vicar of Almondbury, with a net income of £150. A residence for the incumbent has been erected at the expense of John Brooke, Esq., of Armitage-Bridge Hall. There are places of worship for Baptists and Wesleyans.

Loddington (St. Michael)

LODDINGTON (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Billesdon, hundred of East Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester, 7¼ miles (N. by W.) from Uppingham; containing 137 inhabitants. It comprises about 2000 acres; the soil is in part gravelly and in part clayey, and the surface hilly. The living is a vicarage; net income, £92; patron and impropriator, Charles Morris, Esq.: the glebe consists of about 17 acres of land.

Loddington (St. Andrew)

LODDINGTON (St. Andrew), a parish, in the union of Kettering, hundred of Rothwell, N. division of the county of Northampton, 4 miles (W.) from Kettering; containing 226 inhabitants. It comprises 1126a. 2r., chiefly arable land; the surface is undulated, and the soil in general fertile. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 4. 4½., and in the patronage of the Crown. The parish was first inclosed in the time of the usurpation of Cromwell, and the tithes were then much reduced in value, but were restored, after a suit in the exchequer by the present rector, the Rev. G. E. Hanmer, in 1820; there are 45 acres of good glebe in hand, with an excellent glebe-house and premises, and a walled garden, and the total income is about £500. The church, which dates 1536, is one of the most curious in the county. The Methodists have a place of worship.

Loddiswell, or Loddiswell-Arundell (St. Michael)

LODDISWELL, or Loddiswell-Arundell (St. Michael), a parish, in the union of Kingsbridge, hundred of Stanborough, Stanborough and Coleridge, and S. divisions of Devon, 3 miles (N. N. W.) from Kingsbridge; containing, with the chapelry of BucklandToutsaints, 1069 inhabitants. It comprises 3054 acres, of which 150 are common or waste. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £26. 0. 2½.; patron, Col. W. J. Jones: the great and small tithes have been commuted for £266 each; the vicarial glebe comprises 103 acres. The church contains some interesting monuments to the families of Fortescue and Arundell. There is a chapel of ease at Buckland-Toutsaints. Blackdown camp, an ancient military post, is in the neighbourhood.

Loddon (Holy Trinity)

LODDON (Holy Trinity), a market-town and parish, and the head of the union of Loddon and Clavering, in the hundred of Loddon, E. division of Norfolk, 10 miles (S. E.) from Norwich, and 113 (N. E.) from London; containing 1197 inhabitants. This place, which gives name to the hundred, is situated on the road from Norwich to Beccles, and on the banks of an inconsiderable stream called the Chet, which flows from the neighbourhood of Howe into the Yare at Hardly cross; it consists of one street, the inhabitants of which are well supplied with water. Malting is carried on to a small extent. The market is on Tuesday; and there are fairs on Easter-Monday, and on Nov. 25th for horses. The county magistrates hold petty-sessions every fortnight at the Swan inn, and a court baron is held at the will of the lord of the manor. The parish comprises 2988 acres, of which 2303 are arable, 615 pasture, and 70 wood. The living is a vicarage; patron and appropriator, the Bishop of Ely: the great tithes have been commuted for £520, the vicarial for £300, and the glebe comprises 4 acres. The church, erected at the expense of Sir James Hobart, chief justice of the court of common pleas in the reign of Henry VII., is a fine edifice of stone, in the later English style, with a lofty embattled tower; the font, now much defaced, was formerly very beautiful. There are places of worship for Wesleyans and Primitive Methodists. A national school has been established; and about £100 per annum, derived from 80 acres of land, are applied to the repairs of the church, and to the relief of the poor. The union comprises 42 parishes or places, containing a population of 14,472.

Lode

LODE, a hamlet, in the parish of Bottisham, poorlaw union of Newmarket, hundred of Staine, county of Cambridge; containing 494 inhabitants.

Loders (St. Mary Magdalene)

LODERS (St. Mary Magdalene), a parish, in the union of Bridport, liberty of Loders and Bothenhampton, Bridport division of Dorset, 2½ miles (N. E.) from Bridport; containing 952 inhabitants. The parish is on the road from London to Exeter, and comprises by measurement 2305 acres, of which 1114 are arable, 1056 pasture, and 134 woodland; the greater portion is beautifully situated in a fertile vale, sheltered by hills. There are some quarries of stone, which is of good quality for building, and is also used for the roads; and about 100 persons are employed in the making of twine. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £14. 5. 7½., and in the alternate patronage of the Crown, and Sir Molyneux Hyde Nepean, Bart.; net income, £235. The church is a handsome structure in the later English style, with a low massive tower, and contains numerous interesting details. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans. An alien priory, subordinate to the abbey of Montsburgh, in Normandy, was suppressed here in the reign of Richard II., when its revenue, valued at £80, was bestowed on the priory of St. Anne, near Coventry: it was restored to its ancient owners in the reign of Henry IV., and, after its dissolution by Henry V., formed part of the endowment of Sion Abbey, in the county of Middlesex.

Lodsworth (St. Peter)

LODSWORTH (St. Peter), a liberty and parish, in the union and parliamentary borough of Midhurst, hundred of Easebourne, rape of Chichester, W. division of Sussex, 3½ miles (W. by N.) from Petworth; containing 634 inhabitants. The Rother, or Arundel, navigation is crossed by a bridge here; and the parish is intersected by the road from Petworth to Midhurst. The liberty is co-extensive with the parish, and has certain exemptions granted by the 3rd of Richard I. to the Bishop of London, to whom the manor formerly belonged. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £75; patrons, the family of Perceval, who, with the Dean and Chapter of St. Paul's, are the impropriators. The tithes have been commuted for £200. The church was enlarged in 1839, by the erection of a north transept, at the expense of H. Hollist, Esq., lessee of the Dean and Chapter's tithes.

Lofthouse (St. Leonard)

LOFTHOUSE (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York, 8½ miles (E. N. E.) from Guisborough; containing 1091 inhabitants. This place, in the Domesday survey Lochtushum, was granted by the Conqueror to Hugh Lupus, Earl of Chester, who soon afterwards transferred it to the Percy family, of whom William de Percy, the third baron, in 1133 founded at Handall, in the parish, a priory for Benedictine nuns, which he dedicated to the Virgin Mary, and of which the revenue, at the Dissolution, was estimated at £20. 7. 8. The lands remained for many generations in possession of the Percys; the greater portion of them is now the property of the Hon. Major-General Sir Robert Lawrence Dundas, lord of the manor. The parish is bounded on the north by the sea, and comprises by measurement 3775 acres, including 383 of common or waste. Near the coast the ground is elevated, but it declines gradually from the cliffs towards the village, whence it rises gently, assuming a northern aspect, and commanding a good view of the sea; the surface is diversified with richly-wooded dales. The substratum is chiefly freestone of good quality for building; and the rocks abound with alum, of which some very extensive works, belonging to the lord of the manor, afford employment to many of the inhabitants of the adjacent hamlets. Lofthouse Hall, the seat of Major-General Dundas, is a handsome mansion, recently erected. The village, which is on the coast road from Guisborough to Whitby, consists mainly of one long street of houses built of stone. A customary market is held on Thursday. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 0½., and in the patronage of the Crown: the tithes have been commuted for £450, and the glebe consists of 56 acres, with a parsonagehouse in the Italian style. The church, originally given by William de Saucey to the priory of Guisborough, was rebuilt in 1813, at a cost of £1300, and is a spacious structure with a square embattled tower. There are some remains of the convent.

Lofthouse, with Carlton

LOFTHOUSE, with Carlton, a township, in the parish of Rothwell, Lower division of the wapentake of Agbrigg, W. riding of York, 3½ miles (N.) from Wakefield; containing 1536 inhabitants. This township, which includes the manors and villages of Lofthouse and Carlton, comprises by computation 1810 acres: the soil is generally fertile, the commons having been inclosed under an act of parliament obtained in 1836; the substrata are chiefly coal and freestone, of excellent quality. The village of Lofthouse is situated on the road from Leeds to Wakefield, along which it stretches for a considerable length; and about a mile to the north-east of it, is the village of Carlton, many of the inhabitants of which are employed in the rope manufacture. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £277, and the vicarial for £168. A church dedicated to Christ was erected at Lofthouse, in 1840, at an expense of £1050, of which £250 were granted by the Ripon Diocesan, and £100 by the Incorporated, Society; it is a handsome structure in the early English style, and contains 392 sittings, of which 294 are free. A parsonage house, also, was erected in 1842, at a cost of £600, of which one moiety was paid by the Ripon Society; the sites for the chapel and house were given by Miss Harrison. The living is in the gift of the Vicar of Rothwell; net income, £120. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Loftsome, with Wressel.—See Wressel.

LOFTSOME, with Wressel.—See Wressel.

Lolworth (All Saints)

LOLWORTH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of St. Ives, hundred of Northstow, county of Cambridge, 6¼ miles (N. W. by W.) from the town of Cambridge; containing 122 inhabitants. It comprises 1076 acres, of which 62 are common or waste. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £6. 2. 3½., and in the gift of P. Orchard and L. W. Buck, Esqrs.: the tithes have been commuted for £200, and the glebe contains 24 acres.

Londesborough (All Saints)

LONDESBOROUGH (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Pocklington, Holme-Beacon division of the wapentake of Harthill, E. riding of York, 2½ miles (N.) from Market-Weighton; containing 267 inhabitants. Dr. Drake considers this to be the Roman station Delgovitia, Roman coins and other remains having been discovered. The parish comprises 4200 acres, of which about 300 are wood, and 400 comprehended in the park, to which the Roman road from Brough is continued. Londesborough Hall, a large ancient mansion in the form of the letter H, was taken down in 1819, and a neat mansion in the Elizabethan style was built in 1839. The village is picturesquely seated on the western side of the Wolds. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £16; net income, £798. The church stands on the verge of the park, and consists of a nave, chancel, and north aisle, with an embattled tower at the west end; the interior is neat, and has a few mural monuments of the Clifford and other families. An hospital for twelve aged bachelors, widowers, or widows, was founded by the first Earl and Countess of Burlington.



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