Manton - Marazion

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Institute of Historical Research

Publication

Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

251-253

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'Manton - Marazion', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 251-253. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51132 Date accessed: 25 November 2014.


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Manton (St. Hibald)

MANTON (St. Hibald), a parish, in the union of Glandford-Brigg, partly in the wapentake of Corringham, and partly in the E. division of that of Manley, parts of Lindsey, county of Lincoln, 5¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Glandford-Brigg; containing, with the township of Cleatham, and the hamlet of Twigmoor, 182 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 6. 8.; net income, £252; patron, M. D. D. Dalyson, Esq. The tithes were in part commuted for land in 1805.

Manton (St. Mary)

MANTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Oakham, hundred of Martinsley, county of Rutland, 3¼ miles (N. E.) from Uppingham; containing 272 inhabitants. It comprises by computation 1150 acres, of which 150 only are arable, and the remainder pasture. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10; net income, £73; patron and impropriator, E. W. Smyth, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1772. A college or chantry was founded here in the 25th of Edward III., by William and John Wade, for a master and two brethren, whose revenue at the Dissolution was valued at £22. 18. 6.

Manton

MANTON, a tything, in the parish of Preshute, union of Marlborough, hundred of Selkley, Marlborough and Ramsbury, and N. divisions of the county of Wilts; containing 290 inhabitants.

Maperton (St. Peter and St. Paul)

MAPERTON (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Wincanton, hundred of Catsash, E. division of Somerset, 3¼ miles (S. W. by W.) from Wincanton; containing, with the hamlet of Clapton, 214 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £13. 9. 7., and in the gift of Wadham College, Oxford: the tithes have been commuted for £330, and the glebe comprises 89 acres.

Maplebeck

MAPLEBECK, a parish, in the union of Southwell, N. division of the wapentake of Thurgarton, S. division of the county of Nottingham, 5¾ miles (N. by E.) from Southwell; containing 162 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1200 acres. Stone of good quality is obtained, chiefly for the roads; there were formerly quarries, from which the stone was raised for the erection of the bridge at Newark. An ancient mansion near the church, once the residence of the De Markham family, has been taken down, and the materials have been sold. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £68; patron and impropriator, the Duke of Newcastle.

Maple-Durham (St. Margaret)

MAPLE-DURHAM (St. Margaret), a parish, in the union of Bradfield, hundred of Langtree, county of Oxford, 4 miles (N. W. by N.) from Reading; containing 481 inhabitants. It is situated on the Thames, and comprises 2850a. 1r. 8p., of which 2029 acres are arable, 352 meadow and pasture, and 374 woodland; the surface is undulated, and the scenery pleasingly diversified. The Hall is a handsome mansion in the Elizabethan style, and contains some stately apartments, and an extensive collection of paintings; attached is a Roman Catholic chapel, erected by Michael Blount, Esq., in 1800. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £12. 10.; patrons and impropriators, the Provost and Fellows of Eton College. The great tithes have been commuted for £59. 14. 3., and the vicarial for £807. 5. 9.; the glebe comprises 51 acres. The church has been the burial-place of the ancient family of Blount for many generations.

Mapledurwell (St. Mary)

MAPLEDURWELL (St. Mary), a parish, in the union and hundred of Basingstoke, Basingstoke and N. divisions of the county of Southampton, 3½ miles (E. S. E.) from Basingstoke; containing 214 inhabitants. The parish comprises 818 acres, of which 101 are common or waste land. The living is annexed to the rectory of Newnham: the tithes have been commuted for £220, and the glebe comprises 8½ acres.

Maplescombe

MAPLESCOMBE, in the parish of Kingsdown, union of Dartford, hundred of Axton, Dartford, and Wilmington, lathe of Sutton-at-Hone, W. division of Kent, 6 miles (N. N. E.) from Seven-Oaks. The parochial church of this place is in ruins, and the living is annexed to Kingsdown.

Maplestead, Great (St. Giles)

MAPLESTEAD, GREAT (St. Giles), a parish, in the union of Halstead, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 2¼ miles (N. by W.) from Halstead; containing 452 inhabitants. This place is supposed to have derived its name from the number of maple-trees that formerly grew here. The parish is intersected by the river Colne, and comprises 1902a. 3r. 3p., of which 1440 acres are arable, 320 pasture, and 115 woodland and plantations; the soil is rich. The living is a vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 3. 4.; patron, R. Myall, Esq.; impropriator, the Rev. J. Sperling. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £335, and the vicarial for £175; the impropriate glebe comprises 88 acres, and the vicarial one acre. The church is a small ancient edifice, with a square tower, and attached to the south side is a chapel belonging to the proprietor of Dynes Hall, and containing two costly monuments of the family of Deane.

Maplestead, Little (St. John of Jerusalem)

MAPLESTEAD, LITTLE (St. John of Jerusalem), a parish, in the union of Halstead, hundred of Hinckford, N. division of Essex, 2¼ miles (N. by E.) from Halstead; containing 407 inhabitants. It comprises 1063a. 3r. 19p., of which 845 acres are arable, 98 pasture, and 72 woodland and plantations; the soil is fertile, and the scenery finely varied. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £54; patrons and impropriators, the proprietors of the Hall farm, whose tithes have been commuted for £205. The church is ancient, and remarkable as one of the few remaining models of the Holy Sepulchre; the east end is semicircular: the church is said to have had the privilege of sanctuary. Juliana, wife of Fitz-Aldhelm de Burgo, in the time of Henry I., gave the parish to the Knights Hospitallers, who had a commandery here.

Mappercombe, with Nettlecombe

MAPPERCOMBE, with Nettlecombe, a tything, in the parish and liberty of Poorstock, though locally in the hundred of Eggerton, union of Beaminster, Bridport division of Dorset; with 255 inhabitants.

Mapperley

MAPPERLEY, a township, in the parish of KirkHallam, union of Belper, hundred of Appletree, S. division of the county of Derby, 7¼ miles (N. E. by E.) from Derby; containing 358 inhabitants. It comprises 968a. 3r. 29p. of land, mostly a strong cold clay: the Nutbrook canal crosses the eastern side of the township. The ancient Manor-house, a half-timbered building with gables, is now in three tenements. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £84, and the vicarial for £130. The Methodists have a small place of worship, built in 1830.

Mapperton (St. Mary)

MAPPERTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Beaminster, hundred of Beaminster-Forum and Redhone, Bridport division of Dorset, 2 miles (S. E. by E.) from Beaminster; containing 94 inhabitants, and comprising by admeasurement 804 acres. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 3. 1½., and in the gift of H. C. Compton, Esq.: the tithes have been commuted for £193, and the glebe comprises 51 acres. The church, in 1291 styled a chapel to Netherbury, was rebuilt in 1704, by Richard Broadrep, Esq., and the interior handsomely fitted up.

Mappleton (St. Mary)

MAPPLETON (St. Mary), a parish, in the hundred of Wirksworth, S. division of the county of Derby, 1¾ mile (N. W.) from Ashbourn; containing 204 inhabitants. An estate and manor here belonged at an early period to the Bassetts, of Blore, whose heiress brought them to William Cavendish, Duke of Newcastle, by whose descendants they were sold in 1757. Another estate has been for a long period possessed by the Okeover family. The parish comprises 780 acres of fertile land, and has a pleasant village situated on the east bank of the Dove, which river is here crossed by a stone bridge having a remarkably flat arch. The living is a rectory, united to the vicarage of Ashbourn. The church is a small edifice, and has a dome surmounted by an urn. Rowland Okeover, Esq., in 1727, vested some land in trustees, for building almshouses for three clergymen's widows; the income is £90 per annum.

Mappleton (All Saints)

MAPPLETON (All Saints), a parish, in the union of Skirlaugh, N. division of the wapentake of Holderness, E. riding of York, 2½ miles (S. E. by S.) from Hornsea; containing, with the hamlet of Great Cowden, and part of the township of Great Hatfield, 414 inhabitants, of whom 198 are in the township of Mappleton with Rowlston. This place, anciently Mapleton, from abounding in maple-trees, was part of the possessions of Peter le Brus. The township is bounded on the east by the sea, and intersected by the road from Aldbrough to Hornsea; and comprises by computation 1946 acres, of which 250 are pasture, and the remainder arable. The living is a perpetual curacy, valued in the king's books at £4. 13. 4.; net income, £58; patron, the Archdeacon of the East riding. The great tithes have been commuted for £418, and those of the incumbent for £29; the impropriate glebe consists of 133 acres, and the incumbent's of 5½ acres. A handsome glebe-house was erected in 1822, by the incumbent, at an expense of £1000. The church, situated on an elevation above the road, consists of a nave, north aisle, and chancel, with a square tower of three stages; also, on the north side, of a chapel long used as a burial place by the family of Brough, to several members of which there are monumental inscriptions. Marshal Brough, who presided as judge of the court of admiralty on the trial of Admiral Byng, was interred here. The dissenters have a place of worship.

Mapplewell

MAPPLEWELL, a hamlet, in the chapelry of Woodhouse, parish and union of Barrow-upon-Soar, hundred of West Goscote, N. division of the county of Leicester; containing 28 inhabitants.

Mappowder (St. Peter and St. Paul)

MAPPOWDER (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Cerne, hundred of BucklandNewton, Cerne division of Dorset, 6 miles (S. W. by S.) from Sturminster-Newton; containing 275 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1800 acres. Good stone for rough kinds of building, and for the roads, is quarried. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £17. 14. 7., and in the gift of Earl Beauchamp: the tithes have been commuted for £330, and the glebe contains 82½ acres. The church is an embattled structure in the later English style, with a low plain tower, and contains a Norman font of Purbeck marble, and several monuments to the family of Coker, whose ancient mansion, a large and handsome building erected in the reign of Elizabeth, has been converted into a farmhouse. Of this family was Mr. Coker, author of the Survey of Dorsetshire.

Marazion

MARAZION, an incorporated market-town and a chapelry, in the parish of St. Hilary, union of Penzance, hundred of Penwith, W. division of Cornwall, 63½ miles (S. W. by W.) from Launceston, and 282 (W. S. W.) from London; containing 1683 inhabitants. The ancient name of this town was Marghasiewe; the more recent appellation of Marketjew, still in use among the common people, is supposed by some to take its origin from a market formerly held here, which was much frequented by Jews. In the early part of the reign of Henry VIII., a party of French soldiers, having landed from a fleet then cruising in the Channel, took possession of Marazion; but on the approach of the sheriff of the county with the posse comitatus, they retreated to their ships, having first set fire to the place. It again suffered by conflagration in the reign of Edward VI. The town is very pleasantly situated on the eastern side of Mount's bay, chiefly at the foot of a hill, by which it is sheltered on the north: the air is particularly mild and salubrious; the inhabitants are amply supplied with water. The profits of a fair held here were given to the priory of St. Michael's Mount, in the reign of Henry I.; and in the reign of Henry III., that religious community was empowered by Richard, Earl of Cornwall, to hold three fairs and three markets, which had been previously granted to them at Marghasbigan by charter of the kings of England, on their own land at Marchadyon. In the year 1331, a market on Monday, and a fair on the festival of St. Andrew, to continue three days, were granted to Ralph de Bleyon. There are several mines in the chapelry, but none at present in operation; also several quarries of good building-stone: the chief manufacture is that of rope, which is carried on to a moderate extent. The market is on Saturday; and there is a fair on Michaelmas-day for horses and for cattle. The town was incorporated by charter from Queen Elizabeth, in 1595, and the corporation consists of a mayor, who is a magistrate, eight burgesses, and twelve capital inhabitants. The chapelry comprises by computation 650 acres. The living is a perpetual curacy, in the patronage of the Corporation, subject to the approval of the Vicar of St. Hilary; net income, £98; impropriator, the Rev. J. Rogers. The great tithes have been commuted for £105, and the vicarial for £147; the glebe comprises one acre. The chapel is dedicated to St. Ervat. There are several places of worship for dissenters.


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