Marshfield - Marston Magna

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Institute of Historical Research

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Author

Samuel Lewis (editor)

Year published

1848

Supporting documents

Pages

263-266

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'Marshfield - Marston Magna', A Topographical Dictionary of England (1848), pp. 263-266. URL: http://british-history.ac.uk/report.aspx?compid=51136 Date accessed: 21 October 2014.


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Marshfield (St. Mary)

MARSHFIELD (St. Mary), a market-town and parish, in the union of Chipping-Sodbury, Upper division of the hundred of Thornbury, W. division of the county of Gloucester, 11½ miles (E.) from Bristol, and 102 (W. by S.) from London; containing, with the hamlets of Becks, Rocks, and Weston Town, 1674 inhabitants. The town consists mainly of a single street, nearly a mile in length: the trade is principally in malt, a great part of which is the produce of the vicinity. The market is on Tuesday; and fairs are held on May 24th and Oct. 24th, the former chiefly for horned-cattle, and the latter for sheep, horses, and cheese. A bailiff is annually elected at the manorial court, and is assisted by a serjeant-at-mace. The parish comprises 5845 acres, of which 72 are common or waste land. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £29. 4. 9.; patrons and impropriators, the Warden and Fellows of New College, Oxford. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £680, with 118 acres of glebe; and the vicarial for £321. 14., with a glebe of 15 acres. The church is a handsome and spacious edifice, in the later English style, with a fine tower. There is a place of worship for Unitarians. A free school was founded about 1722, by John Harrington, Esq., and was endowed with lands in 1731, by Dionysia Long: the income is £62. Almshouses for eight persons were endowed by Nicholas Crispe, in 1625; and there are benefactions for other charitable purposes. In the parish are some barrows and intrenchments, supposed to have been raised about 561, when the battle of Dirham took place in the neighbourhood; and Leland mentions the existence of a nunnery, of which, however, there are no vestiges.

Marshfield

MARSHFIELD, a parish, in the union and division of Newport, hundred of Wentlloog, county of Monmouth, 5 miles (S. W.) from Newport; containing 503 inhabitants. At Castleton, a hamlet in the parish, anciently stood a castle, occupied, if not built, by the Normans, to protect their conquest of Wentlloog: the only remains are some small ruins of the citadel, and the chapel converted into a barn. On the level summit of an adjoining hill is a circular encampment, called Pen-y-Park-Newydd. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £6. 2. 6.; patrons and appropriators, the Dean and Chapter of Bristol. The great tithes have been commuted for £175, and the vicarial for £48; there is a glebe-house, and the vicar's glebe contains 27 acres. The church is a large and handsome structure, in the later English style.

Marshwood

MARSHWOOD, a parish, in the hundred of Whitchurch-Canonicorum, union of Beaminster, Bridport division of Dorset, 4¼ miles (W. S. W.) from Beaminster; containing 554 inhabitants. This place, which takes its name from the marshy woody vale in which it is situated, was anciently an honour, the only one in the county, and the head of a barony. The living is annexed, with the livings of Chideock and Stanton St. Gabriel, to the vicarage of Whitchurch-Canonicorum. The church, which fell down in 1662, has been recently rebuilt.

Marsk (St. Cuthbert)

MARSK (St. Cuthbert), a parish, in the union of Richmond, wapentake of Gilling-West, N. riding of York, 4¾ miles (W.) from Richmond; containing, with the township of Feldom and the hamlet of Skelton, 274 inhabitants. The lordship of Marsk was bestowed upon the Hutton family in the 12th century, by Conan, Earl of Richmond, whose original grant is still preserved in the Hall. The parish comprises by computation 5220 acres. The village is small, and picturesquely seated on the north side of Swaledale, upon the road from Richmond to Reeth; about a mile and half north of it, on the high moors, is the hamlet of Feldom, and half a mile westward that of Skelton. Marsk Hall and Clints Hall are both beautifully situated in fine lawns and pleasuregrounds, and near the former is an obelisk 60 feet in height, which covers the remains of Captain Matthew Hutton, who died in 1813. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £12. 6. 5½., and in the patronage of J. Hutton, Esq., with a net income of £179. A school, endowed with about £20 per annum, is conducted on the national system.

Marsk in Cleveland (St. Germain)

MARSK in Cleveland (St. Germain), a parish, in the union of Guisborough, E. division of the liberty of Langbaurgh, N. riding of York; containing, with part of the town of Redcar, 1177 inhabitants, of whom 503 are in the township of Marsk, 5 miles (N. N. E.) from Guisborough. The manor was one of the lordships granted by the Conqueror to Robert de Brus, lord of Skelton, whose family held it for some time; it was afterwards possessed by the Fauconbergs, since which the lands have belonged to various families, including those of Neville, Lowther, and Dundas. The parish is divided by the Saltburn beck from the parish of Skelton, and comprises about 3500 acres: the soil of a portion is of a fine sandy kind; the other parts are inclined to a strong fertile clay, suitable to the growth of wheat. The village is of considerable extent, and contains some neat houses; near its centre is Marsk Hall, built by Sir William Pennyman, Bart., in the style that prevailed in the time of Charles I. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £10. 11. 10½., and in the patronage of the Earl of Zetland, with a net income of £91; appropriator, the Archbishop of York. The church, founded before the Norman Conquest, and rebuilt in 1821, stands near the edge of the cliff on the sea-shore, its spire serving as an excellent landmark. At Redcar is a separate incumbency. There is a place of worship for Wesleyans.

Marston

MARSTON, a township, in the parish of Great Budworth, union of Northwich, hundred of Bucklow, N. division of the county of Chester, 2¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Northwich; containing 479 inhabitants. It comprises 970 acres, of a clayey soil. The Grand Trunk canal passes through the township.

Marston (St. Mary)

MARSTON (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Newark, wapentake of Loveden, parts of Kesteven, county of Lincoln, 5 miles (N. by W.) from the town of Grantham; containing 434 inhabitants. The living is a rectory, united to that of Hougham. Margaret Thorold, in the year 1718, gave some land, the income to be applied to instruction.

Marston (St. Lawrence)

MARSTON (St. Lawrence), a parish, in the union of Brackley, hundred of King's-Sutton, S. division of the county of Northampton, 5 miles (E.) from Banbury; containing 540 inhabitants. It comprises 1865a. 28p., of which two-thirds are rich pasture, and the remainder arable and woodland. Several tributaries of the river Ouse have their rise in the parish. The females are employed in making pillow-lace. There are some quarries of stone for building purposes and for repairing the roads. The living is a vicarage, with that of Warkworth annexed, valued in the king's books at £20; net income, £316; patron and impropriator, John Jackson Blencowe, Esq. The tithes were commuted for land in 1759; the glebe comprises 190 acres, with a house. The church is a fine edifice of the 14th century, with the usual ground plan, and has a square tower of lofty proportions; the churchyard is inclosed by an invisible fence merely, so that it appears to form part of the pleasure-grounds of Mr. Blencowe. Two schools are partly supported by charity.

Marston (St. Nicholas)

MARSTON (St. Nicholas), a parish, in the union of Headington, hundred of Bullingdon, county of Oxford, 1¾ mile (N. N. E.) from Oxford; containing 396 inhabitants. In the reign of Charles I., the treaty for the surrender of Oxford to the parliamentarians, was negotiated here, in the mansion-house of the family of Croke, now converted into a farmhouse. The parish comprises 1177 acres, of which 220 are arable, 950 pasture, and 7 woodland; the meadows on the banks of the river Cherwell are luxuriantly rich. The living is a discharged vicarage; net income, £195; patron, incumbent, and impropriator, the Rev. T. H. Whorwood.

Marston

MARSTON, a chapelry, in the parish of St. Mary, union of Stafford, S. division of the hundred of Pirehill, N. division of the county of Stafford, 2¾ miles (N.) from Stafford; containing 178 inhabitants. It comprises about 1500 acres of land, the soil of which is a rich loam; a considerable extent of waste was inclosed in 1800, when 125 acres were given to the parishioners in lieu of their right of common. The living is a perpetual curacy; net income, £140; patron, the Rector of St. Mary's. The impropriate tithes have been commuted for £242, payable to the trustees of the Stafford charities, and the small tithes for £100. The chapel is a neat edifice of stone, with a campanile turret.

Marston

MARSTON, a quarter, in the parish of ChurchBickenhill, union of Meriden, Solihull division of the hundred of Hemlingford, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3½ miles (S. S. W.) from the town of Coleshill; containing 310 inhabitants.

Marston

MARSTON, a hamlet, in the parish of Wolstan, union of Rugby, Rugby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 6 miles (E. by S.) from Coventry; containing 486 inhabitants. This place, anciently called Breton's Mannour, was held by Guido Breton in the reign of Henry IV.; the manor has since gone with that of Wolstan. The hamlet is situated near the river Avon, where the soil is naturally marshy; and derives its name from that circumstance. It is separated from Wolstan village by a small stream.

Marston

MARSTON, a tything, in the parish of Potterne, union of Devizes, hundred of Potterne and Cannings, Devizes and N. divisions of Wilts, 3¾ miles (S. W.) from Devizes; containing 179 inhabitants.

Marston, in the hundred of Halfshire, county of Worcester.—See Hall-Green.

MARSTON, in the hundred of Halfshire, county of Worcester.—See Hall-Green.

Marston-Bigott (St. Leonard)

MARSTON-BIGOTT (St. Leonard), a parish, in the union and hundred of Frome, E. division of Somerset, 2¾ miles (S. S. W.) from Frome; containing 534 inhabitants. This place derives the affix to its name from the Bigott family, to whom the manor for several centuries belonged, and the site of whose ancient mansion is still marked by the moat. The parish comprises about 2000 acres of land, watered by two small rivulets. The scenery is richly diversified: a line of hills extends through the parish from east to west, on each side of which are woods of luxuriant growth; and Marston House, the seat of the Earl of Cork and Orrery, is beautifully situated, overlooking a fertile valley. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £11. 19. 9½., and in the gift of the Earl: the tithes have been commuted for £250, and the glebe comprises 46 acres. The church was taken down, and rebuilt on another site, by the 7th earl. A room at Gaer Hill, formerly used as a dissenters' meeting-house, has been converted into a chapel; and schools are partly supported by the Boyle family.

Marston, Broad

MARSTON, BROAD, a hamlet, in the parish of Pebworth, union of Evesham, Upper division of the hundred of Kiftsgate, E. division of the county of Gloucester; containing 289 inhabitants.

Marston, Butlers (St. Peter and St. Paul)

MARSTON, BUTLERS (St. Peter and St. Paul), a parish, in the union of Shipston-upon-Stour, Kington division of the hundred of Kington, S. division of the county of Warwick, 1½ mile (S. W. by S.) from Kington; containing 313 inhabitants. The parish comprises by computation 1650 acres of land, chiefly arable; the soil is clayey, and the surface undulated, rising in some parts into considerable hills. The living is a discharged vicarage, valued in the king's books at £8. 3. 4.; net income, £88; patrons and impropriators, the Dean and Canons of Christ-Church, Oxford. The church is an ancient structure, principally in the Norman style. Upon an artificial mount was, until lately, a decayed elm of large dimensions, capable of containing twelve persons, and formed by nature into the appearance of a grotto.

Marston-Fleet (St. Mary)

MARSTON-FLEET (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Aylesbury, hundred of Ashendon, county of Buckingham, 3 miles (N. W. by W.) from Aylesbury; containing 38 inhabitants. It is beautifully situated in the vale of Aylesbury, and comprises 918 acres, of which 102 are arable, and the remainder pasture. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £8. 2. 8½.; net income, £176; patron, the Rev. S. Humphreys. The church is in the early English style.

Marston-Jabbett

MARSTON-JABBETT, a hamlet, in the parish of Bulkington, poor-law union of Nuneaton, Kirby division of the hundred of Knightlow, N. division of the county of Warwick, 3¼ miles (S. by E.) from the town of Nuneaton; containing 93 inhabitants.

Marston, Lea.—See Lea-Marston.

MARSTON, LEA.—See Lea-Marston.

Marston, Long

MARSTON, LONG, a chapelry, in the parish of Tring, union of Berkhampstead, hundred of Dacorum, county of Hertford, 3½ miles (N. W. by N.) from Tring; containing 269 inhabitants. The chapel is dedicated to All Saints. The extra-parochial place called Long Marston with Asthorpe adjoins this chapelry, but is in the parish of Marsworth, county of Buckingham; it contains 12 inhabitants.

Marston, Long (All Saints)

MARSTON, LONG (All Saints), a parish, in the W. division of Ainsty wapentake, W. riding of York, 7½ miles (W.) from York; containing, with the townships of Angram and Hutton-Wandesley, 649 inhabitants, of whom 446 are in the township of Long Marston. This place is memorable as the scene of the battle which occurred on the 2nd of July, 1644, upon MarstonMoor, between the royalists, commanded by Prince Rupert, and the parliamentarians under Cromwell, and which, after an obstinate and protracted conflict and considerable slaughter on both sides, terminated in the total defeat of the royal army, and the ultimate abandonment of York to the republican forces. The parish comprises 4260 acres, of which 2540 are in the township of Long Marston: the surface is generally flat, and the soil a stiff clay, alternated with portions of lighter quality and greater fertility; the lands are principally arable, and the system of cultivation is improved. The village, which is on the road to Wetherby, consists chiefly of irregularly built and scattered houses, and the surrounding scenery is pleasingly diversified. The living is a rectory, valued in the king's books at £24. 3. 9.; net income, £865; patron, Lord Wenlock. A portion of the tithes was commuted for 371 acres of land in 1766; the rector has an old glebe of 39 acres, and receives a tithe rent-charge of £341. The church is an ancient structure in the decorated English style, repaired and repewed in 1810, with a square embattled tower.

Marston Magna (St. Mary)

MARSTON MAGNA (St. Mary), a parish, in the union of Sherborne, hundred of Horethorne, E. division of Somerset, 5¼ miles (N. N. E.) from Yeovil; containing 357 inhabitants. The living is a discharged vicarage, endowed with the rectorial tithes, valued in the king's books at £6. 10. 10., and in the gift of Mrs. Fitzherbert: the tithes have been commuted for £300, and the glebe comprises 87 acres. The church is a neat stone structure, with a strong embattled tower crowned by pinnacles. Sir John St. Barbe, in 1736, gave to the vicar the rectory, parsonage-house, and some lands, on condition that he should educate, or cause to be educated, ten poor boys. On opening a pit in 1788, near the margin of a brook, some fine specimens of a calcareous blue stone, almost filled with cornua ammonis, overspread with white pearl, were discovered, and raised in masses sufficiently large to form slabs which took a beautiful polish. In the same field, irregular heaps of mundic, with large metalliferous cornua ammonis, were found; and the quarries on the hills, from one of which the brook takes its rise, abound in ammonites, nautili, belemnites, &c.